By on April 19, 2016

2016 Honda Accord Sport at Sunset Front 3/4 Image: © 2016 Jeff Jablansky/The Truth About Cars

2016 Honda Accord Sport

2.4-liter inline four-cylinder (189 horsepower @ 6,400 rpm, 182 lbs-ft @ 3,900 rpm)

Six-speed manual transmission, front-wheel drive

23 city / 34 highway / 27 combined (EPA Rating, MPG)

30 mpg (Observed, casually)

Base Price (Sedan, LX 6MT): $23,040

As Tested (Sedan, Sport 6MT): $25,100

All prices include $835 destination and handling fee.

Quality of life is about making the best of your surroundings. There isn’t a car on the market today that reflects that ethos more than the Honda Accord.

After years of growing to make room for smaller models in the lineup, the Accord — which has gathered accolades as the most reliable choice in the family car segment for decades — has skipped having a midlife crisis, and is still playing like a kid. It would be easy to say the Accord has always been a favorite for us, but as the competition improves, we wanted to come back and give the Accord another go.

Here’s what we learned after several days of puttering around southern California in the Accord Sport, the value-priced model that hits the sweet spot of what you have and what you want.

2016 Honda Accord Sport at Sunset Rear 3/4, Image: © 2016 Jeff Jablansky/The Truth About Cars

Exterior

Sure, the Accord has grown, and grown, and grown in its lifetime — but who among us hasn’t? It hides its larger dimensions, thanks to oversized headlights and nice proportions, although it won’t stand out in a crowd. In San Marino red, which sparkled in the West Hollywood sunshine and reflected beautifully against sunsets in Malibu, the Accord looked a class above. A wise reviewer/mentor once declared that you’re not supposed to judge a car based on its color, but kudos to Honda for offering such a rich hue.

2016 Honda Accord Sport Interior, Image: © 2016 Jeff Jablansky/The Truth About Cars

Interior

In short, the Accord’s interior feels like it’s built to last, and the Accord Sport offers refinement and build quality leaps and bounds above its price. The best way to understand a Honda interior is to get in and immediately start touching everything. The solid, tensile fabric of the cloth seats. The softness of the steering wheel leather. The knurled pattern of the shift knob. The chunkiness of the center control knob. There’s a reason you immediately feel comfortable in the Accord, and the Accord Sport (thankfully) ignores the trend of turning the “sporty” trim into an excuse for garish design.

Yes, the design itself appears dated, especially next to a comparable a Hyundai Sonata, but swoops and swashes aren’t for everyone.

By sticking with the Sport trim, you avoid a secondary screen on the dashboard, and any mention of THE TOUCHSCREEN VOLUME CONTROLS.

Technology

On the Accord Sport, there’s not much to see in terms of technology, thanks to rigid trim level differentiation (more on that later) that keeps most of the good stuff for loaded Accords only. A hooded screen sits atop the center stack, which is only useful for viewing the backup camera and a rudimentary trip computer. Neither navigation nor other goodies, like CarPlay, are offered on Accord Sport, but keeping it simple also means retaining traditional knobs and buttons for radio controls. Active and passive driver assist systems are available as part of the Honda Sensing package, which requires substituting the manual with the continuously variable transmission. In the decision between having fun with a manual gearbox and hearing a beep when you deviate from lane markings, there is a clear decision for enthusiasts, but I’m not sure there needs to be one.

2016 Honda Accord Sport Six-Speed Manual Shifter, Image: © 2016 Jeff Jablansky/The Truth About Cars

Drivetrain

Most Accords come with a direct injection, non-turbo 2.4-liter four-cylinder engine, although Honda still offers a V6, presumably to court legacy Accord buyers and continue the Accord v. Camry rivalry. Accord Sport models get a bump from 185 to 189 horsepower (yay!), and a slight bump in torque over LX, EX, and EX-Ls with the same four-cylinder powerplant. A six-speed manual transmission is standard on the Accord Sport, as it is on the LX and EX; a CVT is optional across the board, standard on the EX-L, and on both Accord EX-L V-6 and Touring.

2016 Honda Accord Sport at Sunset, Image: © 2016 Jeff Jablansky/The Truth About Cars

Drive

Here’s the part you were waiting for: Yes, the Accord Sport with the manual still drives as sweetly as it ever has — and everything hereon reflects our opinion of the manual Accord Sport. We didn’t have a chance to spend time with the CVT volume model, but we can easily recommend spending some quality time with this manual one in particular.

The relationship among all the moving parts in the Accord has developed harmoniously over the last several decades, and the Accord Sport is the second most competent performer in this segment. (Top honors still go to the Mazda6 with the manual transmission.) For anyone who cares about driving, choosing an Accord over the competition means appreciating high quality in all aspects of life. The steering feels direct, not floaty. The clutch is forgiving, and the six-speed manual is as crisp to use as in any Honda performance car. The engine note sounds refreshingly unaltered. It’s fun to let the engine sing all the way up to redline in a way we couldn’t have expected the CVT to match. Even sitting in traffic in the hell that is California’s 405 freeway in rush hour, the Accord’s throttle was easy to manage, causing no left-leg clutch pedal fatigue.

The Accord Sport offers the confidence to enter a corner a little faster than you wanted, and come out even quicker. The standard 19-inch wheels do little to mar the ride quality, which ought to be much harsher given the larger-than-necessary rims. Braking performance could be stronger and firmer. Judging this family sedan against other family sedans, they’re just fine, but because the Accord’s chassis errs on the side of Four Door Sports Car, the comparison expands beyond the category.

2016 Honda Accord Sport Exterior Rear 3/4, Image: © 2016 Jeff Jablansky/The Truth About Cars

Pricing

With the Accord Sport, what you see is what you get for a not-unreasonable 25 grand. Honda fastidiously maintains trim levels, and there are no options on the Accord Sport. For more toys, you’ll need to upgrade to the EX, EX-L, or Touring trims. For example, Apple CarPlay, the infotainment innovation that could have turned the Accord Sport’s useless display screen into a useful one, is only available on Accord EXes and above. Further complication of the trim level strategy means that the excellent Honda Sensing driver assist tech isn’t available on any Accord with a manual transmission. Sigh. Even fully equipped, an Accord won’t run more than $35,000 or so, which is a great deal.

Disclosure: Honda provided the vehicle, insurance, and a tank of fuel for this review.

[Images: © 2016 Jeff Jablansky/The Truth About Cars]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

154 Comments on “2016 Honda Accord Sport 6MT Review – High Expectations...”


  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    It will be interesting to see how many takers Honda gets for this package given that we are continuously told that “No one wants a manual in a family sedan.”

    • 0 avatar
      kvndoom

      It outsells the EX manual, which still befuddles me, considering the significant amount of extras you get with the EX (much better radio, sunroof, etc).

      Like I’ve said before, the Sport is only a small step up from the stripper LX. I guess it’s the big wheels that draws people to it.

      For me, it’s still V6 coupe or GTFO. Anyone wanna float me the balance of my student loans, so I be done with them and get a new car? ;)

      • 0 avatar
        burgersandbeer

        The sport also has the dual exhaust. It’s probably easier to get an EX and add the dual exhaust than to get a sport and add everything in the EX trim though. Especially since Honda equips all of them with the rear bumper cover that has the cutout for the exhaust; it really stands out on cars lacking the second pipe.

