By on January 12, 2015

2017-Ford-GT-9

We thought this wouldn’t happen, but here it is: The Ford GT has returned.

The new GT will begin production late in 2016, and will be sold in select markets around the world in celebration of the 50th anniversary of Ford’s destruction of Ferrari at Le Mans with the GT40.

Power for the GT is derived from a mid-mounted next-gen twin-turbo 3.5-liter EcoBoost V6 producing upwards of 600 horsepower, which is sent to the back via a seven-speed dual-clutch transaxle.

Surrounding the engine and transaxle is bodywork composed of carbon fiber with front and rear aluminum subframes. The body itself is heavily optimized for aero and downforce, and features an active rear spoiler that follows both speed and what the driver desires.

Other features include: adjustable ride height; 20-inch wheels mounted in Michelin Pilot Super Sport Cup 2 tires with a composition made specifically for the GT; upward swinging doors; and Ford’s new SYNC 3 connected-vehicle system.

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178 Comments on “NAIAS 2015: The Return Of The Ford GT...”


  • avatar
    hybridkiller

    I’d rather have a Z06 with a proper SC V8 – though the Vette would be even nicer with a DCT option.

    • 0 avatar
      energetik9

      I’m not even sure I would put those two in the same category.

      • 0 avatar
        hybridkiller

        I’m assuming this won’t be a quarter million dollar car – not with that meh engine.

        To paraphrase the old expression, this won’t be your father’s GT40

        Pricing remains to be seen, but if this thing comes in at anywhere near $100K (and I suspect it will) then I'd say it's aimed right at the C7 Z06.

        • 0 avatar
          cmoibenlepro

          Since when is 600HP a ‘meh’ engine?

          • 0 avatar
            hybridkiller

            In the context of a modern “supercar”, especially one with the storied heritage of the Ford GT, you bet it’s a meh engine. I’m not saying this will be a true supercar, but that seems to be the expectation.

            TT V6s are all fine and dandy, but does anyone seriously think they do 600ish HP as well as a supercharged V8 without some tradeoffs?

            Weight savings with the V6 can’t be that significant, someone will no doubt correct me if I’m wrong.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            The weight savings will be insignificant, if it’s savings at all. The Coyote is lighter than the current 3.5EB.

          • 0 avatar
            LeMansteve

            I remember when the McLaren F1 was THE supercar to beat. It made 627hp from a NA V12. Years later, the Enzo Ferrari came out and was the NEW supercar to beat. It made 650hp from a NA V12. Now Ford puts a 600hp engine in their new supercar and it’s “meh”. Nevermind that it’s 50hp more than the previous S/C V8.

            For street cars, look at the R8, 458, Huracan. Not the base models, the highest-trim special editions. They all run right around 600hp.

            For racing, Ford is already running V6 turbos in endurance prototype chassis. In this sense, the engine choice makes sense.

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            “I remember when the McLaren F1 was THE supercar to beat. It made 627hp from a NA V12. Years later, the Enzo Ferrari came out and was the NEW supercar to beat. It made 650hp from a NA V12. Now Ford puts a 600hp engine in their new supercar and it’s “meh”. Nevermind that it’s 50hp more than the previous S/C V8.

            For street cars, look at the R8, 458, Huracan. Not the base models, the highest-trim special editions. They all run right around 600hp.”

            I guess if the benchmark were 20 year old hypercars and previous generation super cars, there would be more univeral excitement. Many of us expected the bar to be raised.

          • 0 avatar
            ellomdian

            In the realm of Internet Fanboys. See all the below commentary and gnashing of teeth about the V6, the ‘busy’ design language, and a whole bunch of wasted internet bytes from people who will likely never be in the same space as one of these, let alone be a prospective buyer.

            Lots of talk about this car and the Vettes/Vipers, but aside from Jingoistic circlejerking, the important number is likely $150k – the cost of a new 911T. If this comes in at or below that, I expect Ford will have a waiting list. Above that, and you have to really love the Oval to pass up on the leaders in that segment.

          • 0 avatar
            raph

            When it’s not a Porsche or Nissan and it’s cylinder count is a six pack.

            Ford is pushing it’s EcoDud agenda a little to hard with the cool-aid going full flavor at the headquarters.

            I’ll have to check out Jag XJ220 pricing to see how a V6 super car holds up but I’m betting the older, slower, and heavier supercharged V8 GT will be worth more as the years roll on.

          • 0 avatar
            bumpy ii

            “Since when is 600HP a ‘meh’ engine?”

            HELLCAT BRAH!!!!

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            “meh” engine?

            Funny, the previous GT500 engine was based on the 5.4 pickup truck engine.

            So now a EB 3.5 V6 pickup truck engine no longer works?

            I prefer the sound of a V8 but beyond that, power characteristics are what matter.

        • 0 avatar
          RobertRyan

          I just hope it does not have the myriad problems that killed the last Ford GT. It was going to be the Supercar, but faded rapidly into mediocrity.
          I wonder how many here can remember it?

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Yes, the Hellcat may have more horsepower. But I’m gonna go out on a limb here and predict two things:

            1) The GT will come in a LOT lighter than the Hellcat Challenger, which is a total porker at 4500 pounds or so. Power to weight ratio should be better.

