By on January 19, 2015

2015 Toyota Camry XSE blue crush metallicThe Camry connoisseur, if there is such a thing, would spot the difference.

Unlike some well-known TTAC authors who don’t hide their Camry admiration, I wasn’t on board the Camry love boat. The last SE I drove disappointed me with unimpressive efficiency figures, an interior in need of polish, and an overall sensation of obsolescence. And it was in fact obsolete, as Toyota Canada delivered a Camry Hybrid SE to my driveway in October 2014 when the refreshed 2015 car was already a thing.


• USD Base Price: $27,725

• Horsepower: 268 @ 6200 rpm

• Torque: 248 lb-ft @ 4700 rpm

• Observed Fuel Economy: 19.3 mpg


Nevertheless, I’ll readily admit I appreciate that Toyota finally located the Camry’s sense of style. When this particular car pulled up in front of our house, I noticed right off the bat that it was an XSE, a trim level Toyota introduced for 2015 to combine XLE luxury with the SE’s sporting intentions. The Blue Crush Metallic also represents top-notch taste.

While it’s my job and I do my best and I take a measure of pride in these things, I didn’t notice key signifiers: twin tailpipes. Granted, Blue Crush arrived on Monday, January 5, the busiest work day of the year for a sales-oriented auto writer like myself. I backed the car into our driveway, refusing to take time out of my busy schedule for an unnecessary late night Volkswagen GTI-like drive to the grocery store. “It’s not like it has a V6,” I muttered.

Yet there may be no V6 more captivating than a surprise V6 in an increasingly competent midsize sedan. You see, 24 hours after my muttering, I was heading into town to collect dog food. After a few miles of routine driving behind slow-moving traffic, I hit the highway under heavy throttle to see if Toyota further isolated the 178-horsepower, 2.5L four-cylinder’s inherent vibration. Except I couldn’t answer that question, because I was approaching my exit with more than enough pace to mutter, “This feels like an engine Lotus would squeeze into an Evora.”

Yes, Camry fanbois (if there are such a thing) would have understood the meaning behind Blue Crush’s dual exhaust outlets. But even in XSE trim, Toyota completely bypasses the V6 badging process. It’s debadged. Or at least unbadged.

Toyota is therefore cool, like the guy who ordered his Porsche 911 without all the extra taxonomical addenda. Or at least sort of like that guy.

2015 Toyota Camry XSEToyota says the 3.5L generates 268 horsepower and 248 lb-ft. It’s such a rev-hungry, buttery engine, however, that it feels like there are 300-plus of each. 0-60 mph times below six seconds bring believability to such feelings. The 6-speed automatic lacks all manner of aggression and rewards paddle shift inputs not at all, but it’s a sufficiently cooperative partner for the V6, never flubbing a shift or causing the driver to worry over fragility.

Blue Crush was much more than just an engine. Indeed, the XSE can be had for thousands less without the V6 powerplant. As a whole, the Camry is a stronger package now than it was last year. With “unique shock absorbers, firmer bushings, higher-rate coil springs, specially-tuned steering,” the XSE bears that out more clearly. The structure is stiffer, enabling Toyota to more finely tune the suspension for a very pleasing real-world balance. The ride is only just on the firm side of average, yet the Camry XSE handles ham-fisted, mid-corner adjustments easily and without fuss. The steering is still too slow and light for the XSE to be a genuine sports sedan; brake feel (said to be improved) and brake performance are not confidence-inspiring. But if this suspension configuration represented the conventional Camry’s layout, I believe enthusiasts would grow very fond of the midsize Toyota, and they would wonder just how good TRD’s engineering team could make it if given free rein.

The Mazda 6 is a sharper corner carver, but it rides more stiffly and is noisier inside. Dynamically, the Ford Fusion is very nicely balanced, but not every buyer will put up with Ford’s current infotainment unit when the Camry’s system is so straightforward and intuitive. Hyundai and Kia, with the Sonata and Optima, aren’t yet able to mate serene ride quality to their more aggressive suspension tunes. For a moment, it seemed as though Nissan built the better Camry with their fifth-gen Altima, but the 2015 Camry refresh is a significant one.

