By on December 4, 2014

2015 volvo xc60 t6 side 2

Volvo is in midst of a turnaround. Sold by Ford and acquired by Chinese Geely Automobile, Volvo representatives see the company heading on a path similar to Jaguar and Land Rover. With this fresh injection of money, in recent years we have seen many concept cars, existing product updates, amazing new engines, and the first all-new post-Ford model, the handsome XC90. Refreshed for 2014, the 2015.5 XC60 receives further minor upgrades, including an app!

2015 volvo iphone app screenshot

Smart phones, as they are called, are all the rage among kids these days. They say that kids even care more about their fancy phones with intentionally cracked screens than they do about cars, which is equally sad and puzzling. Automakers have their hands full with cell phones, too. From distracted driving, proper connectivity, to charging ports and cubbies, cars must be fully cell phone friendly. Several automakers have even gone as far as integrating cell phone-like apps into their infotainment systems and even developing their own apps, which is what Volvo just did.

This app, available on iOS, Android, or Windows Phone (respect and apologies to all the BlackBerry users) enables to user to get vehicle information, location, status, as well as remote unlocking and start. It’s basically all the information that is selectable on the gauge cluster of most modern vehicles, in the palm of your hand. It even sends you push notifications if your Volvo is unlocked. Its best feature is probably being able to unlock and start the car from your phone and spy on its location when it is used by someone else. VIN number, user passcode, and code generated by the vehicle were needed for the initial setup. Only the user passcode was needed for further usage. The app is part of the 2015.5 update which includes Sensus Connect, an OnStar-like service which I did not try out.

2015 volvo xc60 t6 front

Recently Volvo has also introduced a new family engines called Drive-E. I had a chance to drive an S60 with the 302hp supercharged and turbocharged version of that engine and simply fell in love with it. The engine had plenty of low-end power and pulled to the redline with authority, all while achieving almost 30mpg overall. Unfortunately the Drive-E engines are currently available only in FWD configuration. The vehicle in pictures is an AWD T6 model powered by an older 3.0-liter turbocharged six-cylinder engine with 300hp and 325 lb.-ft. of torque, mated to a six-speed automatic transmission. It’s a powerful engine, and it moves the boxy XC60 with ease, but it is neither as refined as the new Drive-E nor nearly as efficient at 17mpg in the city and 24mpg on the highway.

Despite its age, the recently updated XC60 still looks fresh and really stood out when I parked in a garage full of gray generic cars. It’s still a modern and handsome design, one that draws attention but is also quickly forgotten, and almost invisible to cops. It’s also unmistakably Volvo, thanks to the family headlight and grill design, as well as the huge six inch male symbol logo front and center.

2015 volvo xc60 t6 dash

The driver and passengers are rather isolated from road in the XC60. The vehicle is very quiet and the body feels very stiff, allowing only deep thumps from road imperfections to be transmitted inside. The ride is very comfortable overall but the twenty-inch wheels and 255/45 Pirelli Scorpion Zero tires are a bit of overkill and probably not the best choice for winter. The few buyers who will throw the XC60 into a curve at speed will be rewarded with minimal body roll and general composure similar to many European sedans.

The interior has premium and solid feel to it. All of the interior materials are soft and nice to touch, gauges are easy to read, and the two-tone sports seats are very comfortable and supportive, finished in soft leather. Rear passengers might complain about legroom, and fitting three booster seats across the bench seat will be challenging. The center stack is full of small buttons but the primary controls are performed via the four big knobs and steering wheel controls. The infotainment system could use a bigger screen and it could be a bit higher in the dash.

2015 volvo xc60 t6 interior details

The 2015 Volvo XC60 T5 Drive-E FWD starts at $36,200. The vehicle reviewed here is $42,400. Platinum package is $4400 and it includes a power tailgate, Xenon headlights, keyless entry, backup camera, HomeLink™, Harmon Kardon audio, adaptive cruise control and many other active safety features such as collision warning and avoidance, pedestrian/cyclist detection, and lane departure warning. Climate Package & Child Booster Seats is $1550, sport seats are $500Blind Spot Information System Package is another item that should be standard on a Volvo but costs $900. Metallic paint is $550, dub wheels are $1000, and the destination/delivery charge is $925. The total for the tested vehicle comes to $52,225. The top of the line XC60 T6 AWD R-Design Platinum is $50,750 before options.

2015 volvo xc60 t6 trunk

For decades Volvo has been know as the safety brand. Looking at the Monroney sticker and where the company is today, I would love to see all of those new active safety features become standard across the model range. Furthermore, all of that technology and those great new engines are not going to contribute to additional sales if price is significantly higher than the sales leaders such as Jeep’s equally equipped Grand Cherokee or the Lexus RX 350. The XC60 is a pleasurable vehicle to live with but it is out-pricing itself in a very competitive market segment.

Kamil Kaluski is the East Coast Editor for Hooniverse.com. His ramblings on Eastern European cars, $500 racers, and other miscellaneous automotive stuff can be found there. 

Volvo Cars of North America, LLC provided the vehicle for this review.

2015 volvo xc60 t6 rear 34 2

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144 Comments on “Review: 2015.5 Volvo XC60 T6 AWD...”


  • avatar
    Serpens

    If you consider its competition to the Mercedes-Benz GLK, BMW X3, or Audi Q5 its not pricing itself out of the segment at all.

    • 0 avatar
      baconator

      Yup, this. A friend of mine just bought one. Wife runs a bakery business in the city and they have a 3-month-old child, so a small CUV made sense. He really wanted the Q5 but dealers here weren’t dealing on them, so the Volvo ended up being significantly cheaper, and his wife thought the Volvo was more comfortable as well.

      Volvo will do just fine with this thing, provided that the techie turbo engines don’t bring new reliability problems.

  • avatar
    petezeiss

    Looks like it’s presenting its generous rump for mating.

    If I were a guy car I’d be all over it.

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    Objectively, it’s a good car. Safe, reliable, well-made, etc.

    But compared subjectively to it’s peers, it’s a bit of a turkey, especially with the pricing. Volvo isn’t Mercedes/BMW and they would do well to remember that.

    • 0 avatar
      TrailerTrash

      I fell in love with this car as well when test driving.
      I am not sure which competitor you are referring to as to power, capacity, luxury and the like. Those you listed are much higher in price…and jump quickly when adding stuff.
      I am looking forward to including this when I price a new SUV next year, but need to wait until I test the newest Ford/Lincoln Edge and the 2.7 turbo.
      And I think this car still has a real spare.