            2) On a track, we’re talking about a 4500 pound converted family sedan versus a far lighter, mid-engined sports car. Translation: the GT would probably do things to a Challenger Hellcat on a track that would be immoral to do to a farm animal.

          • 0 avatar
            raph

            Faded into mediocrity? Hardly

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            “Faded into mediocrity” it sure did. It had so many things wrong with it,, this halo car became an embarrassment
            Ford dropped it, as there was just too many things to fix, looked good though
            Hopefully the latest incarnation will be a lot better

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Ford dropped it because it was a luxury during The Way Forward.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            Ford dropped it in 2006 Remember viewing one at Sydney Motorshow then another in California
            First it was the control arm issue, then other problems appeared, then they had to modify it for some Califonian regulations. The negative publicity and the modifications were too much for Ford at the time
            “Production was behind due to the control arm issue early on. Thery lost several weeks of production while revised arms were manufactured. The new federal crash regulations would have required considerable re-engineering and investment so the last of the cars went to Canada/export I recall. The line was wound down before the “4500” units. BTW, I sat in on a video meeting with Ford before the cars release and they refused to confirm the total production number. I understand that the commonly quoted “5000 units” was never given nor confirmed by FoMoCo.”

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            The issues you speak of had nothing to do with Ford dropping the GT. The Way Forward closed at least nine plants, axed many models, and killed a whole brand. Ford also sold off four brands. It was economic problems that killed the last Ford GT, not ones related to the vehicle.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            The problem was they still had not resolved those teachnical issues and it would have cost them a bomb to fix them add in the shutting down of the plants and it was goodbye

    • 0 avatar
      PaulieWalnut

      The engine has to comply with Le Mans rules. Winning at Le Mans again is the whole point of this car. Engines must be less than 4.0 litres boosted or less than 5.5 litres NA (the Viper’s v-10 was grandfathered). I have no doubt the engine in this will make more power than the 5.2 in the GT 350. Alfa Romeo has shown a V6 can sound amazing, so I’ll keep my mind open on the engine.

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

        Lol, yeah, the GT was SO bad, I remember all the cash on the hood offers and how many were dumped into rental fleets.

        Wait, its the latest Viper that has sold so poorly that its not worth killing. Ford sold the GT for well over MSRP, and the values of those rare cars that find themselves on the used market have been astounding. Yes, a horrible failure on Ford’s part.

        Oh, the 600 hp engine is meh, but my modded Impreza is da $hitz, yo.

        • 0 avatar
          mik101

          Pretty much. This had to comply with LeMans (you know, the point of making it in the first place), and the Corvette doesn’t. People jump to conclusions like OMGz engine so small. The engine also doesn’t have to waste energy spinning its massive supercharger. That’s something people frequently forget. (I’m a supporter of turbos and not superchargers anyway, unless we’re talking about giant diesel locamotives or something).

          All of those complaining don’t have the money to buy one anyway so it’s a moot point.

  • avatar
    bball40dtw

    Sweet Jesus

    • 0 avatar
      tresmonos

      more like lol ford racing

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        I like the look.

        The powertrain…I will reserve judgement until I see numbers. I’m with Danio and would have been happier with a Voodoo or Coyote TT monster. And I am someone who likes the ecoboost V6 quite a bit.

        I will admit that I am interested in the idea of a close to 500 HP/lb.ft 3.5EB Mustang.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    They should join two GTDI V6 blocks together to make a production GT90. That would be a burning hot setup.

  • avatar
    daniel g.

    ok ford, i get it, now do it again in lemans.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    “Power for the GT is derived from a mid-mounted next-gen twin-turbo 3.5-liter EcoBoost V6”

    Oh good, because I want a Fusion engine in my super car. WTF.

    V8! Super cars (through history) with V6 engines have not been as successful in the sales department as V8 ones.

    I really liked the last GT, and now I’m irritated with this one. It also reminds me of that old British brand… something. Had a hyphen in the name? They only made one or two cars.

    Edit: Marcos. Reminds me of a Marcos.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      “Oh good, because I want a Fusion engine in my super car. WTF.”

      Taurus engine? F-150 engine? No V6 in the Fusion no more.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      “Oh good, because I want a Fusion engine in my super car”

      Fusion still offers a six? Pretty sure it was dropped in it’s CD4 and is only available in the Zephyr “trim” as it were.

      But I do agree who wants a six in their 100K+ supercar? This especially when Ford HAS A GREAT V8 and it is offered in the Mustang. Honda didn’t have one when the developed NSX back in the day at least AFAIK.

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        Likely to push Ecoboost brand equity since that’s the direction they’re going with their volume powertrains. At 600hp, this clearly wasn’t intended to be a world beater.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Thanks for the reply, I see it as further watering down in this case and an overall fail. Why even develop the car if you’re not going to be serious, for marketing? Shouldn’t products market themselves on their merits, performance, and word of mouth?

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            If I were in charge, I would have done an Ecoboost V8 based on the 5.0L to take it up an extra notch.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @danio

            Bingo.

            This car reeks of committee thinking.