Not surprisingly then, the Blue Crush’s prime competition comes in the form of America’s second-best-selling car, the Honda Accord. It’s a game of personal preference at that point.

2015 Toyota Camry XSE interiorPersonally, I’m pleased to discover a Camry that appeals on a large number of different levels. It’s still not the most handsome sedan, its interior is completely devoid of expression, it will quickly become terribly commonplace, it drank at a sub-20-mpg rate during its stay with me. But the Camry XSE is the place where solidity, reliability, and space marry moderate degrees of fun, modestly increased levels of vehicular passion, and mature amounts of back road frolicking.

And it’s relatively affordable. In the United States, Camry XSEs start at $27,725. That’s $2310 more than the SE and the same price as the XLE.

Adding the V6 to a 2015 Toyota Camry XSE costs another $5220, but the V6 XSE includes a raft of equipment that’s optional on the four-cylinder model. It’s worth it. If you’re going to buy America’s best-selling car in large part because the sampling size which helped establish its image of dependability is so large, you owe it to yourself to get the best version of America’s best-selling car.

Timothy Cain is the founder of GoodCarBadCar.net, which obsesses over the free and frequent publication of U.S. and Canadian auto sales figures.

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95 Comments on “Capsule Review: 2015 Toyota Camry XSE...”


  • avatar
    haroldingpatrick

    Get your V6’s while you can, the times are a changing. . .

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Why of course the V6 will be dropped for prole edition cars, why should the little people have any joy in their lives?

      • 0 avatar
        Maymar

        The little people don’t earn that kind of joy until they make a concerted effort to actually enjoy it. 95% of V6 Camries are incapable of outaccelerating my 100hp subcompact without causing serious harm, or losing control (or so I’m forced to assume by their drivers).

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          How so, what is your ride?

          • 0 avatar
            Maymar

            The point was less what I drive (Mazda2), and more that the sort of person who tends to buy a Camry, for the most part, drives it in a manner that would’t tax a scooter engine (how my subcompact of limited speed often finds itself crammed up their tailpipe). And, the interior hasn’t made the necessary strides to bring it to the level of refinement that you’d get from the engine.

            Realistically though, it’s got less to do with restricting the proles from having nice things, and moreso with the proles largely rejecting the extra cost of nice things.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I agree its a cost issue, but not necessarily one of those not wanting the top trim. If the base Camry is 22970+dest and the XLE trim is 27,7 +dest, that’s a roughly 5K premium for the V6 and whatever else is in the top trim package. However Toyota would probably prefer to push you into an Avalon than offer a V6 in the Camry as it is a cost to them, and the base Avalon starts at $31590 + dest, an 8500 dollar premium over base Camry and about a 5K premium over the XLE Camry.

          • 0 avatar
            tuffjuff

            I see plenty of middle-aged douchebags ricing around in brand new Camrys, thank you very much.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Personally, 28, I’d say us proles can get plenty of joy in this class, and don’t have to pay $34,000 for it. Nor do you need a V-6.

        Check out a Honda Accord Sport with the six-speed, or a Hyundai Sonata Eco – both offer 0-60 in the mid sixes, all the equipment you need, good handling, and excellent fuel economy. All for about $25,000.

        I drove the Accord Sport and I’m not waxing hyperbolic when I say it’s one of the best all-around cars I’ve ever driven. As soon as the alimony’s done, it’s on my short list for sure.

      • 0 avatar
        JD321

        Because when the retarded little public school Proles experience joy…They start breeding. Wait til their owners raise the price of gas to $10 per gallon.

    • 0 avatar
      carguy

      I suspect that turbo 2.0 used by Lexus will eventually make it into the Camry and RAV4.

    • 0 avatar
      caltemus

      Nope. People are always saying “X engine will go away” they come out with a 700 horsepower family sedan. Not every company will always offer a V6, but you won’t see them leave the marketplace anytime soon.