    • 0 avatar
      Nick 2012

      I was one of those takers and put 40,000mi on a 2014 6MT Accord Sport. A couple of overlooked points in the review:

      – The stereo is horrid. Beyond terrible. It is so bad, my 65 year old father (who still listens to AM radio) immediately complained about it. You can’t fix it without adding aftermarket amps and speakers, which isn’t a small job.

      – After comparing the Accord to a Mazda6 6MT, I’m convinced the Accord is the better car, but the Accord sticks you with a manual in lower trim levels only.

      – The Accord’s gearbox really is that good.

      – The K2 version of the Earth Dreams motor found only in the Sport is underrated. C&D found the car putting down ~180 hp at the wheels. With the typical 15% driveline loss, the Sport’s motor probably makes ~210hp, a solid boost over the CVT motor (also shown in the substantially faster 0-60 times). The unique K2 motor – if power is your thing – is the reason to choose the 6MT Sport over the better-equipped EX.

      – The Sport’s unique Nomex-like seat fabric is impervious to greasy kid handprints, spilled drinks, mud, and boogers.

      – At 80 mph, the engine turns around 3000 RPM. Audible, but not obnoxious and it has plenty of guts to maintain that speed without downshifting.

      – The undersized brakes are real and obnoxious. In mostly highway driving, I had 2 resurfacings done under warranty.

      – Midwest real world transaction prices will be well under $25k.

      – Road noise is noticeable on the highway.

      I traded it in a month back for something completely different. I really liked the Accord, but it wasn’t the right car for my current transportation requirements.

      • 0 avatar
        tonycd

        Nick, thank you for filling in the portions of The Truth about this car that weren’t provided by the tester. Which, not incidentally, has been happening here much too often in the past few weeks.

        If people like you keep posting, they may not even have to change the name of the website.

        • 0 avatar
          omer333

          To be fair to a lot of the reviewers here, the cars they get for testing they get for a couple days. It’s kind of hard to notice everything about a car in two or three days. Nick’s hit a lot of points about his car after 40,000 miles of ownership that most reviewers won’t because they might get to only put 200-300 miles on them.

          Alex and the writers here try to put as much information as possible in their articles. Am I a shill for them? No, but I respect them. Even if I don’t agree with them sometimes.

          • 0 avatar
            tonycd

            Omer, I’m a fan of Alex. No debate there.

            As for this test, I just think that extremely obvious, fundamental criticisms such as a high level of road noise or a crappy stereo ought to be obvious regardless of the duration of the test. If they’re not, what hope is there of gathering anything meaningfully informative from a test?

          • 0 avatar
            scottcom36

            I read dozens of reviews before I bought my ’15 Civic. None of them mentioned the performance of the cruise control. It loses 4 mph on hills that my 4.2 V6 F-150 would hold within 1 mph with its cruise control. None of the reviews mentioned that the arm rests are at such different heights that it’s impossible to find a seat position where my elbows will both rest on them. So yes, there are things reviewers could observe in a 250 mile test that they indeed miss.

          • 0 avatar
            30-mile fetch

            scottcom,
            Would a reviewer noting those two quibbles have changed your decision to get a 2015 Civic? It didn’t exactly do well in comparison reviews for a number of other bigger reasons noted by reviewers but you still decided to go for it.

        • 0 avatar
          Rojofasto

          Don’t believe everything Nick is saying. Own a 2013 accord 6 speed manual with 65,000 miles. First of all, the radio is not horrid, far from it. I don’t know what his expectations were, maybe Harmon or Bose, but the radio and speakers sound great for oem manufacturer. Also, the brakes are not undersized. I’ve braked hard many times, and stops like a proper sports sedan. Haven’t needed a brake job yet confirmed by Honda techs everytime I service the car, so if Nick is resurfacing twice on his 2015, then he doesn’t know how to drive this car. Manual transmission cars outlast automatic cars when it comes to brakes. Road noise is acceptable….its a sports sedan for crying out loud. The tester’s article was spot on about this car, so that’s The Truth.

      • 0 avatar
        Drew8MR

        I’ll bet downsizing the wheels to whatever steelies the LX/EX comes with would reduce the road noise quite a bit. You could probably sell those retarded 19s for 2-3 times what a set of steelies would run you.

        • 0 avatar
          Nick 2012

          I had 16″ Steelies with Blizzaks on it for two winters. It rode a bit better over chuckholes, as the 13-15 Accord Sports only came with 18″ rims, but I didn’t notice any noise difference.

      • 0 avatar
        Yuppie

        Accords have come equipped with undersized brakes since the 1998-2002 generation. I had a 2001 V6 coupe; the front brake rotors have the same part number as a 1995 Integra Type R, a much lighter car with similar horsepower ratings. Braking was disconcertingly inadequate when loaded with three passengers.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      This gushing “review” should be labeled appropriately as “sponsored content,” and I do hope that Honda’s check clears quickly and problem-free.

      W. T. F.

    • 0 avatar
      Superdessucke

      I’m one of the freaks who owns one too. I have a ’15. Wish I would have gotten a ’16 as I like the styling updates and color choices better (previously if you wanted manual you were relegated to black or gray). But the deal I got on the leftover ’15 was so good I couldn’t pass it up. They gave me mine for less than 20k. So as Nick said, out the door prices are going to be way less than the 25k MSRP. Honda dealers want to move these.

      Anyway, this review is accurate. Solid car and I love it. It has some soul, gets great mileage, and is quick enough (0-60 not reported here but I’ve heard mid-6s, which sounds about right).

      Obviously the take rate is good enough to keep offering it, but I’d say it’s rare compared to the CVT models. Mine was the only manual they had (out of like 90 Accords) and I got a comment from the service guy during my first oil change about how he never even knew a manual Accord existed.

      As to Nick’s comment on the radio, I don’t know. I think it’s on a par with most OEM radios, which don’t match aftermarket units. I didn’t notice it being overly good or overly bad, and I’ve owned the vehicle for several months now. The Sport doesn’t offer satellite radio, which is a glaring omission these days when pretty much every car offers it.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    This would be lots of fun for this 65-year-old guy for about 15 minutes…

    I suppose someone would want a manual in a regular sedan, but I’m not one of them.

    Having a manual tranny would drive me crazy for a daily driver that isn’t a small sports car, but then I’ve long outgrown the desire for a stick shift in anything except my lawn tractor!

    Kudos to those who want to drive a stick, especially in rush hour traffic. I certainly can’t imagine trying to live with one in SoCal – I’ve been there and have driven in that traffic many times and it would drive me clear out of my mind!

    • 0 avatar
      Kenmore

      Me so ditto. I see three pedals in the photo; that just means more stuff to wear out or break than two pedals.

      MTs are for young people. I used to drive nothing but, but nothing about them still attracts me, not even compression braking which used to be my numero uno for preferring them.

      • 0 avatar
        hubcap

        Three pedals or not an auto tranny is a bit more complicated than a manual but this isn’t a V6 Honda so it shouldn’t be too much of a worry either way.

        That’s not something I’d expect a fridge to know, but I do wonder why you have no ice dispenser?

        • 0 avatar
          Kenmore

          Japanese do complicated very well, no worries there.