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            “This car reeks of committee thinking.”

            Well, it has to make sense on some level. They certainly won’t make money selling the cars individually.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Typically something like this was designed by a small team usually headed by one brilliant engineer or designer (common corportate systems such as drivetrain, HVAC, braking, notwithstanding). This feels like dozens if not hundreds of people were involved and as someone commented below, the car looks very unnecessarily “busy”.

        • 0 avatar
          greaseyknight

          Exactly my thought, this is a Halo car to further the Ford brand. A major part of Ford at the moment is the EcoBoost line of engines. Plus the car will be lighter and more compact with the v6 vs the Coyote v8. And give Ford a better platform to showcase their turbo tech.

        • 0 avatar
          juicy sushi

          Depends on the class. It’s right in the hunt with the 458, Huracan, Mercedes AMG and McLaren offerings, and the motor is already race proven for the GTE-class race car this will spawn.

          It makes more sense than a V8.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          danio3834 – “Likely to push Ecoboost brand equity since that’s the direction they’re going with their volume powertrains.”

          Someone give Danio a gold star.

          Ford has gone the “Ecoboost” route.

          V8’s at FoMoCo are all but dead.

          The ONLY holdouts are two vehicles made almost exclusively for the USA market – the F series pickup and the Mustang.

          Sucks to be a V8 fan at “One Ford Global”.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          I dunno, Danio, if that car is light enough, 600 hp would be PLENTY potent.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        Do you really think they can keep a V6 Ecoboost out of the Mustang forever? The Raptor is getting a V6 that will put out more power than the 6.2L. It’s only a matter of time before that engine finds a home in the Mustang.

        • 0 avatar
          anomaly149

          No market space. The V8 won’t go away, too much room for growth still, and there’s no room for a turbo six and an NA 8. Expect the Corvette / Grand National problem for some time.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      “Oh good, because I want a Fusion engine in my super car. WTF”

      Lotus used commodity Toyota engines to great effect* in in the Elise and Exige. The Evora uses the Toyota 3.5L and again, it’s a very good car. And then there’s the Corvette, whose engine isn’t that divergent from what’s in some of GM’s trucks.

      As much as I wish it weren’t the case, using a commodity engine in this day and age is technically just fine—it’s only the snob appeal that stands against it. Heck, it’s better than fine, as you end up with something people can afford to keep, and it allows the OEM to spend money where you really feel it, like the chassis.

      Hopefully, Ford does this well. I agree that the last GT was very well done, and it will be hard for Ford to equal it’s “workingman’s supercar” appeal, assuming they even want to, what with the Corvette and Viper moving upmarket as well.

      * technically. I know they didn’t sell.

    • 0 avatar

      Noble has been using a boosted Ford Duratec V6 in the M12 and M400 for 15 years now. Zero-to-sixty in the low threes!

    • 0 avatar
      juicy sushi

      I think the V6 was probably used because they already have a successful endurance racing version of the motor being used. I would suspect that they’ll just try and use as much of that version as possible in the GT car.

      Since this is supposedly intended to have a GTE version to go racing with, the turbo V6 makes sense in that light.

    • 0 avatar
      Fred

      Where can I get a Fusion with 600hp?

    • 0 avatar
      korvetkeith

      +1 on committee thinking. The person that decided this car should have a V6 wears poorly fitting khakis, has a cheap watch and drives a focus to work.

      They couldn’t understand the demographics for this car less.

      • 0 avatar
        hubcap

        Possibly. Or maybe they decided to use the engine that powers their Daytona prototype?

      • 0 avatar
        Truckducken

        But they understand the demographics for the products that benefit from the halo of this contraption pretty well, methinks.

      • 0 avatar
        dtremit

        The buyers of this car aren’t its market; the buyers of other Ford cars are.

        I mean, obviously it has to sell enough copies that it won’t be seen as a flop. But producing a limited number ensures that.

        The real purpose of this car is for people to point to it and say “my Fusion has a little of that in it.” The profit comes when they sell an Ecoboost F150 because “it’s got the same engine as the GT.”

        • 0 avatar
          hubcap

          Noone, well I can’t really say that. Few if any buy a Fusion to say ‘it’s got a little of that in it’.

          Even fewer will buy an F-150 because “its got the same engine as a GT.”

          I could be wrong but I wouldn’t bet against it.

  • avatar
    Jellodyne

    Does this seem a little smaller than the previous Ford GT? Or is it just the black moulding?

  • avatar
    energetik9

    I have always been a fan of this car and glad to see it returning. The back end looks pretty spectacular.

  • avatar
    Steinweg

    I just like the Noble M600 more and more every day.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Also, the flying buttresses are hella cool.

  • avatar
    VCplayer

    I can’t be the only one who checked to see if it was April 1st all of the sudden…

    Anyways, car looks great. Hopefully Ford takes the opportunity to show off some new technologies in this car that can move down later on.

  • avatar
    energetik9

    I just liked the sound of this, “Ford’s destruction of Ferrari at Le Mans with the GT40”.

    It’s amazing to see those old GT40s close up.

