By on November 3, 2014

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With the unveiling of the Scion iM just weeks away, a bit of news out of Thailand has revealed some information about the other new Scion that will be released alongside the iM.

Set to debut at the end of November at the Thai Motor Show, Mazda’s sedan version of the Mazda2 may or may not be sold in North America – but it will appear as a Scion.

Information from Toyota sources tells us that the Mexican made vehicle will form the basis for another Scion product. Such a vehicle would benefit from Mazda’s lightweight Skyactiv engines, transmissions and chassis technology, but without the oddly-named moniker attached to it.

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42 Comments on “Scion’s Next Small Car Won’t Be A Wagon...”


  • avatar
    petezeiss

    Oooah! Snoopy as a puppy!

  • avatar
    319583076

    Two things interest me regarding this post:

    1. I think the new 2 looks great in photos and I’m looking forward to reviews once it’s released. It will be interesting to see what Scion does to the 2 for better or for worse.

    2. petezeiss, Lie2me, and myself sure like to comment on TTAC!

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    There’s a brand new CX-5 here at work, in a very pretty dark navy metallic color. From the looks of it it’s loaded, but it has the smallest sat nav screen this side of a 95 LS400. I was amazed how small it was!

  • avatar
    Volt 230

    Well, there goes the Scion reliability downward slide continuing, started with the FR-S, thanks to Subaru and now this thing made by Mazda in Mexico, really?? what is Toyota management thinking? or are they thinking at all?

    • 0 avatar
      anti121hero

      It is becoming the geo of toyota.

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        Of course GM’s Geo was actually their highest quality and best engineered brand, which serves to show how Toyota is GM’s polar opposite.

        • 0 avatar
          Volt 230

          Some of them were (Prizm) others not so much. Metro and Tracker for example.

          • 0 avatar
            NoGoYo

            The Prizm was a Toyota Corolla for less money with basically no other differences. You can’t go wrong with that.

          • 0 avatar
            bosozoku

            The Metro was sold all over the world by Suzuki. It was a solid vehicle for the price and loads of them are still out there pounding the pavement carting around their frugal / broke owners.

          • 0 avatar
            petezeiss

            My Metro was awesome in grad school. Paid parking meant either a 60-acre University lot 3 miles from the campus core or time-sharing a spot on a miserably small slab at the end of a 100 year-old house’s driveway once the 48 students who rented in that Dickensian warren had removed their cars in the morning. Three out of five days you’d find their wasted friends’ cars from the night before blocking your way.

            3rd world conditions require 3rd world cars and my GM badged kei car was perfectly reliable and perfectly sized. And at 6’2″/250 I was perfectly comfortable inside it.

            Yay Suzuki! Yay Geo!

  • avatar
    akatsuki

    Obviously Scion has no idea or statement for the market. Just chasing after random segments.

    Is it youth/sporty? Is it cheap unreliable crap that they don’t want to associate with Toyota? Is it a way to shove JDM cars into the US retail channel?

    Here is my suggestion – go with the last one – JDM products. The xB was awesome until they internationalized it. The FR-S needs a bit more reliability, but has done a ton for Scion’s image Bring over the Vellfire or Alphard. Switch them to RHD, do the minimum safety upgrades. Don’t reskin them otherwise. Include whatever is the current trendy body-style as a trim (right now I’d say do a VIP-style trim but revisit this every 2 years or so).

    • 0 avatar
      Quentin

      The 2nd gen xB was a JDM product (Toyota bB, IIRC). It was just a larger, different box because the feedback they got from consumers was that they wanted a bigger box.

      I think they are on the right track with the plan they have now. The tC and FR-S don’t sell in huge numbers, but those that buy them seem to love them — myself included. Keep massaging them and making them better and the sales will come. Doing the normal Scion thing of offering a bigger engine than the comparable Toyota chassis could make the Auris a nice, reliable, sporty hatch when it arrives if they put whatever they have cooking up to replace the Camry 2.5L without hosing up the Corolla by trying to turn it into a sporty car. Turning the 2 into a sedan is probably the biggest thing I have concern about, to be honest. It is hard to make a sedan that small that doesn’t look goofy.

      • 0 avatar
        319583076

        tC or FR-S? Care to share some driving impressions?

