By on November 26, 2014

2014-Mitsubishi-Mirage-G4-Sedan _1_

Looking for a cheap new car that isn’t a hatchback? Mitsubishi might just have what you need.

According to Motor Trend, Mitsubishi Motors North America executive vice president Don Swearingen proclaimed that the Mirage sedan — already on sale in Thailand as the Attrage — would arrive in U.S. showrooms within the next year or two.

Like the Mirage hatch (which we reviewed not too long ago), the sedan is powered by a 1.2-liter three-pot mated to either a CVT or five-speed manual.

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78 Comments on “Mitsubishi Confirms Mirage Sedan For US Market...”


  • avatar
    Lie2me

    No, Mitsubishi, please don’t. Nobody wants this and few will buy it. Save yourself the embarrassment of hearing us beat it to death, just no

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      That’s what was said about the hatch, but it sells, at least in big enough numbers to make it worth Mitsubishi’s while. The sedan will probably sell too. The intro of new models indicates Mitsubishi is NOT going the way of Suzuki, and is satisfied with its niche toehold in America.

  • avatar
    RangerM

    Perhaps my memory isn’t what it used to be, but back in the early to mid ’90s Mitsubishi seemed to do no wrong. They seemed to sell as many Mirages, Eclipses, and Monteros as they could make.

    There’s got to be a case study in what they did wrong.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      They’ve fallen so far off the map, so quickly, that no one thought to ask what the hell happened to them.

    • 0 avatar
      Silverbird

      Probably a factor is that this “new” Mirage they’ve been selling for the past ~2 years is still basically 90’s technology

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      What they did wrong was Diamond Star Motors.

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        DSM was a good move for them. They certainly expanded a lot more in the US than they would have without that partnership. Domestic partnerships were instrumental for a lot of the smaller import players.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          I have to feel like it’s an overall negative though, due to the decline in reputation which occurred during and after it. Those DSM cars fell right apart, and nobody wanted anything to do with whatever else they made.

          And for the record, I’ve always been a Montero Limited fan!

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            Before DSM, Mitsubishi basically had no reputation in the US. The partnership allowed them to build cars domestically and gain a presence. The 90’s was Mitsubishi’s best period in North America.

            You won’t get an argument from me that Talons and Eclipses were crap cars. But from a business standpoint, the partnership was a boon to Mitsubishi and opened the door to their limited period of prosperity in the US. Plus, in spite of being piles of unreliable crap, DSMs are still very highly regarded in performance circles.

            Mitsubishi fell off a cliff in the 2000s because they stopped selling compelling cars like the DSMs and tried going forward peddling their uncompetitive mass market (if more reliable) garbage that no one wanted.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            That’s a good point RE: growth and the current performance reputation.

  • avatar

    The Versa needs more direct competition at its price point. If nothing else to drive people to the lots. Right now, it’s Sonic and Rio both of which have serious badge-related issues. If Mitsu can get a stripper actually on lots for $13K they have a contender.

    This argument presumes the bizarre non-correcting steering issue has been or shall be addressed and that more people than not can actually find a Mitsu store.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      You’re arguing that Chevrolet and Kia are less appealing on the badge front than Mitsubishi? Are you running on the most recent version of the AOL software, cause it’s certainly 1994 wherever you are?

  • avatar
    petezeiss

    Yay! Cheap cars are good. Bring it.

    But lift it 4″ and give it a hatch.

  • avatar
    wmba

    Only people working in rooms with grey walls working at CAD stations encased in grey plastic and hounded by accountants in grey suits could come up with such an apologetic car that shows not a single flash of inspiration in its design and specications. To buy one is to admit you have given up entirely.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      … Suicide @ 11:00

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      For some reason a friend of mine really wants one of these. He’s not a car guy, and all he cares about is cost of ownership, with an emphasis on MPG. He’ll drive it into the ground, so resale is not an issue. He’s been driving a 2002 Accent that he bought new.

      I tried to point him in the direction of the Sonic and the Versa, but costs were too high.