  • avatar
    Verbal

    Dear Santa: Please leave one of these in my stocking for Christmas 2016. Thanks in advance.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    So will we have to listen to Clarkson talk this up for one or two series?

  • avatar
    Crabspirits

    God, this is the first car since the Italia that I find ridiculously good-looking, with hardly a flaw to be found. Just enjoyable to drink in.

    The V6 is a looser engine choice for a supercar even if it makes sense. Put a de-stroked V8 with twin turbos, and pipe the noise inside.

  • avatar
    dabossinne

    There is one helluva a lot going on in the design of this thing. Very contemporary, very 3-dimensional, totally intriguing. I think Ford made the right call to go completely contemporary and leave retro-design in the past.

    That said, there is clearly Ford lineage in the design… there’s some GT40 and some S550 Mustang in there. Also some LaFerrari, some McLaren, some Aventador, some Porsche Carrera GT and 918…what a fascinating melange of styling cues.

    Can’t say as yet how well I like it…it’s too much to take in just in one glance. You want to just stare at it from every angle and drink it all in slowly, and even then its almost too much to fully comprehend. Can’t wait to learn about the details and specs.

    Bravo Ford! Bring it on!

    • 0 avatar
      juicy sushi

      Not really a fan, it’s bit too busy looking, but it looks like the rear half of the car is all about aerodynamics with the buttresses and out-rigger style rear fenders.

      If that turns out to be legal, it could be very interesting to see how it does, provided Ford don’t make a total hash of the development of it.

  • avatar
    Maxb49

    The Ecoboost isn’t a bad engine. The Ecoboost isn’t a particularly great engine either. For $100,000 plus dollars, buyers are going to get a buzzy sounding V6? Ford, you’re better than that.

  • avatar
    nickoo

    Forget the vette and the viper, this is America’s supercar.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    The exterior is way too busy. Apparently, nobody in the board room could say ‘no’ to anything on this car.

    I prefer the cleaner lines of a McLaren 12C or 650S.

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      Agreed, I was honestly hoping they’d just forget about the GT, not revive it as some cheap V6-powered Lambo wannabe.

      Its like a supercar designed by a focus group, something I hardly see that often.

  • avatar
    celebrity208

    It’d be sweet if the exhaust came out of the center of those tail lights. Then the red glow of the driving lights would be like looking up the hot end of a jet engine!

  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    Much better looking than the Corvette.

    Who cares how many cylinders it has? It’s making 600HP in a lightweight car. I’m sure performance will be more than adequate.

  • avatar
    mkirk

    So the brunt of the objections here are that a twin turbo 600HP V6 is not supercar material but the Vette’s pushrod v8 derived from a truck is where it’s at. If it had a diesel though you guys would be all about buying one CPO.

    • 0 avatar
      Maxb49

      @mkirt: The Corvette’s engine was NOT derived from a truck. On the contrary, the truck motors were derived from the Corvette’s engine. Prior to 1955, Chevrolets were six cylinder cars. That changed when Chevrolet’s engineering department, encouraged by Zora Akrus Duntov and led by engineer Ed Cole, developed the first small block V8 for the Chevrolet Corvette and Bel Air. Sixty years later, the small block V8 is the standard by which all performance engines are measured ured for durability, reliability, packaging, and power output. The original first generation small block is still in production for racing and industrial applications. It’s a proven performer. Anything else would be out of character, and quite possibly inferior, in the Corvette.

  • avatar
    Goatshadow

    That is absolutely gorgeous and poster-worthy. I love the no-nonsense interior.

  • avatar
    korvetkeith

    The fact that this gets a V6 while the mustang gets a FPC V8 is mind boggling.

    • 0 avatar
      juicy sushi

      The V6 is likely the better motor, and they already have a race-developed version of this that could be sort-of dropped in.

    • 0 avatar
      Maxb49

      Don’t worry, Ford will eventually go full retard and not offer you a V8 Mustang, either.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      And yet… the V6 has more power and more torque by a wide margin.

      • 0 avatar
        Maxb49

        Turbocharge an eight cylinder and compare the numbers. The V8 wins, with better engine balance.

        • 0 avatar
          heavy handle

          If they used a V8, they would need to make the car bigger and heavier. Weight and agility don’t really matter for a Mustang, but this car may do some real racing.

          Not sure what you mean about “engine balance.” It’s a sports car, not a limo. Packaging beats vibration all day every day.

          I remember reading an interview with an F1 designer 10 or so years ago when each manufacturer used different bank angles from 90 to 120 degrees. He said that the only vibration criteria was that it didn’t prevent the driver from seeing straight. Other than that, vibration wasn’t a consideration.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          But Ford doesn’t have a turbo V8 just sitting on the shelf ready to be hopped up for a low-volume car. The best they can do is a heavy supercharged V8 that’s only a bit more powerful than they expect the V6 to be.

          • 0 avatar
            Maxb49

            dal20402: Wrong. Ford has a turbo 5.0 from the most recent CobraJet. Ford is trying to shove this Ecoboost where people don’t want it. Being an MKS owner, I know enough about the engine to know that while it isn’t a bad engine, I wouldn’t want it in my supercar. I certainly don’t want it in my Mustang.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            That’s not remotely a street-legal or driveable engine. It’s built for going one quarter mile at a time.