    • 0 avatar
      BrunoT

      A 2016 fwd XC60 T6 e drive with heated seats, Titiana alloys, paint upgrade, and no other options can be purchased via Truecar for under $38,000.

      A 2016 BMW X3 S drive with similar equipment is $43,500 there. So adjusted for equipment, the Volvo, in the real world, sells for $5500 more. So there is some price space there.

      The Volvo seats will be wider and more comfortable, yet still sport seats. It will be just as quick to 60 (6.1 sec from car and driver). It will ride a little softer. With a $300 rear sway bar it will handle quite flat. I know, I had an R design version. Add 20mm rear wheel spacers and turn in is quicker and understeer is dialed out. I think the Volvo looks a little better than the X3. The F70 X5 was great looking, the X3 proportions are a little off.

      The BMW will offer rwd handling attributes, resell better, but to drive in snow you need xdrive, so add $2,000.

      So, they’re good competitors. Each has pros and cons vs the other and the (silly) prestige premium of BMW is one you have to pay for.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Nice article, I particularly enjoyed:

    “They say that kids even care more about their fancy phones with intentionally cracked screens than they do about cars, which is equally sad and puzzling.”

    Puzzling indeed.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    As cool as the app is—and it is very well done; Torque could learn a thing or two—it’s not something that I expect will carry Volvo through, not when first-mover is so very, very short in the mobile-app market.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    “Smart phones, as they are called, are all the rage among kids these days”

    *cringe*

  • avatar
    petezeiss

    “dub wheels are $1000”

    Isn’t striving to make your Volvo look ghetto somewhat antithetical to their traditional customer base? Or is that the point?

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    I’m put in mind of Clarkson driving the TT in Scotland on Top Gear.

    “Jeremy, what comes standard on your Audi?”
    “Almost everything really… is an optional extra.”

    You’ve done it again Volvo. Make the people pay for all that extra crap which comes standard on their more-reliable-better-resale-better-badge Lexus. Oh and all of your special safety stuff you’re known for? That’s optional too.

    • 0 avatar
      Maymar

      I’m not sure that’s accurate – at $40k ($4k more than a base XC60), the RX only has FWD, cloth seats (unheated!), no nav, not much of anything. TrueDelta seems to back up that the Volvo is the slightly better value proposition.

      It also makes me a little sad that Lexus is a better badge than Volvo, but that’s entirely subjective.

  • avatar
    raresleeper

    It’s a Volvo, alright. Same old simplistic controls (which I’m not complaining about). Dam, those HVAC controls look familiar (/sarc).

    BUT that ‘ol gray mare still ain’t what she used to be.

    Materials, fit and finish feel premium (YAWN). Okay, at that price, I hope so.

    It’s reliable, eh? Says who? Geely? Oh yea, I remember that legendary Volvo-reliability when Ford owned it. (lol)

    I do like the Swedish voice-overs on the commercials, though. That’s cute.

    WHY- oh, why- would I pick this over an RX350 (assuming I wanted a RX350)? Just to have a Volvo, I suppose… paying for the name only? That supposed to give us butterflies?

    Hell, even having that Volvo insignia on the grill still doesn’t represent what it use to.

    Hark! Hath the Volvo lost its luster to ye ‘ol yuppies of days by and gone?

    #crickets

  • avatar
    Scott_314

    I’ll be contrarian and say that the improved phone integration IS a big deal. We all carry better tech in our pants than is available on our new $30,000 car, in terms of navigation, usability, communications, etc.

    What we really want is a basic system with a nice screen that interfaces with our phone, so that we don’t have to pay ridiculous markup for factory-installed navigation or subscription fees for data / on-star etc. We want to use our phone!

    First maker to get this at the economy-car level will enjoy increased sales.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Nice vehicle. But is it $52,000 worth of nice? No.

    Thus, the issue with Volvo.

  • avatar
    heavy handle

    Just looked it up. Heated seats are a $1350 option on all trim levels in Canada. On a Volvo. That is absolutely moronic. I would avoid them just for that: I can afford it, but I just can’t patronize a company that whores-out like that. Even a Hyundai Accent has standard heated seats in anything but the base model.

    • 0 avatar
      Beelzebubba

      Heated Front Seats are standard on all Volvo models sold in Canada, including the XC60. The $1350 you are referring to is the Climate Package which adds Heated Rear Seats, Heated Steering Wheel, Heated Windshield & Washer Nozzles.

      • 0 avatar
        heavy handle

        That’s thoroughly confusing. The configurator calls it “climate package w/heated seats,” which implies that you don’t get heated seats without the package. The “Features and Equipment” tab just goes to a blank drop-down for the XC-60, although I see that it works for some other models.

        It’s still appalling that a Swedish car could be offered in Canada without a climate package. It’s not a cheap car, and you need all that stuff even if you live in Victoria (cold damp weather can be worse than frigid dry weather). Do they really make money this way? I would venture that they lose more from the tacky bait-and-switch attitude than they gain by charging every sucker (who hasn’t walked) $1350 extra. Their sales figures confirm this.

        • 0 avatar
          Beelzebubba

          The configurator lists it as “Climate Package w/ Heated Seats” only to differentiate from the “Climate Package w/ Booster Seats”. Integrated, fold-down child booster seats are an option for the back seat and the second Climate Package is compatible with the Booster Seat option. But I agree that it wouldn’t be clear at all to the average consumer who was unfamiliar with the XC60.

          While I don’t disagree that the Climate Package should be standard on Canadian models, none of the XC60’s main competitors have it either. The Audi Q5, BMW X3 and M-B GLK250 don’t include heated rear seats, heated steering wheel and a heated windshield as standard equipment. In the case of the X3, two option packages costing $9,250 are required to get heated rear seats! Now that is absurd…

          Heated front seats aren’t standard here in the U.S. They can be added for $500 or as part of the $1,550 Climate Package. Here in Atlanta, where we have a several months of cold weather, almost every new Volvo has the $500 heated seat option. But I was surprised to learn that heated seats are rare in places like Houston, TX because they would never use them. Even top trim level models with every other optional feature often don’t have heated seats down there.