    • 0 avatar
      DrGastro997

      A very scary ending is coming indeed! I don’t care how techno/good/efficient the 4’s are becoming, or even the 3’s. I still like my 6’s and 8’s in my car and suv!

  • avatar
    Fred

    Again another review of the Camry that comes to the conlusion, it’s not that bad.

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    That 3.5L Toyota V6 really is a gem, doesn’t feel out of place whatsoever in my parents’ 2009 RX350. And even in that larger CUV body it gets a solid 25mpg on the highway.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      No snark but you think 25mpg highway is “good” from a V6?

      • 0 avatar
        JohnnyFirebird

        I got 24mpg from my Sport Trac’s V8 as long as I stayed under 110kph.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Roughly 25 is good from a V8 I agree, I’ve driven 4.9 Cadillacs which could easily return 24 in highway settings (IIRC the best mileage I achieved was mid 25s) but I can cruise my V6 past thirty on avg trips.

      • 0 avatar
        SCE to AUX

        For an RX350, that’s pretty good.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Why are these desirable again?

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            I was of the same mindset until I took a few long road trips in it. It’s just such an effortless cruiser with minimal NVH and that extra bit of ‘insulation’ from traffic with the high riding seat position. Add in AWD (and snow tires we mount on ours for the winter) and foul weather is no big deal. Nighttime driving is a pleasure with HIDs with the ‘aiming into the turn’ feature. 5 position Heated seats 8 way power , auto HVAC, real wood grain on the wheel. Interior finish is top notch, I believe the 2010+ RX350s started to get some nastier plastics.

            It ultimately boils down to an absolute minimum of driver fatigue. I can drive it all day and I have, most recently to NYC and back in a single day. After my (relatively) noisy, small, and low to the ground 2012 Civic and lumbering ’96 4Runner the RX350 is magical. The 25mpg it gets on long trips is just the cherry on top. Although I will add that driving a mud caked 4Runner through NYC will get you a whole lot more space and respect in traffic than a soccer mom RX350.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            That sounds very nice but I imagine much of it is true of any Lexus product. My thinking was why does anyone want this when it returns what is less than acceptable highway mileage but you were able to clarify this below. I suppose with AWD, 25 is “good”. I suppose is also depends on what a fair trade off is to most people, in your case you’d probably accept 20mpg for what it delivers vs your civic.

          • 0 avatar
            George B

            28, I’ve driven a Lexus RX 350 around the suburbs several times and the attraction is you get most of the ride height of a truck combined with most of the comfort of a Lexus ES. Unfortunately, the truck height of the Lexus RX means that it needs to push truck volumes of air out of the way at highway speed, hurting fuel economy. If I was just looking for a comfortable, somewhat luxurious vehicle for highway cruising, a nice used Camry or Avalon based Lexus would be on my shopping list.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        For a 4000lb AWD crossover running air conditioning on auto and setting the cruise control at around 75mph, yes I think it’s downright amazing! And this is with the old 5spd automatic mind you.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          AWD explains it, thanks.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            It’s more than that. Compared to your 3800 Grand Prix, it’s got about 400lb more curb weight and a much taller profile to cut through the air with, as well as more air space under the vehicle to worry about aerodynamically speaking.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            The latter is what is sort of what I was inferring. I suppose Lexus has an ES for you if one is concerned about mileage.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      I have a problem with the following two things from the Toyota V6:

      -The HP figures are too low, for 3.5L of displacement.
      -The MPG is too low for a middle-weight FWD sedan.

  • avatar
    319583076

    Those are ridiculous wheels! They remind me of the wheels on the latest Golf R, which are also ridiculous. The effect at the rear, especially, where the small disks end up giving you a nice view of the fender liner and daylight.

    This is a trend that can’t dissipate soon enough for me.

  • avatar
    EAF

    It is immature, but the coolest thing about this Camry is watching videos of it beat Z cars on the strip and on the track. It is so out of place yet so right at the same time.

    No manual here, do the 2015 V6 Accord models offer manuals?

