By on December 11, 2014

Uber Dudebro Travis Kalanicks Stepping Out To Get Beat Down

The dream of the Nineties may live on in Portland, Ore., but for Uber, it’s a nightmare that’s just beginning.

Bloomberg reports the city government sued the transportation network company just three days after the latter began operations in the Rose City. The complaint, filed in state court in Multnomah County, says Uber is in violation of over 20 civil and criminal law provisions because the TNC and its drivers lack the proper permits, and the city seeks to block the company from operating in the city.

Representative Eva Behrend didn’t see the fuss, however:

Uber has received a tremendously warm welcome from riders and drivers in and around Portland. We appreciate the way residents have welcomed Uber into the Rose City, their support illustrates why it’s time to modernize Portland transportation regulation.

Portland joins New Delhi and Rio de Janeiro in putting the hammer down on Uber: the Delhi state government recently banned the TNC after a driver was accused of rape earlier this week, while in Rio, the city’s municipal transportation department filed a complaint with police over the TNC’s lack of taxi service licenses.

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20 Comments on “Portland Sues Uber Over Lack Of Proper Permits...”


  • avatar
    Xeranar

    Nice way to stack the article, but regardless Uber is a taxi service and has to operate like one whether they like it or not. They knew it was the barrier of entry and they thought by being slick using a backdoor method to enter the gray or black market of taxi services they would get away with it. Time to either accept they’re a taxi service and associate with the established system or go ahead and fight to the supreme court to try to claim otherwise which they’re likely to lose.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      I would feel somewhat more amenable to Uber were they not so profoundly shady: no insurance, poor background checks, maliciously anticompetitive (calling and cancelling Lyft rides) and monopolistic (surge pricing) behaviour and doxing journalists.

      Plus, the CEO is a nasty piece of work, even by the (low) standards of the new breed of Valley jerks.

      That said, I have to agree; the article comes across as slanted. Uber isn’t innocent in this; aside from being quite dirty, they’re not acting like a ridesharing company; they’re a taxi or black-car. They’re not a “nice” startup like Aereo; they’re more like Airbnb.

    • 0 avatar
      carve

      …and Taxis are an over-regulated, manipulated market too influenced by politics designed to limit competition via government force. I wish the best for Uber and Lyft.

      • 0 avatar
        Xeranar

        See, the difference here is my statement is based on factual evidence. We can further describe the definition of a taxi service but it is fundamentally that. Your statement in contrast is an opinion piece, so while I respect it as such I don’t see why you’re stating it to create a false dichotomy with mine.

    • 0 avatar

      Perhaps I was too dry for the room there. Also: Have you right-clicked on some of the photos I post?

  • avatar
    turf3

    Please pretty please get an editor!

    Which “Portland” is meant, please?

    Portland, Ark.?
    Portland, Colo.?
    Portland, Conn.?
    Portland, Ind.?
    Portland, Kan.?
    Portland, Me.?
    Portland, Mich.?
    Portland, Mo.?
    Portland, N.D.?
    Portland, N.Y.?
    Portland, O.?
    Portland, Ore.?
    Portland, Penn.?
    Portland, Tenn.?
    Portland, Tex.?
    Portland, Wis.?

    One assumes that it’s either Portland, Ore. or Portland, Me., but proper practice requires a state ID unless there is no chance of confusion. (There’s almost no chance of confusing a news story about N.Y., N.Y. with one about N.Y., Tex., but there are two cities of significant size and importance named Portland in the U.S.)

  • avatar

    Not having the proper permits is the key issue in all countries. In Germany, France and Holland Uber already appealed after courts ruled against Uber. This gives Uber some leeway to influence politicians. But it doesn’t look good. The whole peer to peer movement and share economy actually degrades individuals (like cab drivers) some say. There’s no accountability either from the providers.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    I would feel somewhat more amenable to Uber were they not so profoundly shady: no insurance, poor background checks, maliciously anticompetitive (calling and cancelling Lyft rides) and monopolistic (surge pricing) behaviour and doxing journalists.

    Plus, the CEO is a nasty piece of work, even by the (low) standards of the new breed of Valley up-and-comers.

    That said, I have to agree; the article comes across as slanted. Uber isn’t innocent in this; aside from being quite dirty, they’re not acting like a ridesharing company; they’re a taxi or black-car. They’re not a “nice” startup like Aereo; they’re more like Airbnb.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    And spamblocked

  • avatar
    Landcrusher

    Still not sure where the real issue is. We all know how ugly taxi service is. It’s ripe for innovation. However, is the problem the industry, the regulations, or the taxation?

    If TNCs were allowed to operate while meeting the really core regulatory goals and paying equivalent taxes would they live or die?

    As far as I have seen, the strategy seems to be to pressure politicians into giving the public what it wants rather than enact good and fair reactions. This then let’s the TNC operate with advantages over taxis. The strategy in place makes me think that they know the end isn’t all that rosy once everything is equal, and they plan to cash out on investors who see the meteoric rise and pay too much.

  • avatar
    olddavid

    As a resident of a Portland, Oregon neighborhood that gets taxi-swamped on weekends, I would welcome any innovation that would alleviate the inherent problems with current ride options. However, the arrogance of Uber makes them an easy target, especially in the atmosphere of our fair city. The task is difficult enough, it would seem to me, without purposely alienating the local government. In my area alone, within three blocks I have a freeway on ramp, three bus lines and both light rail and street cars. My cars mostly stay parked unless time or cargo requires extra seats or a trunk.

  • avatar

    I’ve used Uber before but the more I read about them the more I hope they go under after causing just enough disruption to cause the Taxi industry to modernize. To me the real reason for uber is CC payments. I travel mostly for work an use a CC for anything over $20.00. So $40.00 cab rides from the airport annoy me. Uber is super shady. Im also surprised they haven’t been shut down more places where the are outright breaking the law/no following regulations. Here in CT they are out right breaking the law from what I can see reading the regulations. You need to register with the state as both a taxi and a black car here. An the way the operate CT law would require them to be Taxis as they provide an on demand service not a pre arranged reservation system.

  • avatar
    ZoomZoom

    Hah, you people make me laugh…Uber is shady?

    When was the last time you took a cab from LaGuardia or Kennedy to any of the five borroughs, hmmm? Talk about a ripoff, scam, and bait/switch industry.

    I’m sorry, I have to call bullsqueeze on all of you! Sheesh.

  • avatar
    petezeiss

    NOW, cringing manservant, now!

    Slam that heavy door into the pasty-faced attack weasel’s head!

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