          It just seems to me like any new luxury/premium vehicle should include heated front seats as a standard feature. I also think Volvo should drop their “base” XC60 T5 which has cloth interior and lacks navigation, moonroof, the adaptive digital instrument display and roof rack. Stepping up to the Premier trim level for $3,200 adds Nav, Panoramic Moonroof, Leather Seating, Roof RAck, Silver window trim and the adaptive digital display. The Premier should be the entry level XC60, not a bare bones model with cloth seats…then again, very few of the ‘base’ models are sold to retail customers. The vast majority go to fleets…

  • avatar
    superchan7

    Kids can’t afford cars these days (not to mention $50,000 Volvos), so they turn to things that they can afford or have some hope of being able to afford in the future.

    This has been the current consensus for a while. And when the screen cracks, not every owner can afford to replace it, so the owners wear it as a battle scar to be proud of. At least it’s a positive thought.

    Not puzzling at all to me.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      I’m going to blame the OEM, a product which costs several hundred dollars with a 300%+ markup can afford to spend a few points on better screen material. In twelve years I never had a cracked screen (but the early Moto flip phones cheap cases would crack). Since 09 I’ve rocked the VE465 (sadly CDMA only), never a cracked case or phone and I drop these frackers frequently.

      • 0 avatar
        Ryoku75

        You’d think they could, smartphone makers are more concerned about slimming them down and adding more hardware inside, less-so about the hardware on the outside.

        To me, “good” smartphone would have a re-enforced case on the inside and be tough enough to drive over.

        Theres no reason that we can’t make a phone thats tough enough to take a drop or two.

    • 0 avatar

      Bullshit, there are plenty of $2000 beaters around. The problem is that kids want to be like the Kardoucheianes and drive Range Rovers, but would rather walk than drive a rusted Cavalier.

      $20 screen and a youtube video is what it takes to replace a cell phone screen. It’s not really surprising to me tho… I’d dirty up my brand new Reeboks when I was a kid.

      • 0 avatar
        petezeiss

        “there are plenty of $2000 beaters around”

        But how do you keep them on the road when the possibility of a parking-lot mechanic working on them is 30 years in the past and the cumulative knowledge and understand of cars in 95% of American families extends no further than driving to the dealership/real mechanic and trying to describe a noise?

        • 0 avatar

          Look, I can’t solve the world hunger problem and I can’t help the helpless. Choices are:
          a) Make more more money and get a newer car
          b) Learn to fix your beater.

        • 0 avatar
          George B

          “How do you keep them on the road…?” YouTube and brand-specific car forums. If you can turn a wrench and follow the video, you can replace most parts that fail. Repairing my girlfriend’s W210 Mercedes a couple weeks ago required a side trip to Harbor Freight to get a Drive E-Socket set, but YouTube provided excellent instructions unavailable when I first learned to work on cars.

        • 0 avatar
          George B

          petezeiss asks “How do you keep them on the road…?” YouTube and brand-specific car forums. If you can turn a wrench and follow the video, you can replace most parts that fail. Repairing my girlfriend’s W210 Mercedes a couple weeks ago required a side trip to Harbor Freight to get a Drive E-Socket set, but YouTube provided excellent instructions unavailable when I first learned to work on cars.

        • 0 avatar
          danio3834

          “But how do you keep them on the road when the possibility of a parking-lot mechanic working on them is 30 years in the past”.

          Parking lot mechanics have evolved with the cars, they still exist. The principles the cars operate on haven’t really changed and the tools to diagnose run of the mill 15-20 year old cars are affordable and available.

          • 0 avatar
            petezeiss

            True for a certain percentage of Americans, I gave it 5%. But go to any urban shopping mall, select 20 people between the ages of 18 and 34, and ask them if they could find the alternator in their car.

            How many do you figure could?

        • 0 avatar
          petezeiss

          @Kamil

          What the.. o_O

          Wasn’t commenting on you in any way, was merely noting the yawning gap between the average American kid today and what oldsters like me had growing up in a manufacturing and mechanical culture that had us working on stuff by the age of 8. Also, the crippling complexity of cars since ECMs and all their digital spawn.

          Oh, yeah… and transverse f*cking engines.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            “Oh, yeah… and transverse f*cking engines.”

            You know if you position a hand mirror just right they look longitudinal and it suddenly all comes back to you

          • 0 avatar
            petezeiss

            Yeah, but I’m too old to bother now. I just have my Trunk Monkey handle it.

          • 0 avatar

            “But go to any urban shopping mall, select 20 people between the ages of 18 and 34, and ask them if they could find the alternator in their car. How many do you figure could?”

            All of them could.

            They would Google it on their smartphones and figure it out.

            Man, this article has really brought out the old ‘kids these days’ crowd.

          • 0 avatar
            petezeiss

            Hah! Excellent answer! Now the only other problem left for them is which way tightens, which way loosens?

            Oh, and once they’re 5 minutes into it, “Does it matter if I bleed on stuff in here?”

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            “Yeah, but I’m too old to bother now. I just have my Trunk Monkey handle it.”

            Just make sure he doesn’t get his little hands caught in the fan belt

          • 0 avatar
            petezeiss

            Trunk Monkey educated. Trunk Monkey know transverse engine ain’t got no fan belt.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            I’m glad your invisible rabbit has been teaching him, they’re usually kind of irresponsible

          • 0 avatar
            petezeiss

            The irresponsible ones are off surfing bunny p0rn on their tablets. They don’t get near my Trunk Monkey.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Blackwater wanted me to be a “tactical trunk monkey” in Iraq. In private military contractor speak, that is the rear gunner in an SUV. I said no, since I would like to continue to be PTSD free.

          • 0 avatar
            petezeiss

            Whoa…. glad you made that choice.

            I know some guys back from contracting over there. All the money spent and now a future of broken families, zombie drugs and booze.

            Rot in hell, W. And you, too Rumsfeld.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Wow, bball, good decision, not to worry pete’s trunk monkey isn’t allowed to handle firearms just his special, um.. wrench

          • 0 avatar

            @petezeiss “Now the only other problem left for them is which way tightens, which way loosens?”

            Rightie-tightie, leftie-loosey?

          • 0 avatar
            petezeiss

            Wrong!

            Wait.. (fiddles with bottle cap)

    • 0 avatar
      SatelliteView

      What??? What kid can’t afford a $200 lease payment???

      What the hell is going on here???

  • avatar
    FormerFF

    I’m sorry, but I’ve never seen the appeal of any Volvo, and I still don’t see the appeal of this one. They always seemed like a dated version of what Detroit offered, but with a 50% price premium, and less panache.

