By on December 30, 2014

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25 years ago, every American automaker offered at least one vehicle that fit what Kim Clark and Takahiro Fujimoto called “the American Plan”: body-on-frame construction, rear-wheel-drive, V8 power, and a roughly 120-inch wheelbase. This was in stark contrast to the increasingly popular offerings from offshore, which were the antithesis of the American Plan. Today, no American automaker offers such a product.

The modern family car has abandoned the American plan in favor of the transverse, front-drive layout that was once the exclusive province of compact and subcompact cars. Chrysler’s dependence on the K platform meant that they were committed to such a change early in the game. They were also arguably the first of the Big Three to abandon the American Plan when their M-Body cars died in 1989. Today, however, they are the only ones that offer anything close to it.

Allow me to pre-empt cries of “BIAS!” from fans of the bowtie brand. The Chevrolet SS, as enticing as it is, is an ultra-low-volume specialty car meant to compete with high-zoot versions of the Dodge Charger. In another life, GM may have introduced a Zeta-based Impala. But that dream died along with Lehman Brothers. The LX cars, meanwhile, have soldiered on, getting progressively better with age. Not long ago,Jack had good things to say about a rental 2014 model with the V6/8-speed combo. As of about now, that version is obsolete.

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New for 2015 is a larger grille with a prominent Chrysler badge. It recalls the “Bentley grille” aftermarket add-ons that were popular during the 300’s introduction in 2005. There are also slight changes to the lighting and wheel and tire packages and an updated gauge cluster (no ATS-style 80’s dials here). A rotary gear knob also replaces the awkward short-throw shifter that Jack’s 300 employed.

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The biggest news for 2015 might be the demise of the SRT versions of the 300 – at least in our market. Certain overseas markets will get a new 300 SRT, since they don’t get the Charger. North American customers who want a hi-po 300 will have to make do with the 300S V8, which features bespoke styling treatments like side skirts and a rear wing, as well as slightly stiffer suspension settings.

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But in keeping with TTAC tradition, we made a bee-line for the “base” car, the 300 Limited. Base is a bit of a misnomer, since this version has just about everything one could possibly want in a large sedan. The standard spec sheet reads like a checklist of everything we like about Chrysler products: the 3.6L Pentastar V6, made to an 8-speed automatic transmission, the UConnect 8.4″ touchscreen and the Alpine stereo (which Jack nominated as one of the best in the business), an all-new electric power steering system borrowed from other rear-drive Chrysler products that surpasses the old hydraulic unit.

Opting for the Limited means you can’t get the 363 horsepower Hemi V8 or the 300-horsepower variant of the 3.6L Pentastar V6 – instead, you must settle for a mere 292 horsepower. But the Limited does offer a choice of either rear or all-wheel drive, and a driving experience free of extraneous technology like Lane Departure Warning with Lane Keep Assist, Forward Collision Warning with Active Braking and Adaptive Cruise Control (which, it must be said, works quite well).

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What you do get is a sedan based on a 21st century version of the American Plan. The 120-inch wheelbase makes this an ideal interstate cruiser, though the Charger has a bigger trunk. The Pentastar V6 makes far more power than the V8s of a quarter century ago and the 8-speed transmission (double the number of ratios found in that same era) makes the most of all 292 horsepower and 260 lb-ft of torque. Over mixed driving on the freeways and back roads of Austin, Texas, we saw about 24 mpg, while highway mileage is claimed by FCA to sit at 31 mpg.

