By on September 29, 2015

2015 Ford F-350 Exterior3

2015 Ford F-350 King Ranch 4×4

6.7-liter OHV V-8, turbodiesel (440 horsepower @ 2,800 rpm; 860 lbs-ft @ 1,600 rpm)

6-speed 6R140 automatic

Not tested under EPA regulations*

14.1 (Observed, MPG)

Tested Options: King Ranch trim, Super Crew cab, 4×4, 6.7-liter turbodiesel engine, 3.31 locking rear axle, Ruby Red paint, 5th wheel prep, spray-in bedliner, heated seats, upfitter switches

Base Price (F-350 XL Regular Cab 4×2 Flex-Fuel V-8):
$33,900**
As Tested:
$65,590**

* Heavy-duty pickups are exempt from EPA fuel economy ratings.
** Prices include $1,195 destination charge.

There was a time when a 1/2-ton pickup could haul around 1,000 pounds of payload and a 1-ton truck was good for around 2,000 pounds. Twenty years ago a good tow rating for a 1/2 ton truck was 7,500 pounds and 1-ton trucks were used by ranchers for hauling 14,000 pound cattle trailers around. Today things are different.

Now we have a Ford F-150 that can tow over 12,000 pounds and haul 3,300 pounds in the bed without batting an eye. In this world, we have 3/4- and 1-ton trucks boasting towing abilities that would have required a Class 5 medium-duty truck in the 1990s. It’s in this world that the F-350, F-450 and Ram 3500 now exist.

These trucks have pushed the envelope, boasting towing capabilities that 99 percent of pickup truck shoppers can’t even legally test. With massive turbodiesel torque figures, Ford and Chrysler’s latest trucks can tow 21,000 pounds more than my plain-old California Class C license allows. With the 2017 Ford Super Duty on the horizon sporting more aluminum than an Alcoa factory and Chrysler nearing the sale of their re-tweaked Cummins engine and its 900 lb-ft of torque, let’s deep-dive into the Super Duty you can buy now.

Exterior
The Super Duty is the biggest interpretation of Ford’s pickup truck design. The hood of the F-350 stands around five feet off the ground and everything is big, bold and square. I have to say that, although I come from a “Dodge family” as my dad puts it (my parents have a cattle ranch in the middle of Texas), I’ve always been partial to the look of Ford’s big trucks. The surprising thing for me is how relatively fresh the F-350 still looks, despite its successor having already been shown to the world.

The Super Duty family has three pickup models: F-250, F-350 and F-450. The split between the models is primarily defined by their towing capacity, but there are some external differences that the keen observer will notice.

As you climb up the ladder, the ride height increases thanks to frame and suspension changes. The F-250 and F-350 allow the choice between two different bed lengths and three different cabs, but only the F-350 allows you to check the dual-rear-wheel option box. The F-450 is more limited in configuration, coming only in long wheelbase Crew Cab form with dual rear wheels standard. Also different in the F-450 (that many folks don’t realize) is that Ford actually changes the front and rear tracks making them significantly wider in the F-450 for improved stability when towing. The changes necessary in creating the F-450 add over 400 pounds of curb weight versus a comparable F-350.

2015 Ford F-350 Interior2

Interior
Like the exterior, the interior is big and bold. Unfortunately, it’s also primarily cast of hard plastic and imitation wood trim that’s not fauxing anyone. I admit when it comes to a work truck I’m a little torn about the hard plastic versus soft plastic question since hard plastics tend to be more durable over time, but this is a nearly $70,000 vehicle and the F-150 has a much nicer interior. While there are plenty of bargain plastics in the Ram 2500/3500 and Silverado/Sierra 2500/3500 trucks, both of the primary competitors have fresher and more luxurious interiors and Ram will even toss in real wood trim if you pay enough. When it comes to interior style and luxury feel, the Super Duty comes in last with the Silverado/Sierra and RAM seeming more appropriate tow vehicles for your $146,000 Airstream Land Yacht.

Front seat comfort proved good over a week of mixed driving, but the age of the truck’s design means you can’t get the incredibly comfortable anti-fatigue seats currently available in the F-150. GM’s twins offer probably the most comfortable front seats in the heavy-duty segment while Ram ties the F-Series in my opinion.

2015 Ford F-350 Interior6

Infotainment
Ford’s touchscreen infotainment system is not long for this world. Starting in the 2016 calendar year, we will see the new SYNC3 system rolling out, but looks like the Super Duty will have to wait until 2017 for its infotainment refresh.

Because there are both workhorse and luxury versions of the Super Duty, base models start low on the totem pole with a 2-speaker audio system featuring AM/FM radio and a clock. And that’s it. You can upgrade to a CD-player in XL models, Lariat adds Ford’s MyFord Touch infotainment system and top-end models can be optioned up a 9-speaker Sony system like our tester.

2015 Ford F-350 Engine

Drivetrain and Capability
F-250 and F-350 models start with Ford’s 6.2-liter gasoline V-8 engine tuned to 385 horsepower at 5,500 rpm and 405 lb-ft at 4,500 rpm. Twenty years ago that would have been a diesel torque figure, but the optional 6.7-liter V-8 turbodiesel is a modern monster. Optional in F-250 and F-350 and standard in F-450, the “Power Stroke” engine cranks up 440 horsepower and a Bugatti Veyron-like 860 lb-ft of torque.

Power is routed to the rear or all four wheels via a Ford 6R140 6-speed automatic transmission. Fuel economy testing is not required due to the GVWR of all Super Duty trucks exceeds 8,500 pounds, but our 6.7-liter diesel F-350 single rear wheel model averaged 14.6 mpg in mixed driving empty and 11.1 mpg when towing approximately 6,500 pounds in mixed driving.

2016 Ford F-Series Super Duty

Understanding the payload and towing split in the Super Duty line is key to comparing the Ford to the GM and Chrysler competition. The F-250 is fairly self explanatory: It will tow up to 14,000 pounds conventional or 16,600 in 5th wheel configuration. The F-350 tops out at 19,000 pounds conventional and 26,500 5th wheel. That tops the GMC and Chevy 3500 trucks easily and sounds like a big drop versus the Ram 3500. This is where it is important to include the F-450 in the comparison as it will tow 19,000 pounds conventional and 31,200 5th wheel, just 10 pounds less of Ram’s refreshed 2016 truck. Trust me, 10 pounds is nothing when you’re talking about hauling more than 15 tons.