    • 0 avatar
      raresleeper

      Swedish (cough *Chinese* cough) Ford.

    • 0 avatar
      petezeiss

      Up till the late ’80s they were like a car Mom would design. They were sensible, sturdy and compact in a market of oversized, overly flashy domestic junk.

      They appealed to affluent utilitarians, minimalists and contrarians, and once that caught on they appealed to snobs who pretended they were those other things but really just wanted to seem superior.

      Then BMWs grew enough in size and market penetration to capture the snobs and the others went Japanese because Volvo decided they had to get all performance-y and became poo.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Actually that’s not a bad idea for a TTAC interview. Find someone who worked inside Volvo in the 90s and could shed light on what was going on before the Ford buyout.

      • 0 avatar
        Ryoku75

        That post sums it up well, 70’s- early 90’s Volvos were a nice alternative for those who wanted an honest rustproof car.

        Yes you still had electric issues and it took them to the late 80’s to truly sort out rust, but at that point you could get something that wont rust in 5 years unlike a Japanese competitor.

        When the 850 came out everything went into the crapper, Volvos got needlessly complicated, interiors cheapened out, and this was before Ford brought them out.

        The 940-960s were the last breathe of decent Volvos, if anything they’re argurably the best for daily driving.

  • avatar
    schmitt trigger

    Petezeiss:

    I downloaded both the Perapera and Rikaichan plug-ins for Firefox.
    They are really great!

    Thanks for sharing

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    Several decades later I would hope that Volvo could get better mpg than what they were reaching in the 80’s.

    Modern Volvos have more power, sure, I dunno why you’d want 300hp in a practical FWD CUV though. For trips, hauling junk to Goodwill, I’ve never needed anything above 113hp.

    I’m curious to know how the cargo capacity is too, if theres any reason to deal with a 240s electrical bugs, its the almost unrivaled cargo capacity of the wagon models.

  • avatar
    changsta

    Have any of the commenters on this article actually driven a recent Volvo? The XC60 FEELS like a premium product, whether you believe it should be priced that way or not. If you compare a similarly equipped Mercedes GLK350, or BMW X3, the Volvo is actually cheaper by a few thousand. To those comparing it to an RX350, have you ever driven one? It is mundane and boring, and the XC60 is a much better vehicle to drive. More comfortable too. Don’t even try to compare it to a Cadillac SRX or Lincoln MKX, THOSE vehicles are overpriced, and in my opinion, do not reflect their price points in overall feel and materials quality.

    I prefer that Volvo offers so many stand alone options. I hate when manufacturers force to to take a package of options when you don’t necessarily want everything. Or, force you to take a fully loaded model to get access to certain options. Volvo allows you to add features like HIDs, 20″ wheels, sport seats etc to base models.

    People have also noted that Volvo should include their entire safety suite as standard on their vehicles. Volvo already makes City Safety standard on all vehicles, which is something that none of the other competitors do. The technology package consists of blind spot monitoring, radar cruise control and lane departure warning – all things that I would not want on my vehicle. Electronic nannies are irritating. City Safety only acts if you’re about to rear end another vehicle or crash into a pedestrian or cyclist. If they did make the tech package standard, it would only increase the price of the vehicle.

    You may have gathered that I am a fan of Volvo from the post, and you’d be right. I think people need to drive the vehicles before they pass judgement on them. They are impressive in their own right when you actually compare them to their competitors. I think the reason Volvo has done poorly at this point is lack of awareness of their new products and a poor dealer network. Give the vehicles a shot and you might be surprised.

    – Happy Volvo Owner (Previous Ford, Acura, Mazda, Lexus owner)

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      “I think people need to drive the vehicles before they pass judgement on them”

      Not all of us have the time to go to our local Volvo dealer and drive one.

      • 0 avatar
        changsta

        That’s fine, but then why jump to the conclusion that it is overpriced, uncompetitive etc?

        • 0 avatar
          Ryoku75

          Because those are all facts that you can get from looking at the market, no need to be so defensive.

          “If you compare a similarly equipped Mercedes GLK350, or BMW X3, the Volvo is actually cheaper by a few thousand.

          “Don’t even try to compare it to a Cadillac SRX or Lincoln MKX, THOSE vehicles are overpriced”

          I assume that you’ve test driven these vehicles, right?

          • 0 avatar
            changsta

            As a matter of fact, I did test drive these vehicles when I was shopping in the category. The Lincoln MKX felt like a Ford Edge because it is one, and did not feel as luxurious or polished, or as composed as the Volvo. The Cadillac felt cheap in terms of interior materials and the engine droned. Perhaps if you end up taking the time so see any of these vehicles in the flesh, you might agree. I’d be interested to see your opinion.

        • 0 avatar
          Ryoku75

          I’d test them if I had the timepatience to deal with dealers.

          Chances are that I’d agree just from the Volvos interior being well sorted, I like knobs and buttons, I don’t like how so many automakers are removing them to “integrate” more features into their touchscreen.

          Thing is though, I wouldn’t be so defensive about it. I cross-shopped and tried out countless beaters before settling on a Volvo 240 wagon, yet I hardly feel the need to justify my purchase.

          A good car speaks for itself.

        • 0 avatar
          TrailerTrash

          Just give it up! This is the Internet! We don’t need no stinking badges! We don’t need no stinking experience!
          Like you…I have driven this newer version and fell in love with the power and the car. But then I also liked the hard core wagon personality of its brother/sister, the CX70. The rear view, the space…all awesome but for my families hatred for all things wagon!!!

          I will say, however, the next gen Ford Edge and engines might be closer than today…we will see.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        I agree, if we had the time to test drive all the cars we were interested in we wouldn’t need car reviews, but I would never say a car is a POS or the greatest car ever built without some first hand knowledge

        • 0 avatar
          petezeiss

          Neither would I.

          I’d confine my comments to suggesting it resembles a giant white rat in heat. That’s it. Anything more would be presumptuous and unbecoming.

          • 0 avatar
            changsta

            I understand that looks are subjective, but what crossover in this category would you say is more attractive? BMW X3, Mercedes GLK, Lexus RX, Lincoln MKX/C, Cadillac SRX or Range Rover Evoque? If you’re comparing the looks of this to a low slung sports car, then the comparison is obviously no contest. Amongst it’s competitive set though, I’d say it holds its own.

