By on July 22, 2015

2015 Chevrolet Silverado

The Chevrolet Silverado has outsold the Ford F-150 so far this year, but sales of Ford’s Super Duty trucks have boosted the company’s truck business past its competition, PickupTrucks.com is reporting.

All three truck makers are selling more pickups than they were a year ago, but flagging F-150 sales and depleted inventory could be keeping Ford’s perennial half-ton leader back.

The website, which used data from Cars.com to determine sales by segment, said that Ford’s Super Duty trucks led Ram and General Motor’s heavy-duty offerings by a large margin. Roughly 120,000 three-quarter and full-ton Ford pickups have been purchased this year, compared to around 80,000 and 75,000 heavy-duty trucks for Ram and General Motors, respectively.

Earlier this month, Ford offered a series of incentives totaling $11,000 on its F-150 in specific areas for specific models. A spokesman for Ford said that dealer stocks of the full-size F-150 pickups were unusually low, and that normal inventories would be restored by the end of September.

According to our own Timothy Cain, truck sales represent around 14 percent of overall vehicle sales in the United States, up one percentage point from last year. And the average price paid for a truck is $42,429 so far this year.

So who’s ready for a $100,000 pickup?

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

42 Comments on “Super Duty Buoys Flagging F-150 Sales for Ford...”


  • avatar
    DenverMike

    The Silverado has been eating the F-150’s Fleet Lunch, so far this year. Except GM should be aiming for the F-series’ #1 in profitability standings. I don’t see GM giving up the #2 spot in over all taxable profits, no matter how many fullsize pickups GM drops on the market.

  • avatar
    srh

    For me the problem is that the F-150, nicely equipped, has priced itself into the F-250/F-350 space. When I was looking for a truck recently, going with a F-150 over a diesel F-350 was not a significant savings. And the availability of a long-bed on the crewcab sealed the deal.

    $52K in cash later, and I’m walking out the door with a well optioned 4×4 CC LWB 6.7L Lariat F-350 (with a sticker in the mid $60Ks, for those playing the $100K truck game). A similarly equipped F-150 of course doesn’t exist, but foregoing the long-bed and the diesel, and I’m paying mid-40s for appreciably less truck with appreciably more rapid depreciation.

    Do I /need/ the superduty’s super-powers? No. But they’ll come in handy a few dozen times and for the small price difference and the much better resale value… Why not?

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      Formerly the Super Duty was $900 premium over the F-150 when equipped as closely as possible. Both with the 5.4 V8 when they both had them. Except right now expect dramatic savings with the Super Duty over the F-150. But expect the all new aluminum Super Duty (next model year) to normalize the price/rebate difference once again.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      As long as you’re happy driving (and parking) something that’s 22 feet long, your logic is compelling. Length of a LWB crew cab seems to me like the big drawback. It wouldn’t fit front-to-back in any parking space I ever park in. But then again I really don’t live in truck country.

    • 0 avatar

      Or you could be a nice Corvette. It’s all about what you want/need. You could get a 450 PU or an 550 with stake body for just a little more. Hard to declare it’s always a better deal

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    Ford SuperDuty has always outsold the competition rather handily. It isn’t the first time that GM 1/2 tons has outsold Ford 1/2 tons. It used to be the norm.

    • 0 avatar
      EquipmentJunkie

      You’re correct.

      I find it very interesting to see Ram doing so well in the 3/4- and 1-ton segments. I can believe those numbers based on what I see in my area. I know that I’d notice more of the HD GMs since they’re styled so awkwardly.

      • 0 avatar
        derekson

        I think a lot of the Ram strength in HD is due to the Cummins engine and the reputation that brings. This especially seems dot help them when Ford dropped the ball on the early Powerstroke diesels. I think they lost a lot of HD diesel buyers in a few years with the reliability issues there.

        • 0 avatar
          bumpy ii

          Yep, there are a lot of people who buy the Cummins I6 and put up with the truck wrapped around it. There are also kits to swap the Cummins into those POS Powerstroke Fords. Should be interesting to see what happens with the Nissan Titan when the Cummins V8s hit the street.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      Lou_BC,
      If Ford can not devise a way to boost consumer confidence in the new 2015 aluminium F-150, reduce labour and production costs, etc expect the new aluminium Ford HD SuperDutys to be selling in low numbers, aka aluminium F-150 style.

      Ford screwed up with the new 2015 aluminium F-150 and it appears they will screw up the new aluminium HDs.

      Ford has lost the way with it’s most important asset…….the consumer.

      It seems the best possible and most profitable light commercials Ford will have left is the global Ranger and Transits………but they are steel.

  • avatar
    Firestorm 500

    Sometimes a dealer in a town near me advertises a crew cab dually Ram 3500 gas, country boy loaded, for $36,900.