  • avatar
    S1L1SC

    That fourth picture does not show a good angle for this design – it looks like someone already ran into the side of it and bent it.

    Most of the rest of the angles are absolutely georgeous though.

  • avatar

    It’s like a non-terrible XJ220.

  • avatar
    Noble713

    1. Chassis design? Carbon fiber + aluminum subframes = practically a requirement for a modern supercar.
    2. Exterior? Sexy and functional aero.
    3. Interior? High-tech yet functional. Love the steering wheel.
    4. Powerplant…….da fuq?!

    Agreed that this should have a TT version of the GT350’s FPC V8. Then it would be 100% Made of Win. Right now it’s basically America’s non-hybrid take on a LaFerrari, but with a GT-R’s engine. That’s an odd combination.

  • avatar
    John R

    This looks great.

    I won’t try understand the conniption over six cylinders. The GT-R nismo makes 600hp from its motor. The 911 makes the thick end of 600hp from its motor. The GT-R’s motor is a cousin to many a Nissan and Infiniti. The much lauded NSX had a motor that was a cousin to many an Acura and Honda. And Lotus’s relationship with Toyota is well known. All those cars do/did what they do/did well.

    For Ford this boosted 3.5 is a known quantity. They know its limits and shortcomings and they’ll know how to overcome them.

    Also, who is to say that this will be the only engine to power this? The R8 has a choice of two. A V8 (which this boosted six will best it in power) and a V10.

    This new GT will be a quality product.

    Trust the engineers. They aren’t dummys.

    • 0 avatar
      nickoo

      Totally agree, better to use a well built known engine than some new exotic expensive low volume engine with bugs. Corvette and viper both know this and are lauded for it. At the end of the day, better to focus the limited budget on other areas, bravo to ford for doing this smartly.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        You’re implying that Ford does not currently have any reliable mass-production V8’s available for use…

        Such as the 5.0L V8 they’ve had for ages.

        • 0 avatar
          nickoo

          The v8 isn’t forced induction, the ecoboost was likely simply sligjty retuned to make its numbers. Cheap, quick, and easy. Also if this engine is behind the driver and transverse, the coyote may not fit.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Although you bring up an excellent point on the Ford GT motor potentially being transverse, assuming it is not, generally speaking a $100K level car shouldn’t be “cheap, quick, and easy”. This car should showcase what Ford can do, not be subject to cost cutting out of the gate. GM is incredibly profitable with Corvette at something like $60K to start, so if Ford puts $100K (or more) on this we need to cheapen it to protect profitability? Really?

          • 0 avatar
            Maxb49

            Nickoo: They had a turbocharged V8 from the CobraJet program.

    • 0 avatar
      Noble713

      The Japanese have a general aversion to high-displacement NA powerplants, partly due to the exorbitant displacement-based tax structure here in the domestic market.

      While the GT-R’s VR38DETT provides insane performance, it also does so at the cost of being a maintenance nightmare, as well as not delivering a particularly lust-worthy engine note.

      Ford doesn’t have to deal with the displacement tax problem, and already has copious experience with producing high-power V8’s (including forced induction ones). So the absence of a V8 from this American supercar is particularly galling.

      • 0 avatar
        Nessuno

        The Daytona Prototypes have been running the EB 3.5 since last year, sharing 60% of its parts with a stocker. I’m willing to bet the new GT benefits from that 40% digression as well…

      • 0 avatar
        John R

        “The Japanese have a general aversion to high-displacement NA powerplants, partly due to the exorbitant displacement-based tax structure here in the domestic market.”

        So…what…Toyota’s UR engines (at 5 liters now) and Nissan’s VK engines (at 5.6 liters now) are exceptions that prove a rule??

        Look. There are real reasons why you don’t see certain motors where you think they ought to be. Packaging, heat, response, weight, etcetera. I guarantee the word “Coyote” was the first word spoken at the first meeting for the Ford GT and for one reason or another it was simply not going to work.

        As for the GT-R, for Nissan domestic taxes I’m sure were a concern but were near the bottom of the list of concerns.

        • 0 avatar
          Noble713

          “So…what…Toyota’s UR engines (at 5 liters now) and Nissan’s VK engines (at 5.6 liters now) are exceptions that prove a rule??”

          The Nissan VK is not offered in a single current-production JDM passenger vehicle.

          Toyota is an exception. This the company that produces the only JDM V10 (LF-A) and V12 (Toyota Century) engines. Just because they want to. Still, their V8 offerings are a miniscule fraction of car sales here. The UR family is found only in the Lexus LS, GS-F, and RC-F. Excepting the new -F models, that makes about 4,500 cars/annually, based on these registration numbers from 2012 as a rough guide:

          http://www.toyota-global.com/company/profile/figures/production_en.html

          The JDM Land Cruiser 70 and FJ Cruiser both have 4.0L V6’s. While the Land Cruiser comes with a V8, the 15,000 registrations listed also includes the Land Cruiser Prado models which come with V6’s. No idea what the true breakdown is there, but let’s 50/50.