Payload is also an area where you have to include the F-450 to understand the Super Duty line. The F-350 is tuned to be the diesel payload king with up to 7,050 pounds of payload while the F-450’s changes to allow that impressive tow rating actually drop payload to 5,300 pounds. This means that in the Ford lineup you have more of a trade off when it comes to towing versus payload since the Ram 3500’s top 31,210 pound tow rig will also haul 6,580 pounds in the bed. Putting this in perspective, 31,000 pounds is roughly what nine Honda Accord V6 sedans or 13 pallets of bricks weighs.

2015 Ford F-350 Instrument Cluster

The Truth About Towing
Towing is the holy grail of truck bragging rights, perhaps more so even than the number of pound-feet of torque your diesel cranks out. The trouble is most states restrict what you can tow without endorsements or commercial or noncommercial class A drivers licenses. California, Connecticut, Illinois, Nevada and Texas have perhaps the strictest towing laws, but much of this is buried deep in the state’s vehicle code where it’s not easy to decipher. California is the most easy reading of the bunch and the most clear. You can’t conventionally tow a trailer with a GVWR greater than 10,000 pounds with a standard Class C license. Towing a 5th wheel between 10,000 and 15,000 pounds GCW requires a free endorsement to your license from the DMV.

A larger set of states including (but not limited to) Kansas, Massachusetts, North Carolina, New Hampshire, New Mexico, New York, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Texas and Wyoming have the limit for both 5th wheel and conventional trailering at 26,000 pounds GCW. This means math is involved and your max trailering without a special license or endorsement ranges from 12,000-16,000 pounds depending on the configuration of your Super Duty.

The rules are even more strict if you’re a commercial operator as you can end up falling under DOT jurisdiction when your GCWR crests 10,000 lbs (which is basically any Super Duty with any trailer since the lowest GVWR in the F-250 is 9,900 lbs).

2015 Ford F-350 Exterior 5

Drive
You don’t generally buy pickups this big because of how they drive. That’s a good thing. If driving manners were important you’d find a way to make a 1/2-ton pickup truck work in a flash. Three-quarter ton and 1-ton trucks are purpose-built for the mission of towing big, heavy things. Big towing means big curb weight. The lightest F-250 tips the scales a hair under 6,000 pounds while a fully optioned F-450 weighs an insane 8,611 pounds. Our welterweight F-350 was 7,508 pounds and every ounce showed out on the road. Despite the 440 horsepower and 860 lb-ft of torque, acceleration was a moderate 7.6 seconds to 60 mph. Braking from 60 was an average — yet extremely long — 160 feet with the bed empty. Adding extra weight in the bed actually helped a little and with about 1,000 pounds in the back the braking distance dropped to 152 feet. Any way you slice it, that’s a medium-sized school bus longer than an F-150.

So far, all of what I’ve said frankly applies to any of the competition as well. However, one area where one option rides to the surface is in the ride quality, with some caveats. With the latest Ram 2500/3500 incarnation, Chrysler went a little off-script. The Ram 2500 now uses a coil spring rear suspension instead of the leaf springs we see in the Ford and GM trucks and this has a serious and positive impact on ride quality when the bed is empty. Improving things further is an optional full air suspension in the rear of the Ram 2500 and an optional partial air suspension in the Ram 3500. While there is an obvious trade-off in terms of long-term maintenance costs (and acquisition cost) for either air suspension, the difference is pronounced on the road where our Ford tester’s rear end was so lively at speed that we called off the 1/4 mile acceleration test.

The F-350 is the first vehicle in 8 years of vehicle testing that I have called off the 1/4 mile run. Perhaps I’m getting soft in my old age, but the somewhat rough road (with a dip just after 1/8th mile) caused the rear of the F-350 to become unsettled. In the interest of safety and returning the truck to Ford with the shiny side un-dented, I called it quits at 80 mph.

2015 Ford F-350 Exterior 4

Comparisons are also where things start to differentiate more. Since towing is the big buzzword these days, let’s talk about that first. Ford’s decision to make their top-end tow vehicle an F-450 while Ram still calls theirs a Ram 3500 confuses matters a little so you have to read between the marketing lines.

Ford’s top towing happens in the F-450, which comes in one form only: big cab, big bed, duallys and 4×4. Ram claims they will beat that F-450 by 10 pounds. However, the Ram that tows 31,210 pounds is just one model as well, but quite a different kind of truck.

Max towing in the Ram happens only in regular cab, two-wheel-drive form. Add the big cab and 4WD and the Ford beats the Ram’s tow rating by around 1,000 pounds. As a result, it’s not easy to make an apples-to-apples comparison, but there is some flexibility in the Ram’s abilities since it’s possible to get a dimensionally smaller vehicle that can tow similar amounts. The Ram’s payload capacity, when configured in max tow form, beats the F-450. Chrysler will sell you a Tradesman trim in max tow form that’s more than $10,000 less expensive than an F-450.

2015 Ford F-350 Exterior7

Which truck is right for you depends on a number of things. Do you need to tow more than 10,000 pounds? No, seriously, more than 10,000 pounds? If so, are you properly licensed in your state for said towing? If you answered no, stop at the F-150. If yes, then you need to decide how far you really need to go.

The Ram and F-350 are very comparable for moderate towing, but the Ram when properly optioned up will deliver a more civilized ride and a more Mack-like exhaust note. For at-limit towing, the F-450 would be my choice despite the 2016 Ram giving you 40 lb-ft more torque and 10 pounds more towing capacity. Why? The F-450’s wider track, nearly three-foot longer wheelbase and 1,200 pound heavier curb weight make it a more solid choice. All of those characteristics make the Ford a more stable tow vehicle if you honestly plan to tow over 15.5 tons of whatever.

The 2015 Ford Super Duty is certainly a truck that lives up to its name. I fully expect the coming aluminum Supery Duty to take things to the next level of tow insanity and bring with it all the questions circling around the F-150 when it comes to body repairs. If you want your next Ford truck to be made out of steel, shop soon. For the rest of us, the Ram 2500 with the rear air suspension awaits. Oh, and that Airstream? My Saab is rated to tow that.