  • avatar
    tomLU86

    I thought that COMBINED Chevy/GMC full-size pick-ups were outselling the F150.

    You wrote the Chevy Silverado is outselling it. That doesn’t sound right.

    Can you elaborate a little? Provide some data. I find that interesting..

    BTW, if I was buying a truck, I would get a Chevy

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      You ask too many questions here. Not much research was done, just a link to a poorly researched article. Except mucho calories would be burnt separating 1/2 ton sales from HDs, charting history, etc.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      tomLU86,
      The 1/2 ton Silverado is outselling the F-150 alone without any assistance from any other GM pickup, ie, GMC, C twins, HDs.

      Pickuptrucks.com has given some data over the past couple of weeks regarding the question you posed, as I asked the same question on PUTC.

      If you remove the “old” steel and much more profitable and popular 2014 F-150 from the total F-150 numbers the new 2015 aluminium F-150 is selling in Ram numbers.

      This is bad for Ford.

      The new 2015 aluminium F-150 is not selling in GM size numbers, actually it is far off.

      Now the incentives offered on the new 2015 aluminium F-150, especially the largest selling segment of the 1/2 ton market indicates Ford has overestimated the confidence the consumer holds in this product.

      Then add the fact the new 2015 aluminium F-150 is only competitive with the existing pickups and not a generational leap like it should of been, with some manufacturing issues, high labour input which lowers productivity you can see why Ford has a large problem, larger than Ford is prepared to admit to.

  • avatar
    64andahalf

    Is there a reason for the square wheel wells? An honest question here…

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      Adds yet more horizontal lines to make it look lower. Ford has been #1 by default, so could care less about differentiation. Ram locked in the “look as tall as a Peterbilt” crowd, so GM figured the “really prefer a car but need a truck” market was the most underserved.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Only 14 comments? Are we all suffering from Ford pickup exhaustion?

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I think the next generation of F250-350 Super Duties could very easily go to 100k if they offer a Limited Platinum King Ranch Lariat XLT I-Watch Windows 10 trim level all in one package with vibrating heated and cooled leather seats and add lots of plastic chrome with LED lights front, back and sides. I have confidence that Ford can be the first to break the 100k ceiling and eventually exceed it. Add a super charged turbo EcoBoost V-6 and LED lighted steps on the back and LED lighted running boards. If Ford does this and they sell then I will buy at least a couple of hundred shares of their stock. Please Ford go ahead, I know you can do this and break this cycle of low level 65k trucks with a mere Limited badge.

  • avatar
    stuki

    Perhaps Ford underestimated the conservativeness of the truck buying public. The Superduty is ancient, even by slower changing HD pickup standards, while the F150 is cutting edge. No wonder latest-and-greatest tech obsessed Europeans fail to understand the US pickup market.

    Or, it could simply be that incentives on the aging and about to be replaced Superduty is much more appealing than the relative lack thereof for F150s. If not, I but the next-gen alu Superduty designers are more than a little concerned.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      The Super Duty trucks have not yet been redesigned, so they are not affected by the F-150’s inventory teething problems. This is genuinely a supply issue.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        If it were a supply issue only, why would there be large incentives on certain trim levels?

        I’m prepared to believe it’s taking awhile to ramp up, but I’d think if they had the expected demand trouble ramping up would just mean trucks would go out the door at or over MSRP.

        • 0 avatar
          Pch101

          I will repeat my dismay that some auto reporters have been duped by a limited promotion.

          When there isn’t enough inventory, customers go to the competition. Ford seems to have a fairly serious inventory problem, so much so that they are going to lose customers who are annoyed that they can’t get the options that they want. This is a particular problem for trucks because the option packages are so varied and the number of domestic dealers is high, which necessitates a considerable volume of inventory in order to attract and keep customers on the lot.

          Meanwhile, the rivals are competing aggressively on price. Hence, the bait-and-switch promotion that will not get you anything close to the big numbers in the advertising. Dealers have been baiting and switching customers like that for decades.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Pch101,
            So what you are in fact alluding to is;
            1. Ford has a low supply of the new 2015 aluminium F-150.

            2. Ford’s competitors are offereing better incentives so their pickups are moving off the lots in larger numbers.

            3. So…..because Ford has a supply issue, ie, low number of the new 2015 aluminium F-150 and in order to compete with it’s competitors Ford must reduce it’s prices?

            How does your version of supply and demand work??

            Your supply and demand model appears to be flawed and porous.

            How about this scenario that is afflicting Ford’s pricing policy.

            The new 2015 aluminium F-150 is not selling in quantities to keep pace with supply (manufacture). If Ford doesn’t reduce it’s pricing Ford with gradually build up a large supply of unsold new 2015 aluminium F-150s.