          So < 13,000 total V8 passenger cars in a car market of roughly 3 million "normal" passenger vehicles and 2 million kei cars:

          http://business.inquirer.net/101513/2012-vehicle-sales-jump-in-post-disaster-japan

          For comparison, GM sold 17,000+ Corvettes alone in 2013 and 35,000 in 2014.
          http://www.corvetteblogger.com/category/corvette-marketplace/gm-sales-reports/

          "As for the GT-R, for Nissan domestic taxes I’m sure were a concern but were near the bottom of the list of concerns."

          Mizuno-san's youtube vids about the GT-R's design process primarily mention packaging/weight distribution and a flat torque curve (IIRC). Making a new performance V8 to meet their goals would cost R&D money. Taxes affect sales. Sales affect production volume. Production volume affects cost amortization. And if you can't ammortize the costs the engine doesn't get made in the first place.

          So Nissan may not have been thinking "The 1% won't buy a V8 halo car because of road tax." but the tax structure here absolutely has a disproportionate impact on every Japanese company's approach to powertrain engineering.

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          5 liters is now high displacement? That’s news.

          • 0 avatar
            Zykotec

            Yes, for normal roadgoing passenger cars, unless you live in the US in the period 1958-1973, it actually is.
            Everywhere and ‘everywhen’ else 5 liters is/was/will still be regarded as high displacement.

  • avatar
    Russycle

    Am I a bad person for wanting to see a stick shift in this thing?

  • avatar
    Nessuno

    Why all the derision? GT-R TT V6… Also I presume the EB 6 affects CAFE more favourably then the 8.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Volume on this product is so small it won’t have any effect on CAFE at all for a company the size of Ford.

      Agree with you that the derision is asinine, though.

      • 0 avatar
        Nessuno

        Fair point, cheers!

        Asinine indeed, especially when you consider TUDOR Daytona Protos have been running the 3.5 for just over a year now. They say the DP EB’s share 60% of their construction with a stocker, I wouldn’t be surprised to find out the new GT benefits from that 40% digression…

      • 0 avatar
        Nessuno

        Fair point, cheers!

        Asinine indeed. I do wonder if perhaps the low volume nature of this project could make it feasible for Ford to utilize lessons learned from RoushYates 3.5 EB in the Daytona Protos…?

  • avatar
    Jeff Weimer

    Jeez, punch out the GT350’s 5.2 and/or turbocharge it. That flat-plane sound would be *perfect* in this application.

    Using a “pedestrian” (I know – not really the same, but they’re trying too hard to link it to their regular offerings) 3.5 Ecoboost is a mistake for a exotic/near-exotic like this.

    • 0 avatar
      Nessuno

      Tell that to the Daytona Prototypes running the 3.5’s since last season. This is not your neighbours Ecoboost (but it might help sell the other guy one…)

    • 0 avatar
      Fordson

      The Coyote is not designed primarily to have forced induction…it makes power the old-fashioned way…lots of revs. the Voodoo flat-plane engine even moreso.

      So now we have to address some changes to the block and lower end. New cam profiles to do more of a FA powerband.

      Nobody does FA nowadays without using direct injection, because of its vastly superior knock-resistance, which is vital with forced induction’s higher cylinder pressures. Whatever its virtues (and there are many), the Coyote is not direct injection engine…so now we have to completely redo the heads to accept direct injection; ditto the entire intake tract.

      So basically it would be an all-new V8. Can you do forced induction on a Coyote? Yeah – and people do all the time. But that’s not its mission in life.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        Is the Coyote ever going to DI?

        • 0 avatar
          Fordson

          Let me put it this way…if the Mustang’s competition were running something more advanced than 2-valve, pushrod engines, the Coyote might have had DI when it first debuted in 2011…but Ford is getting dramatically better specific output and is a vastly better revver than either the SBC or the Hemi without the expense of direct injection. So some is market-driven.

          Also, Ford knows the first thing to happen was that people would hang a Kenne Bell supercharger onto the Coyote, and that’s way easier for outfits with the engineering resources of a Kenne Bell, but not those of a Ford Motor Company, if the car has port injection rather than DI.

          Wait ’till you see the cost of re-engineering the HPFP on the LT1 in order to add forced induction on an aftermarket basis…it will be more expensive than the blower.

          • 0 avatar
            nickoo

            If gm had used forked rockers and 4 valves per cylinder on the Lt motor, it could be a high rpm monster. There are after market 4 valve ls series heads that are mind blowing. Obviously the reason behind not doing them is the exhorbant pricing.

          • 0 avatar
            Fordson

            Nope. The cylinder deactivation mechanism in the valvetrains don’t like life at over 6500 rpm. Fuel economy dictates that GM use some kind of cylinder deactivation on the SBC going forward.This is the reason the LS7 engine is history…at 7k rpm it made 505 hp but at 6500 it made only around 465…so your new Z06 uses a 6.2 liter supercharged engine with the harsh slap-in-the-face fuel cutoff @6500 that all LT1 testers have mentioned.

  • avatar
    Aquineas

    It looks nice, and I know they won’t likely be in the same ballpark price-wise, but something about the Z06 looks more appealing to my eye; there’s an intangible “everyman” quality about the Z06. Not entirely logical I know, but my impression nonetheless.