Ford provided the vehicle, insurance and one tank of fuel for this review

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135 Comments on “2015 Ford F-350 Super Duty Review – Hauling Above The Limit [w/ Video]...”


  • avatar
    jrasero23

    While I am not your F-350 buyer and see no need for a $70k truck, Ford really was using the bargain bin for this truck. I understand people who actually need a F-350 probably don’t care about luxury touches but damn Ford, using the same vents on the 1st gen MKZ faux wood, hard plastic everywhere, and a steering wheel that looks that it has been recycled from the late 90’s. But what do I know I would probably never buy a truck let a lone a $70k truck

  • avatar
    ajla

    One thing worth mentioning is that, in FL at least, the basic driver’s licence is for 26,001 GCW, but it also has an UNLIMITED weight exception for RV-type trailers.

    I’m guessing FL isn’t the only state that does this exception, so depending on your towing plans it would be good to read over the laws concerning your circumstances.

    • 0 avatar
      Alex L. Dykes

      There are 8 states that allow exempt RVs in a similar fashion to Florida, however disconnect that RV and put a flatbed trailer with a GVWR that’s the same as your ginormous RV and you’re in trouble even if it is empty. The towing laws are a patchwork quilt of insanity.

      • 0 avatar

        I believe Connecticut backed down on the non commercial thing. They used to have 2 classes of non CDL license but they did away with that a while ago. Now you can pull what ever you want non commercial but they tightened the CDL rules quite a bit. Oddly enough I took the regular test back in the 90’s but had the class 2 non CDL (which allowed towing over 10k lbs.) I asked how I got it and the women said it just mattered how the paperwork was filled out.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Are there really any RV trailers that weigh 20,000+ lbs.?

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        Yeah. Some of my Elks brethren have huge fifth-wheel trailers on three axles.

        Some loaded trailers actually weigh more than the tow vehicles. Kinda like the tail wagging the dog going down the road.

        But the trailer doesn’t have to be an RV trailer. It could be a 16-horse trailer or a flatbed trailer for hauling cars, pallets of bricks, etc.

        Most I ever towed with my half-ton Silverado, F150 and Tundra on flat roads was around 14,000 pounds of palletized bricks, tile, thinset and grout. And that felt like the tail wagging the dog when slowing down.

        • 0 avatar
          Drzhivago138

          Our 400+ bushel grain trailer weighs 22K when fully loaded with corn and we pull it with a RC F-350 weighing just over 6300 (yes, it’s over the GVWR for a 1-ton…shh, don’t tell anyone!). We’ve never felt it wagging, but that’s probably because the fastest we’ve ever gone is 65 for a short length of two-lane highway.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Ideally, the electric&hydraulic brakes on the trailer should keep the tail from wagging the dog.

            So, often during the transition from pulling the trailer to being pushed by trailer drivers will reach for the little handle on their electric brake actuator for a controlled slow-down.

            All the larger utility trailers I owned in the past had a hydraulic master cylinder attached to the sliding yoke to activate the trailer’s hydraulic brakes.

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            Yep, electric brakes will always help. Plus, ’08 was the first year the ETB controller was standard.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Is there any combination of the following:

          Elk
          Moose
          Shriner
          Mason

          Which is not allowed?

          Note: As I child, when I would see Shriners at a parade, I thought they were people who happened to be visiting from Morocco for the parade event, as they were clearly wearing Moroccan hats like that cartoon bear from Secret Squirrel.
          http://www.papermag.com/uploaded_images/SECRET%20SQUIRREL%20COLOR%203.jpg

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Corey, I’m a member of the local Elks Lodge and the Moose Lodge and have been since around 1966. Also the local VFW since 1968, and SERTOMA since 1980.

            I am the only one in my family who is not a Scottish Rite Mason. My four brothers are, to the 32nd or 33rd degree.

            You can be a member of all of them or none of them, whatever is a person’s pleasure and belief.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Thanks hdc.

            The Masons scare me a bit with all their secret things. One of those subjects I feel like I can’t discuss without sounding like a crazy person.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Secret Squirrel. Hahahahahaha.

            Morocco Mole wears the fez.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Even more reason for me to think he was Moroccan at the time! I forgot his name.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Corey, in defense of Free Masonry, be it Scottish Rite or Prince Hall, they do good work.

            Many of my friends are one or the other, among them some of my poker-playing buddies.

            I was busy enough doing what I did without joining the Masons and didn’t need all the traveling. Nor did I want to take the Electric Carpet ride.

            But that’s just me.

            Yes, they are secretive but they have humanity’s best interest at heart.

            It’s a brotherhood with a secret handshake that instantly identifies its members among strangers, even without the Mason’s Ring.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    That center arm rest. I had to calm me broughamitis with an Imperialebaronine 400mg.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      Haha

      I recently sat in a ’12 F150 Limited crewcab at a carmax dealer with my gf when we were there looking at something else. Red perforated leather seats, auto-extending side steps, the whole 9 yards. As tacky and as gaudy as it was, I REALLY liked sitting in this thing. I don’t know what it is but I’m finding myself seriously thinking about a pickup as my next vehicle. Crazy, I guess I’m finally fully assimilating into midwestern-ness. I was doing all the usual justifications in my head “well we’re gonna have a house with some acreage and a shop so I’m gonna need something to tow a flatbed with for tractors, atvs and such.”

  • avatar
    ajla

    “My Saab is rated to tow that.”

    Maybe give that the asterisk that your Saab is a 9-7x Aero.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      *AKA TrailBlazer Unlimited Elite

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      And remember that serious people try not to tow *at their vehicle’s limit*, because that tends to be stressful.

      The 2/3 capacity rule of thumb seems like a good idea for not, say, overheating brakes or coolant systems, especially in a vehicle that isn’t towing-optimized.

      (I’d run my (07) F250 at capacity all day, if needed, because it has the same transmission as the vastly more tow-y diesel, and plenty adequate cooling.

      But that’s something of an outlier.)

      • 0 avatar
        Carlson Fan

        Depends where your towing as well. Big difference between cresting Vail pass on I70 leaving Denver than towing down interstate I35 here in MN when your talking about how much tow vehicle you need.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    I kinda want a Nimitz class truck.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      I can’t imagine piloting such a thing for daily use around town. It can’t be pleasant to try and park in even a generous sized space, nor would it fit in any parking garage. And it’s not even comfortable, or really that nice inside.