          • 0 avatar
            petezeiss

            Aagh! I can’t handle your civility, articulateness and earnest patience.

            I’m just on the internet trashing something I can’t afford. I’ll go back to my stable and dirty straw now.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Trash it? It sounded to me that you were quite smitten with it

          • 0 avatar
            petezeiss

            I was *ka-CHEW* was only *ka-CHEW*

            was only ma*ka-CHEW*

            later, st*ka-CHEW* straw dust

    • 0 avatar
      Tostik

      This isn’t the best web site for intelligent comments about Volvo. I’ve driven my wife’s loaded-out 2015.5 XC60 and it is a fantastic car. With CTC, and 20inch Perillis, it out-turns most sedans.

      • 0 avatar
        petezeiss

        “This isn’t the best web site for intelligent comments about Volvo.”

        Except when Tim Cain shows how crappy they sell.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Here’s an intelligent comment: Volvo has been a zombie brand since about 2005/06. While this truly shocked me to realize, Ford simply allowed Volvo to continue in the direction it wanted to starting in the early 1990s. If you take a look at the 1992 Volvo ECC concept, you’ll see it is essentially a prototype of the first generation S60. So even prior to the Ford buyout, Volvo had lost its way compared to its earlier heritage. I’m simply postulating here, but the severe financial issues Ford began to suffer in 2005-07 probably impacted any radical Volvo R&D funding (had Volvo even wanted to do something radical). I speculate they pushed forward with the EUCD and P1 platforms because work had already begun and the workload was split between Mazda, Volvo, and Ford Europe, but both of these platforms were more of the same: small transverse FWD with AWD capability in the case of EUCD. Whether the current underwhelming platforms are a result of Ford cost cutting or really were the direction PAG Volvo wanted to go in I cannot be sure. What is certain is Volvo lacks compelling product and suffers from pricing delusions which results in low volume in North America (Cadillac has a similar malady in compelling product and pricing).

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volvo_ECC

          • 0 avatar
            Tostik

            The one Volvo that is at the price level of the German competition is the XC60. The XC60 and the X3 cost about the same. Despite that, the XC60 is Volvo’s best seller. No price delusion there.. If it weren’t for the XC60, Volvo really would be in the trouble some people imagine them to be in.

            As for North America, Volvo badly needs new product — it’s on the way.

        • 0 avatar
          Tostik

          Volvo’s on track to sell 480,000 cars this year, which a new record for Volvo, and the XC60 is it’s best seller.

          • 0 avatar
            Beelzebubba

            The XC60 is Volvo’s best seller globally, but the S60 is the best seller in the U.S. Even so, the S60 only sold 23k units in 2012 and 2013. In has only sold 18,591 YTD (as of 11/30/14), so it will barely top the 20k mark this year.

            The XC60 has never hit the 20k unit mark in the U.S. The best sales year was 2013 with 19,766 units sold. YTD sales for 2014 are at 17,197 with only one month to go.

            As a whole, Volvo only sold 61,233 vehicles here in 2013. That was a decrease of 6,884 units (or 10.1%) from 2012. YTD 2014 sales are just 51,446, which is down 4,899 units or 8.7% compared to the same time last year.

            With sales decreasing by 9-10% per year, it goes without saying that something has to be done ASAP to stop bleeding! With annual sales volume of only 60k in the U.S., something has to change for Volvo to remain viable in the North American market.

            The company’s future is riding largely on the success of the new XC90. It looks like a winner and I hope it sells accordingly. Volvo also needs a new entry-level product (such as the V40 sold in other markets) and a class-competitive replacement for the aged S80. The S80 only sold 1,745 units in 2013 and it will be even less this year. That is pathetic.

            Volvo also needs to work on increasing their visibility in the marketplace. Most premium/luxury shoppers don’t even think to consider Volvo.

            For the record, I just leased a 2015.5 S60 T6 Drive-E Platinum two months ago. It replaced a 2010 Acura TSX V6 and I had several Acuras, Hondas and Mazdas prior to that. I checked out the Acura TLX, BMW 3-series and Audi A3 but Volvo’s new Drive-E powertrain won me over. My T6 has the Supercharged AND Turbocharged version that puts out 302hp and 295lb-ft of torque. It has much more personality than the Acura or Audi and, in my opinion, looks better than any of the others.

    • 0 avatar
      Maymar

      Also, somehow, no one seems to approach Volvo’s seats, and they’re one of the last few holdouts on the inline six.

      I also find the RX sort of weird and soft and wobbly to drive.

    • 0 avatar
      kingofgix

      Great post, Changsha. I see a lot of authoritative sounding comments on here from people who haven’t been in a Volvo for 20 years. I totally agree. I have recently tested the XC60, RX350, GLK350, and BMW X5. Although I haven’t made a purchase yet, the Volvo is the winner. It had the second best driving dynamics (BMW wins here), the best engine, quietest interior and just felt solid, comfortable, and composed. It also had the second lowest price when equipped the way I want it (GLK was low here) but I really didn’t care for the MB. My second choice would be the Lexus overall. BMW pricing was out of line. Their accessory prices are incredible. Anyway, at worst Volvo has a very competitive vehicle in terms of price, features, and driving dynamics. And that seems to be basically what Kamil is saying in this review.

  • avatar
    Tostik

    Usually Volvos are cheaper than comparable Mercedes, Audis, and BMWs. But not the XC60. It’s priced about the same as the BMW X3! And guess what? It’s Volvo’s worldwide best seller – it even sells well in the US. This fact mocks those who say Volvo can’t compete with the Germans. And the R model has a class leading 325HP engine (in the small SUV category).

  • avatar
    Car Ramrod

    As one of the last eight BlackBerry users, I am deeply offended by Volvo’s decision not to include us.

    • 0 avatar
      Chicago Dude

      No worries. BB10 can run Android apps – in some ways better than Android phones. You can edit the app permissions any time you want, individually.

      • 0 avatar
        Car Ramrod

        I do like the easy of sideloading android apps in BB10.2, but it’s less than smoothly rendered at times. Setting up Rhapsody while driving could kill somebody.

      • 0 avatar
        Car Ramrod

        Well, I don’t know about better. Between the square screen and the lagginess, some of the apps definitely feel non-native. Rhapsody on a Q10 is a driving hazard.

  • avatar
    Tostik

    Volvos are cheaper than comparable Mercedes, Audis, and BMWs. But not the XC60. It’s priced about the same as the BMW X3! And guess what? It’s Volvo’s worldwide best seller – it even sells well in the US. Who says Volvo can’t compete with the Germans?

