By on May 19, 2015

2016 Chevrolet Camaro SS

While by no means the overwhelming success that the first-generation Ford Mustang was back in 1966 – 417,000 were sold in that car’s first twelve months on the market, according to Ford MoCo – the fifth-generation Chevrolet Camaro was a hit by most any other standard.

Now that the sixth-generation Camaro has debuted with surprisingly similar styling to the outgoing model, it’s worth our while to look back at nearly seven years of Camaro sales to gauge the popularity of GM’s Mustang challenger. (Get it? Challenger?)

The main factor for Camaro fans involves the car’s ability to outsell the Mustang. True, the Camaro (and Mustang, for that matter) both put up the kinds of numbers many so-called mainstream cars can’t. But the more appealing measurement is the one which says that in each of the latest Camaro’s complete sales years, from 2010 forward, the Chevy has been the more popular car.

The Camaro outsold the Mustang in the United States by 7,583 units in 2010. In 2011, the fifth-gen Camaro’s best sales year, it outsold the Mustang by 17,811 units. In 2012, the gap decreased to just 1,396 units, but it was still in GM’s favour. In 2013, the Camaro finished 3,381 sales ahead of the Ford. In 2014, as Mustang sales surged in the final two months of the year, Camaro volume jumped 7% to finish the year 3,662 sales ahead.

USA Chevrolet Camaro rivals sales chart 2009-2015

Naturally, early 2015 figures haven’t been nearly as kind to the Camaro. With a brand new Mustang for model year 2015 and the fifth-gen Camaro reaching the end of its term, the Mustang leads by 18,726 sales over the course of just four months. In fact, even the Dodge Challenger outsold the Camaro in the month of March.

(Challenger sales, as an aside, have always increased despite being significantly lower on an annual basis than the Camaro and Mustang. Reintroduced in 2008, Challenger volume doubled between 2009 and 2014 thanks to persistent U.S. sales growth.)

The Mustang and Camaro are not as consistent in their growth patterns, although the Chevrolet has managed to hover above the 80,000-unit annual sales mark ever since 2010. An average of 84,160 are sold per year in the United States. 2014’s 86,297-unit result was the second-best for the fifth-gen car.

Camaro 2015 2016

Maintaining a relatively even keel, even in an industry which expanded every year since the car was brought back from the dead, is a notable achievement for a sporting coupe. Consider vehicles like the Nissan 370Z, which saw its sales plunge 45% between 2009, when the industry was in the doldrums, and 2014, when more than 16 million new vehicles were sold. There’s no surprise in seeing Scion FR-S sales tumble 23% in its second full year of availability or fall 29% through the first third of 2015, just three years removed from its launch.

In their home market, Detroit muscle experiences sustained interest in a way conventional “sports cars” do not.

Any number of issues could crop up to bring the sixth-gen Camaro down a rung or two, from a pricing strategy gone awry to an unanticipated economic crisis to aggressive new competition. What can be seen now, however, is a car that doesn’t look so dramatically different from the last Camaro.

Porsche 911s are evolutionary. Since 2004, revamped Ford Mustangs don’t appear wholly removed from the former models, either. Historically speaking, new Camaros share cues with their predecessors, rather than a striking overall resemblance. Then again, perhaps the distinct resemblance between old and new Camaro will do more good than harm. It works for the Honda Accord.

Timothy Cain is the founder of GoodCarBadCar.net, which obsesses over the free and frequent publication of U.S. and Canadian auto sales figures. Follow on Twitter @goodcarbadcar and on Facebook.

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76 Comments on “The Sixth Chevrolet Camaro Is Here – This Is What The Fifth-Gen Model Achieved...”


  • avatar
    CJinSD

    The 6th generation Camaro looks like a Mustang with a different front fascia. It would be nice to see a chart of the monthly sales rate, since the one showing annual sales total makes it look like all the cars went into freefall this year.