      A very specific tool for a very uncommon job/hobby (horses, boat racing, etc).

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        My dear boy you need a fleet and this is it’s flagship.

      • 0 avatar
        SaulTigh

        Amen. We have a F150 Super Crew and it’s fine but I can’t imagine driving anything bigger. Love to take it on trips (it’s a fantastic highway vehicle) but if we’re going to be doing things in tight, downtown areas we take my mid-size car instead. I can’t imagine piloting an F450 in a tight urban area, but then again tractor trailer and delivery drivers do it all the time.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Once in a while I have a feeling like this. Then I remember…

      1) the heaviest thing I ever need to carry is a few hundred pounds of gravel or dirt…
      2) I have no place at all to park one of these things, either where I live or where I’m usually going… and
      3) they handle, ride, and stop like, well, trucks.

      It would be fun to borrow one for a day, though.

      If I had a fleet, my load-carrying and towing vehicle would be a RCSB EcoBoost F-150, short enough to fit in a garage.

  • avatar
    April S

    Double the price of a base model truck. An overpriced base model truck at that.

    Truly amazing. And insane.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      I wouldn’t call $32K for an F-250 XL 4×2 overpriced, considering what you can do with an HD pickup, as well as the fact that the equivalent Chevy or GMC is $34K. The most basic Ram 2500 is just over $31K, but IMO the standard 5.7 Hemi is not equivalent to a 6.2 or 6.0. Adding the 6.4 on a Ram 2500 brings the MSRP up to $34K.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        I would say that the entry level HD trucks are some of the least over priced vehicles out there. The work they can do per dollar is staggering. I have purchased and leased both the GM and Ford versions for work. Never have I felt like the base models were unreasonably priced.

        The last HD truck that we purchased was an F350 XL SuperCab long bed with the 6.2L. The current version of that truck tows 12500 lbs and has a payload of up to 4400 lbs. All of that for about $36K.

        • 0 avatar
          April S

          Thing is the only hauling many of these trucks will be a bag of groceries from Wally World.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Not in the HD set. Most are used for actual work. Even if you see them not towing or hauling, chances are that it does that for a decent part of the year. Just because that F250 isn’t hooked up at a 5th wheel today, doesn’t mean that it isn’t 90-120 days a year.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I agree and its a pet peeve of mine too.

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      If you’re gonna go nuts, might as well go all the way. How much fun would superhero movies be if the villain was only a little bit loopy?

      One thing to note is that the F450 is really a medium-duty truck with a (modified to fit the frame) Super Duty cab and bed.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        If I had the need for it and could afford it, the F350 HD TurboDiesel Dually would be the truck I would buy, but not the King Ranch version.

        My oldest son is faced with that very choice today. Since giving his JGC SRT8 to his daughter he’s been using my Tundra to do some general hauling and towing.

        But eventually he’ll have to schit or get off the pot and decide if he wants to invest in a Ford F350 HD.

        He and his business partner have the need for it in their ranching business. His business partner already owns an old F350 Dually from the dark ages, but as long as it keeps running, he will continue to use it.

        Now my son will have to step up to the plate, or rent each time he has the need for one.

      • 0 avatar
        Sigivald

        Not this F450.

        The F450 has a GVWR of 14,000 pounds, which is the maximum for a light-duty truck (class 3).

        They can call it a “450” all they want – I understand their reasoning and don’t find it implausible – but it’s a class 3 truck.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      They’ll sell you a 3-series, or any-series for 2X over “base”, if overpaying is what you’re into. But remember *rebates* bring those darn pickups back to Earth.

      Except with these pickups, you are getting a crew cab, 4wd and diesel for all the extra cash. Just those 3 things are about $18,000 Msrp. But the important thing is they allow the crew cab and 4wd on the base truck, without forcing *anything*. And a V8 is always included.

      For businesses, ranches, farms, etc, pickups are a tax write-off. To some degree, the more expensive the better. Then you’ve got pensioners looking for the maximum luxury RV rig, because they’ve worked hard all their life and wish not to leave their adult kids fighting over their fortune.

      • 0 avatar
        Mandalorian

        HD trucks are used for actual work. As many of you point out, they are quite expensive so the owners don’t often have the luxury of additionally buying a Camry to run to the grocery store with. Keep in mind the WORKDAY may be 9-5, but the DAY is 24 hours.

  • avatar
    djoelt1

    In about 15 years, we are going to look back and laugh at the size truck people thought they needed for trundling along to their office job and Walmart.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      I don’t think you can claim that for this particular item. The people who buy these and the other two brand competitors DO use them for work.

      The F150 in higher trims and quad cab? Yeah that’s a grocery and shop item. Not this one.

      • 0 avatar
        Drzhivago138

        Careful with what you call a quad cab. If you mean crew cab, remember that Ram’s Quad Cab is actually an extended cab that tricks buyers into thinking it’s a crew.

        I wouldn’t pay $60K for an optioned-out F-150 Platinum, but it can do pretty much every job as easily as a $32K CCSB XL if you ask it to. Pigeonholing all luxury-trim pickups as grocery-getters is oversimplifying the situation.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          :( To me, truck with >2 doors = crew or quad cab. These terms are almost interchangeable.

          Truck with =2 doors and extended bit behind seats = extended cab.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          I find the rear seats on the Ram QC and Tudra DC to be more comfortable than the Ford extended cabs (haven’t been in the GM version in awhile). The Toyota’s is especially well done.

          But yea, they aren’t the full crew cabs.

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            I know the ’97-’03 Ford SuperCab seats are very upright and cramped, which was normal for the time. Chevy/GMC’s ext. cabs were always the largest of anybody’s (22″ vs. 18″ for Ford and Dodge), but the 400, 800 and 900 trucks all sat bolt-upright. All the extended cab models have gotten much longer, about as much legroom as a small midsize sedan, which almost makes up for the upright seating.

        • 0 avatar
          SC5door

          In ’98 Dodge offered the “Quad Cab” in addition to the “Club” cab which offered suicide doors on the rear along with the standard cab on the 1500/2500/3500 Series. Club cabs did not have any rear opening doors.

