By on January 15, 2015

quebecspecial

The Nissan Micra has officially lost its title as “Canada’s Least Expensive New Car”. Now, the cheapest new car is now the Hyundai Accent.

A new promotional program by Hyundai to celebrate the signing of a Canada-South Korea Free Trade Agreement has seen the base 2015 Hyundai Accent L Manual (aka the “Quebec Special, with no A/C or other creature comforts) priced at $9,400, or $600 less than a base model Nissan Micra. Even the Mitsubishi Mirage starts at $12,198 in the Great White North, making the Accent, and the Elantra L Quebec Special an incredible value.

Of course, two things stand in your way.

  1. While these two cars are qualitatively and quantitatively superior to the Micra and Mirage, you’ll have to find them on dealer lots first. Not an easy task outside of La Belle Province, where people demand these loss leaders in real quantities.
  2. You’ll almost certainly want to upgrade to a better trim level. No A/C is a major drag in many parts of the country.

CZ_en

 

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58 Comments on “Vive Le Quebec Special: Hyundai Accent Is Now Canada’s Cheapest New Car...”


  • avatar
    Hummer

    Not a bad car by any means compared to what cheap cars used to mean. I don’t think lack of A/C is that big of a deal in Canada as long as it has decent fresh air ventilation settings.

    I’ve driven vehicles without A/C in the middle of our summer in 80-90 degree weather, Canada can’t be that bad.

    • 0 avatar

      Where I live, it turns into a humid swamp like DC

      • 0 avatar
        Alfisti

        The the idiots try and say it’s “32 degrees, feels like 42 with the humidity”. No it bloody well doesn’t, it feels like a humid 32 degree day you muppets.

        Then you have everyone wandering around saying “it’s 40 degrees out!!!!”, as an Aussie i tell them that is preposterous, it’s not even close to ‘feeling” like 42. 42 is a freakin furnace with heat radiating everywhere.

        • 0 avatar
          danio3834

          Ah yes. Check out the Canadian invention of the Humidex Factor. Kinda like the Wind Chill thing that everyone likes to talk about.

          • 0 avatar
            Alfisti

            OK now you’ll hate me as it may be my history in a warm climate that affects my judgement but the wind chill at least seems close.

            What i mean is, humid is humid, it’s not hot. Wind chill is still cold. I know if i stand outside in minus 5 it’s oooooook to a point but if it’s so much as breezy it feels WAY colder.

            maybe the problem is the terminology, rather than saying ‘feel like 42″ they should come up with some sort of comfort rating ‘cos no one likes sticky … but it’s sticky not hot.

            Case in point, anyone watch the Australian open Tennis last year? The morons running the tournament would cancel play based on the HUMIDEX reading, which is utterly, utterly insane. It’s 44 degrees (115f) but a dry heat so it “felt” like 37 or something.

            That’s CRAZY, heat is heat and the sun is so strong the players were collapsing en-mass. Just ‘cos it’s more comfortable than it would be if humid, doesn’t make it less hot.

            The world’s gone mad.

        • 0 avatar
          JohnnyFirebird

          It drove my dad insane. Me too. People never tell you the right temperature any more, it’s always that made-up dramatic temperature.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        Ahh yes, then that could be quite unpleasant I agree.

    • 0 avatar
      Jon Fage

      It doesn’t get to be 80-90 degrees in Canada. Here, that’s just shy of the boiling point of water. Temperatures in Canada have been measured in metric since 1975, which makes us just like every other country in the world with the possible exception of the United States, Liberia and Myanmar. Why Americans (and Liberians and the Burmese or whatever they are called now) resist the metric system like a Boko Haram, Al Qaeda or ISIS plot to overthrow the entire planet is beyond my comprehension.

      In Canada, it gets to be 25-35 degrees in the summer. The measurement used in almost every country on the face of the planet. In those temperatures, the biggest threats to Canadians is the loss of shelter as our igloos melt and evaporate.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        We have no reason to convert, the system works very well and will continue to work well, it would cost us trillions to change to the metric system. We shouldn’t have to change to suit you.
        So you can keep your below and around freezing point 25-35.
        =)

      • 0 avatar
        Arthur Dailey

        I’m Canadian and refuse to acknowledge the metric system. It is based on a number of fallacies, the primary one being that it is easier to use because everything ins based on increments of ten. That is incorrect because 12 (inches in feet) is actually easier to use because it is the lowest number divisible by both odd and even numbers.

        Also all construction, infrastructure, etc is still completed using the good old Imperial System. 2 x 4’s, 4’x8′ sheets of drywall/plywood, the grid system used to set-up towns, the trunk systems for sewage/water etc.