        • 0 avatar
          burgersandbeer

          There could be an ice maker inside the freezer; the dispenser through the door is overrated.

          That said, top-mounted freezers are the devil’s work. Freezer should be on the bottom. Failing that, a side-by-side layout is also acceptable.

          • 0 avatar
            WildcatMatt

            Anyone who thinks a bottom freezer is a good idea clearly doesn’t have toddlers.

            I have a two year old and when we visit my wife’s parents, he knows exactly where the ice cream is and it’s at the perfect height to help himself.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      I don’t see what the fuss is about manuals in rush hour traffic. I’ve had 7 cars in my 15 or so years of driving, all manual. For me the pain from stop and go traffic comes in my right leg, not my left. And that’s in a manual or auto car. Different strokes I guess.

      • 0 avatar
        Kenmore

        “my 15 or so years of driving”

        Sensei!

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        In LA stop and go, I greatly prefer manuals, as long as the engines they are attached to aren’t too big and torquey, and preferably aren’t some silly turbo clumser. Much less head toss than even the smoothest of autos. And less lag than CVTs. Modern small to medium NA 4s idle down to and pull cleanly from virtually a standstill with very smooth compression braking on the down, hence rarely requires touching the brakes the way that autos bent on shifting into eight (to save fuel) at above 4mph do. IOW manuals are just a better mousetrap. For minimally and above competent mice :)

    • 0 avatar
      Nick 2012

      One thing to keep in mind with the Accord CVT – fluid changes are dealer only and substantially ($200+) more expensive than getting 2 quarts of Honda MTF and spending 10 minutes draining and filling the MT gearbox. Factoring in the fluid change cost, the CVT’s fuel economy advantage evaporates.

    • 0 avatar
      Superdessucke

      Clutch on this car is very light. I live in very urban area and I’m in stop and go all the time and I barely notice it.

  • avatar
    Cactuar

    The tail lights remind me of the E39 facelift, which makes me wonder: how does this Accord compare to a E39 530i?

    • 0 avatar
      swilliams41

      I owned a Accord EX V-6 and a 2003 530i at the same time. The BMW was a much more substantial car. It handled better and rode better. The biggest diffrence though, the BMW was quiet!

      • 0 avatar
        Xelas

        Heck yes! I own a 2004 Honda V6 Accord sedan – it’s a very decent car, but not for long drives on California roads (even with very good tires). On new asphalt roads, it’s smooth and quiet as silk, but the moment you hit concrete or worn asphalt, it’s impossible to hold a conversation in the car.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    19 inch ‘wheels’? So are there winter tires available for this vehicle? And if so, do they cost anything less than a King’s ransom?

    The number one complaint I have heard from Venza owners in the GTA is the almost impossible task of sourcing winter tires for them.

    • 0 avatar
      Quentin

      There is only a single model of winter tire in 18″ that will fit our incoming MINI Clubman S All4 on tirerack. What drives me crazy is the fact that we had to get summer tires since we opted for the 18″ wheels. 17″ has an option of all seasons. So, I’ll either be buying the 18″ snow tires and swapping back and forth, buying a 16″ or 17″ wheel and tire combo, or pulling off the stock 18″ tires and immediately replacing them with all seasons. All seasons are fine in WV, but summer tires are a no-go in the winter.

      Had I noticed the summer requirement with the 18″ wheels, I’d have ordered the 17″ wheels with all seasons and just purchased 18″ w/ summer aftermarket.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        Look for some take off 17″ and put some winter tires on them. Then swap back and forth. Good winter tires are better in the winter than all seasons even without the snow. Far and away the best I had are the Continental ExtremeWinterContact.

  • avatar

    I just thank God I don’t have to choose between soul-less import econoboxes.

    In fairness, the only Accord I could ever want is the Accord Coupe, and the engine is so lame I couldn’t do my thing to it and turbocharge the hell out of it to make something truly interesting.

    How boring.

    • 0 avatar
      Kenmore

      “How boring.”

      Not with a largemouth ass in it.

    • 0 avatar
      chrishs2000

      Yeah, a J35 putting down 290whp with a 6MT is so lame. How boring. All bow down at the altar of the Hellcat, the Accord’s primary rival.

      https://www.hondata.com/reflash-accord-2013-mt?search=accord

      • 0 avatar
        06V66speed

        What’s so “boring” about them? The fact that they’re extremely reliable?

        Well, gosh…*sigh*. I wish Honda could make products as high-quality as FCA’s *stellar* products are. Maybe I can find a star tonight and wish upon it.

        • 0 avatar
          threeer

          It’s boring because it’s not, you know, a Hellcat. As if folks shopping a $75k+ halo car are also cross-shopping a $25k family hauler.

          • 0 avatar
            30-mile fetch

            There’s something else going on here. BT loves him some Hyundai, even recently claimed he was going to get a Sonata Sport 2.0T. You know, the same soulless foreign econobox “Sport” model that pulls 8 second 0-60 runs from the automaker known for just about anything except excitement.

            BT, seriously what gives?

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “BT, seriously what gives?”

            I believe that Hyundai is sponsoring him. BigTruck isn’t really about HELLCAT, he is about making money and self-promotion (leading to more money).

            If Honda cut him a check he’d slober all over the RLX, Accord, and NSX too.

          • 0 avatar
            TMA1

            The Hyundais aren’t for him. A 3-year lease on a Hyundai is just part of the benefits package for dating him.

      • 0 avatar
        Shawnski

        Yea go easy BT, it’s not like Honda (car) has anything else for sale that even approaches fast.

    • 0 avatar
      Buckshot

      Hondas are not boring, you are boring.
      Sieg heil all the time to Chrysler?

  • avatar
    sirwired

    “For anyone who cares about driving, choosing an Accord over the competition means appreciating high quality in all aspects of life.” Seriously? So anybody that chooses anything else is failing to appreciate quality? What are you trying to say here? I hope it’s something less pretentious and smug than it sounds.

    And call me a skinflint, but I don’t really see an NA-4, weakly equipped, M/T sedan to be much of a value at $25k.

    • 0 avatar
      hubcap

      Methinks actual transaction prices are a bit lower. I drove a 2015 6mt and liked it but I’d want more power. If you don’t need the space, a base WRX would be a better option…at least for me!

      • 0 avatar
        Superdessucke

        I cross-shopped this against the WRX. The WRX lease payment would have been double what this one costs to lease because Subarus are popular and they jack up the money rate. The WRX gets worse gas mileage, requires premium fuel, and would require an expensive set of winter tires The drive on anything beyond a light dusting of snow. I love the WRX but not for the massive real world price difference.

        Don’t get why you think this car doesn’t have enough power. It probably runs the quarter mile in the 14s. 30 years ago you needed a 5.7 liter IROC or 5.0 Mustang for that. Now it’s considered slow, LOL!

    • 0 avatar
      Nick_515

      This article could benefit from the advice I give my students: “before you hit print on your essay, just do me, yourselves, and the world a favor, and DELETE the entire first paragraph.”

      Do you see it now?

      • 0 avatar
        sirwired

        Nick,

        Yep.

        If any other outlet had published this review, TTAC would have accused them of fellating the manufacturer in order to secure future press cars.