          It gets tricky because in ’00 they began offering a Dakota “Club Cab” and Quad Cab which was a true crew cab truck, but still offered the Ram in same configuration that came out in ’98.

          In ’02 they began offering the “Quad Cab” with the conventional doors but the way it was marketed was against the extended cab trucks from Ford and GM being easier for entry and exit….plus the fact that you could now operate your own window in the back. Chrysler attempted to remedy this by offering a “1500” Mega Cab. The Dakota retained the “Quad Cab” designation for the crew cabs until at least 2007.

          Standard, Quad and Crew is offered now on the Ram 1500. While 2500/3500 gets Standard, Crew and Mega Cabs—Quad Cab was deleted from the HD series.

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            Hey hey, another truck geek! I knew all that already, but that’s right, it’s all very confusing if you don’t know what’s what.

            Toyota did a similar move with their shuffling of “Xtra,” “Access,” and “Double Cab” names.

          • 0 avatar
            SC5door

            “Hey hey, another truck geek!”

            I miss my 5.9L Dakota Quad Cab….ok my wallet doesn’t miss stopping at every gas station. What a beast in the snow though!

      • 0 avatar
        djoelt1

        Well, there’s real work and fake work. Fake work includes things like me towing my race car to the track for a fun weekend and the like. Towing recreational equipment, horses, tailgating party stuff, etc – that’s fake work. I.e. work that improves the quality of life of the “worker” but work that would fall by the wayside if there were a serious attempt to restrain carbon emissions. The real work would be done using the lightest vehicle possible, not the heaviest. I’m imagining contractors using Ford Transit style vans but with a flatbed instead of an enclosed area – a lighter vehicle with the necessary utility for the job.

    • 0 avatar
      Brumus

      And in about 15 minutes we are going to look back and laugh at your inane comment that these are primarily used for Walmart or KFC runs.

  • avatar
    bball40dtw

    People that think that a truck like this lives a pampered life driving to an office and Costco are dead wrong. Most of these HD trucks live a tortured existence of being ridden hard and put away wet. They get a life of 200K brutal miles, made up of towing things that weight 4 times as much as the average car or being laden with tools and concrete. All the while, they perform their tasks with aplomb. By the time they go to the crusher, they have done more work than all the cars the average car owner owns in his or her lifetime combioned.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      The XL, XLT and maybe a few Lariat trucks get really tortured. The King Ranches and Platinums probably spend more of their time pulling 3-axle campers or boats, but IMO that’s just as valid a use for them as anything else. The high price tag both to buy and to keep them fueled means that most of the time, you’ll only use them for what they were intended.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        Right. Pulling a 5th wheel or a giant boat still requires a specialized tool. Those high end trucks aren’t beaten on as much, but they still put in significant work.

        What lives a pampered life, in comparison, is full size SUVs. My wife’s next vehicle will be a Navigator or Expedition, and it will tow all of 5 times a year.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          @bball

          I thought you would enjoy this, its from the local sale at BAA:

          2013 FORD POLICE 6G SUV A PS PB AC HT AWD 95,031 BLUE $10,100

          Still ten fracking grand. I can remember when the Panthers would do 4 at 100K.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Goodness gracious. 100K hard miles and still $10K…

            I wonder if I could buy it, take it’s sweet sweet wheels and tires, find a cheap set of take offs, and sell it for a but of a profit. Hmmmmmmm.

            I really want a set of the Explorer PI wheels.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            That’s what I’m saying. Here’s another oddball:

            2001 BMW X5 3.0L 6G 4CUV A PS PB AC SR AWD 236,061 MAROON $1,600

            Really?

            Edit: Aren’t police wheels steelies? I’m pretty sure that’s what they are here.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            5 spoke 18″ steelies with a sweet chrome center cap.

            Also, who the [email protected] wants a 2001 X5 with 236K miles on the clock? That $hit has to be going to Africa.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Maybe, but 16 bucks is nothing in the grand scheme. The issue would be reconditioning costs, if they were low you could sweet talk someone stupid/poor into it for $3,500 or more. I’ve seen it happen.

          • 0 avatar
            CoastieLenn

            “2013 FORD POLICE 6G SUV A PS PB AC HT AWD 95,031 BLUE $10,100”

            Isn’t this an Explorer based Police Interceptor? 6G meaning 6cyl gas engine? That’s a deal and a half! Sure, there’s 95k miles on this thing but even with half of that, the civilian models are priced at nearly $30k for the base model Explorers (steelies, cloth interior, no fog lights, etc.).

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            It certainly has flip potential. $1600 is dirt cheap.

            CoastieLenn-

            Yeah, it’s actually a deal. I see civilian versions of the Explorer Base going for way more. The PI model will have some upgrades over the Base too. Some downgrades as well (no idea what the back seat situation is).

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Police vehicles generally trade for much less because they are not usually in the best condition. I wouldn’t touch that particular thing for any amount of money. Once these are out of warranty the depts are not doing all of the routine maintenance (ie fluid changes) and frequently they are running on extremely cheap tires once the factory ones give out.

            Additional:

            2002 NISSAN XTERRA SE SC 6GT SUV A PS PB AC SR 4X4 264,751 SILVER $1,400

            6GT is gas turbo, I didn’t know Nissan had a turbo Xterra in 2002.

          • 0 avatar
            bumpy ii

            “6GT is gas turbo, I didn’t know Nissan had a turbo Xterra in 2002.”

            Supercharger.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            You don’t want the SC Xterra anyway. They had enough problems in regular variation.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Thanks. Evidently even with problems those were good runners at 264K. PITA cars get junked long before 200k from the period.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            One more:

            2006 HUMMER H2 8G BBOW A PS PB AC SR 4X4 113,928 YELLOW $20,300

            I think commentator Hummer will be surprised.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Hummers are going for $20K? Dang. GM really FUBAR’d that brand. It was the best chance anyone had to take on Jeep. It was the only brand with military cache like Jeep.

            Is that the price with or without all the aftermarket chrome? I kid, I kid.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            That one did and an H3 did 18,5.