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      According to the Build Your Own on the website, yes. Starting at $30,775 (at least for my zip) for the EX-L V6 trim level. Comes in four “colors;” black, white, silver and red. Black-only interior.

      EDIT: This is only for the coupe, BTW. Manual sedans are only available in LX, Sport, and EX, which are 4-pot only.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      Yea as a Z driver who once got stomped at a 2 to 1 lane merge by an AVALON, I definitely respect these things.

      Like the VQ up until 2003, this V6 is a great motor in search of a worthy chassis. Yes the Lexus IS begins to scratch at its potential, but a Toyota somwhere between the Evora and IS in dynamics with a price below both would be an awesome swan song to this engine’s inevitable conclusion. I think they could even call it a Supra…

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    It is ridiculous that the XSE is available with 4 cyl.

    Glad to hear that the V6 is still a gem, love the 3.5 in my Highlander and its willingness to rev while still having good low down torque.

    • 0 avatar
      superchan7

      The V6 is the same butter-smooth 2GR-FE that debuted nearly a decade ago. It always feels significantly underrated. I’ve owned many more interesting cars since my Lexus ES, but if there were anything memorable about a late-model Toyota it would have to be the 2GR-FE V6.

      Toyota’s V6 is the bee’s knees, just like Honda’s inline-4 is the bee’s knees and Ferrari’s V8 is the bee’s knees.

  • avatar
    VW16v

    Another biased reporting, at least no one got the tingly feeling up ones leg. It still is interesting how people can have such vast opinions of the same automobile. Some rate this car as last in sedan comparo tests and some rate it middle of the road. I have yet to drive the 2015 camry, so it will be my next rental.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      How is it biased if different people arrive at different conclusions?

      Are you still angry that everyone knows and acknowledge’s VW’s long storied history of poor quality and reliability?

      • 0 avatar
        VW16v

        Mr.speedy..Angry? Long history of poor quality and reliability? I guess my words from the past still effect you. Sorry about that. Mr.cain is well known for his bias or love for the camry.
        example: Camry’s system is so straightforward and intuitive. Hyundai and Kia, with the Sonata and Optima, aren’t yet able to mate serene ride quality to their more aggressive suspension tunes. For a moment, it seemed as though Nissan built the better Camry with their fifth-gen Altima, but the 2015 Camry refresh is a significant one.
        This probably is the biggest load of bull said about the camry. Almost every other auto reviewer does not seem to find these amazing qualities in the camry. It actually comes in last if not middle of the pack in every sedan comparo.
        example: motorweek https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ouyzV3hIqH8

        • 0 avatar
          Timothy Cain

          Well known? For something other than umpiring Sidney Crosby in Cole Harbour minor league baseball?

          You must not have read the last Camry review I wrote on this very site, which was linked to in this article.

          “Taking up residence in a 2014 Camry Hybrid SE for a whole week, I was saddened…”

          “This is not a happy place…”

          “…this car lacks the sense of overarching solidity with which you acquainted yourself in a 1997 Lexus ES when you were a college sophomore.”

          “…we averaged just 31.4 miles per gallon over the course of the week. That’s far worse than the official figures: 40 mpg overall.”

          Do I look favourably upon its impressive sales figures and Toyota’s knack for keeping it atop the sales charts? Of course I do, who doesn’t? But that has nothing to do with my personal affection, or historic lack thereof, for the nameplate.

          • 0 avatar
            VW16v

            It’s hard to find another auto testing professional with your perspective on the camry. Yes, sales are great. Sales numbers do not equal the quality of anything. Walmart has record sales year to year. McDonald’s has served billions of people.I would not say anything to positive about either of one of those companies, except that sales are amazing, and they offer basic items. Your reviews of other auto brands are spot on, and I enjoy reading your posts. But, the toyota reviews tend to one sided. This is just a blog, don’t take it personally.

          • 0 avatar
            sirwired

            Wow, Mr. VW16V… he posted quotes from his last Camry review showing how little he liked the car, yet you persist in insisting he has some sort of massive pro-Toyota bias. What exactly were you looking for? A complete evisceration of what is, by any standard, a not-horrible car?

