By on April 2, 2015

2016-Toyota-Rav4-Hybrid-3

 

And here we have the final debut of the New York Auto Show…a hybrid version of the Toyota RAV4.

The RAV4 uses the same  2.5-liter four-cylinder Atkinson cycle engine mated to an electric motor. In the NX, the setup makes 200 hp while returning 33/30 mpg city/highway. Not bad for an AWD crossover.

 

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40 Comments on “New York 2015: Toyota RAV4 Hybrid...”


  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    The styling says to me “This is the shape of a crossover. I am a crossover.” in a very neutral American accent.

    But it’s not gopping like the NX or RX is nowadays, so that’s a win.

  • avatar
    Quentin

    We’d have been up for a hybrid when we purchased our 2014 Rav4. We recently moved into a town that actually has stoplights, so the stop and go stuff would be a little easier on gas. I also genuinely enjoy how the hybrid drivetrains work: all the efficiency of a CVT without the worry of Nissan-esque CVT failures.

    I do like the looks of ours better. It looks more rugged.

    • 0 avatar
      KixStart

      I feel your pain. They could rename the burg I live in “Stoplightville” and it would be more than a little fitting. I’m sure our Prius saves us a lot of gas when we must go across town.

    • 0 avatar
      segfault

      Your municipalities need to synchronize their traffic lights if they haven’t already. Makes things run much more smoothly unless the roads are over capacity.

  • avatar
    xtoyota

    My god what did they do to the front clip……Even a mother could not love this son of a design :=(
    Toyota and Lexus designer have been drinking too much Saki the last few years when designing these cars

  • avatar
    philadlj

    It now has that otherworldly anglerfish scowl.

  • avatar

    Remember how Toyota representatives claimed that hybrid in the 4.3 platform is impossible because reasons? The current 4.4 is not that much different from 4.3, the layout of the components and dimensions are the same, aren’t they?

  • avatar
    carguy

    Since most of these end up as urban runabouts, the hybrid drive train makes sense.

    However, that new front end is not an improvement.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    This could hook me, since Kia won’t do it in the Sportage. Not yet, anyway.

    But then again, if it’s $30k+, forget it.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Hybrid versions have sold relatively well on midsize and full-size FWD sedans, but horribly for RWD sedans and large trucks and SUVs.

      For midsize CUVs, it’s mostly been Toyota and sales seem to be worth the effort.

      Not so sure if it will work out for the compact CUV sector.

      As for Kia, maybe the way to go with the new Sportage is to give an option of an e-AWD syatem (like on the Trail’ster concept) – that way, would avoid the double weight penalty of batteries and a separate AWD system.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        Ford sold a lot of compact CUV Hybrids with the last generation Escape and Mariner, at least around here. Of course gas wasn’t as cheap as it is now when they were selling their best. I am surprised that Toyota didn’t introduce a Hybrid RAV4 sooner.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    It doesn’t have Darth Vader face – but it is pinched.

    They will sell a billion of them. Not being flippant – unlike the RX where I’m really wondering if the redesign was a bridge too far, this nails it. It’s distinctly a Toyota, doesn’t alienate the base, and now comes in sweet sweet hybrid version.

    They won’t be able to build them fast enough.

  • avatar
    segfault

    I am still awaiting the return of the Toyota RAV6 (Recreational Active Vehicle with 6 cylinders). Because all small crossovers with sloppy handling should go 0-60 in 6 seconds.

  • avatar
    Conslaw

    The Rav4 hybrid indirectly answers the question of why we don’t have a hybrid version of the Sienna. If the non-hybrid Rav4 gets 33/30 as a hybrid, and the non-hybrid version weighs 3600 lbs, then the 4500 lb nonhybrid Sienna is would likely come in under the magic 30/30 MPG threshold that I guess would be the minimum for a successful hybrid minivan. – Realistically, the 200 horsepower would likely be insufficient as well.

    • 0 avatar
      Dave M.

      Conslaw – i disagree. If the RX and Highlander hybrids can get 26-27 instead of 20-24, the Sienna could too, bring it.

      I’m excited about the RAV4 – but would expect in the 33-35 range mpg wise. Hybrid tech should be available widely these day, at a minimum premium. Maybe next gas crisis…

    • 0 avatar
      clivesl

      Yeah, 200 horsepower would not be good in a Sienna. I think mine has 268 and I use every bit of it. Still gets low to mid twenties on the highway though.

  • avatar
    TrailerTrash

    I like it. Never drove the newest gas version, but I like the storage space.
    And I always liked the last generation with its nice 6cyl. Great car. I was only a bit down on what folks said about this newer version’s driving and then the poor power.
    200 HP should be a pretty nice getupngo system. Now I need to drive one and see where they end up priced at.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    33 mpg city in a crossover. Nice. And it shouldn’t even be that slow.

    I can’t believe they didn’t create this in 2013 when they introduced this generation of RAV4. I’m sure I’d like this one a lot more than the regular RAV4.

  • avatar
    anti121hero

    I hate these new rav4s. I was never a fan although the very first gen almost piqued my interest. I have a close friend who works at a toyota dealership who says these new rav4s are a step down from what they had, boring, ugly outside, cheap inside, and common to find issues in the engine compartment.

  • avatar
    val.catiniit

    I was interested in buying a Toyota. Posts like this one are helpful for me, thanks!