            2008 HUMMER H3 8G SUV A PS PB AC SR 4X4 93,255 BURGUNDY $18,500

            I suspect its because GM nuked the brand that they are doing so well. H3 I believe was on the GMT355 and was almost the only way to get a V8 on that platform.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          All this discussion is making me think of the caravan adventure in Top Gear. How there were all the little Shogun diesels and Vitaras, and a Discovery here or there. People pulling things with a Kia Rio wagon, or a Carina…

          But in the background of one of the shots was a Ram 2500. I want to meet the sort of British person who makes that choice.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            The caravanning adventures were peak Top Gear. The British person that makes that choice probably spends time at dude ranches in the American Southwest when on holiday.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            “If the caravan begins to weave about and dictate the direction of travel, you have a snake.”

            “…No, you have a crash.”

            “What is this a Kia… Seduko.”
            “Cerato.”
            “It’s NOT a good car, James.”

            “It’s not a pan fire, now it’s a van fire.”

            LOL, I have that whole thing memorized. American Southwest tourist Nigel sounds fun.

          • 0 avatar
            matador

            So, I shouldn’t use Castrol GTX to cook with?

    • 0 avatar
      thelaine

      +1 bball. There is no shortage of anti pickup truck bias. F350s are purchased for towing and hauling. Some commenters cannot distinguish between this truck and an F150, but they just can’t stand pickups, so they spew.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        Dudes rolling coal doesn’t help the perception, but I don’t judge all sport compact owners by the fart can and wing crowd.

        Even if someone wants to buy a half ton to drive to work, who the [email protected] cares? Maybe they have other reasons to like that vehicle that doesn’t involve what’s between their legs. I’ll just never get the hate.

    • 0 avatar
      tresmonos

      This comment is the first relevant one I’ve read. Being a supplier and doing warranty analysis on the P473 platform was truly entertaining. I’d say over 40% of the warranty was the truck being pushed beyond it’s designed capability. I once got a power steering line wrapped around a small tree back in a over sized box.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        I would have guessed higher than 40%. Construction guys try to pull a backhoe, load the bed with gear and tools, and carry 4 guys in the cab. It goes well until it doesn’t. Or sometimes it goes well for as long as you own the truck.

        I’ve talked to Danio about this, but one of my favorite TSBs relating to the P473 was the elevated tread wear on the stock Pirelli tires when equipped with the 6.7L diesel. I think the TSB basically said, “400 HP and 800 lb-ft of torque may reduce treadlife of tires.” Hahahaha.

    • 0 avatar
      NoGoYo

      I’m sure a 4×4 half ton CAN plow snow, but 3/4 and 1 ton trucks are the way to go for plowing, and even in southeastern Pennsylvania snow can really pile up during the winter.

      Plowing is definitely harder work than going to the grocery store.

      • 0 avatar
        Drzhivago138

        I’ve seen a lot of ’80s Blazers with a snowplow kit, but they’re on their last legs. The nice SWB of a Blazer or Bronco for turning in a parking lot doesn’t make up for the abuse the front axle is taking. Back in their day, IH made RCSB 3/4 ton trucks. I’ll bet a lot of them got put on snowplow duty.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          “IH made RCSB 3/4 ton trucks. I’ll bet a lot of them got put on snowplow duty.”

          Yes! For 2.5 winters, then they were too rusty.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            2.5 months

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            #shotsfired

            Our preferred snow removal setup for our gravel driveways is a large snowblower mounted on the 3-point of a JD 7410, with heated cab, thank you very much. I usually get put on concrete driveway duty, but as of last year, that’s in a Mustang 2056 skid loader, also with heated cab.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            DrZ-

            That is the way to do it.

            Also, after visiting the JD worksite attachment page, I have decided that I really miss my skid steer loader. I need another one with many attachments.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        The snow plow prep options on half tons are meant for personal use only. I’d use one if I had a super long driveway in Northern Michigan, but I wouldn’t use one as a commercial plow company. That is just a fast way to kill a perfectly good half ton pickup.

        Actually, if I have a long driveway, property and cash, I want a tractor or skid loader with a snow thrower attachment. I could tow it places with my F350 4×4!

        https://www.deere.com/en_US/products/attachment/worksite_pro_attachments/snow_blowers/snow_blowers.page

      • 0 avatar
        Carlson Fan

        1/2 tons don’t hold up very well to plowing. The front ends wear out prematurely due to the weight of the plow and the transmissions are tortured with all the D to R , back D, then back to R, you get it.

        • 0 avatar

          1/2 tons plowing snow are rare here in CT but for some reason in upper New England they are popular in fact Dodge sold a half ton plow package for a few years as a Maine only option (late 90’s) The trouble is the guys that have to plow tight parking lots and driveways. Many of them run older 1/2 tons RcSB or things like Previous gen Colorados with Plows I assume they repair them alot but they get the job done.

          • 0 avatar
            mikeg216

            Chevy for and Dodge all sell half ton plow packages meant for driveway use. It’s not that a half ton can’t plow adequately… It’s that they lack the front solid axle that they once had. Hanging 600lbs off the front end of your truck will wear things out quickly. Due to the Solid axles the jeep wrangler makes for an excellent plow vehicle

  • avatar
    redmondjp

    It is absolutely incredible that today’s F-350 puts up 0-60 (7.6 sec) and 60-0 mph times equivalent to or better than a lot of 1960s muscle cars! Here are some 1960s cars’ 0-60 times for comparison:

    1969 Mach 1 Mustang 351 7.5 sec
    1967 Camaro Z28 7.7 sec
    1968 Jensen Interceptor 7.7 sec
    1964 Ferrari 500 V12 7.8 sec
    1966 Pontiac GTO 7.9 sec

    And hauling 3-4 tons down from 60 to zero in under 200 feet is simply phenomenal.

    We are living in the golden age of automotive performance right now, that’s for sure.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      That is an impressive comparison. The next generation will be even quicker too.

    • 0 avatar
      SaulTigh

      Most family sedans are quicker than that these days, even with base engines. Thank God the days of trundling around in wheezing, under powered sedans is over. I lived in that era. My mom had an ’82 Celebrity making 112 whopping horsepower and by 1987 it was dying and required her stick a rolled up newspaper in the choke to get it started. Only 5 years old.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    This is such a piece of Americana. Only in America do private citizens regularly shuttle objects weighing over five tons around the countryside. And that’s a good thing! It’s much easier to have horse or boat hobbies here, or to tour the country in your own trailer.