        I have no issue with positive reviews, but there was more than a bit of gratuitous fawning praise here. It’s one thing to say something like “Honda is known for building some sporty cars” but it’s another to then use that to state that that imbues Honda owners with an overall aura of sophistication.

        • 0 avatar
          Nick_515

          A little bit.

          Doesn’t bother me personally. I know how to read between the lines, and I know where it comes from. As the write matures, s/he will develop more of their own style. I do have patience and appreciate the reviews in the meanwhile.

          DW doesn’t though. Does he still go after Alex’ reviews BTSR style?

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      For reference, my friend was able to negotiate a new ’14 (back in 2014) down to $20,500 in Boston MA. It’s a steal at that price IMO.

      • 0 avatar
        Wagon Of Fury

        ^ I had an offer of $20068 for a 2015 metallic black one in September 2015. So there’s deals to be had toward the end of the model year. I suspect the red, white and silver ones go first though. Black is a tough sell if you care about maintaining the appearance.

        I drove home in my WRX that night. Still a better drivers car.

  • avatar
    CincyDavid

    Between my arthritic hips & knees, and gouty feet and ankles, I have no desire to drive a manual transmission every day. There is just so much to like about late model Accords of any description…build quality, reliability, the whole package is just wonderful.

    I will admit that the “on the floor” seating position doesn’t exactly fill me with joy, which is why we got a 2016 CRV instead of another Accord…one of the kids is now driving the 2014 Accord.

    The Sport trim level is a great step uo from the stripped-down LX, without getting into leather and other electronic doo-dads.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      Honda would have been better served to offer the bits from this car as a package on all the trims (except the Touring, as now the yuuuge wheels, spoiler and side skirts are standard Touring fare, and could have been an “Elite” package in 20113-2015), since you can’t get a sunroof, and the stereo is crap; even the stereo on the upmarket trims (at least before this MMC for 2016) almost doesn’t deserve a “Premium” label.

  • avatar
    cgjeep

    I looked at these when they first came out. Dealer didn’t have an a Sport on the lot with a manual. I Test drove the LX with a manual and then spent a lot of time inside a Sport model and a EX. I would have gotten an EX then and there with a manual. The LX drove well enough but the features were lacking (horrible stereo) and the braking wasn’t great but I attributed that to the tires. The Sport has the same lousy stereo as the LX and no sunroof available. If I recall it only has 4 speakers. I don’t get why they would do that, nothing even available as a dealer upgrade. The EX was nicer inside, better stereo (6 speakers) but still not great and handled about he same as the sport, really all models handle about he same. Was weird driving something so large with a manual. I ended up getting a used BMw while I waited for a manual EX to show up.

    • 0 avatar
      VW16v

      You purchased a used BMW for a few weeks waiting for your Accord manual Sport to get delivered?

    • 0 avatar
      tonycd

      Doesn’t anybody upgrade to aftermarket speakers anymore? I used to do this all the time, and it often made an enormous difference. I can’t imagine bypassing an entire car I liked because the OEM speakers sucked.

      Then again, I was just reading the other day that venerable Alpine is dropping out of the aftermarket head unit business. Guess the automakers have achieved their goal of making convoluted custom dash holes that make their trim levels the only way of upgrading the head unit. Because, y’know, everybody wants leather and a sunroof for $3,000. Maybe they’ve just gotten buyers out of even thinking about the fact they can upgrade the audio system through the aftermarket. Sad.

      • 0 avatar
        BobWellington

        That’s my first upgrade. I’d never buy a car because the stock speakers aren’t good. The stock speakers are rarely ever any good in most cars.

      • 0 avatar
        Nick 2012

        @Tonycd and @BobWellington

        I actually replaced my stock speakers with some Infinitys (proper resistance, etc). The forums had mixed reviews on a speaker replacement only, with some saying it makes a ‘huge difference’ and others saying it was a waste of money without other upgrades.

        Speaker replacement – at least for me – was a marginal upgrade at best. The stock head in the LX/Sport just doesn’t put out enough power to drive the speakers. Replacement speakers will have better treble response, but that was about it. It still sucked.

        The EX and up models have tweeters and an amp, which makes a world of difference.

      • 0 avatar
        HotPotato

        I always have updated head units and/or amps and/or speakers in my cars, except when I got a car with exceptionally good factory sound. YOU CANNOT DO THIS ANYMORE and reliably expect an improvement. You are just as likely to create a nightmare for yourself. I replaced the speakers in my C-Max with much better speakers and it sounded WORSE. Why? At first I thought it was an efficiency problem, so I added an aftermarket amp, which just made it sound bad louder. As it turns out, the factory stereo is pre-EQ’d to get the best possible sound out of the factory speakers. So you need to buy a sound processor that strips out the factory EQ and lets you re-EQ it to suit your new speakers. Oh, and aftermarket speakers now assume you have a sub, so despite whatever the Crutchfield catalog says, they’ll have less bass than factory, not more, so you will also be ponying up for a sub and another amp. So yeah – you can get to two, three grand and end up with sound only about as good as the factory upgrade woulda gotten you, but without the leather and nav and whatever other goodies you would have gotten in the bargain.(Replacing the head unit, as you note, isn’t an easier option, and it often means losing your car’s steering wheel controls, voice control features, noise cancellation, Bluetooth mike etc.)

        If you care about sound, buy the best factory stereo option available, and then leave it alone.

  • avatar
    VW16v

    Rowing through the gears to keep the Accord barge moving sounds entertaining. Dealing with crappy Honda brakes I can deal without.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      ~$400 in parts can easily remedy that. You’d have to spend a lot more to make a Passat fun to drive.

      • 0 avatar
        VW16v

        Having to spend $400 on aftermarket brakes is the exact opposite of what I’d want to do after putting down $25,000. I’ve owned three Honda’s in my lifetime and everyone of them had crappy brakes. But, this was in the 90’s and I think Honda could have worked on their brakes over the past 20 years. Two Civic’s and one Prelude vtech and about $1500 in brakes and calipers was ridiculous. Since then I’ve owned many other vehicles and spent about $200 in pads.

        • 0 avatar
          sportyaccordy

          I am on my 4th Honda. Things have got better but not perfect. In any case big $$$ to fix the brakes was never necessary. On my 92-93 Accords the brakes were bad… I remember having to roll through a red light once because I cooked my brakes so bad. But with my 09 Civic now, aside from some glazing on the front rotors the brakes get the job done. For my car swapping to the TSX hardware up front costs like $400-500… but even that is overkill. Uprated pads and better rotors would do the trick for about $200-300.

          I think a lot of the complaints about Honda brakes come from the fact that people drive them a lot harder than other cars. I’m sure the handful of stickshift Corolla enthusiasts hate their brakes too. Most importantly though I know for a fact VW brakes are no better, especially since until recently their cars were a lot heavier. My wife’s 07 Rabbit weighs a good 300-400lbs more than my same era/trim Civic and the brakes on that are the same size as mine. But it’s kind of a boat so I never drive it hard enough to cook the brakes in the first place.

          • 0 avatar
            cgjeep

            My issue with the stopping on the test drive had more to do with tire choice I think than the brakes themselves. I wasn’t trying to drive on a race track or mountin road so overheating the brakes wasn’t the issue. Rather the ABS would kick in on bumpy roads, roads that I drive on in other cars without it being an issue.