    Show Auto Reviews

  • avatar
    shaker

    Keep in mind that the battery will take up and redimension cargo space over the stock Rav 4. Still, 33 mpg could be worth it.

    • 0 avatar
      Quentin

      Based on the pictures, it looks like minimal intrusion versus my wife’s 2014 Rav4. There are way more photos of the cargo area if you hop on Toyota Pressroom’s site.

      • 0 avatar
        shaker

        Yes – thanks!

        Saw the photo – the cargo floor (with the rear seats folded) has a gentle slope into the seats; no “battery bump”. And AWD, as well! (Good job, Toyota.)

  • avatar
    Conslaw

    It’s pretty much standard practice with hybrids to omit the spare tire and use that space (and more) for the battery. I’ve looked all over the web for any kind of cost/benefit analysis concerning omitting the spare tire. The spare tire is needed only in the subset of tire failure cases where you can change your tire but a can of fix-a-flat wouldn’t serve as an emergency repair. I personally haven’t had a situation like that come up in over 30 years. Presumably somebody has studied the issue.

    • 0 avatar
      Quentin

      I’ve had one flat where I could swap to the spare but fix-a-flat wouldn’t have helped. I was in my 2007 GTI in the Bear Tooth Mountains down an 8 mile gravel road. 225/40-18 summer tires. No bueno. A large piece of gravel/sharp rock gouges the little sidewall I had. $900 later in Billings, MT, we were back on our way to WV. We missed out on one of our backcountry hikes and had to end the trip early.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      Interesting you’d mention that.

      When I was dealing for our Optima Hybrid last year, I decided to ask the dealer to sweeten it by throwing in the $235 optional spare tire for free. To my surprise, they absolutely refused, unless I paid for it.

      They challenged my ‘need’ for a spare, asking when was the last time I had a flat, reminding me that the car comes with roadside assistance. But I’m a DIY guy, and I’d rather get back on the road than wait for help. So I bought the spare.

      The very next month, each of my other two cars got a flat which needed an internal patch to repair!

    • 0 avatar
      segfault

      I have had a couple. A metal wire in the tread which dislodged while driving, causing the tire to go flat. Fix a flat didn’t work and I had to put on the spare. And I had a sidewall bubble in a tire, which made me uncomfortable to drive on. I guess I’m old school, but I’d rather have a spare.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      I’m absolutely fine driving with no spare in day-to-day use in the city. The last flat I had was almost 20 years ago, and it was a sloppy Jiffy Lube tech’s fault. And if I did have a flat in the city, it would just be a minor inconvenience: call a tow truck, get on a bus, and life goes on.

      But I’m always a bit on edge in the G8, which has no spare, when I’m driving through empty parts of Idaho or Montana. A flat there would be a real problem, especially in the places without cell service, but also because no little garage in a Montana town is going to have a 245/40R19 tire. I triple-check my tires before each leg of driving and avoid driving onto the shoulder or in dirt/gravel. If I lived in a rural area, I’d want a spare.

      • 0 avatar
        Quentin

        That is what I ran into with my flat in Montana. I needed a 225/40-18 and all the tire shops carried exactly one tire in that size: Toyo Proxes ____. It was some super aggressive summer tire.

      • 0 avatar
        64andahalf

        I got a flat in my BMW in a somewhat remote location on a Sunday (stores closing or closed) and the lack of a spare turned into a huge fiasco. I’ll never buy a car with run-flats again.

    • 0 avatar
      Dan

      Manufacturer side is an easy decision, they pay most of the costs and receive none of the benefits. Making the spare tire a DIO knocks $200 off their advertised price and 40 lbs off their CAFE test weight.

      On the consumer side, spending $2-300 up front every time you buy a new car and then burning 50 or 100 bucks of gas to carry 40 lbs of donut around for a decade between uses doesn’t add up as a purely economical decision either.

      That’s not even getting into how many buyers are too prissy or otherwise infirm to change a tire whether the car comes with one or not.

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        I’ve always carried a plug kit and a small compressor. Don’t even have to take the wheel off or jack up the car.

        • 0 avatar
          ixim

          Plugs are unreliable in a radial. Too, I’ve had a couple of flats that were unrepairable even in the shop – “too close to the sidewall”, etc., etc. A donut is OK; Fix-a-Flat is iffy and unacceptable, except to the OEM’s and the Government.

  • avatar
    bkmurph

    The taillights look slightly less ugly and shelf-like than before, so that’s a plus. And I like the slender non-grille stretching between the headlights.

  • avatar
    wstarvingteacher

    Think I have to watch this and see how reliable it is. Have daughters driving priuses and if this is the same tough drive train in a bigger vehicle it might be for me. The Rav4 looks the size of the Saturn Vue I had and that was ideal. Toyota versus Saturn reliability is a definite plus.

  • avatar
    Scott_314

    My god, positive TTAC comments on a Toyota, and a RAV4 at that?! Look up for the pigs.

    I’m kidding, if anything I agree this could be a compelling package. And proof that commenters here are generally a thoughtful bunch.

  • avatar
    This Is Dawg

    I like it, if only because they didn’t opt for the bumper delete to make this look like all the rest of their hideous fishmobiles. Interior doesn’t look half bad either. I’ll keep an eye on this for the inevitable day when my wife gets bored with her old corolla.

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