By on March 30, 2015

LincolnContinentalConcept_01_Front

Here it is: the Lincoln Continental Concept, revealed ahead of its trip down the ramp at the 2015 New York Auto Show.

Power for the concept comes from a 3-liter EcoBoost V6 made exclusively for Lincoln, while the brand’s ride-enhancement technology and adaptive steering help keep things under control. No power figures were given at this time.

Inside, the occupants will be treated to a premium interior composed of Venetian and Alcantara leathers, rose gold and bright chrome trims, a satin headliner, soft-gold LED lighting, shearling wool carpet, and patented 30-way adjustable seating meant to adapt to a given occupant’s shape and size. The passenger-side rear seat can also fully recline when the front passenger seat is moved forward.

Other features include: Revel Ultima audio system; SPD SmartGlass tinting sunroof; tablet-supporting trays for the rear occupants; E-latch door handles; parking and pre-collision assists; 360-degree camera; and LED headlamps with laser-assist high beams.

The Lincoln Continental Concept is also a preview of the brand’s all-new fullsizer — to be called Continental — due next year

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129 Comments on “New York 2015: Lincoln Continental Concept Revealed Ahead Of Show...”


  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    Front end looks very modern Jaguar sedan, and somehow also very Bentley Continental GT.

    That grille is just…gaudy, though.

  • avatar
    jmo

    Back looks great, the side view is great, they just need to do a little more work on the grill.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Big, chromey, comfortable, angular, and not remotely sporting.

    Sounds exactly like what a Lincoln should be. Make it as close as possible to this and the brand will be back.

    Really, really well done.

    • 0 avatar
      Athos Nobile

      Agreed. The super LWB will make for a cavernous rear seat, just what the Dr asked for China.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      I have a problem with calling it “Quiet Luxury” and then putting huge ass low profile wheels on it, which are blingy and not quiet at all.

      And what the hell are they doing bringing back the back-of-seat luggage, like some late 80’s Seville?

      http://images.gtcarlot.com/pictures/54882647.jpg

      The headlamps with multiple crosshair detail are very overwrought, and I hope that goes away.

  • avatar
    Michael500

    What makes this a Lincoln? It looks like a fat Audi. Should have used the “eggcrate” Lincoln grill (63 Continental style). The rear lights don’t say “Lincoln” they copy something else, Audi? Is this thing RWD or rent-a-car FWD? Looks okay as a whole, but completely forgettable- like a Chinese Bentley knock-off. Close the brand down, this junker won’t save it.

    • 0 avatar
      flameded

      100% agreed. AUDI- exactly the 1st thing that popped into my head.
      But, I guess with car design these days, what doesn’t look like an audi?

      The earlier ‘concept’ (and drawings) were at least Lincoln- esque.

      doesn’t look bad, per se, so I guess they did a good job..of making an audi.

    • 0 avatar
      CRConrad

      The rear end, how the C pillar and the body-side “shoulder” come together and flow out into that stair-step shape above the rear lights and outside the boot (“trunk”) opening, is pure Volvo — OK, here it’s metal, whereas the Volvos have the light’s plastic cover go all the way up, but the shape is identical. First-generation S60, first- and second-generation S80:

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volvo_S60#/media/File:Volvo_S60_R_001.JPG

      https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Volvo_S80_%28I%29_%E2%80%93_Heckansicht,_18._Mai_2013,_M%C3%BCnster.jpg

      https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volvo_S80#/media/File:Volvo_S80_rear_20070902.jpg

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

      Oh yeah, time to throw in the towel. What an awful, gaudy grille! Something understated like the Lexus predator grille that ocassionaly swallows up children would be a very taestful direction instead.

      And, what’s with that name?! Uggg its awful! Name it RHY33x7#TT-se, rolls off the toung easier.

      It looks just like -large luxury sedan- at first, but the SIDE! Oh it looks like -large luxury sedan-, and who could forget the 3/4 view of the left side of the rear door window? Clearly a bad copy of -large luxury sedan-. How they came up with this MESS is beyond me, it really looks like -large luxury sedan- from the lower 2/5ths view of the bumper crease. Youll have to excuse me as I find more things I hate because of who built it.