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        And cost is the key, isn’t it? The Great Recession has produced a class of Americans who can barely afford a new car, but the cheapest one available. That’s the market Mitsubishi is tapping.

        • 0 avatar
          geozinger

          However folks got to the position where they need the lowest cost new car, this is the car.

          My kid, starting out on her own, can probably afford this car while working and going to school to be a teacher. It sure beats the 260,000+ mile Cavalier she’s currently driving (but it’s free!). Once her current ride finally dissolves in a pile of rust, that’s probably where she’ll go.

          I don’t get all of the hate on this car, different strokes for different folks and all that…

      • 0 avatar

        A guy who’s dead-set on m.p.g. would be better served by looking at Ford Fiesta SFE. Note that SFE only comes with a manual, but the mileage is easy above 40. It’s almost like Prius C (which, admittedly is at 50), but costs less than a Fit.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      There is nothing wrong with a grey suit. Shame on you.

  • avatar

    No, thanks. My FICO is over 503.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    What is with the infatuation with sedans in the USA? Particularly in small cars the hatch configuration works much better. Of course the wagon or shooting brake style works even better, particularly in brown with a manual.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      We like to hide stuff in trunks

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      Hatches just scream, “break my rear window to get a new flat screen.” Unless the hatch is raised a few inches and called a CUV/SUV.

      • 0 avatar
        Arthur Dailey

        What does that say about American society that either you cannot or you are afraid to leave something in a hatch, when inhabitants of the rest of the world don’t have the same fear?

        Use a hatch whenever we visit/tour Europe and have never had a problem despite leaving luggage etc in the back.

        • 0 avatar
          petezeiss

          Newsflash:

          We don’t care what you think of us.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            Is that the royal ‘we’ that you are using or are you assuming that you speak for everyone? Or was it meant to be ironic?

            If hatchbacks are too easy to steal from, then what of soft top convertibles or pick-ups?

          • 0 avatar
            petezeiss

            America is what it is. What it is *not* is the remote, back-water boonies of a dead empire whose slave trade saddled us with the most profound of our current problems.

            So take your tiresome, de rigueur condescenscion and toss it between some windrows.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            Darn, I posted a scathingly brilliant reply that got eaten by the span filter.

            According to the history books, the ’empire’ was the first to make slavery illegal. When its fleet started to stop slavers from delivering their terrible cargo to the US, the Americans got angry and attacked this backwater, while the English were busily engaged in defeating a European dictator bent on world domination.

            No problem though, we colonials kicked the Americans’ butts right back across the border. In the process we also occupied Detroit and burnt the Presidential Palace in Washington. It had to be painted white to cover the scorch marks.

            About 140 years later the Americans became much smarter and just bribed us into turning over much of our country to them. Unfortunately in this century, it appears that they have in turn sold it to China.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            Do you control the comments section? I posted 2 replies that taxed my brain and they have both been eaten.

            The dying empire was the first to outlaw slavery. When it tried to stop ships from carrying their human cargo to the US, the Americans got angry and decided to attack our little backwater, while the English were busy defeating a European dictator with a world domination complex.

            No matter, we colonials kicked the Americans back across the border, occupied Detroit and burnt the Presidential Palace. It had to be painted white to hide the scorch marks.

            About 140 years later, the Americans learned from their mistake and simply bribed us into selling much of our nation to them. Unfortunately over the past decade it appears that they have re-sold it to the Asian market.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            Darn 3 brilliant posts eaten by the filter. I will have to figure out another way to thwart your nefarious musings.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            Actually the dying empire tried to save the US from the problem that you referred to. Unfortunately the American politicians were not smart enough to follow the lead of William Wilberforce.

            The Americans’ responded to British ships stopping their illegal cargo by invading our backwater. Must have thought that it would be pretty easy as the Brits were busy defeating a European dictator with plans of world domination.

            However, we responded by occupying Detroit, kicking their army back across our border and burning their Presidential Palace. It was painted white to hide the scorch marks.