        The conversion to metric was largely an attempt to shift trade from the US to other markets and its overall impact was largely symbolic.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          The metric system is the tool of the devil! My car gets forty rods to the hogshead and that’s the way I likes it.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            Thanks, I appreciate that laugh!

            However I work in manufacturing and it is an added cost/time waster to have to utilize both systems, which are American customers/suppliers require. And even the majority of our Canadian customers/suppliers use the Imperial system for sizing.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    Regarding the Elantra L. 4 wheel disc brakes, ABS, stability control, air bags, power windows, power locks, power side view mirrors, lit vanity mirrors, 60/40 folding rear seats, 6 way adjustable driver’s seat, the same standard upholstery as the higher market models, decent sound system. Receptacle/outlets for your electronic devices.

    6 speed manual transmission.

    This is not exactly a poverty spec penalty box.

    No A/C might be a deal breaker for some. Otherwise this seems like a great deal.

    • 0 avatar
      Varezhka

      Wow, not bad at all for the money!
      Lack of AC may be annoying but wouldn’t be necessary in places like Vancouver, especially if you have power windows.

      My old Kia Rio from little over 10 years ago ($6500 pre-tax after manufacturer rebate) had no power window, power door locks, or power steering. No remote trunk release, stereo, or anything else people take for granted either. That car truly represented “cheap and cheerful”. This would be a luxury car by comparison.

      • 0 avatar
        MBella

        “Lack of AC may be annoying but wouldn’t be necessary in places like Vancouver, especially if you have power windows.”

        I have found that A/C is more important in the PNW than in other parts. It’s not needed for cooling in the summer, but dehumidifying in the winter. My A/C compressor just went out on my Subaru. It has been incredibly annoying to wait for the engine to warm up before I can drive anywhere. I’ve been trying to take out the Miata as much as possible, but it has been too cold the last couple of days. I have never witnessed glass fogging up in the same manner outside of the PNW. I think it’s more important here, than in areas with humid summers.

        • 0 avatar
          Varezhka

          Not sure I would agree that it’s *more* important here than other areas since I know I would die without AC in, for example, Tokyo.

          I do agree though that they are quite useful for defogging, and I do use AC more during winter time up here in PNW.

    • 0 avatar
      johnhowington

      i dont get the lack of AC either. at most its $400 in actual parts costs and maybe an extra 200 in labor to install at the factory.

  • avatar
    Alfisti

    nearly 10 years ago the Accent was advertised as $9,999. By the time you drove out of the dealership it was near $13k with all the ancillary charges, taxes, fees and BS North Americans seem to tolerate added to their advertised product price (just list the final price people!!! How hard can it be … god it’s annoying).

    We bought one a year old with less than 20k on it for $13K and it had Auto, AC, power windows etc etc etc ….. the base $9,999 jobbie was a joke.

    It also highlights the silliness of the buying public, at this price point just buy what you want rather than tolerate a stripped back crap box because the HIDEOUS insurance costs in most CDN provinces means the extra two or three grand spent on purchase will pale into significance compared to the insurance costs over say five years.

    This is especially the case for target buyers of cheap cars, if you’re under 21 and male with a clean record you’re likely to be hit with $6K to $8k a year in insurance costs in Ontario.

    • 0 avatar
      Onus

      Whats with the Insane Insurance rates?

      I didn’t even pay that much as a new driver at 18 ( didn’t bother getting my license in high school ).

      Though for 10 grand you get a Ton in this car. AC is nice but quite easy to go without I imagine in Quebec.

      • 0 avatar
        Alfisti

        Quebec gets real sticky, AC would be very very nice. They all smoke anyway though, so what’s the difference?

        Go to Belair Direct and do a quote, under 21, clean record. Use L6W 4K6 as the postal code.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        Onus, If you buy the minimum insurance required by law, the rates aren’t too bad. That’s what I do on all my cars, even when new, through USAA.

        Of course, if you choose to finance, the lender will require you get the most expensive coverage to ensure their money in case of total loss in an accident.

        • 0 avatar
          Onus

          I have to minimums on my two cars. 1 driver. Old cars paid cash. 22 year old male. Insurance is really cheap now.

          I figured Quebec should be nice seeing its so far up ( New England here). I see it isn’t really different than summer here. The humidity can be brutal.

          • 0 avatar
            wmba

            I always remember the line-up at the American pavilion at Expo 67. Americans sweating buckets complaining about the heat. Why, a whole 50 miles north of the border, it being Canada and all, they really should have to be wearing parkas, shouldn’t they? seemed to be the average opinion.