  • avatar
    Pan

    If the Dodge Challenger were to offer all wheel drive, I think that its sales would increase significantly, particularly in the Northern States and in Canada. It is supposedly built on a Charger platform; so, adding all wheel drive should be doable.

  • avatar

    There’s just something boring about GM’s designs.
    This looks like a Mustang from the side.
    No thanks.

    • 0 avatar
      ponchoman49

      Boy you people need your eyes checked. Seriously!

    • 0 avatar
      hgrunt

      The Challenger looks like a very stretched mustang from the side and has looked the same since 2008.

      Pot? Meet kettle.

      • 0 avatar
        TMA1

        I think the Challenger is aging very gracefully. Much more than the previous Mustang. I’m kind of tired of the new Mustang already.

        • 0 avatar
          TrailerTrash

          its not that I am tired of the new look already, its the size of the thing!
          I drove along side it on the toll a few days ago with my wife. Even she remarked how awfully large it was, especially the rear.
          In fact, she was surprised I told her it actually had an unusable rear seat.
          Seriosly…no back seat but larger than the Fusion?
          That RWD system is really a silly thing.
          I know…performance.
          But for those of us who want that wonderful ecoboost and a convertible for great summers…the top, drag racing stang is never gonna happen.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    They need to call this a refresh as opposed to a new generation. It’s not different enough to warrant that title.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Its a whole new platform, they simply chose to keep the styling and issues of the Zeta.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Oh, well that was a brilliant idea wasn’t it! I didn’t realize that actually. This is going to be a case like the 300C re-do where people don’t realize it’s a new model, and it causes them -all- to look more dated and age poorly.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          I agree, should have went in a whole new direction.

          • 0 avatar
            carguy

            Or not. The same look strategy has worked really well for the Porsche 911.

            I am sure that GM did their market research and found that a big part of the current model’s success was its design. Why mess with something that is working?

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            If your assumptions are correct of course. I wonder if the periscope will become standard or still part of an option package?

          • 0 avatar
            ...m...

            …we’re no longer in the cartoon-retro-sixties aughts; needs more f-body cues…

    • 0 avatar
      ponchoman49

      So a whole different platform, not one exterior panel that interchanges with gen 5, 3 new engines, new 8 speed automatics, a completely new interior and even new wheels is just a refresh. Come on….

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        It’s like a refresh because even though those body panels wouldn’t be interchangeable, they’re 97% the same (on a car which had bathtub styling that turned quite a lot of people off). I can -barely- tell them apart!

        • 0 avatar
          sportyaccordy

          That’s not GM’s fault….

        • 0 avatar
          CarnotCycle

          I think people will recognize the 6th gen as different and new just from the size difference.

          5th gens are big, blocky cars; in person these 6th gens I imagine look tiny and athletic in comparison.

          I am surprised though they did not seem interested in improving visibility The visibility of the 5th gens – especially with aftermarket tint – is borderline unsafe; the 6th gen looks it might somehow even be worse.

      • 0 avatar
        bumpy ii

        New platform, new engines, new sheetmetal… and internet car nerds have to stare at them side by side to tell them apart. The average person on the street has no hope, and would guess wrong on which was the “new” one about 60% of the time. Up to now, a new Camaro design was instantly and recognizably different.

    • 0 avatar
      Krivka

      Pull up the photos. It is a fastback, and although there are styling similarities, but how could there not be? I think the interior is a step up, but that gauge cluster is too large and is at least four inches above the rest of the dash. Not a good look.

    • 0 avatar
      RobbiesRobot

      So agreed.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    Of all the cars I view as a “retirement” vehicle, I keep coming back to the Camaro – no Fords nor anymore Chryslers for me. I love them, especially since Wifey dissed another Wrangler, and a pickup won’t fit in the garage.

    As to how I can see out of one is the big question, as I haven’t driven one, but would like to just to prove to myself if I would be a danger to others, considering my vision issue.