            About 140 years later the Americans got much smarter and just bribed our business class into selling much of our country.

            Unfortunately for both countries it appears that the Americans have re-sold it.

            No problem

        • 0 avatar
          davefromcalgary

          Hey Arthur,

          I’ll admit, I keep buying sedans because my trunk locks and you can’t see in. To me those cargo shades always scream “I am hiding valuables!”

          Its probably irrational but I cannot shake it.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            Or can we just assume that North Americans who buy/drive hatchbacks have nothing of value that they might put in or carry in their car?

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Not if they’re smart they don’t, no, or they live somewhere safe from stuff like that

          • 0 avatar
            davefromcalgary

            Where you live doesn’t REALLY matter, Lie2me. I live in a pretty safe area of town but I tend to have to park a lot of different places in the course of living of my life.

            Also, the two times my car has been broken into, it was parked in much nicer parts of town. Go figure. (Anecdotes aren’t data, I know, but its all I have to go on.)

          • 0 avatar
            raresleeper

            Most Americans just don’t like hatchbacks.

            It is what it is.

            Across the pond, you all stack stuff in the “boot”.

            Over here, we lay stuff in the trunk.

            That concludes your “Welcome to America” Lesson for the day.

            And yes, trunks get broken into all the time. How else do you explain the cars running around with trunk locks punched out?

          • 0 avatar
            davefromcalgary

            Yup, as I said above, its a perception of safety.

            But people do silly things/pay silly amounts for placebo.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            I’ve never had a car broken into and I grew-up in Chicago then lived in Atlanta most of my adult life. I also never leave anything of value in my car. Anecdotal, sure, but it’s what works for me

          • 0 avatar
            davefromcalgary

            Neither do I. Last time my car got broken into, all they got was a folding lawn chair, and a folder of mix CD’s out of the trunk. Nothing visible in the passenger compartment.

            On a regular basis, the only “valuable” visible in my car is my $15 convenience store sunglasses. I keep PPE (for job sites) and a winter safety kit in the trunk at all times.

            I’ve owned 7 cars, the Alero got broken into twice, the rest were never touched.

            (One break-in happened while my car was parked at work in Edmonton, I was on a work trip with the company truck, the other time crashing at a more well off friends place in Calgary, so I tend to never think of my car as “safe”)

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            “a folder of mix CD’s out of the trunk”

            Nooooooo! Not “Dave’s Hot Jamz 2003” and “Dave’s Slow Jamz 2001”. People are animals.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            It’s worse, they took the “Best of Bryan Adams”

          • 0 avatar
            davefromcalgary

            It was actually “Dave’s Ukrainian polka mix”.

            Clearly they needed some culture.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            avatar

            petezeiss

            November 26th, 2014 at 11:43 am

            America is what it is. What it is *not* is the remote, back-water boonies of a dead empire whose slave trade saddled us with the most profound of our current problems.

            So take your tiresome, de rigueur condescenscion and toss it between some windrows.

            According to the history books, the dead empire was the first to end slavery and when its fleet attempted to stop slavers from bringing their ill gotten cargo to America, the USA attacked our particular backwater.

            No problem, we kicked their butts right back across the border, and burnt their Presidential Palace.

            Just over a century later they got much smarter and used capital incentives to take over our economy. Unfortunately for both of our nations, it appears that they have sold much of that to the Chinese.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          The last time I had a car broken into was in my high school parking lot when I was 17. I had an Audi 5000, so sometimes, some locks diecided not to work without my knowledge.

          They took some of my CDs, but I was offended they didn’t like my musical taste enough to take others. That was almost worse than the crime.

          Dave’s Ukranian Polka Mix…Lol

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            “most Americans just don’t like hatchbacks’.

            That about sums it up, except as Lie2Me said “if they jack it up and call it an SUV/CUV”.

            Just what the heck are the objective differences between a hatch and a SUV/CUV except for centre of gravity, driveability, cost and manufacturer profit?