      Let me see, can I find anything else to gripe about? Oh yeah, its a LINCOLN! Almost as bad as a Cadillac! They rust away in 4 years and they all break down, everyone knows. Audis on the other hand, oh, nevermind their tendancy to catch themselves on fire. Thats just character. Excellent reason to lease another one over an unreliable American car. I bet the shocks need replacing at 160k miles! Pathetic!

      Bad bad bad American car, good, wondeful awesome German/Japanese car. Clearly great, divine excellent Japanese/German car, with bad bad bad American car. If you really think about bad bad bad American car, then clearly you see supurb, perfect never-wrong German/Japanese car. These facts dont lie (as long as theyre repeated often enough).

      • 0 avatar
        snakebit

        OK,
        You don’t like Lincoln. I’m fine with that.

        Next time, put that in the first paragraph, and don’t keep repeating it in kind in each successive paragraph. Sharing your viewpoint is fine, once. We got it.

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    The wheels look like a bad psychedelic trip and the grill is unfortunately pre-blinged so there is no need for those inclined to buy a aftermarket but overall it looks fine and well proportioned much better then the Jonah like MKS .

    I see a bit of an elongated more luxurious Chrysler 300 or if they built an Imperial.

    • 0 avatar
      northshorerealtr

      Allpar.com has a link on their site to the Lincoln Media Center which provides 2 videos of the car (one exterior, one interior)–and the car looks quite good in the videos; seems to have presence. I’m having system problems, couldn’t copy the links, sorry guys. Of course, it’s bringing calls from Allpar’s Best and Brightest to bring back the Imperial, based on the 300.

      In that video, the grill “mesh” seems to be almost in the shape of the Continental star–nice touch of detailing. (And that big star on the grill lights up!)

      I AM curious, though–several here have mentioned the long-wheelbase (LWB), apparently to be offered only in China. What’s the take rate on a LWB compared to the “standard” size? Or, among Mercedes, BMW, Audi? I’m wondering if, economically, it’d make more sense to offer the longer “Continental L” in all markets only, and call it quits…. Do you really lose business by NOT having a shorter version?

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Seems like most of the A8 models I see (which is not many) are the L version. Harder to tell on a passing S since there’s no logo. I see plenty of LWB 7s as well, but not as prevalent in LWB as the A8.

      • 0 avatar
        Chocolatedeath

        https://media.lincoln.com/content/lincolnmedia/lna/us/en/multimedia.lincoln-auto-products:concepts~continental-concept.html

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        I agree that it would probably make more sense to just do the long wheelbase edition only. Of course I also thought that when they added the L version of the town car and then added a L version of the Crown Vic in 03 with the all new frame that they shouldn’t have went with 4 different lengths of that platform.

  • avatar
    arun

    The headlights remind me of those of the Bangle era 6 series.

  • avatar
    Vojta Dobeš

    Is it just me, or does it look like there is a Mustang hiding underneath? Look at the size of the thing – it looks too small to be MKS-sized. And the front end… the headlight placement, the grille – it all screams Mustang to me. Which would make sense, given that Contis were Fox-based in 80s.

    • 0 avatar
      Athos Nobile

      Dash to axle distance says the car is FWD. This will probably be either FWD or AWD.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        It’s FWD with available AWD, so I’m guessing Taurus platform

        EDIT: Update

        “Our sources suggest that the new Conti won’t ride on the MKS/Taurus platform, which is also shared with the Lincoln MKT and Ford Flex, but rather on an enlarged version of the CD4 platform, which underpins the Fusion and MKZ. ” – Car and Driver

        • 0 avatar
          Athos Nobile

          Taurus (or D4) platform is probably on its way out.

          • 0 avatar

            The D3/D4 platform is *absolutely* on its way out. Ford’s future full-sized vehicles will indeed ride on a stretched version of the mid-sized CD4 platform, which is how just about every other manufacturer does it. For example, the Impala, LaCrosse and XTS all ride on the “Super Epsilon” platform, which is just a version of the longer “Epsilon II” platform that underpins the mid-sized cars like the Malibu and Regal.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            It will be done before the end of the decade. The Explorer will probably soldier on wearing the D-platform for another two-three model years. The Flex and MkT are waiting for death’s cold embrace. I like D-platform vehicles, but without the Explorer, the platform would have been an utter disaster.