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For not much more than thirty grand (or less, when you factor in the inevitable cash on the hood, or buying a year-old ex-rental) you can have a proper American sedan that will leave you satisfy in every single way, assuming you never try the V8 version. Chrysler was keen to tout the V8 powered 300S, but I’ll take the regular 300C (the black car in our photos), without any of the sporting pretensions or superfluous body modifications. Where the V6 starts to run out of breath above 80 mph, the 5.7L Hemi keeps on pulling well into the triple digits. The 8-speed is a welcome replacement for the durable but antiquated 5-speed Benz unit.
The new EPAS system will be familiar to anyone who has driven a new Jeep Grand Cherokee – the steering is weighted nicely, but doesn’t provide the most lucid feedback, Body motions are well controlled, and the 300 is about as responsive and nimble as you’d expect a two-tonne full-size sedan to be. The lone disappointment are the brakes. The pedal felt soft and lazy, forcing me to press the toe of my Ariat Ropers towards the carpet far quicker than I’d have liked when coming to a halt from high speeds. One could live without most of the performance gear from the SRT versions on a daily basis. The big binders from the 6.4L Charger wouldn’t hurt on the 300.
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While the changes to the 300 itself are incremental, what really matters is that Chrysler has finally managed to separate the 300 and Charger into two distinct product lines. The 2015 300 Limited is only $2,000 more than a comparable equipped $29,995 Charger SXT, but the difference in interior quality is significant enough that only the most die-hard skinflint, Dodge brand fanatic or rental car company would consider the Charger as a serious alternative. Of course, there is a base model Charger SE at  $27,995, as well as the big block 6.4L and 6.2L SRT Chargers, but that’s the point; Dodge now has Charger options to bookend the 300, whereas before, it was a mish-mash of John Varvatos Luxury Editions and Scat Packs and Super Bees at intersecting price points.
The rationalization of the two product lines doesn’t solve the essential question of who the 300 is for. It’s not as sporting as a Cadillac CTS, but sharper than a V6 Hyundai Genesis. It’s bigger, roomier and pricier than a V6 Camcord, but an Impala or an Avalon is probably better for hauling rear seat passengers.
But that’s ok. The weird niche that the 300 (and Charger) occupy is what allow it to exist. It has the market sewn up for itself, and nobody has the stones to challenge Chrysler. It’s a formula employed by everything from the Mercedes E-Class Wagon to the Toyota Tacoma to the Mazda MX-5 – niche products that serve a particular customer, and serve it well.
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102 Comments on “Capsule Review: 2015 Chrysler 300...”


  • avatar

    The matte, open-pore wood veneers (imitation, I’m sure) are quite a nice touch. I’m getting a bit tired of shiny wood veneers, especially when they’re not real. On the whole, I’m impressed with the updates, and the 300 is a lovely machine that offers an experience that you just can’t *get* anywhere else. Unfortunately, because of the types of people that it attracts, I will probably never own one.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      “The matte, open-pore wood veneers (imitation, I’m sure) are quite a nice touch. ”

      They’re the real deal.

      http://www.chrysler.com/en/300/300c/

      REAL WOOD INTERIOR
      The discriminating driver will appreciate the interior craftsmanship, real wood and soft-touch materials found in the Chrysler 300C.

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      “Unfortunately, because of the types of people that it attracts, I will probably never own one.”

      Unfortunately, I have to agree to an extent. The first gens have fallen prey at an alarming rate to tacky low-brow modifications (20-inch chrome spinners blowing by me in the middle turn lane because the driver was texting at the light and now has to regain his manhood), and the new ones strike me as something I’d want to own when I’m 55 and want something distinctive.

      I’m too boring and introverted for a Charger. Even though I want a metallic orange one.

    • 0 avatar
      probert

      Yes – when I saw Hitler waving from the back of a Mercedes, I felt it wasn’t the car for me. Those who pilot a BMW, Porsche, and especially Audi seem a bit unseemly. Perhaps it’s the tassled loafers – this has got to stop!!! Tough making these decisions.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      To me the open-pore woods look like they haven’t been sanded properly. I’m into more matte wood trim, just not open-pore (Volvo does this pretty well). My car also has fairly matte wood.

    • 0 avatar
      nrd515

      Let’s see the people I know that have 300’s (Almost all of them 300 Hemi C’s_). Scoundrels, every single one of them..

      Insurance salesman next door, his 2009 is his second one, first one got rear ended and was a write off.

      Insurance salesman next door’s mother, who is pushing 80, bought one about 2 years ago. She loves it.