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          You have to have nice things like Americans do in order for people to wanna steal them. Nobody wants your Targus luggage.

          /s

          /a

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      That’s the truth, Raresleeper. When hatchbacks became a thing in the US, they were poverty-level cars. Sedans were large people haulers that show you’re an adult. Our roads are wide, and our parking ample. There’s was no need to drive a small vehicle. A small hatch is what you drove when you couldn’t afford anything else. That’s a stigma that they’ve never shaken.

    • 0 avatar
      Demetri

      In most cases, the hatch version costs at least $500 more in the USA, even when equally equipped, and in a few cases (Mazda3) gets marginally worse fuel economy. If you don’t need the cargo flexibility, you’re better off with the sedan.

  • avatar
    raresleeper

    Nah, nah.

    That Chinese-built Ford Escort appeals to me waaaaay more than this.

    And hell, I said that without even thinking! (*GASP*)

  • avatar
    bball40dtw

    Mitsubishi went wheel shopping in the caster section of harborfreight.com.

  • avatar
    Sixray

    Better get on the list now, this shit is going to be hotter than the Tesla Model X I’m telling you.You’ll get all the ladies on your junk in this baby.

    On a serious note, Mitsubishi clearly has jumped on the trend of making horribly uninteresting cars with the death of the Evo. Except they aren’t even good uninteresting cars. They are future <10 year old oil burners.

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    It makes a Chevrolet Sonic sedan seem like luxury and great engineering.

  • avatar
    Joss

    I’ve heard Mirage don’t handle too well. If the U.S. gets the 10 year warranty Mitsu will erode Versa sales.

    • 0 avatar
      petezeiss

      “I’ve heard Mirage don’t handle too well.”

      Why would they need to?

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        So you can zip into a parking space on Black Friday before someone else steals it from you

        • 0 avatar
          petezeiss

          If Amazon don’t send it, Pete don’t need it.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            I agree, but sometimes I just need to look at something before I buy it

          • 0 avatar
            petezeiss

            Me too, but sure as heck not on Black Friday.

            Every two-ton texting turkey is behind the wheel then struggling against their abdominal fat to breathe between burger bites and screaming at their junior lard balls as they jerk their cattle wagons across lanes to bump over curbs and into the mall lots where they speed diagonally through rows of cars to find a handicapped spot so they don’t have to abrade their thighs walking more than necessary to join the zombie herd in the food court with waves of cheap fragrances mixed with BO and fried fat rolling over it and breaking against the greasy, stained windows of the Radio Shack and Verizon stores that always seem to be right there.

            Now I’m struggling to breathe.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Kind of gives you the warm fuzzies all over, don’t it!

      • 0 avatar

        Sure they need to handle. People buy small cars the world over because they enjoy their dynamics oftentimes. Not everyone buys a small car just to save a buck.

        Small cars must respect their tradition! Handle well or go off into the dustbin of history.

  • avatar
    EAF

    This is a far cry from Mitsubishi’s days of 4G63T equipped vehicles. They had a winning formula in the 90’s; turbocharged & all-wheel drive! WTH happend?

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      As I mentioned before, DSM happened.

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        What are you getting at? Most of those 4G63 cars were DSMs…

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          The formula was fine, AWD + turbo + looks good. Just the quality wasn’t there.

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            Agreed about the quality, but Mitsu needed more than that. You could easily buy quality from any number of brands. When they tried to go exclusively mass market in the 2000s with so-so but reasonably reliable cars, they got into trouble. They should have recognized their niche and better exploited it instead of trying to successfully compete with the big boys all at once.

            Subaru is a good example of how to grow a newer brand, don’t stray too far from your niche lest you abandon your customer base. Their cars were unreliable crap too, but they kept giving their buyers what they wanted in the form of value elsewhere.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    I think if you’re seriously considering this car, you should:

    A) Work the same level of hardness and get a used, superior car.

    B) Work a little harder and get a Sentra, which is similar but superior in every way. Nobody questions your credit when you drive a Sentra.

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