            Kyree-

            The full sizers aren’t all going to ride on CD4. There will be a D6 platform that the Explorer and MkT replacement will be underpinned by. We’ll see if sedans come after that.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            The platform will probably just go fleet only.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          “which underpins the Fusion and MKZ.”

          I haz a sad.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            You expected a different platform? If this comes out next year, like Ford says it will, they don’t have another platform ready.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I didn’t expect it, but it would be nice. Would certainly demonstrate “we are serious”.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            It’s better to underpromise and overdeliver. The stone cold reality is that they just don’t have the platform needed to do a 120″+ wheelbase RWD vehicle that isn’t an F-series truck. If they came out with a RWD Conti concept, and said they were going to build a Conti next year, it would end up being FWD, because that’s all they got, based and people would be pissed.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            And at the end of the day we must keep in mind that this is primarily for the Chinese market. And they don’t care about RWD.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            People keep talking Mustang based sedan…

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            To the B&B, “Stop trying to make Mustang platform sharing happen, it’s not going to happen.”

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @CoreyDL

            I could live without RWD, I just want a normal motor option and fine materials to be used. The only fleet I see using D3 are the police, the livery services in these parts still run Panthers, W-body, and full size vans-and the police editions seem fragile for police abuse. The last thing a long term buyer wants is a fragile car or motor.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Agree on both counts. Needs to be robust!

            Also, MSN has trumped TTAC on information for this vehicle.

            http://www.msn.com/en-us/autos/new-york/16-secrets-of-the-lincoln-continental-concept/ar-AAabQjf

            Better, real-life photos too.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            When high dollar cars aren’t being overpromised, marketing isn’t earning their pay. They just need you to hesitate on the Lexus or Caddy you’re on the fence about. Even if you’re not completely blown away, you still might buy it.

            But why would AWD be a must? Especially in China. When has there been an AWD Conti? I’d say a stretched Mustang would be the ticket.

    • 0 avatar
      Athos Nobile

      Vojta, I forgot earlier.

      When I think Lincoln Continental, this is the image that comes to my mind: http://gearpatrol.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/1961-Lincoln-Continental-Gear-Patrol-Ambiance-1.jpg

      In all its suicide door awesomeness.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        Mark Fields on Bloomberg this morning said that their lawyers will not allow them to offer suicide doors. Even so, the new Continental is no where near what the Continental of yore was.

  • avatar
    Mr. Orange

    It appears that Lincoln will begin to move away from its Mysticeti inspired front end. And onto what appears to be an Orcinus orca inspired design. Lincoln designers must really enjoy and are smitten with whales.

    I just hope they aren’t equally smitten with Monodon monoceros. Unless there’s another Death Race. Then it would really work.

  • avatar
    IronEagle

    Why does China determine the big back seat like they did with the LaCrosse? Is it just a grand scheme to get people to buy big very profitable SUVs here when most sedans for this US market have less than adequate rear seating?

    • 0 avatar
      dwford

      Smaller than ideal back seats seems to be a function of exterior design on current cars. Everyone wants the coupe roofline and that cuts into space. Wheelbases have certainly gotten long enough on most cars to create enough rear legroom. In China many more people are chauffeured, so they are demanding extra legroom in the back.

      This car screams “designed for China.” Which, if it means a better, richer car for us too, all the better.

  • avatar

    Looks too gawdy.
    Have to see in person.

  • avatar
    vent-L-8

    I could not be any happier about this…

  • avatar
    gearhead77

    Not a fan of the grill so much, but I think it’s a rather handsome car. The problem is getting excited about it because it’s not too exciting. I was at a local show sponsored by the Lincoln dealer across the street and they had an MKZ. Maybe it was an MKS (another part of Ford’s problem with Lincoln as we know). Either way, it had a 50k window sticker and I nearly spit my coffee all over it.

