By on January 9, 2015

2015 Dodge Viper

Is the standard color palette for the 2015 Dodge Viper not enough for you? Have you looked at your child’s Twilight Sparkle and Sonata Dusk brushables and thought to yourself, ‘Those hair colors might look good on on a Viper’? Dodge has a program just for you.

New Dodge Viper owners can get a lot more for the $94,995 base price with the brand’s 1-of-1 customization program, which is set to open in February. Owners who place their order with their dealer will have the following to consider:

  • 24,000 hand-painted custom stripes
  • 8,000 hand-painted exterior colors
  • 16 interior trims
  • 10 wheel options
  • Six aero packages
  • A wide array of standalone choices

With every possible option under the sun, over 25 million unique build combinations can be had from the program, which also includes a concierge service throughout the build, a new mobile-friendly website to track the build process, personalized plaque and instrument panel with “the customer’s chosen name to commemorate their design,” and a complementary 1:18 scale replica to confirm color selection.

The program also allows Dodge and SRT to demonstrate the full capabilities of the Conner Avenue Assembly Plant in Detroit, where the Viper is assembled. Brand president Tim Kuniskis explains:

Because every Viper is hand crafted with such an extreme level of detail, we have the unique opportunity to make each one even more special by giving buyers the opportunity to customize each vehicle to their exact specifications. Now, Viper owners will be able to say their Viper is truly one of a kind.

Delivery options include rapid transport in an enclosed carrier, or, for those wanting to visit Detroit, picking up their new Viper at Conner Avenue following a tour of the facilities.

Production of the first 1-of-1 Vipers will begin in Q2 2015.

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25 Comments on “Dodge Unveils 1-of-1 Program For New Viper Owners...”


  • avatar

    The Viper is a failure in my eyes. The C7 destroys it in all aspects but straightline acceleration and the ZO6 completes that job.

    It’s too small and there’s nothing exciting about it.

    Hopefully it will be discontinued.

    SRT needs an AWD car with the 6.4-L and 6.2-L Supercharged.

    I want my Jeep’s AWD and engine without the ride height.

    If you build it, they will come.

    • 0 avatar
      caltemus

      The Viper is trying to be more upmarket from the C7. With this development the Viper is the custom made shoe to the off-the-shelf C7 running shoe. While the C7 might be better value for money, the Viper has that special feel that some high-end buyers are looking for. Jack touched on this in his “What makes expensive cars terrible” piece. Also, the C7 and Viper are essentially the same size; with the C7 ever so slightly longer but narrower than the Viper.

    • 0 avatar
      MrIcky

      You must have been sleeping. Turns out, the Z06/07 does none of those things to the Viper. Despite early peanut gallery predictions, turns out they’re very close with a slight edge to the Viper in acceleration.

  • avatar
    jrmason

    Because its a failure in your eyes means just that.

    If the 8.4 was ditched for the 6.2 the nose could be shortened for better balance. But taking these attributes away from the Viper would be taking its identity away from it. I’ve always loved the looks of them and the 3rd gen I had the priveledge of driving had more performance capability than you’ll ever use on the street. To say there’s nothing exciting about them tells me you’ve never been behind the wheel of one, or I suspect you’d have a different opinion.

    I’m not a fan of the Corvette and I despise what GM has become, but that doesn’t mean the Vette should be discontinued. Different strokes for different folks.

  • avatar
    geozinger

    I think this is a great idea for the Viper line. It’s in a class all by itself, meaning it has no direct competition. The Corvette has taken off on a different tangent and is possibly the better car. However, GM would never allow this kind of customization on the ‘Vette, it would kill whatever profit margin there is on that line (IMO).

    If I had the cubic dollars to buy something like this, a customized one from the factory would be just thing I would like. I wonder if they would offer wraps, too? That would take customization to a new level…

    • 0 avatar
      energetik9

      No direct competition? Seriously? Just off the top of my head, Corvette, Audi R8 V10, Nissan GT-R.

      • 0 avatar
        caltemus

        Of those cars you mentioned which offers this level of customization? That’s the lack of “direct competition”

        • 0 avatar
          energetik9

          I’m not arguing the level of customization. This is unique although many manufacturers do offer customization beyond what’s listed on the website configurator. I’m just comenting on this…
          “It’s in a class all by itself, meaning it has no direct competition.” By my read, that a comment on the car, not colors. Maybe I misread it.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            It’s in a class by itself just as the Alfa Romero C4 is in a class by itself; there are other, vaguely similar cars (i.e. Lotus) but they’re not the same. They’re designed to appeal to different people.

          • 0 avatar
            geozinger

            Actually, Vulpine interpreted my comments better than I relayed them. Similar in intent, but different horses for different courses and all that…

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    “Have you looked at your child’s Twilight Sparkle and Sonata Dusk brushables and thought to yourself, ‘Those hair colors might look good on on a Viper’? Dodge has a program just for you.”