  • avatar
    Fordson

    People are acting like this is going to be some 3700-lb. hybrid, AWD sled like the NSX.

    This car will be carbon fiber tub (new process developed in conjunction with Dow Chemical) and bodywork with aluminum subframes…RWD and no batteries. Pushrod and torsion bar suspension and carbon fiber brakes. I’m thinking like 2900 lbs.

    Based on what we’ve seen from Ecoboost V6s to date, if it has over 600 hp, it’ll probably have over 700 lb/ft of torque, over a wide powerband. From what we’ve all seen, the V6 Ecoboosts are all underrated powerwise.

    • 0 avatar
      johnny_5.0

      Yep, the weight is the most important information for me. I think a debut of a 5.0 EB would have been epic, and could have easily supported whatever quasi-sane power levels they wanted (800+ hp). If their intent is that this is almost like a homologation of the upcoming race car, the 3.5 EB makes sense. I imagine that other than displacement and name, this engine will share very little with an F-150 as far as internals go. The potential for a trickle down of the dual-clutch is interesting, but I still assume the only new transmission in the Mustang’s foreseeable future is the 10 speed auto.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      The last GT was 3500 pounds, so 2900 sounds pretty ambitious to me, even with contemporary materials. Still, we could dream…

      • 0 avatar
        psarhjinian

        “The last GT was 3500 pounds, so 2900 sounds pretty ambitious to me, even with contemporary materials. Still, we could dream…”

        It’s possible: more extensive use of carbon fibre, a smaller, lighter engine, etc. If you consider the Corvette as a benchmark (~3500lbs), the GT has some packaging advantages for being mid-engined, then there’s reason to hope.

        I’d hope for ~3300 or so; basically a Lotus Evora ($3100) with (much) more power. I can’t see that being a bad thing.

  • avatar
    EAF

    Would it be safe to assume that most of you would forfeit 160+ hp to own the GT with a V8 instead of the Ecoboost? Tough choice, but I’m with those who would opt for the Vette!

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    In my Chrome tabs, I can only see “The Return O” and I want it to say “f the Mack” at the end. I love that song.

  • avatar
    Chocolatedeath

    You guys got it all wrong. If Jack were here he would tell you so elegantly that this engine is just screaming to be placed in a Lincoln full size RWD Halo car. Place it in size with the 7/S and A8 class for about 90 grand fully loaded. If not then he would tell you that this would fit perfectly in a modified 4 door midsized Mustang platform for Lincoln to finally get you know-it-alls of their backs. Fully loaded at 70 gs.
    Do it Lincoln, call Jacks bluff and since it was my idea invite me and Jack to be the first to test drive. Thanks in-advanced.

  • avatar
    jdash1972

    Wow, that is one ugly car. Way too much aerodynamic laundry hanging out to dry. Does it have My Ford Touch too?

  • avatar
    Jerome10

    It should have had a V8. Or a different name.

    Sorry small motors with turbos and batteries all over them, no matter how cool or fast they are just doesn’t do it for me. Same reason the Nissan GT-R does 0 for me.

    I’d rather hear a V8 and hit 60 in 3.5s than not hear a V8 and do it in 3.2s and get 2mpg better.

    These cars really should play more on emotion. My non car executive opinion.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Looks like someone at Ford styling is a Clockwork Orange fan.

    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c3/Probe_16.jpg/1280px-Probe_16.jpg

    But daddy does like this one…oh, yes.

  • avatar
    hubcap

    Lots and lots of pearl clutching going on. Let me ask a question? Has the definitive horse power figure been released because the post states upwards of 600 hp. To me, that mean 600+, not 600 flat.

    That being said I don’t understand the amount of whining coming from the commenteriat. Would I like to see a version of the Voodoo in this car? Sure, but I’m not going to write it off because it doesn’t have that especially when the engine it’s getting is a derivative of the one running in their IMSA cars. To me, that engine is race proven, is known, and will continue to be upgraded and refined.

    I’m not adverse to a six cylinder super car. Is it different? Yup. But let’s wait and see what it delivers before piling on. After all, look at the performance Porsche gets from their six cylinder cars, especially the turbos.

    Let’s just wait and see, just this once, before the Camry division reinforced by the CR-V Dragoons commence their offensive.

    • 0 avatar
      Nessuno

      Exactly, the RoushYates built 3.5 was the first thing that came to mind…If its going to be THAT low volume of a project I wouldn’t be surprised if the RY was essentially plug and play here…

  • avatar
    danio3834

    Colin Comer, an actual GT owner, hoped for more too.

    From R&T, January 9:

    “Keep the weight, and the gadgets, to a minimum. V8 power (a 750+ horsepower EcoBoost version of Ford’s new GT350 flat-plane crank unit, please) with a real manual transmission would be welcomed.”

    • 0 avatar
      hubcap

      This is intended to prove what?

    • 0 avatar
      Fordson

      His engineering and design qualifications in order to be a Ford GT owner = 0. Just sayin’.