    And the R model has a class leading 325HP engine (in the small SUV category).

  • avatar

    Let’s face it, the once proud Swedish auto industry is dead.

  • avatar
    Beelzebubba

    The XC60 is Volvo’s best seller globally, but the S60 is the best seller in the U.S. Even so, the S60 only sold 23k units in 2012 and 2013. In has only sold 18,591 YTD (as of 11/30/14), so it will barely top the 20k mark this year.

    The XC60 has never hit the 20k unit mark in the U.S. The best sales year was 2013 with 19,766 units sold. YTD sales for 2014 are at 17,197 with only one month to go.

    As a whole, Volvo only sold 61,233 vehicles here in 2013. That was a decrease of 6,884 units (or 10.1%) from 2012. YTD 2014 sales are just 51,446, which is down 4,899 units or 8.7% compared to the same time last year.

    With sales decreasing by 9-10% per year, it goes without saying that something has to be done ASAP to stop bleeding! With annual sales volume of only 60k in the U.S., something has to change for Volvo to remain viable in the North American market.

    The company’s future is riding largely on the success of the new XC90. It looks like a winner and I hope it sells accordingly. Volvo also needs a new entry-level product (such as the V40 sold in other markets) and a class-competitive replacement for the aged S80. The S80 only sold 1,745 units in 2013 and it will be even less this year. That is pathetic.

    Volvo also needs to work on increasing their visibility in the marketplace. Most premium/luxury shoppers don’t even think to consider Volvo.

    For the record, I just leased a 2015.5 S60 T6 Drive-E Platinum two months ago. It replaced a 2010 Acura TSX V6 and I had several Acuras, Hondas and Mazdas prior to that. I checked out the Acura TLX, BMW 3-series and Audi A3 but Volvo’s new Drive-E powertrain won me over. My T6 has the Supercharged AND Turbocharged version that puts out 302hp and 295lb-ft of torque. It has much more personality than the Acura or Audi and, in my opinion, looks better than any of the others.

    • 0 avatar
      tremorcontrol

      Nice. I also came from TSX (1st gen) and got an S60 T5 AWD. The S60 is a great car (although I give the steering edge to the 1st-gen TSX). Only regret is not being able to wait for the wagon version (V60). Great for long road trips. I’m thinking my next car will need to be a Volvo wagon with the newer design language featured on the 2015 XC90.

    • 0 avatar
      Tostik

      But US sales for Nov 2014, the XC60 sold 1,643 units, UP from 1,500 in Nov 2013, and the S60 sold 1,017 units, DOWN from 1,426 in Nov 2013. XC60 sales continue to rise, and the S60 seems to be on the decline.

  • avatar
    raresleeper

    Test

  • avatar
    olivebranch2006

    Hey Everyone,

    Long team reader but not much of a contributor. Wife and I own a 2011 F250 Crew Diesel 4×4 King Ranch which I use for work and hauling stuff for the animals, that truck is awesome and a keeper. The 2005 Toyota Tacoma crew cab is still reliable but just so tiny for our growing family (2 kids could be 3 or 4 one day). I’m also concerned about poor roof strength and crash performance of the tacoma to the point where I don’t want to put my children in it. We’ve been researching and test driving the tacoma replacement which should also be something easier for the Wife to drive (F250 is a bit large for her comfort level).

    Basically been looking, talking, reading articles and comments, reliability and crash data, test driving, etc for 2 years now. I’ve tested drive these cars:
    Acura MDX, TL
    BMW 5 series, X5
    Mercedes ML, GL
    Volkswagen Taureg
    Ford Explorer, Expedition, Edge, Fusion, Taurus, Flex, F150
    Lincoln MKT, MKS, Navigator
    Chevy Tahoe, Suburban
    Buick’s 3 row crossover which I forget the name of
    GMC Sierra, Yukon
    Toyota Sienna, Avalon, Tundra, Sequoia, Highlander
    Honda Pilot-Meh
    Dodge Durango-Loved this car
    Jeep Grand Cherokee
    Chrysler 300
    Subaru outback, legacy
    Volvo S80, XC60, XC70, XC90

    Spent waaaaay too much time at dealers and watching reviews. We’ve compiled charts of resale value, crash test scores, pricing, reliability ratings from 6 different sources, etc.

    Why am I being so anal? Three reasons:
    1. My Mother was killed rolling her Ford Explorer because the roof caved in. Safety
    2. It’s our hard earned money we save for this depreciating asset. Reliability and Value
    3. My Wife is disabled and needs a very comfortable passenger seat that can recline AND tilt. All Japanese cars available do not offer this feature unless you move up into their respective luxury brands. Comfort

    I’ve approached the task emotionally before thinking that a car would be something and upon driving it, realized it is not what I expected. Some cars didn’t show their true driving dynamics, comfort, and refinement until the 2nd test drive or after immediately comparing a competitor. I’ve learned to approach it with no expectations at all. The Dodge Durango really blew me away with how nice it is. EVerything was great except the seats were too hard for the Wife and the latest crash scores were poor. OUT

    We’ve whittled it down to Acura MDX and Volvo XC90. When it comes to value vs competition, safety frame design, driving dynamics, comfort, noise, the whole package…. These two are awesome and highly recommend. The only reason we’re waiting is because of the new XC90 hitting showrooms in the spring. We agreed to drive the new XC90 and the MDX back to back and make a final decision at that time. It’s hard to get the Wife to the dealerships because of back pain, so I’ve test driven most cars myself and learned to “imagine” what seat would cause her pain and which wouldn’t. Lesson learned: I told her the Durango was great and the seats had her in pain within 5 minutes of test driving :)

    If I were strictly buying for myself with no family, I’d go S80 or XC70. Just great cars after comparing to competitors. I like the value proposition comparing to Audi’s and BMW and the performance was enough for me. I don’t need an M3 :)

    Just sharing some of the research we’ve done. Go out and test drive them because you can read and review and watch from home all you want and the real thing can end up so different. Have an open mind. Weigh all the values including safety. Look at Volvo’s safety crash and research center vs the competition. Look at alternative crash testing besides IIHS/NHTSA, especially the rollover tests on YouTube. I’ve found most Volvos to be very competitive and the Acuras to be great products as well. I can respect a company that has research real crashes for decades to better protect car occupants. I can respect a company that is serious and proactive with protecting people in the car. After seeing the rolled Explorer and doing more research, I have little respect for car companies that take safety in a reactive manner to only keep up with government tests or get away with whatever they can (GM ignition). After watching hours or crash tests online, there are quite a few death traps out there, in my opinion, and people misconceive the idea that “all new cars are safe so Volvo doesn’t have an angle anymore”.

