By on September 9, 2015

All-New Elantra_1

Hyundai’s compact model, the Elantra, will arrive with the brand’s newly adopted trapezoidal grille, new engines and a number of enhancements to improve perceived quality.

The automaker, who looked at the Dodge Dart and said, “Yeah, that looks good but needs more grille,” revealed the sixth-generation Elantra on Wednesday in South Korea.

All-New Elantra_3

While the visible changes are likely to garner the most interest from consumers, the Elantra may be set to receive a new 2.0-liter Atkinson-cycle engine in America. In Korea, the engine produces 146 horsepower and 132 pounds feet of torque mated to either a six-speed manual or automatic transmission. U.S. specs have not yet been released.

Also new for Elantra is a 134-horsepower, 1.6-liter VGT diesel engine and seven-speed dual-clutch automatic gearbox, though don’t hold your breath that the combo will find its way it to the States.

A 1.6-liter GDI engine will continue on in markets outside the U.S. with some revisions. There’s no word on whether the Elantra will be offered again with the 1.8-liter four cylinder in the U.S.

While compact cars are rarely thought of as premium offerings — especially those from Hyundai that sell more on value and content than they do on style and high-quality appointments, the next-generation Elantra will offer improved NVH characteristics through the use of more sound-deadening material, thicker glass and re-engineered windshield wiper blades that “are carefully positioned to dramatically reduce road and wind noise in the cabin,” said the automaker. If the outside world is still too loud, an optional eight-speaker Harman audio system will surely drown it out.

It’s not just NVH, but also ride and handling that gets engineers’ attention this time around. Improvements to the electric power steering system and suspension, specifically the rear shock absorber and spring positioning, are meant to make the car more engaging while improving ride comfort.

Overall, the Elantra does grow slightly. The sixth-generation car will be 20 mm longer and 25 mm wider than its predecessor. That growth translates to a “spacious interior comparable with that of the segment above,” Hyundai said in its release. The Elantra also utilizes 32-percent more high-strength steel, now making up 53 percent of the total steel content.

All-New Elantra_2

While the new compact is more stylish, Hyundai won’t be abandoning its value and feature propositions just yet. Integrated Memory Seat (IMS) — because that needs an acronym — for the driver will make an appearance. So does a suite of safety and convenience equipment including Autonomous Emergency Braking (AEB), High Beam Assist (HBA), Blind Spot Detection (BSD) and Rear Cross Traffic Alert (RCTA). The Elantra will also carry more initialisms than any other car per dollar*.

* probably not true

Hyundai’s Smart Trunk, as seen on the Genesis, Santa Fe, Sonata and Tucson, will also make an appearance on the Elantra for the first time.

The Elantra nameplate has been on sale for over 25 years and sold over 10 million units, said the automaker in the release. According to GoodCarBadCar, 222,023 Elantras were sold in the U.S. in 2014.

How the new conservatively styled Elantra will stack up against the visually bonkers tenth-generation Civic will have to wait ’til next year.

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19 Comments on “Hyundai Reveals Sixth-Generation Elantra in South Korea with Atkinson, Diesel Engines...”


  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    Not sure how I feel about it. The interior is a step up, but the current Elantra is easily the best looking compact this side of a Mazda 3. And even the 3 doesn’t have the Elantra’s perfect compact car proportions.

    Actually the interior is OK with me, aside from the parallelgram treatment around the infotainment screen. I hate to say it but I actually would prefer the “tacked on Ipad” situation more. It looks cleaner and more modern than a big bulky binnacle.

  • avatar
    VW16v

    Once again it destroys the Civic to an out of date piece of basic transportation. Put an Acura name plate on the Limited Elantra models it and could replace the ilx.

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      Eyes closed, the Elantra driving experience is entirely “basic piece of transportation”. Any avoidance of milquetoastiness begins and ends with the sheet metal.

      • 0 avatar
        VW16v

        Times have changed and Honda civic has not. Go test drive a new elantra.

        • 0 avatar
          30-mile fetch

          Can’t. Not out yet. But I’ve driven the current one. Nice little car, as most of them are these days. But it’s as boring as the Japanese competition.

          If I’m going to play the boring basic transportation card, I may as well get resale and reliability reputation along with it and go for the Honda.

          If you think the Elantra is the *interesting* entrant to the compact sedan field, here’s some required reading:

          https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2011/01/review-2011-hyundai-elantra/

          http://www.motortrend.com/roadtests/sedans/1404_2014_compact_sedans_the_big_test/viewall.html

          http://www.caranddriver.com/comparisons/2011-hyundai-elantra-limited-page-4

  • avatar
    CB1000R

    I get that the aerodynamics and such dictate the design and all, but can they just go all the way and add the lift-back already?

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    I like it a lot. For once, the new Hyundai grille works for me (barely), and the more conservative interior is a nice change.

    But I’m guessing the Kia Forte version will look even better.

  • avatar
    highdesertcat

    It never ceases to amaze me how far Hyundai has come since the days of the cheap-schit they schat on us.

    The 2011 Elantra we bought new for our grand daughter way back when served her long and well all through college, and continues to do the same for the new owner.

    Best of all, we never had to take advantage of that magnificent Hyundai warranty.

    I hope the new Elantra is just as good for those who choose to buy Hyundai.

  • avatar
    dwford

    A little more conservative, but still good looking. Looks like it avoided the mess that became the 2015 Sonata’s styling. Very curious about the engine options. I had assumed the 1.6T from the Sonata Eco and the Tucson would be the new motor.

  • avatar

    Very (European) Ford-like.

  • avatar
    Tosh

    You are obviously mistaken: it is plainly an ‘Avante.’

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    It’s a shame the diesel only gets the horse power figure with no torque figure.

    Hyundai here compete with many FCA products, especially Chrysler and its products.

    I’d buy a Hyundai over any Chrysler product any day. They are superior in quality, reliability and even looks in some cases.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Beautiful – I’ll assume the pee stains on the driver seat is a Photoshop editing issue and that someone didn’t actually pee in the seat.

    Love the navy blue.

  • avatar
    Dipstick

    Do you like the looks of german cars and wish they were reliable?
    Buy Korean.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    I still the Forte is better looking.

  • avatar
    boogieman99

    Judging by the front and the rear, they must really like the Mazda3. Is it even legal for them to design something that looks so identical…

    Hopefully it drives better than the current generation.

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