    Of course, I’d prefer a convertible…

    Oh, well, I suppose I’ll drive my Impala ’til the wheels fall off!

    • 0 avatar
      Funky

      I would recommend driving one. I don’t find mine (a 2014) to be too difficult to see out of. And, I agree that it is the sort of vehicle that would make a good “retirement vehicle” (the thing even has enough space in the back seat for toddler grand children).

      • 0 avatar
        TrailerTrash

        You have to admit there is a certain acceptance one has to make to like this bunker look. This as well as the Chrysler cars have this silly high beltline that make you feel like height challenged people are inside the way you can only see their heads…and not their necks or shoulders.

        I haven’t sat in the new mustang so I do not know how terrible the rear view is out the mirror, rear window or rear sides yet. It doesn’t look promising, however.

  • avatar
    joeveto3

    Living in between Milwaukee and Chicago, for many reasons, I prefer sunroofs to convertibles. The Camaro addresses this need, while Ford’s product planners have chosen not to. Therefore, it’s the Camaro for me.

    Coincidentally,I have a new Mustang convertible sitting outside waiting for me (rental), and it’s nice. But I’m on the west coast for meetings and the weather is beautiful. I actually grabbed it as a form of cynical “rain dance” for these folks. I’m hoping by virtue of me driving in my suit with the top down, the gods will smite me with rain, and in the process give LA some much needed water.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      I love sunroofs. They cut out way too much room in the old Camaro though – my head was against the headliner. Supposedly the seats are lower in the Gen-6 Camaro, so hopefully that means more headroom. Meanwhile, the Challenger has plenty of headroom.

      Don’t know why Ford can’t give us the option with the Mustang. Maybe they’re waiting to put the panoramic roof on the Lincoln version of the Mustang.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    While I would have liked to see a more radical styling do over, staying mostly true to form is probably the best bet from GM’s standpoint. They don’t want to alienate the existing fan base in the same way that Ford and Dodge didn’t radically overhaul the styling of their entrants, while offering numerous improvements in other areas that will keep those buyers coming back.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    youtube.com/watch?v=D4d5Eeq-9L4

    Tossing the Pontiac’s door shut, Adriana hurried across the Sam’s Club parking lot in a frenzied pace. She neglected to look both ways before crossing the striped pedestrian pavement, taking one last drag of her cigarette before flicking it onto the sidewalk. The club’s doors opened and she dashed past the Customer Service area where Tim turned his wrist to reveal 11:01 on his digital Casio. She opened the door to the break area and punched the clock right at 11:03.

    “Sh*t” she thought “Monday is off to a great start”.

    Adriana stood at register number seven and put on her best face to greet the customers. Kaleigh waved from her register on number seven and she returned the wave. The customers were the same as they always were, as a matter of fact it could be the same five carts over and over Adriana could hardly see the difference. Monday. Tuesday. Wednesday. Thursday. Punch in, punch out; customers in, customers out. The only thing to look forward too being smoke breaks with Kaleigh and time with her daughter Marilyn. She felt a tap on the back of her shoulder that particular Friday.

    “I need to see you” Tim whispered in her ear.

    She sat down in the cheap plastic seat in dull grey office facing Tim, her left leg shaking uncontrollably. Air escaped as Tim slowly eased himself into a faux leather chair and eyed Adriana up and down.

    “Look. I’ll get right to the point. You have been late four days in a row. What’s going on?” Tim asked calmly.
    “My husband recently left me and its been difficult to find a sitter for my daughter and my mom-” She replied as Tim put up the palm of his hand in a stopping motion.
    “Ok. You’ve been here for seven years and have never gotten a warning. I’m not going to terminate you, but consider this your warning” he said with a wry smile as he stared at her. Adriana felt a little uncomfortable as he stared right at her and she did not return his glance, instead looking down at her shaking leg.
    “I understand, sir” she replied.
    “Good, I’m glad we understand each other.” he said as he stood up. Adriana held back tears as she slowly stood up and headed back to her register.