            Hey, but you think you are smart….Hmmmm, I don’t think so.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Pch’s point is that Ford is lacking variation of supply. Ford made the decision to have an initial product mix of more higher end trucks to maximize profits while supply was low. This was the right decision. Because of the frame issue and the loss of a year of fleet sales, the F150 is down. To make matters worse, GM and RAM are selling their trucks for cheap while Ford gets it’s stuff together.

            The discounts that have been talked about are on specific XLT SuperCrew models that have MSRPs anywhere from $44K-$50K+. Part of this is due to GM/RAM discounts, but it also has to do with the lack of options available. The three volume Ford dealers closest to me have under 100 F150s on their lots combined (none have regular cabs and SuperCrew trucks have finally outpaced SuperCab). It is also hard to find one with the options I would want. In order to get a sale, they are offering more off some models.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            BAFO isn’t even smart enough to figure out that I don’t read his responses. I wouldn’t bother trying to explain the auto industry to him — he simply won’t understand it, no matter how well you do it.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            bball40dtw,
            I don’t think so.

            Ford is selling less XLTs than the older and more popular steel F-150s.

            You Ford guys will need to adjust to a new Ford.

            Ford is also going backwards in many global markets.

            What changes over the past several years or so has been made at the top of Ford.

            This is where the problem lies, along with Ford’s marketing of over promising and not delivering.

            Ford screwed itself, now they are paying the price of producing Ram numbers of the new aluminium F-150 with thousands more people.

            Ford has a problem, many problems and issues that are compounding.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Pch101,
            The new 2015 aluminium F-150s with the largest incentives ARE NOT selling in the numbers of the old steel equivalents from Ford.

            It appears you again do have the correct information and are talking utter nonsense.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Right. XLT volume is down.

            For exactly the reasons I stated.

            Ford built up as much XL and XLT inventory as they could with the last gen and has been skewing production to high end (more profitable) trucks with the new model. Considering you can’t even buy some XLT configurations right now, I wouldn’t call this a long term problem.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            Bball must be a UAW chicken farmer.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Kickin’ ass for the poultry class…

            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_labor_slogans

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I wish I was a chicken farmer. Hipsters love them locally produced eggs. The egg dude at Eastern Market gets $7 for a dozen.

            I don’t want to know what organic, locally grown, cage free, pasture fed, boneless, skinless chicken breasts go for at farmer’s markets. $$$$$

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            You could use the $10,000 in rebates to start a chicken farm. Well, except you probably won’t find a truck that will be eligible for the $10,000 in rebates.

    • 0 avatar

      It’s all about production this time around. I’ve lost several sales (most ended up buying a used truck, but to Ford thats a lost sale) because I can’t even get basic regular cab 8′ bed trucks. Period. Non showing withing 300 dealers of me and I can’t order them. KC doesn’t start ’16 production until November I believe. So my belief is we pretty much lost the fleet segment this year but kept up with the retail segment. Incentives were low because they could be and were probably selling just as many of those fancy retail trucks.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        I’m curious: What percentage of your truck inventory is eligible for the $10,000 +/- in factory incentives?

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          At the dealerships by me it’s basically 5% that could possibly qualify. That’s assuming that the vehicle is on the lot and not in transit.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            I suppose that Ford should send a thank you note to Bloomberg for all of the free advertising

            I’m waiting for the next article: “Industry desperate for customers offers free coffee, floor mats”

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Ford will produce a lot of F-250-350s before they retool their plant to make the new aluminum body trucks just like they did for the F-150. The outgoing heavy duties will be heavily discounted and many will buy them. Even when these trucks are heavily discounted Ford will still make a good size profit. There are many conservative buyers that will buy the outgoing model, but then this has always been true when you look at the last of the full sized cars in the late 70’s sold well. The manufacturers used this in their advertising. I remember a Monte Carlo ad in late 1977 that said these are the last of the large Monte Carlos, the last of the breed. Eventually the buyers got use to the new downsized cars and bought them which is what will happen with these aluminum body Ford trucks. Aggressive promotions and discounts will help move the customer to buy the newer model once the previous generation is gone and the newer model will be accepted by most buyers.


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • geozinger: Fnck. I’ve lost lots of cars to the tinworm. I had a 97 Cavalier that I ran up to 265000 miles. The...
  • jh26036: Who is paying $55k for a CTR? Plenty are going before the $35k sticker.
  • JimZ: Since that’s not going to happen, why should I waste any time on your nonsensical what-if?
  • JimZ: Funny, Jim Hackett said basically the same thing yesterday and people were flinging crap left and right.
  • JimZ: That and the fact that they could run on gasoline, which was considered a useless waste product back in the...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributors

  • Timothy Cain, Canada
  • Matthew Guy, Canada
  • Ronnie Schreiber, United States
  • Bozi Tatarevic, United States
  • Chris Tonn, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States
  • Mark Baruth, United States
  • Moderators

  • Adam Tonge, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States