      A friend’s wife, who is an elementary school teacher. Liked the looks better than the Charger.

      A friend who got one from his kids for his 61st birthday. He worked for the county in the inspection department. He wanted one from the time they came out, but just didn’t have the $$ to get payments low enough to tolerate. His kids, and older brother pitched in and bought it for him, black everything, for cash.

      A friend’s dad, who his 73, just bought his about a week ago, got a hell of a deal. What did he do before he retired? He was a policeman for 40+ years. If it wasn’t for the grandkids riding with him, he would have bought a Challenger, as his younger brother just did (TorRed scatpack R/T), but the 300 is a nice second choice.

      A couple more teachers I know are waiting for their income tax refund to arrive and they will be either buying a Charger or 300. I would bet it will be a 300, for looks alone. I had a Charger, but then, and now, I liked the 300 better. And the Challenger even more, so I traded the Charger for one.

  • avatar
    theupperonepercent

    The 300, XTS, MKS, and Model S are America’s top cars and not a single one of their interiors even comes close to a 2009 Mercedes E-class.

    Their only card is offering gas-guzzling performance models which are literally as archaic as slapping a supercharger on a 6.2-L engine and screaming *HELLCAT* in caps.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      Archaic? How about World-beating?

      • 0 avatar
        theupperonepercent

        World Beating?

        What about the GT-R’s twin turbo V6 hooked to AWD – which pretty much kills every single SRT8 (and everything else) on the track?

        What about Audi’s supercharged engines?

        What about Mercedes Twin Turbo V6’s an V8’s?

        The only thing I’d give Chrysler is that their engines don’t break down easily since they are so simple. Easy to work on as well.

        • 0 avatar
          JuniperBug

          So the only thing you give Chrysler is that they make robust, powerful engines for far less money than the competition you named?

          You’re right: that’s terrible.

        • 0 avatar
          slow-rion

          Those vehicles all cost double, or more, what the big Chrysler’s do. Sounds like Chrysler is really screwimg up with these. As a recent buyer of a German SUV I tested high end grand Cherokees. The interior in the jgc was just as good as the big Germans. I’m assuming the same for the 300. Certainly the pics imply that it is on par.

        • 0 avatar
          danio3834

          “What about the GT-R’s twin turbo V6 hooked to AWD – which pretty much kills every single SRT8 (and everything else) on the track?”

          Of course that focused sports car beats out bigger and heavier sports sedans around a track. There is, however, an SRT the GT-R doesn’t beat, the Viper with it’s archaic pushrod V10 and obsolete RWD.

        • 0 avatar
          superchan7

          The GT-R was a world-beating track car at its debut.

          The Hellcat is a world-beating engine mounted in your choice of family car or muscle car.

          None of the other cars you mentioned make 700 hp. I’m not exactly a fan of putting 700 hp within the reach of subprime borrowers, but numbers don’t lie.

        • 0 avatar
          jstrauch

          So let me get this straight.. you are comparing a GT-R (sports car) and a twin-turbo Benz V8 (much higher price point) to a Chrysler 300? Well, that pretty much discredits any points you might have had to make. Thanks.

    • 0 avatar
      morbo

      The 2009 Merc had rat fur headliner. At least the one I looked at the 2009 Philadelphia auto show did. Panel gaps were comparable to an Accord or Genesis, but at twice the price. When I did eventually purchase my 2011 300C, the only other car I seriously considered was the Hyundai Genesis (at least after test driving the Lincoln Taurus MKXYZ, Charger, and ES300). The Merc never showed up on my radar based on how crappy the one at the auto show was.

      My good deed for 2010 was convincing a friend to NOT but a Merc C300, and get a Honda CR-V instead.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      If GM had a single competent high ranking exec at Cadillac, they’d buy 300s from Chrysler in bulk, re-badge them, and then sell them as the top of the line Caddy Sedan, because the 300 is 8x more Cadillac than anything GM now makes.

      And it’d be the Cadillac with the highest satisfaction rating, too, and Cadillac would actually sell them, instead of having them clog up Cadillac Dealership lots, causing the production line to be shut down and layoffs.