          • 0 avatar
            Kevin Jaeger

            If the ABS was kicking in on a bumpy road I’d guess that means the ridiculous wheel and tire choice on this thing caused the wheels to bounce.

            That likely wouldn’t happen with a sensible wheel and tire size.

      • 0 avatar
        duffman13

        Try more like $1-200.

        Aftermarket rotors do nothing. Just throw on a slightly more aggressive pad like the Stoptech Street or the Sport if you really need some heat capacity and call it a day – it’s around $100-125 for both axles, double that if you pay someone to do the swap for you.

        • 0 avatar
          S2k Chris

          Aftermarket rotors resist warping better than the OEM potato chips. Centric Premiums from TireRack are way better than the OEM discs on my TSX.

          • 0 avatar
            chrishs2000

            Agreed. The Centric Premiums are a revelation for cheaper than OE discs. I’ve got 40k miles on Centric front and rear rotors on a 2011 TL 6MT that is very heavy and driven hard…still smooth as glass. Plus the hubs don’t rust which is a nice bonus.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      The brakes on my 2013 Touring are arguably the best of any of the Hondas I’ve owned.

  • avatar
    RS

    So few people know how to drive a MT these days, it’s an extra layer of security. I would only want a manual transmission if I lived in an area high in car thefts.

    Also, knobbed radios should be standard on all trim levels. If they made touch screen radios a dealer installed option, would anyone buy it?

  • avatar
    Dave M.

    With the exception of the silver moustache, the Accord is by far one of the best sedan designs on the market IMO. I’d take the EX for the sunroof and power seat.

    My Trooper was my first car with an automatic, only because trim level and Houston traffic commute. I can’t imagine a stick shift on the 405. I love stick shift; if I lived in the country it would be a no-brainer. In traffic it sucks.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    I have mixed feelings about this. Long story short the Accord is just too big man. The 92-93s I had used to heavily channel the E30 3 series. These things are like current gen 5 series in size and style. I get how we got here but it just seems silly. Even the current Civic is a little bigger than I think is necessary. If I were to get another Honda… if I could stomach the road noise and severely downgraded looks it would probably be the Fit. Honda is doing some interesting things but they are in a design funk.

    • 0 avatar
      cgjeep

      That’s the problem I have with a lot of cars today. This Accord is too big for me, the Civic is a good size, but lacks the refinement. The 05 gen Accord was about perfect for me size and refinement wise. The first gen Highlander would be perfect for the wife but the current one is too large and the RAV4 is too unrefined. For the most part you have to move over to the premium side to get some refinement in a small size. I’m not equating gadgets with refinement, rather less NVH and a larger non buzzy engine.

      • 0 avatar
        Dave M.

        I too thought the gen 1 Highlander was a perfect size as well. We had a 4 cyl base model that I would have gladly taken over when my wife upgraded to a fancy Edge. If it had a sunroof and power seat (which should be standard on all Toyotas) I would have been all over it.

        I’m really impressed with the RAV4 hybrid – nicely sized; the Limited trim adds the fancy stuff.

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          Gen 1 Highlander really was just the perfect mix of size, power, economy, practical amount of ground clearance, all wrapped up in very handsome sheetmetal. Gen 2 in 2008 got cheaper interior materials, but gained the ubiquitous corporate 3.5L V6. Resale on clean gen 1 and 2s is absolutely insane.

    • 0 avatar
      hubcap

      Looketh thee to the WRX. All that fun in a neat and tidy package!

      Buyers wanted more space in their midsize cars and Honda responded. And there is a lot of space in the back seat. I wouldn’t be surprised if the Accord is a borderline full size car.

    • 0 avatar
      Robbie

      I feel this way too… I think the GTI is a bit too small and too hatchbacky…

  • avatar
    TDIGuy

    Now this is interesting… In Canada you can buy a Touring trim level with an MT. Doesn’t look like that is a choice in the US because the touring is available as 4 or V6 in Canada, but is V6 only in the US.

    The top level blurb on the web site says the Touring is “loaded with features like the Honda Sensing Suite”. However in the details there is an asterisk that says (you guessed it) on automatic only. At least the asterisk is reflected in the price difference between MT and CVT.

    Edit to add: More colours available for the auto as well. MT is black, white or grey. The red of the review model is not available on any sedan trim level. Also my personally favoured non-black interior is only available in a white car, but only CVT? Come on, really?

    • 0 avatar
      hubcap

      you can also get a moonroof on the Sport in Canada and you have access to the full color palette.

      A few years ago, if you wanted a manual Accord in the states, your choices were grey and black. Now, red and white are also options. Sadly, no blue.

  • avatar
    andyinatl

    It would have to be at least EX for me. I like Sport model’s bodywork, but those rims look (and i’m sure feel) atrocious. The other thing that would give me a loooooong pause before buying this car is Honda’s world-famous horrible paint quality. There are a ton of this vintage Accords on my work’s parking lot, and most of them have medium to heavy rock chips all over the front ends. I would venture to guess that most of them are likely still financed. I cannot imagine still making payments on a car with front end that looks like a beater car after couple years of highway driving.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      I got a free paint job on my 09 Civic through a recall. The shop that did it left some orange peel and the like but it totally beats the faded clearcoat spots I had down my roof and trunk. Every manufacturer had their thing. I’d rather bad paint than fragile water pumps.

      • 0 avatar
        andyinatl

        I agree on the every manufacturer having some sort of issue. I currently own ’12 Civic, that i had repainted after deer accident, and body shop paint is actually holding up better than factory paint before that. I guess clear film protection would be another option. Love Hondas but wish they at least got to Hyundai levels of paint quality.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      I had a full front PPF package installed before I took delivery of my 2013 Touring, and always park such that door dings shouldn’t pose a problem. Car still looks like new!

  • avatar
    seth1065

    I can not see why this car would sell well, if you wanted a stick get it in a ex , you get more stuff and still have the stick, I thought the 6 cyl accord did not have a CVT in the top trim level, maybe they changed this for this year. I would pass on the stick because of NYC traffic, but am not sure I would want a CVT in this car. Are they gonna make a 2016 Accord Hybrid??? the 2015 reviews for the hybrid were outstanding.

    • 0 avatar
      TDIGuy

      The V6 gets an automatic, not a CVT.

    • 0 avatar
      Dave M.

      I think they may skip right to ’17 for the hybrid. In December I took a friend car shopping and we really liked the Accord Hybrid. By that time though the dealers in Houston were down to two color choices with no hope of finding the color she wanted, so she moved on to something else. The car felt solid; the cameras in the mirrors that activated when you put your turn signal on were trick.

      • 0 avatar
        hubcap

        “…the cameras in the mirrors that activated when you put your turn signal on were trick.”

        Honda Lane Watch.

        I really like that system. Would you believe that you can’t get it on an Acura?

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    I’m generally a snob when it comes to cars, and I like whatever I have to be loaded up with leather, a sunroof and factory navigation. However, the Accord Sport is one of those cars that I would just take as-is.

    Yes, Honda benefits from simplified trims and streamlined offerings.