    But it also comes with disadvantages, such as the many operators of these trucks who have no commercial-vehicle training and drive them in a wildly irresponsible way. No, 400+ horsepower and mountain-moving torque does not mean it’s SAFE to tow your RV trailer or large boat, riding on trailer tires, at 95 mph (a depressingly frequent sight in these parts). No, even if your giant truck will do 0-60 in seven seconds, you shouldn’t be tailgating and weaving through traffic as though you were a teenager driving a fart-can WRX. (See Alex’s stopping distance.) And, no, your real 4WD system with locking diffs does not mean you can cruise downhill from the top of Stevens Pass at 70 mph in January.

    (For the record, I’m a current CDL B holder, licensed to drive any vehicle except a semi, and drove buses professionally for five years.)

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Your post made me think about those giant charter bus size RVs I see driving about with some regularity, with grandma and grandpop at the front of the large glass forward viewing parlor.

      I wonder if you have to get a CDL to drive round in one of those. And they have to cost $250,000+.

      • 0 avatar
        Drzhivago138

        No, you don’t need a CDL, scarily enough. Elmer and Gertrude, who haven’t driven anything bigger than a Park Avenue all their lives, are now in command of a true land barge.

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A9z78d7tp_A

        They start at $100K, IIRC.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Aww Gert. I bet she makes good oatmeal cookies.

          1) That is utterly terrifying there’s no requirement, and this should be corrected by the states. Especially given the average age of ownership of those beasts has to be mid-60’s.

          2) The integrated screen door is adorable on that video.

          3) This weekend I watched my first Regular Car Review (sort of by accident), on an imported ’86 190E 2.0. I found the poncy way the guy went on and on about it’s purity irritating, but loved the Euro-only wheel covers.

          I was also annoyed that someone would go to such trouble to import a -worse- version (though unique) which looked exactly like the thing sold here, except with less equipment. It wasn’t even a diesel.

          It would be like importing something from Germany because it was available with cloth seats and a worse engine there, and not here.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            The mid-’80s was peak gray market (gray market importation was banned in 1988). A lot of Euro-spec German cars got imported by importers of varying scrupulousness, and were often less well-equipped than the U.S.-spec versions.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I forgot about the grey market thing entirely. If I were bringing something over in 86, it had better have yellow headlamps like France and plaid seats.

            I do recall reading that Mercedes was the prime lobbyist for grey market banning, as their cars were the most popular for that.

          • 0 avatar
            matador

            It could be worse- there is a farmer’s exemption in our state now. I’m a farmer, and support them, buth they’ve gone too far the other way.

            I, with my regular Class C license, could now legally drive a semi for farm use. We had our grain hauled in a 40′ semi this year. It tipped the scales around 98,000 pounds. I’ve seen people straight out of high school driving them. It can’t end well….

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        A CDL is not hard to get. At least in Michigan. Written exam and a skills test. Just like getting a regular license. Just costs $25. You have to supply the vehicle that has a GVWR of 26,001+ though. I was 18 when I got mine. I couldn’t operate across state lines until 21 though.

        • 0 avatar
          Drzhivago138

          That’s similar to here in MN, but it might be a little more expensive. And I think (maybe) the over-26K-GVWR vehicle has to be articulated.

          In my father’s day (early 80s), you could take the CDL driving test with a pickup truck and gooseneck trailer ._.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            This is all the State of Michigan specifies for vehicles when it comes to CDL testing:

            “You must supply an empty vehicle with a GVWR representative of the type you plan to drive (including a trailer if required), with at least two permanently mounted seats. Safety belts are required for both the driver and examiner (except for the examiner on buses).

            Applicants applying for the P-Passenger endorsement must pass skills tests in a bus-type vehicle with a seating capacity of 16 or more passengers, including the driver.

            Applicants applying for the S-School bus endorsement must pass skills tests in a school bus-type vehicle with a seating capacity of 16 or more passengers, including the driver.”

            LOL Michigan. We also let you register pretty much anything as vehicle that can be driven on roads. Hot dog car with engine may pass.

          • 0 avatar
            matador

            Today, you could make that legitimate argument at a CDL testing center.

      • 0 avatar
        RideHeight

        “the large glass forward viewing parlor.”

        Exactly. Always reminds me of grandma and grandpa watching through the storm door as we left to go back home.

        Something powerfully wistful about it.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        Most states have a specific exception to the CDL requirement for RVs.

        In my experience, though, old couples in RVs are a lot less scary on the road than jacked younger dudes in HD pickups with big heavy trailers. They are often rolling roadblocks, but they don’t usually cause safety problems.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          I don’t see people with trailers much around here. I guess I’d have to go further out of town for that. When I visit small town Indiana it’s more common, because the majority of people there are idiots.

        • 0 avatar
          Drzhivago138

          That’s true. Most of them drive 60 because either they know the limits of the machine or their own skills, or they remember when 55 was the national limit and they still operate under that assumption. It’s only when one tries to pass another that you run into problems.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          “Most states have a specific exception to the CDL requirement for RVs.”

          It’s called an Endorsement, or limitation (like eye-glasses).

          If you are licensed to operate an RV or School Bus, you cannot operate a 40-ton Tractor/Trailer combination.

          But if you are licensed for Tractor/Trailer on your CDL, you can drive anything up to 40-tons.

          In my state you have to have a Motorcycle endorsement even if you already have a Tractor/Trailer CDL with Hazardous Cargo endorsements. It’s crazy.

          I got my CDL in 1985 by attending Truck Driving School in residence in Phoenix, AZ. Cost me $3K total and I had to drive cargo with a partner for 5000 miles after getting my CDL in AZ, before being certified to operate on my own.

          After that it was just renewal every four to eight years.

      • 0 avatar
        SaulTigh

        This actually doesn’t bother me. Racking my brain, but I don’t think I’ve every seen an RV that size driven in a reckless manner. Who knew?

    • 0 avatar
      87 Morgan

      Here in CO and some of the other western states tandem trailering is permitted. You see a F350 with a four wheeler in the bed or a bunch of motor cross bikes with a bumper pull camper that has a boat hitched to it. I forget the length limit, I want to say 78 feet. My wife and I call them the professional recreators. In the summer it is very routine to see 150k worth of toys being towed down the highway.