    Later in the break room, she stared at the government employee postings on the aged bulletin board and relived some of the key moments of her life. Growing up an only child and befriending Kaleigh. High school graduation. Meeting her soon to be ex husband Adam. The birth of her daughter Marilyn. The passing of her father Paul. Just an ordinary life. She’d never been late, she was always on top of things. She was a good wife, mother, daughter and yet things were in disarray. Where did she go wrong? She felt another tap on the shoulder.

    “Hey, what happened earlier?” Kaleigh asked.
    “I got a warning for being late.” Adriana replied.
    “Oh. What happened with the lawyer?”
    “He’s a sh*thead. He said if he pushes for the child support I’m asking for he said Adam will ask for joint custody just to punish me. I don’t want Marilyn around his mother, she’s a violent drunk.”
    “You need to get a new lawyer” Kaleigh said.
    “I can’t afford a better one” Adriana replied as she threw up her hands. “I could really go for a cigarette” she said as she chuckled and looked at the no smoking sign posted on the wall.

    Kaleigh wrapped her arms around Adriana reassuringly as her long red hair brushed against her skin.

    “Its going to be ok Addie”.

    Night had fallen and Adriana slowly walked toward her Pontiac while checking her text messages.

    MOM: Marilyn fussy, running slight fever. Get home.

    She unlocked the car and turned the key to find the car would not turn over. Tears began to well up in her eyes and she pounded the steering wheel with her hands.

    “Damn car!” sobbing. “Damn stupid car!” she cried. “Just like everything else in my life, it fails on me just when I need it most!”. Her tears smeared the mascara and she reached into her purse for a tissue to wipe her eyes. She was startled by the knock on the driver’s side window.

    “Everything alright?” Kaleigh asked muffled by the window glass.
    “Oh, Kaleigh” Adriana, now calmer, said out loud as she opened the door. “The car won’t start”
    “Well Roger is right over there, maybe we can jump it?” Kaleigh replied while turning and pointing.
    “Oh that would be great” Adriana said as Kaleigh started to wave Roger over. The late model GMC pickup parked next to the Pontiac and Addie popped the hood. Roger reached into his extended cab producing a jumpbox and attached the leads to the Pontiac’s battery.

    “Ok, hit it” Roger said rather loudly to Addie as she turned the key and the motor came to life.
    “Told you everything would be alright sweetie” Kaleigh said smiling ear to ear. Roger unattached the jumpbox and placed it behind the driver’s seat in his truck. He came over to the girls and leaned on the open driver’s door.

    “How many miles are on this thing now?” he asked.
    “The odometer broke last year at 203 and it was 150 when we bought it for my older sister in 2010” Addie replied.
    “Okay. As much as I love these things, this one overall seems a little tired” he reached into his wallet and produced a business card.

    “My buddy Brian down 422 has a lot. He has alot of different stuff but he puts out near new Volkswagens cheap and I know could get you financed. As much as I hate Volkswagen, right now you need something which just turns and goes; at least that’s how I see it.” Roger said as he handed her the card.

    “Thank you Roger, I’ll give him a call. But now I have to go” Addie said shutting the door and putting down the driver’s window.
    “Wait, Addie”. Kaleigh said. Addie took a slight breath and looked up at her best friend. Kaleigh smiled as she laid her hand on the edge of the door revealing a diamond ring.

    • 0 avatar
      Wayne

      You should finish the novel. Plot twist: Roger is part owner of used car dealership and used to date Kaleigh. Addie doesn’t know that her bff is secretly engaged to two time Adam.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        That’s an interesting twist. (I actually posted this in this article in error).

        I’ve been kicking around a story arc for a novel but it will be a long time coming. There’s something else I have to finish first which is hard for me to write (whereas these little stories are much easier). This particular one was written for a very specific audience outside of TTAC.