    Then again, the 19″ wheels are ridiculous for a family sedan (ditto for you, Mazda6). I’d swap them for 17s. And it’d be nice if you could get CarPlay. Maybe they could even do an upscale Sport version, like how you can load up a Sonata Sport, or something comparable to the Camry XSE.

    • 0 avatar
      Zackman

      “I’m generally a snob when it comes to cars, and I like whatever I have to be loaded up with leather, a sunroof and factory navigation.”

      I can agree with most of that, but having a car with leather, I’ll never have leather again, though it sure looks nice.

      The car had better have chrome door handles, though…

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        My Golf SportWagen has black leatherette, which wears very well. You can’t even get real leather on it, actually.

        The X5 had beige leather and beige carpet, which I’ll never do again.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          That leatherette could wear like vibranium and I’d still hate it, though. Test drove a red Golf with a black interior in July, and when I sweated it made weird noises when I shifted around in the seat. Yecch.

          Mazda’s fake leather is way better.

        • 0 avatar
          hubcap

          “The X5 had beige leather and beige carpet, which I’ll never do again.”

          The leather, the color, or both?

          I like a nice, quality, cloth but that can be hard to come by. If I must have leather or faux leather I like to have color choices besides black.

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            Both. I can’t say I’m not so dumb that I wouldn’t purchase another X5…I just wouldn’t do one with beige leather.

            The Accord Sport in question has quality cloth. I know that from 2013-2015, it was a different kind of cloth than Honda was using in the non-sport LX models. I hate that mouse-fur cloth that Nissan and Honda are known to use, though.

          • 0 avatar
            hubcap

            “I can’t say I’m not so dumb that I wouldn’t purchase another X5…”

            It is what it is and I totally understand.

            I’ve been looking at a beautiful, yellow CPO Z4, 6mt with the M sport package. Close to perfection that thar is.

            Have you considered the F-Pace as an alternative especially with the new 5yr/60,000 mile warranty?

  • avatar
    laserwizard

    Now Honduh is copying the old Mercury nomenclature for naming its products – along with bloating everything that it builds to outrageous proportions. It is odd that what failed Detroit is exactly what Honduh has decided to do. It is the malaise era at Honduh. And it is quite ugly.

  • avatar
    omer333

    I don’t know what you guys are listening to in your Accord Sports, but I find the stereo in mine to be pretty good; I’ve been listening to Queens of the Stone Age lately and I’m hearing instruments and sounds I wasn’t able to hear while listening to their songs on other car stereos.

    The stereo, chassis, seats, and ride in my 2015 is great, I just wish I could’ve got the manual transmission. I’d probably want to keep the car if I did.

  • avatar
    laserwizard

    I love manual transmission cars. It doesn’t make any difference if the car is a sedan or a coupe. Once you have had the taste of being one with a car, you don’t go back. And if you do, you are a faux enthusiast. Since even a great automatic cannot see the road, I am able to whip that shift through the notches as quickly as I need. An auto may be as quick a shift as I am, but I have more variability and adaptability than any slushbox.

  • avatar
    MT

    Having learned to drive in a ancient Beetle, and finally giving up my MT ’97 Accord Wagon and my ’89 Brick when my left knee cashed out, I have to wonder who the target customer really is. Young buyers didn’t learn on a stick, and old guys who loved driving a car instead of steering it gave up their knee long ago and don’t mess with an MT for a daily driver. And the Accord is a daily driver. So who?

    • 0 avatar
      Kenmore

      “Young buyers didn’t learn on a stick, and old guys who loved driving a car instead of steering it gave up their knee long ago”

      Exactamundo. This approach is 20 years too late for the US market.

      Plus, it’s a sedan and thus automatically (nyuk) self-diminishing here.

    • 0 avatar
      06V66speed

      Hey, MT… you just hush up!

      What are you trying to do, diminish the last few manual transmission offerings we have left? ;)

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      @MT: I am probably a member of the same generation and ordered and drive family sedan MT; a Hyundai Sonata. My wife can drive a manual and we are teaching our daughters how to drive one.

      Just one of life’s skills that may help in the long run. And it has greatly enhanced their understanding of the physics/dynamacs of driving and how a vehicle operates. Even what to do regarding ‘unintended acceleration’ and how to ‘bump start’ a car.

      My eldest is now dating a nice guy who has a manual transmission VW.

      The youngest may be working at a pick-your-own that has manual trucks. Those who can drive them get the ‘cushiest’ jobs.

      • 0 avatar
        Dave M.

        My 14 year old is very adept on both manual and paddle-shifter CVT. The fact that she has no interest in driving anytime in the near future astounds me. I have to beg her to go practice on the weekends. That wasn’t me at all; I graduated from the riding tractor to the car at 13.

        Kids today.

  • avatar
    06V66speed

    Right after I walked out of my marriage and left my wife, I needed a car that would be reliable, fun to drive, and I absolutely had to have no more than two doors (because bachelorhood, sucka).

    That’s when I bought my 2006 Accord Coupe V6 6MT.

    At the time (October 2014), it had roughly 125k miles on it.

    Now granted, I suppose it wasn’t that long ago. But now it’s got 176k miles on it. I haven’t done not a fucking thing to it besides one set of wiper blades, oil changes and tire rotations. And oh yeah, one rear license plate bulb. That’s it.

    Sure, the brakes are getting soft… but I figured if I continue engine braking, I can stretch that out another 5-10k miles before I get some new pads on the front rotors.

    (The timing belt/water pump was done at 113k per my CarFax report, so don’t give me no fuss.)

    Sure, I get tired of shifting in heavy interstate traffic (God dog, rush hour is the worst). But I am still impressed- often- by just how easy it has been and continues to be to live with this car.

    I would abso-fucking-lutely by a brand new one and keep it for years to come. :) Hell, I wouldn’t mind this 4-banger.

    I might have to point my lady to the direction of one of these here…

  • avatar
    2drsedanman

    Would it kill Honda to put rear a/c vents in these things? Yet another reason to get the EX.

  • avatar
    doublechili

    Instead of wondering who is going to buy it, be glad they make it.

    And for all the complaining about how hard it is to shift, especially for older guys, look at the bright side. Every time you depress the clutch your Fitbit thinks you’re taking a step.

  • avatar
    AK

    The most recent refresh to the Accord was not kind. That front grill, the 19 inch wheels instead of the 18s and most importantly- the addition of loads of piano black interior trim. All horrible choices that made a handsome car look bad.

    Back when I was shopping last year, I was bring quoted around $21,500 for a 6 speed Sport. Very reasonable. Ended up with a new Focus ST for right around the same.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      That new Honda schnozzola is simply taking over for Acura.

      As a couple other Honda fanboi sites have noted, Honda seems to come out with a nice Accord for the first few years of a generation, then lose the plot come MMC time, so we’ll see what 2018 brings. (And on the Sedans, a different grille is available as a dealer accessory, and depending on the car color, it helps with the overall look.)

  • avatar
    nels0300

    This was the car I was going to buy, I read all of the reviews, seemed like the perfect car to me. Looks good, should be reliable, efficient, manual transmission, fits two car seats.

    I’ve had 12 cars (4 Hondas) in 22 years of driving and 11 of them were manual, so I KNEW I was going to buy this Accord Sport with a manual transmission when it came out.

    I went and drove it and was expecting to buy it that day.