      With the mountains, it is truly amazing the abuse these rigs will take.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    I do see the appeal of these HDs. Would I own one. No, if I was required to tow significant loads I would buy a truck that would do the work I expected without towing.

    I would then look at a smaller pickup for many of the errands required.

    I do like the PowerStroke diesels. They are nice.

    I had a twin cab 250 SuperDuty in Vegas with the diesel. I thought the acceleration was adequate. Driving it though was another story. Why would you buy such a large vehicle as a daily driver? Some do.

    The easiest place I found to park the pickup was at Bass Pro. But the Bass Pro parking lot was more or less just pickups.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Take away the touch screen and that becomes an ancient looking interior.

    The faux wood look simply horrific in the pictures – and the glove box area treatment screams cheap hard plastic.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Well, it’s still ancient looking with the touch screen in there. That thing is just grafted on. It’s like someone put a double DIN touch screen radio on a 2005 Explorer.

      Ford did a much better job hiding the old bones in the interior of the Navigator and Expedition.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      It’s a 2008 interior. Hard plastic and faux wood are expected in this segment. Surely that’s at least better than a sticker?

      http://www.lov2xlr8.no/brochures/ford/81fp/bilder/3.jpg

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      “The faux wood look simply horrific in the pictures – and the glove box area treatment screams cheap hard plastic.”

      Thing is, the guys that actually buy these “new”, prefer hard plastics. Why? Because they last forever(durable) and are easy to clean.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    The tow limits in the US and licencing system appears a little archaic. Here the country is standardising many regualtions across all of the states and territories.

    I do know a trailer hooked up to a tow hitch is limited to 4.5 tonnes. That’s the largest load that can be towed. A fifth wheel arrangement is different.

    What this has done is removed the “tow war” out of the system and improves vehicle safety. Also many of our load and tow limits are matched to our licencing system. So many vehicle regulations align to operator and licencing regulations.

    Real trucks can tow pigs and dogs, but the hitching setup is far different.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      We also have different fifth-wheel and bumper-hitch ratings.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Do Australian trucks and commercial vehicles use SAE J2807 towing standards?

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        bball40dtw,
        No, we don’t use a heavily industry supported regime or model. Our regulators appear to be more independent of the industry.

        Don’t get me wrong, industry should have input. But, look at the VW saga and self regulation. I do believe many of the tow limits set out in the US, even the SAE limits are quite large.

        I support a system where there is a maximum tow limit based on the Class of the vehicle.

        The figures I’m giving are rudimentary, a guess;

        Class 1 – 7 500lbs

        Class 2 – 10 000lbs

        Class 3 – 15 000lbs, etc.

        But devise a system through research and engineering that would probasbly differ from my figures.

        This would still encourage manufacturers to design the best, lightest, most economical, etc vehicle to suit the limits. This would also improve vehicle safety and reduce fatalities.

        I’m also a member of SAE, probably as many who comment on TTAC. SAE have done a lot of great work.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      “The tow limits in the US and licencing system appears a little archaic”

      I’ve never heard of any limits. Since 1988 I have rigged my half-ton pickup trucks with a fifth-wheel plate, a gooseneck ball and a DrawTite Class IV load-leveler. Yup, all of them on one pickup truck.

      That doesn’t mean I can pull what an F350 can pull. But I can pull them empty or up to MY GVWR. And I have done so many times. My oldest son is doing it now, shuttling equipment and livestock to/from different locations.

      No cop has ever pulled me over for pulling a 16-horse trailer (empty) behind my half-ton pickup trucks over the decades.

      I don’t know of any limits. Maybe just limits to good judgment, like finding a travel trailer and half-ton Silverado rolled over in a ditch along Hwy 54.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        Hwy 54 is a lonely stretch of road. Not a place I’d like to roll a truck.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          Wrecks happen on Hwy 54 with alarming regularity. Just within the last few months the state reduced the speed limit to 70mph.

          Since most traffic cruises at 85mph or better, this is great for mining the highway and fattening up the state’s coffers.

          But it also was aimed at reducing accidents caused by excessive towing speeds, crosswinds and white line hypnosis.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            There are a bunch of highways like that out west. I’ve spent a lot of time hiking in the Arizona-New Mexico-Texas corridor. So many lonely highways.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            How about a separate speed limit for those who are trolling, errr I mean trailering?

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            As long as we all go to the highest current posted speed limit.

            Michigan is considering raising some speed limits to 80 MPH. To be honest, some freeways in the Detroit area should be above that if they want to follow the 85th percentile rule.

          • 0 avatar
            sgeffe

            I-696 west of I-75 to I-275 (and likely beyond to I-96 to Lansing) clippety-clops at ~80 minimum (definitely west of U.S. 23 north of Ann Arbor fer sure), and M-14 between Plymouth and Ann Arbor ain’t too shabby either! (On a late Sunday afternoon in September last year, I set my ACC to its 90mph Vmax on that stretch, then just sat back and said life. Is. Good! :-) ) I understand that I-75 “up north” of the Tri-Cities is also somewhat more free-flowing nowadays versus thirty years ago, as well.

            An 80mph limit between downriver Detroit and the Ohio border would be perfect, with strictly enforced “keep right except to pass” rules once the construction on the various segments is complete. My ACC would be set ~82 or 83; that Accord will run all day at those speeds (and likely up to a buck-five or so, after which I’d be concerned about tire performance and emergency-braking capability — the brakes are better on this generation of Accord than previous, but they would still wimp-out hauling down to 30mph from 100mph without drama and possible rotor warpage) with no complaints!

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    This vehicle is so far from my experience, yet I enjoyed the review. I may as well have been reading about a Ferrari or something.

    One thing I’ll say: people who drive these things mean business, and they Get Stuff Done. I admire and respect that.

  • avatar
    Carlson Fan

    Wow I was appalled in the video at how poorly designed the flip down rear seating is. That sucks! The 60/40 rear seat in my GMC crew gets flipped down all the time. i couldn’t live with a design like that.

    Good thing Ford is coming out with a new HD truck. Everything about that cab inside and out just looks old & dated. Again I’m amazed that Ford continues to own HD segment with this crude offering.

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