        In a departure from what I normally do, all three of the main characters in this piece are real people. Expect them in the future to appear in the background of other stories but not necessarily be the premise. Kaleigh already appeared here and here:

        https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2015/04/junkyard-find-1990-chevrolet-cavalier-z24/#comment-5455953

        https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2015/04/junkyard-find-1988-chevrolet-nova-sedan/#comment-5377521

    • 0 avatar
      Exfordtech

      Kind of a frying pan to the fire with the suggestion of a VW to replace the Pontiac.

  • avatar
    heavy handle

    Any numbers for fleet sales? Most of the new Camaros and Mustangs I see are in rental lots, so the sales crown probably goes to the brand that gives Hertz the best deal.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      That’s good, building an expensive muscle car destroys the point. The cheaper the base cars are that go to hertz, the cheaper the V8s are to people that want the real deal. If I was buying a Muscle car and didn’t have allegiance to any one brand, after deciding which one(s) I couldn’t stand, the next question would be the cheapest V8.

      These are getting expensive, $30k for a no features base V8 is ridiculous, we need price wars, not soft touch interior wars.

      • 0 avatar
        Sigivald

        I thought the point was for aging boomers to finally get “their dream car”.

        Okay, and for enthusiasts to get A Cheap Fast Thing.

        (But “the cheap V8!” is, well, not what people actually buy, mostly.

        The latest numbers I can find are 2011 for e.g. the Mustang: http://mustangsdaily.com/blog/2011/04/05/a-complete-breakdown-of-mustang-production-in-2011/

        Over half of them were V6s – and only 2% of those bought the Performance Package.

        Like wise – http://www.torquenews.com/106/2014-chevrolet-camaro-stats-show-why-v6-muscle-cars-exist – 73% of last year’s Camaros were V6s.

        This tells me that “whatever the cheapest V8 ends up being” is … not a majority buying decision.

        Because it’s 2015, and a V6 provides the power that you used to need a huge V8 to get; today’s base Camaro is more powerful than any buy the 396/427″ ’69s – and that’s even giving them the charity of taking BHP as net.

        A similar thing is true of the Mustang; the base V6 is *stupidly fast* already.)

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          Base engine pony cars have always outsold their V8 premium models and other turbo’d limited editions. Usually by a wide margin. But no way do current base V6s have anywhere near the power of older huge V8s, except on paper. They never will.

          And V6s will always be prone to popping head gaskets if you look at them wrong.

  • avatar

    “Since 2004, revamped Ford Mustangs don’t appear wholly removed from the former models, either.”

    That’s because they weren’t. Although it’s a long timespan, you could pretty much consider the 2005-2014 model years to encompass a single generation. But Ford will often use the same bodyshell more than once on a car, across multiple “generations”, or they’ll do a really heavy facelift after four or five years (as with the 2010-2014 Mustang), to effectively create a new version, which will linger for another four or five years. Ford has done this with several of its vehicles, most of them SUVs. With the arrival of the 2015 Expedition and Navigator, they have recycled those vehicles’ bodyshells twice.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Looking forward to driving one — I expect this will be a very nice vehicle to drive.

    But I can’t actually picture myself buying any ponycar. They’re just too conspicuous. What I really want is a new generation of the SS based on Alpha, roughly CTS-sized, with the same powertrain as the Camaro SS.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Call me if Chevy ever decides to do a riff on the styling of the 2nd generation Camaro, that’s a car that would be a looker.

    • 0 avatar
      nrd515

      That was what I hoped this car might be. But, GM disappoints again. I don’t get this car at all, just like I didn’t get the outgoing one. I like the Mustang better, and that’s something I never thought I would say, as I have hated Ford’s styling since about the time the second generation Mustang appeared.

  • avatar
    akatsuki

    They should have restyled more aggressively and opened up that pit of a cabin.