      Melody Lee should work for Lululemon or Hermes.

      Johann de Nysschen should work for Spyker.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        p.s. – A 30k base 300 is a better built, more refined, more luxurious, quieter, smoother riding, far more roomy (back seat fit for actual adults), more solid vehicle, by far, than the pint sized, breakage prone ATS, CTS, or the grossly overpriced fwd XTSalibu.

        • 0 avatar
          energetik9

          In the past year I’ve rented a Cadillac ATS and a couple 300’s (base and limited) among many others. I concur that the 300 was a better cruiser and more comfortable with better space. Both have quirky infotainment systems, but the ATSs was so horrible and frustrating, I was looking for ways NOT to use it. ATS had the edge with better driving dynamics, but it also had more squeaks, wind noise, and rattles than the 300 did and the Cadillac only had 22k miles on the odometer.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            Agreed 100%.

            It can’t be said enough (really) – the ATS truly should’ve been a $23,000 to $29,999 MSRP Pontiac G6 (with a massive used car depreciation rate due to shoddy build quality/durability).

            It’s in no way shape or form a Cadillac but Melody Lee will have Publicis try to market it as one nonetheless, with a “free” $250 Lululemon gift certificate, gift voucher for 1 pair of Jimmy Choos shoes, and a Starbucks free latte per month card.

          • 0 avatar

            I know that Mister DeadWeight has an unhealthy and somewhat irritating fascination with dragging the ATS’s name through the mud, but I think it’s a proper luxury car, hardly bad enough to be relegated to “cheap Pontiac” status. However, the rear accommodations are too small, and the base 2.5-liter NA engine never should have been an option.

        • 0 avatar
          GS 455

          Yesterday I test drove the 15 XTS AWD Luxury, 15 Genesis 3.8 AWD Luxury and 14 300C AWD V8 and I agree with you. The XTS’s ride was stiff and unyielding over rough roads. Not only did I feel every bump they would cause the chassis to jounce and shake and you could hear them as a bang from the tires that resonated through the car’s structure. The engine sounded and felt coarse and there was an unacceptable delay in downshifting. The Genesis was better than the Cadillac in every respect: ride quality, NVH, and handling. The 300C was the best of the three, far better than the XTS. It’s ride was steady, composed, serene and comfortable. Of course the hemi is a great engine, smooth powerful and responsive. The only thing I didn’t like about the 300 was the lower seat back felt a bit too hard for me even with the lumbar support deflated.

        • 0 avatar
          ponchoman49

          The ATS I’ll give you. The larger XTS actually has the same rear legroom, more hip and shoulder room and a larger trunk 18 cu.ft. than the 300!

        • 0 avatar
          thornmark

          DW-You’ll love this:
          http://247wallst.com/autos/2014/12/15/saving-20000-on-a-new-cadillac/

    • 0 avatar
      frank908

      I think, you think, that the E-class interior is really that good. You keep thinking that.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    “They were also arguably the first of the Big Three to abandon the American Plan when their M-Body cars died in 1989”

    The M-bodies were downsized unit-body models themselves. Transverse torision bars FTW. I get what you’re saying though…RWD V8.

  • avatar
    John R

    “The Chevrolet SS, as enticing as it is, is an ultra-low-volume specialty car…”

    That is the definition of understatement. There is something amiss when Nissan is able to push more $100k GT-Rs with a Nissan badge than GM (of all producers) is able to push $40k 400hp RWD sedans with a Chevy badge…in North America.

    I can’t speak for the 300, but I am surprised to find how much I love my Charger R/T.

    • 0 avatar

      “There is something amiss when Nissan is able to push more $100k GT-Rs with a Nissan badge than GM (of all producers) is able to push $40k 400hp RWD sedans with a Chevy badge…in North America.”

      I don’t think GM *cares* to push too many SS units. The SS is expensive to make *and* ship. It is probably a lot less profitable than the other cars that GM sells at that price point. They’d much rather have you buy a loaded pickup for the same money, so that they can reap a five-figure profit, or a base Tahoe.