    Just my 2 cents. I tried to approach this with zero bias and simple fact analysis. Back to being a mostly reader, love this site, love the commenters! by the way, what happened to BigTruckSeriesReview? I never read why he was banned but the story would be entertaining, no?

    Cheers!

  • avatar
    olivebranch2006

    My post hasn’t shown up so I’ll break it up into two:

    Hey Everyone,

    Long team reader but not much of a contributor. Wife and I own a 2011 F250 Crew Diesel 4×4 King Ranch which I use for work and hauling stuff for the animals, that truck is awesome and a keeper. The 2005 Toyota Tacoma crew cab is still reliable but just so tiny for our growing family (2 kids could be 3 or 4 one day). I’m also concerned about poor roof strength and crash performance of the tacoma to the point where I don’t want to put my children in it. We’ve been researching and test driving the tacoma replacement which should also be something easier for the Wife to drive (F250 is a bit large for her comfort level).

    Basically been looking, talking, reading articles and comments, reliability and crash data, test driving, etc for 2 years now. I’ve test driven these cars:
    Acura MDX, TL
    BMW 5 series, X5
    Mercedes ML, GL
    Volkswagen Taureg
    Ford Explorer, Expedition, Edge, Fusion, Taurus, Flex, F150
    Lincoln MKT, MKS, Navigator
    Chevy Tahoe, Suburban
    Buick’s 3 row crossover which I forget the name of
    GMC Sierra, Yukon
    Toyota Sienna, Avalon, Tundra, Sequoia, Highlander
    Honda Pilot-Meh
    Dodge Durango-Loved this car
    Jeep Grand Cherokee
    Chrysler 300
    Subaru outback, legacy
    Volvo S60, S80, XC60, XC70, XC90

    Spent waaaaay too much time at dealers and watching reviews. We’ve compiled charts of resale value, crash test scores, pricing, reliability ratings from 6 different sources, etc.

    Why am I being so anal? Three reasons:
    1. My Mother was killed rolling her Ford Explorer because the roof caved in. Safety
    2. It’s our hard earned money we save for this depreciating asset. Reliability and Value
    3. My Wife is disabled and needs a very comfortable passenger seat that can recline AND tilt. All Japanese cars available do not offer this feature unless you move up into their respective luxury brands. Comfort

  • avatar
    olivebranch2006

    I’ve approached the task emotionally before thinking that a car would be something and upon driving it, realized it is not what I expected. Some cars didn’t show their true driving dynamics, comfort, and refinement until the 2nd test drive or after immediately comparing a competitor. I’ve learned to approach it with no expectations at all. The Dodge Durango really blew me away with how nice it is. EVerything was great except the seats were too hard for the Wife and the latest crash scores were poor.

    We’ve whittled it down to Acura MDX and Volvo XC90. When it comes to value vs competition, safety frame design, driving dynamics, comfort, noise, the whole package…. These two are awesome and highly recommend. The only reason we’re waiting is because of the new XC90 hitting showrooms in the spring. We agreed to drive the new XC90 and the MDX back to back and make a final decision at that time. It’s hard to get the Wife to the dealerships because of back pain, so I’ve test driven most cars myself and learned to “imagine” what seat would cause her pain and which wouldn’t. Lesson learned: I told her the Durango was great and the seats had her in pain within 5 minutes of test driving :)

    If I were strictly buying for myself with no family, I’d go S80 or XC70. Just great cars after comparing to competitors. I like the value proposition comparing to Audi’s and BMW and the performance was enough for me. I don’t need an M3 :)

    Just sharing some of the research we’ve done. Go out and test drive them because you can read and review and watch from home all you want and the real thing can end up so different. Have an open mind. Weigh all the values including safety. Look at Volvo’s safety crash and research center vs the competition. Look at alternative crash testing besides IIHS/NHTSA, especially the rollover tests on YouTube. I’ve found most Volvos to be very competitive and the Acuras to be great products as well. I can respect a company that has research real crashes for decades to better protect car occupants. I can respect a company that is serious and proactive with protecting people in the car. After seeing the rolled Explorer and doing more research, I have little respect for car companies that take safety in a reactive manner to only keep up with government tests or get away with whatever they can (GM ignition). After watching hours or crash tests online, there are quite a few death traps out there, in my opinion, and people misconceive the idea that “all new cars are safe so Volvo doesn’t have an angle anymore”.

    Just my 2 cents. I tried to approach this with zero bias and simple analysis. Back to being a reader, love this site, love the members!

    Cheers!

  • avatar
    olivebranch2006

    2nd part:
    I’ve approached the task emotionally before thinking that a car would be something and upon driving it, realized it is not what I expected. Some cars didn’t show their true driving dynamics, comfort, and refinement until the 2nd test drive or after immediately comparing a competitor. I’ve learned to approach it with no expectations at all. The Dodge Durango really blew me away with how nice it is. EVerything was great except the seats were too hard for the Wife and the latest crash scores were poor.

    We’ve whittled it down to Acura MDX and Volvo XC90. When it comes to value vs competition, safety frame design, driving dynamics, comfort, noise, the whole package…. These two are awesome and highly recommend. The only reason we’re waiting is because of the new XC90 hitting showrooms in the spring. We agreed to drive the new XC90 and the MDX back to back and make a final decision at that time. It’s hard to get the Wife to the dealerships because of back pain, so I’ve test driven most cars myself and learned to “imagine” what seat would cause her pain and which wouldn’t. Lesson learned: I told her the Durango was great and the seats had her in pain within 5 minutes of test driving :)

    If I were strictly buying for myself with no family, I’d go S80 or XC70. Just great cars after comparing to competitors. I like the value proposition comparing to Audi’s and BMW and the performance was enough for me. I don’t need an M3 :)

  • avatar
    olivebranch2006

    3rd part:
    Just sharing some of the research we’ve done. Go out and test drive them because you can read and review and watch from home all you want and the real thing can end up so different. Weigh all the values including safety. Look at Volvo’s safety crash and research center vs the competition. Look at alternative crash testing besides IIHS/NHTSA, especially the rollover tests on YouTube. I’ve found most Volvos to be very competitive and the Acuras to be great products as well. I can respect a company that has research real crashes for decades to better protect car occupants. I can respect a company that is serious and proactive with protecting people in the car. After seeing the rolled Explorer and doing more research, I have little respect for car companies that take safety in a reactive manner to only keep up with government tests or get away with whatever they can (GM ignition). After watching hours or crash tests online, there are quite a few death traps out there, in my opinion, and people misconceive the idea that “all new cars are safe so Volvo doesn’t have an angle anymore”.