            I doubt that last review won him any friends at all in Toyota PR.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            The VW dude is a wee bit obsessed.

          • 0 avatar
            bd2

            ” finally located the Camry’s sense of style.”

            – OK, lost me right there.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Yeah kind of like saying that Kraft Macaroni and Cheese is a connoisseur’s delight

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            Please, “Timothy Cain” is an anagram for “Toy Cam In Hit”. How can that be a coincidence?

            John Davis already rendered THE OPINION on the new Camry “Xtra Snooze Edition” and trying to change our minds at this point is just embarrassing.

          • 0 avatar
            usonianhorizon

            Wait, you umpired Sid in Cole Harbour? Forget car statistics. This is worthy of a article in its own right!!

        • 0 avatar
          bd2

          Yep – in Toyota’s quest to make its lineup more “sporty” – they stiffened up their suspensions which resulted in numerous complaints in reviews as to a “brittle” ride for the Camry (particularly the SE), Avalon and ES, among others (the box-ute Soul was deemed to have a better ride than the Corolla).

          Now maybe Toyota worked out the suspension in the refreshed Camry, but the new Sonata has been getting very positive reviews for its ride.

          And the outgoing soon to be replaced Optima still gets the nod over the newer (and refreshed) Camry – such as by Car & Driver.

          • 0 avatar
            kovakp

            So even the Japanese with their fish-is-healthier diet can get sclerotic brains.

            Because what else could possibly persuade them to stiffen the ride on Avalons? For dog’s sake, that was the only Toyota I ever enjoyed riding in.

          • 0 avatar
            VW16v

            The camry is just a average car now. It is not a pos. But, sales numbers tend put it in that elite category. Which to be fare marketing and lack of buyers knowledge of other products, Toyota does sell the hell out of them. I toured the plant in Kentucky three years ago and it was nice to see American’s at work. Even the toyota commercial makes fun of people that can’t help themselves from purchasing another camry. “Another Camry” ever hear the phrase K.I.S.S. Well toyota has made millions with hat slogan due to people just not willing to put a little effort into looking. One of the highest recalled cars, and people still are drawn to it like a moth to a flame.

          • 0 avatar
            30-mile fetch

            There is the LE and XLE if you want the traditionally soft Camry ride. SE and XSE if you want something closer to an Accord or 6. Not a bad idea to play both sides of the field, the last SE accounted for ~40% of Camry sales.

            The new Sonata has been getting praise for its ride quality & solidity, but not so much for the lazy handling and donkey-slow 2.0 turbo in their “Sport” trim. Surprisingly, the 1.6 Eco looks like the driver’s choice of the lineup.

            As much as you robotically love to snipe at Camry articles with your endless admiration for H/K and fleet sales quips, there are tangible reasons for choosing one over the Sonata/Optima, particularly over the outgoing generation, regardless of what C&D says. Who, tangentially, rated the Avalon first in their last comparison with the H/K offerings in fifth and sixth.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Doesn’t sound like a rave review to me, dude…sounds like a decent review for a decent car. And if you’d like to prove to me the Camry isn’t a decent car, go right ahead. It’s not my favorite nameplate by any means, but I’d never say it wasn’t a good car. Just not my cup of tea.

          Trolling much?

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            He’s a bigot: https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2014/11/chart-day-u-s-auto-market-share-october-2014#comment-4355185

            His definition of bias is along the lines of “someone who doesn’t completely agree with me or devote cons1derable internet time to Toyota bashing.” You would have to be inside of a very tiny Teutonic box in order to make him happy.

          • 0 avatar
            VW16v

            Pch. Maybe you should look up the definition of a bigot before posting mousy words.

          • 0 avatar
            kovakp

            No child left behind.

            Oh, we’re out of blue crayons.

        • 0 avatar
          Timothy Cain

          “But, the toyota reviews tend to one sided.”