      • 0 avatar
        geozinger

        I would have to agree with you on that, Kyree. I’ve got to imagine a Chevy Equinox makes more profit than the SS. I guess that’s part of the reason why this car gets so little publicity.

        OTOH, when the GT-R was released, it was hailed as the Second Coming. (Kind of like the WRX STI and the FR-S, ad nauseum…) Only hermits didn’t know this car was available, no matter the price. And, for the $60K difference, there had better be a huge difference in capabilities…

      • 0 avatar
        energetik9

        GM is fine with a limited run. IT’s all they need to keep it qualified as a NASCAR platform.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      The SS is almost impossible to buy.

      Dealers are ordering few of them and the 2015s they’re ordering (it seems like as of now) are all automatics. And special-ordering doesn’t appear to be an option anymore either. How’s this for stupid: the special-order window closed the day before the media embargo on the 2015s expired and all the manual SS reviews appeared.

      I’m very tempted to replace my G8 GXP with a manual 2015 SS but honestly don’t know if I’ll be able to get one with my preferred options.

      • 0 avatar

        It seems pretty stupid, alright. On one hand, disallowing special orders may be a way to mitigate the SS’s expensive production costs; on the other hand, someone buying *that* kind of car is highly likely to want a specially-ordered one.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Still one of my automotive lust objects, Hemi 300.

    With the death of the SRT-8 BTRS must be crying in his cognac.

  • avatar
    cwallace

    I don’t think I’ve ever seen the words “tonne” and “Ariat Ropers” used in the same sentence before. Jolly good show, pardner!

  • avatar

    “doesn’t solve the essential question of who the 300 is for”.

    Here in the hood, in Charleston, SC, Chrysler is your to-go car. You be stylin. Mom gets the Avenger, son drives the Charger (and now the new 200) and dad drives the 300. Never see the hemi’s, mostly base version.

  • avatar
    geozinger

    One of the things that I appreciate about these cars is that the lower trim levels don’t look greatly different than the more expensive models. Of course, if I owned one of the expensive models, maybe I wouldn’t like this characteristic…

    I think this refresh has been very successful in moving the 300 to the next level of styling. I’m curious to see what the next generation of 300 will look like.

  • avatar
    Gardiner Westbound

    The 2015 “300” has piqued my interest in a Chrysler product more than anything it has produced in a couple of decades.

  • avatar
    raresleeper

    As usual, I am just about bowled over by the good looks of Sergio’s products. That interior is quite handsome and the materials feel fairly premium to the touch.

    I think its a great price point, too.

    Alas, longevity is questionable. I’d have some concerns with resale value, as well (especially over the long haul, longer than your typical American consumer keeps their rides for).

    Sorry FCA, but this raresleeper needs more than a pretty face.

    And that 8 speed slushy does wonders for MPG, sure, sure. But I bet she likes to hunt. Often.

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      If there is more cash on the hood than, say, an Avalon, the more rapid depreciation may not be such an issue. These probably won’t be great cockroach cars for the second and third owners, but if it can hold up over the average length of first ownership (6 years? 7?) and the hood cash offsets some depreciation, then I wouldn’t hesitate.

      It’s a unique car in the current market, and unlike the first generation it appears well-finished and highly competent as well.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Shifts with the 8-speed are so unobtrusive, and the car is quiet enough, that you really end up not caring about “hunting.” The transmission is as good as advertised and far less bothersome than most of its 6-speed competition.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        The 8 speed ZF knockoff Chryco transmission works as well/smoothly as any modern automatic in a large vehicle as I’ve experienced, and nets pretty astounding fuel economy figures for a vehicle this heavy, as well.

        As a bonus, the 300 with the Pentastar V6 & 8 speed transmission ranks near the top of the charts in both road test score & reliability according to none other than Consumer Reports.

        FCA is kicking a$$ and taking names in terms of both putting out solid vehicles like the 300, JGC/Durango, 200, Challenger, Charger, RAM (especially with the 2.7 diesel), and all at compelling real world transaction prices that slay much of the competition.