      In this thread, you say the Ford GT will have exactly 600 hp…actually they said north of 600…they specifically don’t say how much north. They do say, “With the broad application of structural carbon fiber elements, the GT will exhibit one of the best power-to-weight ratios of any production car.” And yes, the engine is derived from the current Daytona Prototype.

      In the NSX thread you say the NSX will be a worthy competitor to the GT…except it’s going to weigh around 700-800 pounds more and will have not even as much HP/torque as the GT.

      All of the 800-900 hp superexotics are hybrids with AWD and weigh a minimum of around 3500 lbs. This car is not going to be anywhere near as heavy or complex. In fact, your current GT owner’s wishes will be largely answered.

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        You don’t need anything but the cash and the desire to be a GT owner, just sayin’. Ford has to spec a car the buyers want to qualify their product if they want to make a production target.

        The performance may very well be as good as described, but if it doesn’t check all the boxes that the owners want, they may not sell as many as they hoped to. Personally, I don’t doubt they’ll make that target, but I do sense some disappointment that might not drive the demand seen of the last iteration.

        • 0 avatar
          Maxb49

          That is because the last GT was ICONIC. This is…a fast race car. An icon it isn’t. And I am a diehard Ford loyalist. I have had a Ford performance vehicle in my driveway since 1962.

    • 0 avatar
      anomaly149

      A turbo 5.2L V8 wouldn’t pass the new global sports car regulations, defeating half the point of this vehicle. This is a homologation special and a Dow/Ford joint project on working out how to rate produce carbon fiber/aluminum structures.

      That last point is really interesting and needs a lot more examination. Where are they thinking of using the CFRP?

  • avatar
    thegamper

    It looks truly amazing. I don’t usually get too excited about supercars, this is no exception, but I have to say that it inspires a certain amount of salivation and lust.

    Lets see in it Gulf livery already.

  • avatar
    Spartan

    Everyone’s complaining about the EB V6 being used. I guess the GT-R gets a pass? The EB is a better engine setup than the old Ford GT. It had a truck motor with a supercharger. Yeah, remember that?

    Ford is in the business of making money, even with this one off car. The EcoBoost V6 is a volume engine that is easily modified to produce a lot of power. Combine that with the fact that people will say “my car has a supercar engine in it” and you can see how that will trickle down and translate into more sales for the company.

    Ford needs a halo car. I’m glad this is the one because it looks awesome and will very likely be a very high performer.

  • avatar
    superchan7

    The V6 thing is an early buzzkill, but after thinking about it, a super-high revving V6 (with minimal exhaust silencing) would be interesting. Not sure what the power band on this thing is like.

    The car looks bonkers, though. Lots of visual depth that the NSX doesn’t have.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      In 400 hp tune this engine is not a revver. It’s like other DI turbos, with a fat torque curve from just off idle to about 5000 rpm and then a shortage of breath.

      But something tells me that in 600+ hp tune it’s going to behave very differently.

  • avatar
    thornmark

    The Ford sure looks ugly compared w/the Acura. Frankly it looks looks like it’s rear end is eating a three wheeled car.

    The last GT never met sales expectations – a flop. Hard to see how this will do any better.

  • avatar
    anomaly149

    1. The Ecoboost engine is because this is a LeMans homologation special. LeMans rules clearly favor turbogcharged engines, and they’re already running it in USCC. Look to the 2016 global sports car regulations and feel abashed.

    2. Final power and weight numbers have yet to be announced, cool your jets.

    3. The really important point in this story: this is also a plaything to let Ford figure out cheaper carbon fiber with Dow, a lot like BMW and their i8.
    http://autoweek.com/article/detroit-auto-show/ford-unveils-all-new-gt-supercar-detroit-auto-show

    Enough playing around with aluminum subframes and carbon fiber structural elements mean we could be looking back in 20 years and snickering at how revolutionary we thought the aluminum bodied, steel framed 2015 F-150 was. For CAFE, weight is the ultimate enemy.

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    This is cool, but since it doesn’t resemble the GT40 at all, I would hope Ford would give it a new name…

    • 0 avatar
      Maxb49

      I don’t know. It’s probably going to be a class leading race car. I wouldn’t put it past Ford to win at LeMans. Who is designing these vehicles? Where is the heritage in the design?

  • avatar
    meefer

    V8. Because tradition. If you wanted to ecoboost v6 it, don’t resurrect an iconic name and style it similarly. The GTR doesn’t get a pass, every single one of its predecessors used a twin turbo v6. This is highly dependent on pricing, it better live in R8 v10 territory.

    • 0 avatar
      Noble713

      Nitpick: The R35 GT-R’s predecessors were Inline-6, not V-6, powered. For a short while the R35 was derided as “Not a real GT-R” because of this, but the car’s consistently bonkers performance has kinda squashed dissent.

  • avatar
    Signal11

    Wow, that’s just ugly.

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    If this new GT sells well or at least gets good buzz in the auto press it could force Chevrolet to finally build a mid-engine super car that is segmented above a Corvette but not a replacement. I don’t think hard core Corvette aficionados are too thrilled with the prospect of a mid-engine Vette.

  • avatar
    rockets

    Hot Wheels goes mainstream. My 6 year-old self is in love.

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