          Like this Lexus CT200h review? https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2014/08/capsule-review-2014-lexus-ct200h/

          And this past week’s Scion FR-S sales-related article?
          https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2015/01/scions-fr-s-took-hit-2014/

  • avatar
    Halftruth

    19.anything is atrocious for a mid size sedan.
    How can this be? How heavy were you with it?
    Ford’s F150 with 4 wheel drive does better *smirk*.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      I could get 19mpg out of my Honda Fit if I worked at it; if you gave me a V6 Camry for a week, I’d certainly have no trouble getting 19mpg out of it, too.

      I’ve driven a V6 Camry, albeit of the last generation. It’s a very quick, very rev-friendly car that gives very little negative feedback for greater and greater speed.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      What sort of city (or mixed) mileage do you expect from a V6?

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        I get 22 to 24 out of a 2010 Highlander 5 speed V6 AWD in a 60% highway 40% city mix. That’s topping out at 65 to 70 mph.

        Less than 20 (with the 6 speed as an improvement) you have to be keeping a steady 85 mph and undulating terrain. Or participating in the stoplight drag races.

    • 0 avatar
      Timothy Cain

      I maybe had a bit more fun than I might have in the 4-cyl, but it was also brutally cold. Brutal cold means a bit more time warming up the car before we take the baby out, for example. Mileage in our family’s personal vehicles typically drops by about 10% in a comparison between September and January. Knobbier winter tires and periodically snow-covered roads don’t help, either. The car is rated at 21 mpg in the city, same as Accord V6 auto, but Accord is rated at 34 on the highway, 3 up on the Camry’s 31.

      Recent mileage in different week-long tests: Yukon Denali, 12.7 mpg. TLX V6, 25 mpg (w/ unusual amount of hwy driving.) GTI, 24.8 mpg. Outlander V6, 21.4 mpg. XTS V Sport, 16 mpg.

    • 0 avatar
      05lgt

      I once did below 10mpg for a tank in my 4 banger Subaru. It was after a weekend of rallycross. I only hit second at the end of the finishing straight, and that was pushing deep into the braking zone indeed. I didn’t even ask for a recall based on the efficiency.

  • avatar
    energetik9

    It’s quite telling when the premise of an article is that, ‘it wasn’t as bad as I thought it would be’.

    Personally, I have no desire to be in this category. the last Camry I drove was my inlays loaded Camry. Parked at my place for a month while they were in Great Britain. 2012 model I think. I drove it just enough times to keep it operational. Nothing was particularly exciting, interesting or inviting about that car. It serves a utility purpose and for those who desire that, it’s a great car. Just not me.

    • 0 avatar
      VW16v

      Yes good car, average in every category. A little over priced, yes. I too just not ready to drive an appliance. Something my aunt or in-laws would enjoy. The v6 does seem a zippy in strait line.

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    I don’t get the half-leather-half-cloth seats with cloth being the part one actually SITS on.

    Seems like a rip off.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      I never got it either but Ford sold that in the 80s and early 90s with some success. Something about when you sit down in a hot car it didn’t burn your behind (but did the back of your thighs).

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    VW wheels and a perversion of the Nissan GTRs front end, this car just looks like someones Dad trying to be “hip” with the teens, its a modern counter-part to the fool who throws fancy rims on his ’85 Camry, I just don’t get it.

  • avatar
    Prado

    I find myself drawn to this trim level Camry (V6 XSE). However the price is a little difficult to swallow for ‘just a Camry’. Realistically these sticker for about $33K. Without a steep discount, a slightly more expensive TLX seems like it would be a better buy for a sporty well optioned FWD V6 sedan.

  • avatar
    fatalexception04

    As these cars like the Camry become more powerful but still lack true road feel or tighter steering, how much does this become a liability in terms of safety? This isn’t your grandma’s old v6 Camry. This thing is quick and it seems it could get messy for some people.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      “As these cars like the Camry become more powerful but still lack true road feel or tighter steering, how much does this become a liability in terms of safety?”

      Not likely. Better steering feel doesn’t really help the majority of drivers: they’ll panic and react the same way regardless of chassis tuning.