        There’s no other car as solid as the 300 for anywhere near the real world average transaction price.

        • 0 avatar
          petezeiss

          Yabbut.. they have nothing for the Corivic, Camcord or CRAV4 segments. The stuff ordinary people buy in six-figures.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            Although I am not crazy about it, the Jeep Cherokee is selling well, & your beloved Renegade is on the way and should be in the popular price zone.

          • 0 avatar
            petezeiss

            Yeah, I have a feeling I’ll be standing in line to test drive the Renegade.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @DeadWeight
          The Ram 1500 is a 3.0 diesel.

          I test drove a Ram 1500 Pentastar. Rode nice and had decent power BUT the transmission had a harsh clunking down shift into first that occurred several times during my test drive. The tailgate also rattled when I went down a short stretch of gravel road.

          No thanks.

          I wanted to test drive the Ecodiesel 3.0 but they alleged stiff sales and wanted a deposite. I refused and oddly enough, the local dealer offered me several test drives not even a week later.

          No thanks.

  • avatar
    Dave M.

    Not crazy about the new grille (i preferred the brash egg crate), but this is a great looking car. Well done.

  • avatar
    energetik9

    Not a big fan of the new grill. Seems to follow Audi’s lead. I think I see a rotary knob as the shift lever. I’m sorry, but not a fan. I will admit I have never used it, but it just strikes me as quirky. Maybe anti-sport. I’ll be curious to see this application over time. Will it be adopted, scrapped, or remembered as an oddball system?

    • 0 avatar
      Roberto Esponja

      FWIW, Chrysler used this shape grille before Audi adopted it for its production vehicles. It featured it on its 2nd generation LHS and subsequently its Concorde models.

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      I’m not a fan of it myself, the “Gangsta Rolls” look of the first 300C had more character. This new one would look better if they just dropped any Audi pretensions.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    Chances are that 300C base makes 300hp at the dyno, not bad looking cars big grille aside.

  • avatar
    MK

    Ive always preferred the looks of the Charger over the 300 but that white model at the top looks quite nice.

  • avatar
    Davekaybsc

    Can you turn off all of that dumb backlighting around the gauges? That’s the number 1 issue I have with both this car and the 200 – the ’90s era bubbly look gauges that seem to try to scream “ZAZZ!!!” at you. It doesn’t work. They are better than the ATS gauges ONLY because of the ATS’s criminally bad center mounted minivan speedo look.

    I could probably tolerate them during the day, but if they look the same at night and basically shine a spotlight in your face, no sale. Give me clean, crisp red needles on white numbers ala the VW Golf.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    The LX car I’d buy isn’t made.

    The Charger is ugly. The worst bits are out back with the LED Ring of Glitz and on the s!de with the big swoop crease and the flap door handles that look like they belong on an ’86 Ford Taurus. The interior looks lower-rent than it actually is, too. Materials are pretty good and seating is comfortable, but it manages to look cheap.

    The 300 is much more attractive ins!de and out, but it doesn’t offer the 6.4 (which is the ideal LX engine for street use) and accompanying upgrades. I’d like to see a 300S with a simple option package, much cheaper than the old SRT, that included the 6.4, the big brakes, wheels to clear the big brakes, and nothing else. The 5.7 is in a no-man’s-land where it has V8 fuel consumption but can’t match other modern V8s on performance, particularly in a car as heavy as a LX.

    • 0 avatar
      mikeg216

      there will be a 6.4 in it eventually, and what modern v8 is better than the 5.7 or 6.4?

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        The 6.4 is at least the equal of most of the V8 competition.

        The 5.7, on the other hand. gets smoked by pretty much all V8s in sedans now. That’s true from GM’s old LS3 in the SS to Hyundai/Kia’s 5.0 to Nissan’s 5.6 to all three of Ze Germans. Only Toyota’s old 4.6, due for replacement, has less grunt.