    I’m not a huge fan of GM, but at least Cadillac has become competitive, nearly enough in my mind to justify what they want. Ford has a long way to go, but naming it Continental instead of an alphabet soup would be a step in the right direction. Getting people to forget the last car of that name could be a challenge too. I was OK with the last Continental , but it wasn’t a great car.

  • avatar
    cargogh

    Is Venetian leather nicer than Corinthian?

  • avatar
    dwford

    So many comments about it being too gaudy. IT’S A CONCEPT CAR. They all get over the top styling features. The grill is actually brilliant – instead of the split wing or a honeycomb pattern, its a Lincoln log shaped pattern. The seats mimic the tufted cushion look of the 70’s cars, pretty cool.

    I like this. It short circuits the split wing grill theme and moves the car an extra couple steps away from its Ford chassis roots. It’s still on a FWD/AWD chassis, but if Audi can get away with it, Lincoln can too if they do it right.

    • 0 avatar
      TrailerTrash

      The Lincoln Haters on this site feed off themselves. In fact the reviewers themselves repeat nonsense others write.
      I was looking at a brand new Genesis in the lot yesterday.
      If THIS is what they call roomy and then they call the MKS narrow and coffin narrow…then I know for sure it is all hate and copycat writing.
      The Genesis, praised around these parts…is small inside and that trunk is stupid small for a large luxury sedan. It couldn’t have been more than 13CuFt! The MKS gives 20!!!
      I sit in a lot of test cars and the repeated narrowness of the Taurus/MKS front seat and interior is all utter nonsense. Total subjective bull.

      But to get back to your thoughts…there is a reason for the FWD chassis…engine placement and room.
      Perhaps THIS is why designers go to this. It allows you to get away from that long, useless front hood and give room in other places. Like the trunk.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        You seriously don’t think that the center console of the Taurus is at all intrusive when driving?

        The space utilization of the new Gensis sucks compared to the last generation and the console bangs my knee. When TTAC posts a review I’ll be sure to complain so you dont think I’m just picking on Ford.

        • 0 avatar
          TrailerTrash

          no. not at all. how could it consideringmy waist doesn’t come to the edge of the seat and when in all my cars my legs and knees rest against some side or the other.
          In every damn car I have this happens.
          If anything about the Fords seem narrow, it would be the foot wells. But then again, this is similar to all my cars.
          All I am saying is this is no big a deal it is brought up every damned time.
          The fact it does shows me the group mentality and thinking that takes place with auto reviewers.

      • 0 avatar
        dwford

        I don’t think For HAS to create a luxury RWD/AWD chassis. I wish they would – look what Infiniti has done with basically one chassis. Cadillac has been back in the RWD game for over a decade and is still struggling to regain their stature, at a cost of $billions. So let Lincoln stick with the FWD/AWD chassis and make a complete differentiation from the Ford models. The MKZ was a good first start, but I think the interior isn’t good enough, and now the MKC and new MKX are differentiated enough from their Ford counterparts to be taken seriously.

        I’m hoping Ford doesn’t chicken out and build this down to a price. If they go all in and make an honest $60,000 car that has not one nit to pick (the turn signal is the same as the Fusion’s, etc), people would buy it. Look at how many people lined up to buy the Navigator when it first came out. People who never would have bought a Lincoln before.

  • avatar
    insalted42

    Hats off to Lincoln designers for making this car look (almost) nothing like the Ford(s) on which it will surely be based. Keep it up and you might become your own brand soon!

  • avatar

    Nice job.

    Perhaps a little too Jaguar-esque at the grill – but you could fix that with a flush placement.

    A little too Hyundai Azera rear 3/4 – a little tougher to fix.

    All-in-all, though, it makes a bold statement and is one heck of a lot classier – to my eyes – than the “creased paper” idiom over at Cadillac.

  • avatar
    VW16v

    Absolutely beautiful. It could take a few sales away from the S class.

  • avatar
    blueflame6

    Lincoln hate is quite the meme. It must be hard to evaluate a design on its own merits when you dislike the brand so much.

  • avatar
    oldowl

    Sunlight reflecting off the center stack could blind the driver.