  • avatar
    carguy

    It’s been days since the 2016 Camaro reveal and the Internet is still full of people hating on it. The last one was a great success and the new one will be too but apparently delivering a lighter, more powerful & more efficient RWD sports coupe is simply not enough for the Internet. Sure we live in a golden age of affordable muscle cars but the Internet says “meh” because apparently it has very high expectations.

    • 0 avatar
      Zackman

      The OEMs really don’t care much about what the internet says – they don’t buy cars, people do, and that’s what counts. The internet just gets the word out, and the more hate, the more curious people get.

    • 0 avatar
      hgrunt

      I feel the same way.

      The internet says a lot of things: The FRS should be a 300hp, awd diesel shooting brake with a 20k price point, Porsches should be air-cooled, BMWs should be 6 cylinder E30s only… when in fact, we haven’t had more great choices at any price range, to choose from. Cars have never been better, faster, or safer (outward visibility is an exception), and much of that spurred on by things the internet hates, like CARB, EPA, and Euro environmental regulations.

      It’s easier to get noticed for talking down on something than to praise it.

  • avatar
    Speed3

    If its not broke don’t fix it. While everyone is entitled to their own opinion, I think the sales figures speak for themselves. A lot of people actually DO like the Camaro looks, and GM decided update the same design (this happens all the time folks – Kia Optima, Kia Soul, Chrysler 300, Ford Mustang, VW Beetle, Mini Cooper, etc).

    GM prioritized improving the driving dynamics, and good for them. I think this is the best Camaro ever and if you all don’t like it then don’t buy it.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      “I think this is the best Camaro ever and if you all don’t like it then don’t buy it.”

      I’m guessing you still won’t, either. LOL And as for “best” Camaro, I think that happened around 1968.

      http://cdn.barrett-jackson.com/staging/carlist/items/Fullsize/Cars/113237/113237_Front_3-4_Web.jpg

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    While I personally don’t like the current or future Camaro I certainly respect that they’ve done something right to get them to sell so well.

    With the proportions of the Camaro and Challenger, I’d go so far as to say the Personal Luxury Coupe is alive and well in the 21st century after going extinct in the 1980s. They may be trying a little harder to be “sporty” but I’d wager that the buyers of a Monte Carlo or Cordoba in the 1970s bears a striking resemblance to a Camaro or Challenger buyer today.

    As far as the Mustang, I can’t image how many Mustangs you would have seen on the road in 1966 on any given day. At 417k you’d see one ’65 Mustang for every ’14 Camry you see on the road in 2015. Factor in that there were fewer cars on the road in general and my mind starts to boggle.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      “…I’d wager that the buyers of a Monte Carlo or Cordoba in the 1970s bears a striking resemblance to a Camaro or Challenger buyer today.”

      Polyester shirt and gold medallions?

      • 0 avatar
        Land Ark

        More like guys who wear hats that look like vizors with spikey hair coming out of the the top.
        Those may not have existed in the 70s, but if they did, they would have worn them.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Who wears those now? I never see that!

          I did see it in Korea, where older women wear them. That’s called an “Adjima visor.”

          • 0 avatar
            Land Ark

            There was a guy on my flight last week (to and from even) wearing one. A “touch of gray” version.

            http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61HcMD-4KHL._UL1500_.jpg

            I see them at every car show/event I go to where classic cars are the main attraction.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Oh good grief. That’s awful, and I have never seen it in real life.

    • 0 avatar
      319583076

      Challenger buyers are boomers buying trophies, not drivers buying cars.

      • 0 avatar
        TMA1

        What’s wrong with driving the Challenger? Unless you’re trying to take down the Mustang or Camaro at the track, it works just fine. It makes a pretty good trade off for space, comfort and headroom. That Hemi sounds better than anything from Ford or Chevy as well.