        • 0 avatar
          Quentin

          FR-S. 6MT with TRD goodies (sways, exhaust, air filter) and Enkei PF01 wheels on Conti DW tires. Almost every drive is enjoyable in the FR-S. I’m manufacturing reasons to drive it. I love the noises, the feel, and the looks. The cockpit is fantastic. It feels like a tailored suit compared to most “fun” cars these days in that it fits my frame perfectly rather than being one size fits all. The seats are low to the ground and have great bolstering. The steering wheel feels great in your hands. The shifter is perfectly placed. I’m not great at heel toe downshifting… except for this car. Perfect pedal placement. The car is just so playful. It loves input from the driver. I think that is why this car feels so different than other, faster sporty cars that I’ve driven. It is very much a reciprocal relationship between you and the car. It isn’t particularly fast in a straight line, but when I’m on my favorite twisty roads, the car has more than enough umph to put you too fast into the next corner. That is the funny thing about the car. You don’t even have to particularly be pushing hard for a twisty road to be fun. It is precise and can dance around any tight corner without feeling like you are going to end up over a hill. If I lived in a grid state where all the corners are perfect 90* turns, I’d go with something else. But here in WV, this car just feels great.

          • 0 avatar
            319583076

            Thanks. When I traded up to my 2013 Miata, the FR-S were just out and I still haven’t driven one. I sometimes wonder if I should’ve gone that route instead. It’s nice to get opinions from an owner rather than a “pro”.

          • 0 avatar
            Quentin

            I test drove an NC Miata in 2010 after selling my MKV GTI*. I loved it. The only problem was that I wasn’t crazy about the top up NHV and my wife and I were talking about having our first kid, so we went with the wait and see approach and I was without a fun car for 4 years. When my daughter got old enough to go front facing, I did some test fitting of car seats in the FR-S and pulled the trigger. If we had more days that were top down appropriate and I didn’t have a 2 year old, I’d have probably saved $10k and gone with an early NC Miata. The NC is a great value on the used market.

            *Funny enough, when I bought the GTI, I test drove the just released NC Miata and loved it. We only had one other car at the time and it was a MINI, so I went with the more practical option.

          • 0 avatar
            319583076

            Interesting. I bought my first Miata (used) after spending some time in my gf’s MINI convertible. I really liked the MINI, but I like the Miata even more.

    • 0 avatar
      bosozoku

      “Switch them to RHD”

      You mean LHD.

    • 0 avatar
      Xeranar

      Can we stop with the 2nd Gen xB hate? Seriously, it was what people wanted and frankly if the Kia Soul didn’t exist it would still be eating everybody’s lunch. The soul clocked in cheaper and was more highly advertised (those hamsters were the largest KIA buy ever at the time).

      The market was primed for the xB, the soul took it by force afterwards.

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        At the time I thought it would have made more sense for the xB to grow to the size, weight and engine of a Corolla instead of getting as big, heavy and powerful as it did. Still do.

        • 0 avatar
          Xeranar

          The Gen II xB is the exact same size, weight, and engine as a Corolla. it uses the same uprated 2.4L you can could get in the Corolla and it has the same basic dimensions. The Gen I was based on the Yaris/Echo platform.

  • avatar
    Easton

    Yeah, that’s what the world needs is another cramped sedan.

  • avatar
    tjh8402

    Scion iM eh? Next up will be the iV or the iO? will the performance versions be called STAT?

  • avatar
    bd2

    Interesting that Toyota is the largest automaker in the world with profits enhanced by the falling Yen and yet they have numerous ventures with other automakers (letting them do most of the development work) – Subaru, BMW, Mazda, Citroen-Peugeot, etc.

    I guess that’s one way of bettering one’s lineup.

    • 0 avatar
      Xeranar

      Free R&D, running it in a sub-brand, using their excess factory capacity to push a few more units without having to do any real heavy lifting? It’s a win-win-win for Toyota because they have a generation of goodwill built up for themselves. If they rebadge other brands under the Scion logo in the US nobody is going to worry too much plus they’re largely picking vehicles that don’t overlap with their core component choices.

  • avatar
    Lorenzo

    Scion is gradually getting to the point of a youth brand. They’re eliminating those easy to get into and out of models that seniors will buy, and going for models that only those under 30 can flex themselves into. Gets them out of driving grandma to the doctor too.

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