  • avatar
    redav

    Those wheels are hideous.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    This does not live up to the promise of the last Continental concept. I still think they should try and give the thing suicide doors and really call on that heritage. The ’65 is one of the greatest sedan designs of all time. This looks like a poor man’s……. Continental (by Bentley, hahaha just making the connection now)

    Butt shouldn’t droop. That recalls the awful bustle butt Continental of the early 80s. They gotta go full 65. Interior looks pretty pedestrian too, they need a striking design like the current S Class or the 92-96 Prelude. They cant afford to mess up on this one, everything’s gotta be perfect.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    It’s no MKR. Not striking enough, likely less power than the outgoing MKS. Disappoint.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      If the new 3.5TT puts out well over 400 HP, I’m sure the new 3.0TT can bust out more than 355 HP. That being said, why don’t they just stuff the 3.5TT in there?

      • 0 avatar
        dwford

        If Cadillac is going to get 400hp out of their new 3.0T V6 in the CT6, then Ford will have to bring a similar amount of power. The 3.5T V6 used to be the new V8, no apparently the 3.0T V6 is the new V8.

        BTW, I hop the make it sound good. We just got in a Taurus SHO on trade and I was really disappointed at the engine/exhaust sound for what is supposed to be a sports sedan.

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        All depends on the boost. Of course I’d rather have a turbo’d 3.5L than a turbo’d 3.0L. No replacement for displacement and all that.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        “why don’t they just stuff the 3.5TT in there?”

        Chinese displacement taxes, which have major jumps above 2.0 and 3.0 liters. I suppose it’s possible that the 3.5 would be an American-market option.

  • avatar

    I honestly don’t care if it’s RWD or not. RWD is not what’s hampering Lincoln in this day and age, when many luxury buyers wouldn’t appreciate their Cayennes and X5s any less if they were based on the Toyota Yaris. I don’t have any issues with the way the MKS with the EcoBoost and AWD, or even the FWD version, handles. What’s holding Lincoln back is milquetoast and/or downright ungainly styling, paired with overall packages that don’t make compelling cases over their quite-nice Ford counterparts. So a properly full-sized car with imposing styling, a compliant but capable suspension setup, and an abundance of space would be a vast improvement, and might be just the thing needed to breathe life back into the brand. And although I am a European car fan, it is refreshing to see something distinctly American, and even if I wouldn’t buy it, I *respect* it.

    Build it.

    Now.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      “full-sized car with imposing styling, a compliant but capable suspension setup”

      Sounds like the Chrysler 300! Although that lacks a truly fullsize trunk and rear legroom. Jack had mentioned before how they should simply take a 300 and tack on some length behind the wheels and call it an Imperial, well they should add in a few inches of wheelbase as well to complete the picture.

      I agree, quintessential American styling is imposing and solid, this thing is just a bit too aerodynamic and ‘generic European.’

      Ford should just buy the stamping presses and robots for Infiniti’s 2003-2004 M45, now that’s a handsome, classic looking vehicle!

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Nicest concept I’ve seen in quite a while, although ditch the wheels in production. I am impressed by the use of a name alone, my only other thought is Ford either don’t do transverse mounting because I’m sick of it or if you do offer an N/A motor. Please don’t build something so good and do two dumb things to the customer in a home run like this (the D3 Taurus already seems disposable in heavy use, don’t let these be disposable too).

  • avatar
    thegamper

    I think the car looks pretty good, especially side and rear views. Downsized wheels in production version will certainly alter the appearance. I never once thought Audi when I looked at this, Jag initially came to mind due to the grill. I think this is better than split wing grill, but it is not a particularly distinctive looking front end….which may be good or bad depending on your taste. I would be more impressed if this were RWD but I will say that this is a car I didn’t think Lincoln was capable of making. Nice work, and calling it Continental vs some variation of alphabet soup was also a nice move.

    As exciting as this car is, everyone will still bash it for not being RWD. I would suggest not even offering a FWD version and make AWD standard. That should silence at least a few haters.