        • 0 avatar
          golden2husky

          Don’t know if I’d say the Hemi sounds best, but we are probably splitting hairs here. The sound of a LT1 nearing redline is simply glorious…

          • 0 avatar
            NoGoYo

            The Hemi pickups are the only ones with a good exhaust note from the factory in my experience, so at least in that case the Hemi wins.

          • 0 avatar
            TMA1

            Well, I was comparing it to the current 1LE, which I’ve driven. Haven’t seen the LT1 in a Camaro yet.

            392 Hemi > LS3 1LE > 5.0 Coyote (2015 models).

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            The LS/LT engines are great powerplants, but they don’t sound great with as far as V8 notes go. The 5.0L coyote and Hemi both sound bada$$ however.

          • 0 avatar
            TMA1

            I think Ford made the Coyote too quiet in 2015 Mustang. Great for cruising the highway, but you have to put the pedal to the floor to hear it from inside the car. After-market exhaust is the first swap owners will need to take care of.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      For what it’s worth though, those Mustangs didn’t stay on the road very long. Few cars did back then. We’ve got the last 20 years worth of Camrys still clogging up the streets.

  • avatar
    Sigivald

    That graph makes the baby Edward Tufte cry.

    If you want YTD sales included in a graph like that, graph *monthlies*, or at least *quarterlies*.

    Don’t make it look like every graphed car had a catastrophic collapse of sales starting this year, by including a half-sized sample for the last entry.

  • avatar
    alluster

    The initial reviews are out and it looks like GM nailed it. Only the V6 prototypes were available for testing and the auto journalists came away very impressed. It will be a vastly different and vastly SUPERIOR car to the 5th gen with resemblances ONLY to the exterior design. The SS will stomp the GT. The V6 will stomp the ecoboost. The base V6 Mustang might beat the base 2.0lT Camaro.

    Chevy will sell a bunch of them unless they price it like they did with the full size suvs. The Alpha chassis is not cheap nor is a nicer interior, standard brembos, lt1 engines, standard rearview cameras and increased use of aluminium. The turbo4 will take the place of V6 and SS will go up in price to give room for the mid pack V6. You will be paying more for the same engine whatever the configuration.

    • 0 avatar
      raph

      I think the Camaro will do okay sale wise but I don’t think it will be curb stomping Mustang which IMO has the better wrapper inside and out. The Camaro will post great numbers as GM is saying the alpha based F6 is to the F5 what the C7 was to the C6.

      I purchased a new Mustang almost a month ago and several of my coworkers who appreciated my 09 Shelby because it was in beast mode 24/7 flat out love the new car because of its style. They range from my boss who is a Jag, BMW, and Land Rover man to one of my coworkers who is Japanese import guy.

      The new Mustang has broadened it’s appeal well and that’s the issue I see with the Camaro. Not enough of a departure appeared e wise from the previous car. To many it’s going to seem like a mid-cycle update.

      That’ll probably suit Camaro fans just fine though. The one constant refrain I hear from the F-car camp is that they see Mustangs at every stop light and around every corner where the Camaro is more unique ( well despite what sales,numbers sat anyways)

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “The SS will stomp the GT. The V6 will stomp the ecoboost.”

      This is important. The biggest letdown for me in the last gen was that the Ford was a better performer (and it was a bigger Mustang advantage on the lower end of things).

      The F-body was never as good of a daily driver as the Mustang but it didn’t matter so much when the Ford owner needed an SVT or a bucket of aftermarket parts to hang.

      • 0 avatar
        raph

        Like Ford ram-rodding people into the EcoBoost that’s always been part of their playbook. GM offers better out the box performance where you have to step up with Ford. The GT350 is going to come with a 10k or more premium most likely.

        But aftermarket parts are part and parcel of the pony car game. Finding a stock car gets progressively harder as the weeks go by.

    • 0 avatar
      GeneralMalaise

      “The initial reviews are out and it looks like GM nailed it.”

      yes, if pud to floor with a ten penny nail is the definition, they most certainly did.

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