      • 0 avatar

        Increasing repair costs, increasing injury settlement costs, and the fact that a relatively minor collision that makes the air bags deploy results in a pretty major repair to the car (the bags are expensive to replace). No, I wouldn’t want to go back to the pre-airbag, pre-ABS days personally but this stuff does cost money.

        Also, modern bumpers damage very easily (to absorb impact for the humans) and they typically cost the better part of $2,000 to replace on many cars.

        • 0 avatar
          mmmbacon

          I don’t understand private insurance in Canada.

          We have non-discriminatory government insurance in Saskatchewan, I used to pay $1,200/year for insurance on a brand new car when I was a teenager.

          Not every young person is a reckless driver. If I have a clean record, why should I pay $3,500 in AB for the same coverage I have for $1,000 in SK?

          And they still manage to return $70 million in profits to the provincial government every year.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      Too many people just agree to pay the so called doc fees, if I learned one thing from my grandparents, It’s that doc and processing fees are a scam. It’s stupid to agree to pay them, those employees aren’t paid by the job-those fees are 100% profit. As such I’ve always refused to pay them, and have on occasion walked out due to the infuriating money grab.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnnyFirebird

      Since GEICO in Colorado wouldn’t talk to ICBC in British Columbia I was insured as a new driver when I got my 2004 Mustang GT, for about $4500 a year.

      Have I mentioned that I made terrible decisions as a twenty-something year old?

    • 0 avatar
      iMatt

      Do a little digging into how much insurance fraud takes place in Ontario. Million dollar backroom deals happening all of the time and the people who profit the most are the lawyers and insurance companies. Of course consumers pay.

      In quebec where it is illegal to sue someone involved in an auto accident, insurance rates are ridiculously cheaper. A full year’s coverage there (Montreal) cost me less than one month of insurance in the GTA.

    • 0 avatar
      Sooke

      “…the HIDEOUS insurance costs in most CDN provinces means the extra two or three grand spent on purchase will pale into significance…”

      $600 a year for $200,00 basic liability on a 15 year old Kia for this 60 year old in BC.

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        You got the geezer rate for a throwaway car that will be totaled in a fender-bender, and they’ll pay $200 before subtracting the deductible.

        • 0 avatar
          Arthur Dailey

          Lorenzo is correct. BC has much lower rates than Ontario and Sooke is 60 years old with a car that would not be repaired.

          To put my 22 year old son, who got his license at 16 and has a clear driving record as the primary driver on a 10+ year old Buick in Ontario was nearly $5k per year.

          That is for the GTA which is the highest of the highest. Due to congestion and a generally low level of driver competence. The first snow fall each year turns the roads into a scene from Mad Max. It’s like they have never seen snow before. And the worst offenders/vehicles most likely to spin out or be involved in crashes (not accidents) are either German sedans or pick-ups.

  • avatar
    heavy handle

    Great winter beater if you own something sporty (two wheeled or four). At that price it’s cheaper than the depreciation from driving a nice car in the salt.

    • 0 avatar
      Alfisti

      Insurance and tyres gonna cost you.

      • 0 avatar
        heavy handle

        You’ll pay for those either way. Compare the price of tires for an Accent to those of any sports car, and you’ll see that you come out ahead.

        Never mind that some cars can’t be driven in snow at all. I remember a situation where someone I know wanted a major service done on their NSX over the winter. They had to build wooden ramps just to get it into the service bay, it couldn’t get up a slight snowy incline on it’s own.

        • 0 avatar
          greaseyknight

          Exactly, drop the insurance on the cool car down to Comp only, just in case it gets stolen or a tree falls on it. And put the snow tires on the beater. As a bonus, you have a spare vehicle if something happens to your “cool” car.

          I do this with a car and a motorcycle.

        • 0 avatar
          Alfisti

          Right but you’re running two cars now, in other scenarios you’re running one. Running two comes with tyres and insurance which could cost you upwards of $10K to $15K over 5 years.

          • 0 avatar
            heavy handle

            We’re all car guys (and gals) here. Some cars are too nice to drive in salty slush.

            Here in the snow belt, any evidence of winter driving knocks $10K off of the value of a used Porsche immediately. It’s hard to hide; aluminum pits and develops a flaky white coating. You can argue that you plan on keeping your Porsche (or Nissan Z, or Miata) forever, but you probably won’t if it gets all corroded and all of the chassis bolts are seized, and nobody qualified will work on it anymore.

            So, you do have to spend money to own a winter car, but it pales in comparison to the cost of driving your nice car in the winter. Obviously, if your “nice car” happens to be a motorcycle, you don’t have a choice. It’s either a winter beater or taking the bus.