  • avatar
    hshields

    Is this still for livery market? If so:

    1. Trunk door needs to be widened for those airport runs with luggage.
    2. Centre rest and business centre in the rears needs to be removed. Executives do need space for their briefcases/laptop cases.
    3. Roofline “looks” ok but I would want to make absolutely clear a 6″ executive won’t be rubbing his balding head in the back.

    As far as looks I don’t care. What I want to know is, would corporate fleets of conservative, corporate elites want to put their executives in something discrete or something that shouts “I AM AN ELITE BUSINESS MOGAL!!”

    Between this and the Chrysler 300…I want to pick the Lincoln but my bosses would appreciate it if I showed up in the 300.

    • 0 avatar
      dwford

      I think this would turn out to be a better looking limo than the XTS limos I’ve seen. A lot of that concept car fluff will end up going away, but it would be cool for this back seat to be an option like Hyundai does with the Equus.

      • 0 avatar
        hshields

        Hyundai Equus – an interesting statement in discretion and formality. I like this concept don’t get me wrong. I’m just wondering who the target buyer is. If it is to be the heir of the Towncar club then it is for fleet purchases in the livery/limo industry.

        For that industry you don’t need RWD. You want the rear seating to not have a large hump running down the middle. You want maximum comfort in the rear seats, opportunities for climate control, audio control in the back. Have enough space for those after-market add ons like privacy shields.

        Maybe Ford will need to come out with two versions like they did for the Crown Vic and Towncars of yore. The standard wheel base model that is designed for powerful luxury (which would eat away at MKS sales) and an extended “L” edition for livery duties that is FWD, save some coin on power but spend more on suspension and comfort.

  • avatar
    rpol35

    What a mash-up! Good start, I guess, but it will need a lot of filtering.

  • avatar

    Okay, Imma go ahead and say that I miss the current Lincoln grill on this. This grill is very generic, and Lincoln is doing a much better job of making their existing grill better looking and immediately indicative of “Lincoln.” When I look at this, I don’t see “Lincoln.”

    Still, it looks good. If they sold it it would either fall into the RLX category of “decent but overpriced” or the XTS of category of “decent enough that some of us will pay”.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Lincoln design language puzzles me. They’ve spearheaded a comeback around the front end treatment of the MKS and MKC, but what’s with this grill? I don’t get it.

    And FWD? That type of platform is a tough sell in this market. Ask Cadillac.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      The XTS was already ungainly looking compared to the MKS. This car is much nicer looking than both, has more room than both, and actually has a real name.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Personally, I’ve always liked the way the XTS looked, and I don’t have any real issues with the style of this car either (it could stand less bling, but overall I like the look). But what puzzles me is that Lincoln is finally enjoying some sales success with its new design language, and this front end treatment doesn’t continue that.

        Just not sure what the point of the new front end treatment here is.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          Well it’s a concept, so it could change. I like the new winged grille, and even the waterfall in certain applications.

          Also, I would have no problem driving a twin-turbo XTS. It’s the most “Cadillac” of all their current sedans. I would not buy it new. Depreciation on those things is brutal.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            That, or a used 300c, which is also something of a bargain.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I don’t trust a used Chrysler. Plus, I don’t buy from BHPH lots.

            I’ve rarely heard anyone recommend a used Chrysler product. Sure, buy a used Fusion, Malibu, Cruze, or Focus. However, it seems to me that 200s, Avengers, Darts, 300s, etc go from the new lot, to one owner, then they clear auction for $75.12, and end up at Slick Ricky’s Auto and Bail Bond Emporium.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      For what it is, the XTS sells fairly well.

      It’s Acura that has bombed with the RLX.

      As for this, while not groundbreaking design-wise, it’s a rather pleasant design with some touches (which some may find too “gaudy”) which harken to the past.

      If Lincoln execute the production version well, might surpass the A8 in sales.

  • avatar
    Chocolatedeath

    Was hoping they would put the current grill on it. I have been one of a few that actually like the current corporate grill. Looks like a Taurus from the side to me though.

  • avatar
    55_wrench

    I didn’t come to this site to watch a Ram ad splash itself all over the photos of the Lincoln I’m really trying to see.