      What does help is that stability control is getting better, thus preventing people from getting into accidents in the first place.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      Yup. It’s not your grandma’s Camry.

      ABS, traction control, stability control, brake override module, throttle by wire…for most cars today the electronic nannies kick in way before the fun stops being fun and turns into a crap storm.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        ” It’s not your grandma’s Camry.”

        I don’t know about that. An elderly couple from my church, well into their seventies, were among the very first to buy a 2015 Camry V6 XLE.

        They traded their 1994 Impala for it. It only had ~86K miles on the clock. Seriously!

        I’d say that makes that 2015 Camry, grandma’s Camry, for someone.

        I asked them why they didn’t buy the Avalon and his reply was that this Camry had everything they wanted at more than $10K less than an Avalon.

        Gotta love frugal people.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          “They traded their 1994 Impala for it. It only had ~86K miles on the clock. Seriously!”

          The only car wearing the Impala name that existed in 1994 was the Impala SS- the one that came all-black with the sport suspension, Z-rated tires, LT1 V8, limited slip, dual exhaust, and 3.08 rear end.

          If that is what your friends traded-in then they are almost certainly automotive enthusiasts. On a one-owner 86K miles ’94 Impala I hope they got at least $10K on trade for it.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            “automotive enthusiasts”

            Yes, HE is. Also owns a 454 Corvette from way back when. And several other Detroit Iron cars. His DD is a Ranger.

            SHE used to drive an IHS Scout II for decades but old age made getting into and getting out of it too involved.

            Scout II was sold to a HS kid in town, as were several other of the old cars. Plenty of takers in this area for the old cars. Mostly illegal aliens passing through the state on their way North and East.

            Because of out of town doctor appointments they wanted ONE new car for dependability. Hence the 2015 Camry.

            BTW, you know your sh!t! Didn’t think anyone would know that about the 1994 Impala SS.

            I don’t know how much they got for it on paper but the paint on it was shot because of the desert sun. I don’t recall seeing him drive it recently. He did drive the 2015 Camry to Mass yesterday.

  • avatar
    Dave M.

    Not sure why anyone needs more than 200 hp in a midsize sedan. You can flog that sucker when needed, but still get 25-35 mpgs in return.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    The Toyota Camry XSE.

    One more letter in the alphabet soup and now 30% less boring.

  • avatar
    superchan7

    My colleague has a ’14 SE V6. Butter-smooth engine is almost the selling point of the car…the suspension is oddly stiff for a Camry. It felt stiffer than another colleague’s BMW M5. Something about that didn’t sit well with me. Was it the lunch?

    • 0 avatar
      energetik9

      “It felt stiffer than another colleague’s BMW M5.” Sorry, not buying that. If it was a new M5 with adapt suspension set to the lightest setting, perhaps. Still seems a stretch.

      • 0 avatar
        superchan7

        I’m dead serious. Either some setting is awry on the Camry, or it really is a little too stiff for a Camry buyer. Perhaps part of the issue is the damping. I’m not a suspension connoisseur (although I should be, being an avid sports car fan and owner), but it felt as if the rebound wasn’t being damped sufficiently, allowing repetitive and harsh oscillations. But could it be the opposite, a compliant suspension with over-damping?

        The M5 is an E60 with the V10. It’s a significantly better ride.

  • avatar
    rentonben

    IT”S A CAR!

  • avatar
    FormerFF

    I drive a 2014 Fusion, and there’s no “putting up” with its infotainment unit. I’d say it’s very good to excellent.

    • 0 avatar
      th009

      Meh. I haven’t driven the new Camry, but I’ll take the Mailbu’s infotainment unit over Ford MyTouch any day of the week and twice on Sundays.

      Not to mention that the Fusion really could use some grown-up gauges to replace the video game ones.

    • 0 avatar
      th009

      Meh. I haven’t driven the new Camry, but I’ll take the Mailbu’s infotainment unit over Ford MyTouch any day of the week and twice on Sundays.