      • 0 avatar
        burgersandbeer

        It isn’t so much that the 5.7 is awful, more that these cars are heavy and need something ridiculous (the 6.4) to really move.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          The 5.7 isn’t awful, it’s just not competitive anymore. These days 360 hp is six-cylinder, not V8, output, except in a pickup. But it still gets V8 economy.

          We’re in a very different place than when the 2005 Hemi 300C with 340 hp was being compared with older-than-dirt Panthers.

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      “The worst bits are out back with the LED Ring of Glitz and on the s!de with the big swoop crease and the flap door handles that look like they belong on an ’86 Ford Taurus.”

      I dunno, between all that stuff the latest Chargers have the Darts cheap-looking front end aloing with pasted on ’69 Charger taillights, its a very modern example of way too many facelifts.

  • avatar
    PJmacgee

    That “awkward short-throw shifter” takes about 3 seconds to learn, and then can be forever operated without looking at it or thinking about it. A rotary knob that you always have to check its position while spinning it…seems like poorly re-inventing the wheel (HA, sorry). Does it have detents or something clever that allows it to be used by feel only?

    • 0 avatar
      bunkie

      Last week I drove my nephew’s new RAM 1500 which has the knob shifter. You’re right, it required real attention to use. There were detents, but they felt soft. However, with practice, I’m pretty sure it would become second nature. The real payoff will come when the lliberated center console space gets repurposed in clever ways in future designs.

      Having said that, I have memories of the older generation needing to keep a pencil handy to press the missing shift buttons on early ’60s Chrysler products.

  • avatar
    baggins

    I would like to be interested in one of these. At 6’4 with a long torso, I really like a big car.

    Driving this car is like driving with a baseball cap pulled all the way down to right above your eyes. Cant see much.

    Of course, I could remedy that by reclining the seat to about 45% from perpendicular. I’ve seen quite a few of these driven that way

    Which points out the second issue with this car – the image it projects can be a bit too “urban”, depending on one’s own situation it might not suit your overall persona. A man’s got to know his limitations, what look he can pull off.

  • avatar
    raresleeper

    I likes mine wit’ dem buttah-fly doors.

  • avatar
    JohnnyFirebird

    An Alpine stereo! Will it play my Corey Hart tapes?

  • avatar
    daviel

    This is the first big American car I’ve liked since the Town Car. My 21st century town car with the grille I would put on it myself. Golfgti or 300? I’ll have to measure my garage.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    A very old school and two-tone interior indeed. I like it. And I also like the quilted leather on the door panels. The chrome wheels from a 2002 M45 have gotta go. If they could just de-ghetto this dang thing. It has plenty of presence, and has a chance at being much more substantive and tasteful than the Avalon or MKS.

    So, being as I haven’t been in one – where does the interior feels rate? Is it German Audi solid, Mexico Jetta, Lexus GS of ten years ago, 08 Sable?

    This IS the kind of car I like, RWD + AWD, large, comfortable. Just get rid of the image issues :(

  • avatar
    Buckshot

    The dinosaurs are extinct, except for this…thing.
    Perfect for drugdealers.

    • 0 avatar
      nrd515

      And a lot of teachers, policemen, etc, etc. There are all kinds of people who drive 300s. The whole “gangsta” thing is nonsense.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        Really depends where you are. In some regions, 300s are driven by a broad cross-section of the population (at least the population that has enough money to feed a big car). In other regions, particularly in large cities, the 300 is pretty much confined to people who want to project a gangsta image.

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  • avatar

    I think this whole “Gee what segment does this fit in? Who is going to buy it? It doesn’t fit!!!” argument is so tired. It’s a big American* sedan with brash looks, a nice interior, and lots of power. For like 30 grand. So people who prefer a big squishy ‘murica yacht for 30k have one choice, and aren’t really punished for choosing it.

  • avatar
    stuki

    Like how they are leaving the Nascar engines to Dodge. Hopped up, gaudily appointed “luxury” cars (that’d be AMG S) always struck me as about as flattering as a toupee with 80s era highlights.

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