    TTAC, you really need to find another less obnoxious way to sponsor your site.

    That said, the concept is a move in the right direction..but suicide doors would be nice, along with an electric shaver grille instead of what looks like one taken from a Chrysler 300.

    Definitely a move in the right direction.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    I like it, and I’ll really like it when it is 5 years old and had far steeper depreciation than the compatible Ford. Another value used car buy from Lincoln.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Just think what the release of a new flagship and the revival of the Continental nameplate will do for used MKS pricing!

    Edit: They should have done a vertical bars waterfall grille, rather than this Grille by Gilette (TM). It looks like an electric razor foil.

  • avatar
    Chocolatedeath

    Honestly in five years I will be in the market for a new car and want to go big. I prefer to have a Lincoln but would require something that looks like this but longer and RWD and 500 hp V8. If you build it I will buy it. Oh yeah I do realize that I would be the only one. Baically I want a 750il for 65 grand. Who can give it to me.

  • avatar
    jpk112

    I like it!

  • avatar
    PRNDLOL

    I like the exterior styling job, not so much the interior treatments. Looks like a robot whorehouse.

  • avatar
    carguy

    Within the limits set by the FWD architecture, the exterior style is suitably in-your-face Lincoln. However, the interior is gaudy – even for a concept car.

    Not that any of that matters. This thing is designed for the Chinese market and not for folks like me.

  • avatar
    honda_lawn_art

    Using the full width grille surrounding the headlights like Elwood Engel’s Lincoln Continental would be more attractive and instantly recognizable as a Lincoln; whereas the car pictured above looks like a lot of cars, none of which are a Lincoln.

    The original Lincoln MKX (Lincoln Edge) and the 2002 Lincoln Continental Concept used something like a full width grille and it looked pretty nice.

  • avatar

    Where is DW when you need him? Is it better that CT6 or not? (IMO it is better at least than XTS which is theoretically similar).

    It does not look like Audi or Bentley or any other car. It is just when humans see a new thing they try first to match with the patterns already stored in the long term memory in the brain (is it dangerous, edible and etc). If does not match identified they smell it and next is to try how it tastes. So if you think the pattern matches with Audi, Bentley – it is a good sign because it fires the shopping impulse.

  • avatar
    akatsuki

    Better rims, suicide doors, and put it a bit lower to the ground. Otherwise I think it us perfect. God I hated the split grill.

  • avatar
    Johnster

    It’s a continuation of the front-wheel drive Lincoln Continentals like those from 1988 to 1994 and 1995 to 2002.

    No, it’s not a world-class competitive rear-wheel drive V-8 powered flagship. (The only other Front-Wheel Drive luxury cars that come time to mind are the Cadillac XTS, Acura RLX and TLX, Lexus ES, and various Audis.)

    It’s a bit of a disappointment, but still an improvement over the MKS and much more competitive with its main rival, the Cadillac XTS. It should be available with All-Wheel-Drive, just like the current MKS. It sort of reminds me of the old (and definitely not bad) Buick Park Avenue. If it’s roomy, quiet and comfy cruising down an American Interstate at 80 mph, it should sell O.K.

  • avatar
    jimmyy

    Much better than I expected from Ford. Now, if they can get the reliability and price tag under control, they might have something.

  • avatar
    Noble713

    Overall….I like it. Alot.

    Pros:
    Love the interior. A bit art deco mixed with 21st century tech.
    Likewise the exterior styling mixes art deco with JDM VIP and Bentley.

    Cons:
    Not a RWD V8.
    Wheels are too big for my tastes, and generally speaking I don’t like chrome. I realize it’s a concept though.

    I’d love to see a sportier version, with maybe 19-20in deep concave wheels, a matte paintjob, and blacked out accents/details. An RS6/M5-fighter.

  • avatar
    Polishdon

    I’ve read in other articles that Lincoln is trying to compete with the S-Class, Audi, etc. with this car.

    I hope that they realize that someone shopping for an S-Class (V8/V12) RWD is not going to consider a V6 Lincoln is in the same class. Heck, even Audi knows that!

    And if that’s the price range they are aiming for, they are in trouble !

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