  • avatar
    CapVandal

    The obvious comparison is this vs. the Accord Touring. Both 6’s with automatics. The Touring is the fully optioned top of the line Accord.

    After reading the comments, I want a Lexus.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      I believe the Accord V6 lets in more road noise. My grandson bought a left-over 2014 Accord V6 this past August and from the front passenger seat I could hear quite a bit of road noise when he took me for a spin up the mountain.

      The Accord is also a bit roomier in the passenger compartment than the 2015 Camry is, but sits lower to the ground.

      Either is a solid choice and both will, no doubt, continue to be best-sellers in America.

  • avatar
    Power6

    I guess Camry reviews are just a forum for commenters to prattle on about whatever car they drive.

    VW fanboi thinks Passat is exciting
    Fusion owner likes MyFordTouch

    Amazing insights here folks…

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    Like I said; “Toyota play good music……..but it only cover music”.

    This Camry appears to be good. Why not an AWD version? They already have the AWD drivetrains at their fingertips?

    Turbo the engine, tune the suspension, fix the body to look the part (and work) and then let is go!

    I hope Toyota don’t use a 4 or 5 speed and only have power window in the front. Toyota have a knack for not quite blinging a car adequately.

    Maybe they should look at Hyundai……the next “Toyota”.

  • avatar
    Jerome10

    The problem for the camry has been, and still remains, this: the Honda Accord is the better camry.

    I don’t see anything here that leads me to change my opinion.

    The feel of the Honda is better, drives better, looks better, and the reliability is just as good or better.

    Nothing in this article persuades me that I shouldn’t just get a V6 Accord instead.

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      “The problem for the camry has been, and still remains, this: the Honda Accord is the better camry”

      Having owned a Camry, I really don’t agree with that. In the guilded age of Toyota and Honda, both were quality offerings at the top of the segment, but Accord provided more driving involvement at the expense of ride comfort and noise control, while Camry provided supreme comfort and refinement at the cost of driving involvement. It depended on what you wanted out of your sedan.

      Now that the current Accord is much improved and the Camry is trying to be all things to all people at a competitive price point through a bunch of different trim levels, I think your statement may finally be correct.

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    Question- wouldn’t a 2015 Sonata Eco for about 24-25K fully equipped that does under 7 seconds 0-60, gets a whopping 11-12 MPG better mileage, superior interior furnishings, superior steering and comparable ride/handling and quietness be a better value than this? Oh and it has a better warranty and sound system too!

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      Well Tim did admit to a ton of idling. Does the Sonata Eco have a remote start setting so Tim could still warm up the car for his baby?

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      Sonata Eco looks to be a great car. On paper, I may even choose it over a 4 cylinder Camry SE which I am quite fond of.

      But really, “a whopping 11-12 mpg?” Camry V6 combined EPA mpg is 25, Sonata Eco is 32, which is good but nowhere near 11-12mpg. It also has much less power. How full of ___ do you need to be before you decide it’s enough?

  • avatar
    chiefmonkey

    The crossing guard for the elementary school down my street just bought a ruby red 2015 Camry to replace her 1995 Chevy Lumina,also red, which she bought new in 1995 and had been driving every day with, in her words, “zero problems.” I’d say it’s great for someone like her. It’s got all the right styling cues, like the rubber triangle reminiscent of the Ford LTD behind the rear windows, but clearly much sportier! Clearly…

  • avatar
    Frylock350

    For the price tag I’d rather have a Charger V6 SXT. I realize its a full-size, not a mid-size, BUT it is RWD. That leads to superior driving dynamics without sacrificing as much ride quality. The Pentastar V6 with the 8sp trans is a fantastic powertrain that balances economy and power quite well. Take that and combine it with the Dodge’s U-connect infotainment and a higher quality interior and there’s no contest IMO. As far as reliability goes I expect any car from any manufacturer* to serve as vehicle that will give me 100,000 reliable miles of service. Besides, these Chargers are beat to hell in police duty and they seem to take it in stride.

    *Exception: Land Rover and Jaguar products


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