    Just my 2 cents. I tried to approach this with zero bias and simple analysis. Back to being a reader, love this site, love the members!

  • avatar
    olivebranch2006

    part 3:
    Just sharing some of the research we’ve done. Go out and test drive them because you can read and review and watch from home all you want and the real thing can end up so different. Weigh all the values including safety. Look at Volvo’s safety crash and research center vs the competition. Look at alternative crash testing besides IIHS/NHTSA, especially the rollover tests on YouTube. I’ve found most Volvos to be very competitive and the Acuras to be great products as well. I can respect a company that has research real crashes for decades to better protect car occupants. I can respect a company that is serious and proactive with protecting people in the car.

  • avatar
    olivebranch2006

    3rd:
    Just sharing some of the research we’ve done. Go out and test drive them because you can read and review and watch from home all you want and the real thing can end up so different. Weigh all the values including safety. Look at Volvo’s safety crash and research center vs the competition. I’ve found most new Volvos to be very competitive and the Acuras to be great products as well. I can respect a company that has researched real crashes for decades to better protect car occupants. After seeing the rolled Explorer and doing more research, I don’t like car companies that take safety in a reactive manner to only keep up with government tests or get away with whatever they can under our noses. After watching hours or crash tests online, there are quite a few poorly designed vehicles out there, in my opinion, and people could misconceive that safety isn’t a factor anymore.

    Just my 2 cents. I tried to approach this with zero bias and simple analysis. Back to being a reader, love this site, love the members!

    Cheers!

  • avatar
    olivebranch2006

    Wow. I guess posts can be really delayed? I had my post into 3 neat entries and now its a mess.

  • avatar
    fledbrit

    Does anyone commenting own an XC60 ? We’ve owned our T6 R-Design over a year and did compare it to others .I am (was) an Audi guy and would never have shopped Volvo if my wife hadn’t insisted. Its bigger than a GLK , and has a larger trunk than a Q5. if you review crash test results and pictures , especially offset frontal , Japanese is not comparable . i am confident if any vehicle was to collide with us we would survive . does this even warrant saving $5000 ? Our XC60 is extra quiet , extra comfortable , extra safe , avoids collisions by itself , nudges you if it detects unusual driving habits . people buy lexus and acura to match their dress sense , at the end of the day they are just over priced toyotas and hondas . our aluminum trim and accents aren’t cheap plastic . when our doors close they are solid not clicky . we did six months of research and we chose right . as a footnote , ford bought volvo in the 90’s because they thought the volvo commercial truck line was included , it wasn’t , they boo bood .happy motoring , next time you see a volvo driver notice the face of confidence. look forward to all comments .

    • 0 avatar
      Tostik

      I just bought my wife a 2015.5 T5 (5 cyl) AWD, Flamenco Red, Platinum, Blis Package, Climate Package. With CTC (Volvo’s torque vectoring) and 20 inch Perellis, it’s very tied-down when making a high speed hard turn. The 5 cyl has 250HP, but it’s max torque of 266 lbs ft comes in at a low 1800 RPM, and it has a temporary boost to 295 lbs ft when needed!

      I love the deep thud when you lightly close the door too. It sounds like a bank vault. Like you mentioned about the ‘small overlap crash test’, the XC60 aced it, as did all 4 Volvos tested, including the 12-yr old XC90. The only other car company that was not embarrassed by this test was Subaru, but some Subarus were downgraded to an ‘acceptable’ score. I read the reason on why the Outback first got an ‘acceptable’ on the IIHS web site, and I decided an ‘acceptable’ score was not acceptable to me. :-D

  • avatar
    Tostik

    I just bought my wife a 2015.5 T5 (5 cyl) AWD, Flamenco Red, Platinum, Blis Package, Climate Package. With CTC (Volvo’s torque vectoring) and 20 inch Perellis, it’s very tied-down when making a high speed hard turn. The 5 cyl has 250HP, but it’s max torque of 266 lbs ft comes in at a low 1800 RPM, and it has a temporary boost to 295 lbs ft when needed!

    I love the deep thud when you lightly close the door too. It sounds like a bank vault. Like you mentioned about the ‘small overlap crash test’, the XC60 aced it, as did all 4 Volvos tested, including the 12-yr old XC90. The only other car company that was not embarrassed by this test was Subaru, but some Subarus were downgraded to an ‘acceptable’ score. I read the reason on why the Outback first got an ‘acceptable’ on the IIHS web site, and I decided an ‘acceptable’ score was not acceptable to me. :-D

  • avatar
    Tostik

    A quote about the new Drive E T6 engine on the Volvo S60 from Hooniverse:

    “The trend to change to smaller (displacement and cylinder-count) force-fed engines has been going on for some time. Unfortunately a lot of times those new powertrains are disappointing (I won’t name any names *cough* BMW *cough*), lacking in low-end power, being slow to respond, and not all that fuel efficient. Not the T6. It powers off the line with no delay and keeps pulling to the redline. It is a very responsive and a genuinely fun powertrain, and the little sedan feels damn fast. A quick look at the numbers reveals that the horsepower-to-weight ratio of the S60 T6 is somewhere between the Subaru WRX and the BMW 335i.”

  • avatar
    Tostik

    And Wards Auto just put the Volvo T5 Drive E engine in it’s list of top ten engines of 2015. From wardsauto.com;

    “This silky Swedish gem does everything well: It has a broad powerband, is smooth enough for a luxury application and can deliver 32 mpg (7.3 L/100 km). Despite the glut of good turbo-4s, very few engines achieve all three of those objectives. Rated at 240 hp, Volvo’s T5 likes being driven hard.”

  • avatar
    boogieman99

    I’d buy this or a S60 if they weren’t the same price as the competition and if they fixed that counter-intuitive center stack. If a cheap Mazda can have an intuitive media controller, why can’t a Volvo?

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