    No, if you’re going to own a Viper, it’s Pinkie Pie or Rainbow Dash all the way.

  • avatar
    energetik9

    I’m always leery of odd colors and odd color combinations. It may be unique, but if it’s too specialized, it makes it very hard to sell.

    • 0 avatar
      FormerFF

      It’s like any other bespoke item. It’s the owner’s dream. If saving money is important, you wouldn’t buy a viper anyway.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      That may be true with Corollas, but with supercars there’s cons1derably less risk in customization if the factory does it for you.

    • 0 avatar
      caltemus

      Have you heard the story of jack’s Porsche Green S5, and how quickly he was able to sell it?

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      When I buy a car, my thoughts aren’t on selling it or trading it until I don’t trust it any more. I’m not one of these people who buys one year and sells the next. So if I want a car in Russet Orange or skinned to look like a fox, then dog-gone it that’s what I’m going to buy. Its a color or skin that represents my personality and at least looks different from any other car on the road. In other words, I absolutely love the concept, but would like to see it broadened to the mass market through automated painters (and don’t tell me it can’t be done).

      We, the consumers in the US, have let the dealerships take choice away from us in the showroom. No longer do we have the option of a dozen or more colors except in very limited cases (like Ford’s pickups). No longer can you find three shades of blue, green, even brown or orange. We’re stuck with Black, White, Silver, Grey and Red. Then, depending on brand, you might find a single shade of green or blue. Skinning shops are getting rich off of doing hood jobs and sometimes full-body skins just to get some variety on the roads that drivers want. This is money the OEMs are losing out on as they could offer this personalization far more easily with probably better quality than some of these independent shops. (There’s one such shop where I live that the skin starts peeling within a year while another’s still looks freshly applied after 10 years.)

      As such, more choice could mean more interest in buying as people are able to get what they want, instead of what some dealership says they want.

      • 0 avatar
        Windy

        Exactly Vulpine. I could care less about a owning a viper but the prospect of having real choice returned to me in major aspects of new car selection is exciting.

        In the distant past we also had a huge choice in what our interior seating and headliner material was to be i recall the mohair seating and headliner with deep wool pile  carpets in my grandfathers last early 1950s cadillac and the beautiful red leather and custom two tone paint on a car my dad ordered at the end of the 50s… even his mid sixties Lincoln had very nice deep green leather that still looked great when it was sold when he died in 1985.

        The day that an affordable (under $35k to me these day) car can be ordered can not come too soon for me.

        I think it is the last step in the changes that outfits like MINI started when they began offering a vast array of equipment and appearance choices with the advent of more automated assembly factories about 12 years ago. While MINI did offer more than the standard black, white, shades of grey or silver and perhaps if you were lucky red that most cars seem to be offered in, by offering several bright colors and even British racing green and stripes. What the offerit is still a limited color pallet and interior color choices are still just as limited as most of the industry in many ways.

        With modern computer controlled paint mixing and spray systems that can purge and change color on the fly it should be possible to offer someone who special orders his car an unlimited choice that is now restricted to the bespoke megabuck cars like RR or Bentley or the top of the line offerings from M-Benz or BMW

        We might even see a return to bright and cheerful two and three color paint jobs that today only show up on show cars and hot rods.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    Fantastic. Did you see this, Jack? I’m sure they can hue one in bright green for you.

  • avatar
    wmba

    Customer has to consider 24,000 custom color stripes? Why? Aren’t two or three enough?

    Assuming you only pick one out of the 24,000, how is it custom? It’s preordained.

    I’m afraid I don’t gel with the the author’s writing style at all. Half the words that provide clarity are often missing, phrases suffer from misplaced modifiers, and the split infinitive is king. Never mind the overstatement.

    It’s like some foreign language I have to interpret.

    • 0 avatar

      Fair enough. I know my style is not for everyone, and can only hope to do better the next time.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      “Assuming you only pick one out of the 24,000, how is it custom? It’s preordained.”

      Now we’re being pedantic. People can distinguish about 10 million colours and shades. I don’t have the figures, but I’d expect only a subset of those can be reproduced using automotive-grade paints; the gamut is much smaller.

      24000 colours is effectively custom. Heck, when I started working with computers, I was looking at a 4096-colour palette and, if I could’ve chosen any one of those for my car, I’d safely have called that “custom”

  • avatar
    jrmason

    ¿estás con fluidez en Inglés

    I didn’t have a problem understanding any of it.

  • avatar
    Power6

    This is great, good to see an American mfr doing this level of customization, which the German makes have been doing for years via BMW Individual, Audi Exclusive, Porsche Exclusive etc.


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