    That road noise, seriously Honda, you need to figure that out. It also doesn’t feel like a 6.6 second 0-60 car. It reminded me of a giant 4 door version of my old Integra, and not in a good way. Slow off the line, and noisy and revvy at speed.

    Anyway, I was kinda bummed out because I was excited about that car.

    • 0 avatar
      hubcap

      “It also doesn’t feel like a 6.6 second 0-60 car.”

      The one I drove felt it but it was a 2015. Don’t know if there are any differences besides cosmetic.

      I test drove a new Miata and that did not feel like a 0-60 in the low sixes. Then again, I didn’t do a clutch drop either.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    This is the puffiest review I’ve seen here in a while, and it’s unfortunate. Yahoo Autos could run this easily.

    And who is “we,” this “we” who has always loved the Accord? Wife? TTAC? Camera man? How many people are writing the review?

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      +1

      Take this treacle as an example:

      “The relationship among all the moving parts in the Accord has developed harmoniously over the last several decades, and the Accord Sport is the second most competent performer in this segment. (Top honors still go to the Mazda6 with the manual transmission.) For anyone who cares about driving, choosing an Accord over the competition means appreciating high quality in all aspects of life.”

      If you are going to ape Car and Driver’s shamelessly complimentary editorial position, at least follow their example by making it cleverly written and amusing. This is shallow & dull garbage.

      • 0 avatar
        05lgt

        I thought TTAC said it better and quoted them below. This is more “competing to see who could fellate automakers the quickest and fastest” than anything I’ve read here before.

        • 0 avatar
          30-mile fetch

          That is certainly the analogy that came to mind. I know we are clamoring for more content and reviews all the time, but if this piece is what TTAC has to do to provide it, I’d rather they stick to rental and reader reviews of their own cars.

    • 0 avatar
      scottcom36

      It’s called the Royal We and is a perfectly acceptable writing style.

    • 0 avatar
      scott25

      I was just going to comment about this. This writer has been pretty shamelessly doing the whole “cheap knockoff of Car & Driver” schtick lately, which has no place on this site. It should be honest, unique, and personal. Which means no “we” either. “We” want to see the reviewer’s personality, not just the “you’re not an enthusiast if you don’t love manuals more than life itself” and “Honda and GM FTW, forever, no matter what” thing that C&D have mastered.

  • avatar
    tjh8402

    on the one hand, I’m really glad Honda offers this car. Some of us need the space of a sedan and don’t want to sacrifice the fun and satisfaction of a manual. I see two problems for the Accord Sedan manual in general

    -the first is availability. There are only two in my area, none of which are EXs. There are no EX’s at all within 300 miles of me, new or used. Carmax has one in their whole national inventory. Honda’s trim line way of doing options really hurts them here.

    -the second point, related to the first and more specific to this model, is the internal competition to the Civic. I have not driven either the current Accord or current Civic, but the Civic has been getting rave reviews. With Honda’s plans to offer the stick shift with the turbo engine and uplevel trims, it having reasonable space, albeit slightly less than the Accord, and being cheaper ($25k will probably get you a well optioned Civic), a lot of enthusiasts will likely choose the smaller car. Personally, the stereo would be the biggest issue for me. I can live without touch screens, backup cameras, leather, sunroof, acc, power seats, active safety, etc. However, I want to at least have a good sound system with satellite radio capability.

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      The Civic with 1.5 and manual looks like it will be a fantastic car. Its growth this generation means I’d be looking at it instead of the Accord if I wanted a Honda to haul my family of four around.

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    “The best way to understand a Honda interior is to get in and immediately start touching everything.”

    The interior of the Accord is fine, but it is midgrade mainstream family sedan and no better. Why it is praised beyond such is lost on me, I must be out of my mind to believe the Camry interior is no worse and the Fusion and Passat are significantly better.

    I’m guessing you didn’t touch the cheap rock hard plastics or notice the flimsy door cards, and perhaps your tester didn’t have a misaligned glovebox door. The $34K V6 version I tried had all of those plus a driving experience that didn’t live up to the high expectations the press gave me from reviews like this. Maybe it wakes up when flung down a canyon road in extremis, but it felt like a Camry LE to me.

    The charm of this car is an excellent manual paired to a genuinely good engine in an affordable package that does family duty as well as any competitor. The lousy stereo, poor brakes, lack of options, stupid stupid stupid 19″ wheels and mediocre interior are demerits that keep this from being the home run it is often portrayed as.

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    Hard to believe it’s been nearly 35 years since I bought a new 82 Accord 4-door 5-speed. Definitely a fine machine for its time, but the one flaw was a serious gear whine in 5th that drove me crazy on the interstate.
    Dealer and the factory rep didn’t want to hear about it.

    Looked it up, those were 8 inches shorter than the current Civic and 17 inches shorter than the current Accord LOL.

  • avatar
    05lgt

    I tend to root for Honda, but this is hardly living up to:
    “Nearly 10 years ago, Robert Farago and Frank Williams stumbled upon a grand idea: to counter all those other websites, media outlets, and blogs competing to see who could fellate automakers the quickest and fastest, TTAC decided instead to put on a pair of size 12 steel-toe boots and swing its leg where the sun don’t shine.”
    Try harder.

    • 0 avatar
      chrishs2000

      Seriously. I’m a pretty big Honda fanboy after so many positive experiences with them but I cannot put my money on this car as badly as I want to…it has too many faults that would be extremely easy to resolve.
      – Terrible stereo..awful awful awful awful awful.
      – Road/wind/tire noise control is decent but the new Civic blows it away.
      – Almost impossible to find in 6MT guise…and when they pop up on lots they are snatched up within hours or days. Why are they not building more of these?
      – No features…a $25k Civic Touring is a legit luxury car compared to this. Clearly they sell a lot of Sports as I see them all over, so it’s a popular package…so why can’t they just make a Touring Sport?!
      – Already being discounted below invoice in Michigan and it’s not even been out for 6 months.
      – Mazda6 kills this thing in every aspect EXCEPT for the drivetrain for anyone who has been spoiled by Honda MT’s. Put a K24/6MT in a Mazda6 and it’s just about perfect.
      – BRING BACK THE V6 6MT SEDAN!

      • 0 avatar
        sgeffe

        All of the handling and appearance goodies are now included on the Touring. That wasn’t so from 2013-2015; those pieces would have made a fantastic “Touring Elite” package, and these bits should have been available on all trims as a “Sport” package, since this is really a buffed-up LX with a (non-memory) power driver seat.

      • 0 avatar
        TDIGuy

        chrishs2000: “so why can’t they just make a Touring Sport?”

        They do, you just can’t buy it in the US. You can get a Touring level trim with MT in Canada. See my earlier comment.

  • avatar
    burgersandbeer

    I thought Honda refreshed the Accord for ’16, allegedly trying to do something about road noise? Was that only for the coupe? No mention of anything that changed for ’16? I’m pretty sure the availability of color with the sport trim is new.

    I want to like this car, but every Accord I’ve driven or ridden in has a crashy ride quality. Not graceful or confidence inspiring when it hits rough pavement.