          • 0 avatar
            heavy handle

            Just to be clear, since lots of car guys (or gals) aren’t into NSXs and Porsches and what not. A nicely preserved 1974 Chrysler Imperial is easily worth 10 grand to the right buyer. One that’s been driven in the salt is worth $200/ton at the scrap yard. Your “nice” car doesn’t have to be expensive to justify driving a $9400 Hyundai in the winter.

  • avatar

    Sweet, a Veloster for $16,000. That’s like $5300 a door!

  • avatar
    86er

    I don’t even know what a Nissan Micra is. Guessing something microscopic?

    “Am I so out of touch? No, it’s the children who are wrong”.

  • avatar
    infinitime

    This is even a better deal with our weak Canadian dollar these days.

    As a fellow Canuck and long-time fan of minimalist transportation, this is an incredible deal. My only gripe about the current Accent is the relatively high beltline, which stylistically led to a way too short rear windshield… Awful visibility for such a small car…

    What is really interesting is that with the gradual implementation of the Korea-Canada free trade deal, the tarriff (about 10 – 15% on these) is expected to go away in the next three years.

    I am curious as to what the actual production costs would be, if they can afford to sell it this cheap right now, even with most of the tariffs still in place.

    • 0 avatar
      Alfisti

      I bet they just about lose money on it. But they figure most buyers will not actually buy one!

      They go to the dealership, get in and what, a window handle?? WTF! Oh and no aircon, jeeeebus! And WTF is this stick between the two front seats and why on EARTH are there three pedals.

      You know what happens next.

    • 0 avatar
      wmba

      Import duty on cars from Korea and Japan into Canada has been 6.1% for decades, not 10 or 15%.

      And it’s on the declared value, so about next to nothing, or $300 or so on an Accent, valuing these things at about $5K. They’ve been selling off old model Sonatas for $12,999, or just over $11K US around here, and they’re not strippers.

  • avatar
    JohnnyFirebird

    On the walk from the metro (station Angrignon, in Montreal, Quebec) to my apartment every night I walk down a street of 60% Quebec specials – steel wheels, manual, no AC. Most were probably bought used.

    Wages are pretty low, especially in my neighborhood, and Japanese / US cars tend to disintegrate after 15 years. Pre-2000 cars on the road are very rare.

    • 0 avatar
      Brumus

      Johnny, I see many ’06 – ’07 Hyundai’s on the streets that show signs of not holding up well to Montreal winters (i.e., showing rust) compared to other makes of a similar vintage. Don’t know if you’ve noticed same…

      Interested to see if local dealers actually have any of these “strippers” on the lot.

      • 0 avatar
        JohnnyFirebird

        Yeah, when I worked at a Montreal VW dealer there were quite a few base Jetta Trendlines sold, but more Trendline+ (AC and power group) sold. As a used car manager I see a *lot* of Vibe / Matrixes / Corollas come in manual with no AC.

    • 0 avatar
      iMatt

      The used car market in Quebec is also unique. People view their cars as disposable appliances and hence fairly new cars can be had for relatively cheap.

      Another funny thing I noticed while living there is that cars were always judged by their age. Ex, “It’s a 2004 so it must be old and undesirable.”

      Mileage, condition and even the make of the car seemed secondary!

  • avatar
    mik101

    The Accent L was listed for $8900 from dealers in Nova Scotia in the Summer.

    Nice try TTAC, but you’re asleep at the wheel.

  • avatar
    bullnuke

    Never had a/c in any of my vehicles bought new until 1992. Currently 63 years old. Still alive.

  • avatar
    deanst

    According to unhaggle.com the 2014 fiesta has a $5,000 incentive – for a net price of $9,500. And it has air conditioning.

    You can get the Hyundai with air for an extra $2100.

  • avatar
    Joss

    But the Micra was specially engineered for Canada. It sports rear seat heater ducts. The extra $600 earns you a 4-speed automatic & rear drums over the Accent.

  • avatar
    claytori

    When I test drove one of these last August, the salesman pointed out that the AC dealer install cost on the base L model was less than $1500. That is much less than the increment to the higher trim model, which would have run in the high $15k’s. Yest the upholstery is the same. But there are some nice things like cruise control and bluetooth that would be very good to have. No, I didn’t bite. The sales guy had me pegged. Still to rich for my blood. Note to southerners, road de-icing chemicals up here make cars disposable items. If all you are buying is transportation, then finding the lowest cost for it is important. The big surprise with this thing is that I could sit comfortably in the back seat of the hatch with the driver’s seat set for myself (6′-1″ tall).

  • avatar
    maestromario

    I’m surprised how many Nissan Micra I see on the road in Montreal.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    Those prices seems quite cheap.

    What is the average or median wage in Qubecistan?

    The Accent would make an ideal second car, cheap to run and it would be reliable enough.


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