  • avatar
    Carrera

    Last fall I test drove a brand new left over 2015. It was very hard to find a manual. Out of the 5-6 regional dealers only one had a manual in the not too desirable for Florida, black color. I was overall impressed with the car and if it wasn’t for having to qualify for a car purchase, I would have bought it on the spot. The guy couldn’t get rid of it as it was a manual and it was black. There were two things I didn’t like from the start. One a big one in my book, the other not really a big deal. The Sport has no AC vents for the backseat passengers. Only the EX and up have those. The Accord is a rather large car and in Florida, those are must haves for the back seat passengers. That was a big deal to me. The other thing that I dint like was the position of the reverse gear. I like the R gear to be up and to the left of 1st. I think Honda is one of the few manufacturers who has it down and to the right of 6th. I test drove the Mazda 6 and the gear box was a bit better than the Honda’s. Not a lot better, but better. The only problem with the 6, for me, it is too snug. I wear certain gear around my waist which I don’t like to take off when I go to work or come from work and with it I couldn’t fit in the 6. I did fit in the Accord. When I saw the 2016s, I loved the addition of the two new colors for the 6 speed. The white and red. Of course, they are more rare than a Porsche 911. The dealers stock the lots with CVTs only. Also, wasn’t too excited about the 19 inch wheels. My commute takes me 90 miles per day round trip. I don’t need 220 dollar per tire every 15,000 miles. In the end I did the sensible thing and bought a slightly used Corolla S 6 speed manual. It seems to be a better commuter and just as roomy for me in the front seat.

    • 0 avatar
      hubcap

      Reverse placement would become second nature after a couple weeks. I haven’t driven a Mazda6 manual but have driven a Miata.

      If it’s the same box then yeah, it’s a nice one but so is the snick, snick nature of the Accord’s.

  • avatar
    George B

    I like the 9th generation Accord enough to buy one, but never understood the accessory choices for the Sport trim level. Seems to me that most Sport buyers would prefer an audio system upgrade to go with the wheel upgrade.

    • 0 avatar
      hubcap

      And some, *raises hand*, would like a moonroof!

      • 0 avatar
        Dave M.

        Indeed. Any car seems naked (and bottom feeder) to me without a sunroof.

        Thing is, I’m a Puritan by nature. I love base models. I don’t care if the door handles, mirrors or bumpers are black. But I must have a sunroof and power seat.

        • 0 avatar
          Zackman

          Nope. No way. Speaking personal, a proper car MUST have at least bright window reveal and chrome door handles!

          • 0 avatar
            hubcap

            That’s funny. I was just thinking of how much I don’t like chrome door handles.

            I think they should all be body color and I really don’t like the acre of chrome affixed to trucks.

  • avatar

    I’d love to see how it stacks up against the new Civic, the Mazda6, and the Mazda3. Given the “small” cars are as large as the full-size were just 2 generations ago, I personally don’t see a whole lot to separate them.

    • 0 avatar
      06V66speed

      Minimum Product Differentiation.

      ‘Cause appeals to most people, in this case… being consumers.

      Makes cross shopping a little more challenging as the lines become more skewed, eh?

  • avatar
    FromaBuick6

    I bought a ’14 model in late ’13. It was a compromise choice, the result of being in a hurry to unload an out of warranty VW and not really being blown away anything on the market at the time. After two and a half years and over 40k miles, my conclusions are a mixed bag.

    The Good
    – Looks: This is a very attractive car, in a classy, understated sort of way. The dual exhaust and, lip spoiler, tasteful use of chrome and 18″ (in 2014) wheels make the car look more expensive than it is. Whether or not you see the 2016 updates as a plus or minus comes down to personal taste; I like the new 19″ wheels but that grille is ridiculous.
    – Comfort: The driver’s seat provides enough support and adjustment to endure 6+ hours behind the wheel, not something I could say about the previous generation car. Road noise is improved for a Honda. although by no means class leading.
    – Performance: Excellent for a four cylinder. Feels as quick as a V6 from 10-15 years ago, while simultaneously embarrassing similar vintage four cylinders in MPG. The ability to wind out gears with the 6-speed helps, but I was suitably impressed by the CVT version after some extended seat time.
    – Price: At least when I bought, Honda dealers were looking to move metal. Got mine for just over $21k, which seemed like a steal for this size/class of car.

    The Neutral
    -Transmission: I don’t see what the fuss is about. Sure, it’s smooth, but the clutch effort is so light it’s kind of obnoxious. The outgoing Civic Si is apparently similar. Being able to row my own in this car is not any more engaging than any other manual I’ve driven that wasn’t a tractor.
    -Handling/braking/grip: Good for the class, but don’t let the reviewers fool you…this is still a family sedan. Still plenty of roll in the corners if you push it hard enough. Brakes are meh. Early reviews featured cars with Michelins; these were quickly swapped for Bridgestones that offer mediocre wet weather handling, although they seem to wear very well.

    The Bad
    -Stereo: As much as this has been beaten to death on the internet, it bears repeating…this thing sounds like absolute garbage. Even at the low price of entry, there’s no excuse for a four speaker sound system on a car in this class. What’s worse is that FM sounds so compressed and tinny it’s unlistenable. Conversely, the bluetooth integration is the most reliable of anything I’ve owned to date.
    -Interior material quality: The door panel plastic is flimsy and has some of the cheapest graining I’ve seen in a newer car. The gauges are chintzy, especially without the Sensing Package. The “carpeting” is laughable. These things are tolerable on the Sport or an LX but I’d be really disappointed after spending over $30k for a Touring. Still feels like a step above Camry and on par with Altima, but I prefer the interior of every other competitor.

    Summary: An overall good value, nice balance of driving dynamics and feature content for the class. Detroit and Korea offer more luxury for the price, while a CPO German car offers a more engaging experience behind the wheel. Driving enthusiasts looking for a sports car replacement will be disappointed, while everyone else will probably love it. If I had to do it over again, I would, but only because it now shares a garage with something more entertaining.

  • avatar
    SC5door

    There’s too much chrome on this car to be a “Sport” model. A small strip of chrome on the door handles would have been fine to stand out, but everything else should either be body colored, or blacked out.

  • avatar
    macc4644

    The Sport was priced very fairly.
    But like others said I did not see the interior was upscale or made to last. It wore rather poorly in just 19K. The paint was the worst I had ever seen. This was my 11’th Honda-Acura since my 1986 LS Integra.

    The engine was smooth and got great mileage. However below 30F it sounded horrible on start up. Honda said it was fine.

    What ended my ownership with Hondas was wind noise and road noise and after all of these years Honda hasn’t figured out the American roads. A lowly Mitsu O.S. is quieter and better tuned to the roads here.

    I moved on and if Honda wants me back they need to clean up their act.

    BTW- the stereo was a joke. Same with the last several Hondas I have had.

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • el scotto: @ Principal Dan There are former sorority women of a certain age group who would commit immoral physical...
  • Arthur Dailey: True but through the 60’s and until this downsized, cheapened version the T-Bird was considered...
  • Arthur Dailey: @Inside: your sign in name is correct as you are looking in the wrong direction. Since 2002 the vast...
  • el scotto: For all the acquisitions talk; the extended Ford family, related to Crazy Henry still controls Ford. Next...
  • Garrett: Ford knocked it out of the park with the Bronco, to the point where I would rather have the new one.

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Matthew Guy
  • Timothy Cain
  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Chris Tonn
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber