By on November 20, 2014

chevrolet-colorado-zr2-2014-la-auto-show-03

The Chevrolet Colorado ZR2 is officially a concept car, but the 2.8L Duramax diesel I4 is coming to showrooms within a year.

Putting out 181 horsepower and 369 lb-ft of torque, the diesel will be a first for the mid-size pickup segment. The ZR2 is four inches wider, and features front and rear skid plates, King coil-over shocks and locking rear differentials. For now, customers will have to make do with a less extreme Z71 package.

 

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73 Comments on “Los Angeles 2014: Chevrolet Colorado ZR2 Packs Diesel Power...”


  • avatar
    Lie2me

    “Duramax diesel I4 is coming to showrooms within a year.”

    Which, showrooms… Outer Mongolia?

  • avatar
    Beerboy12

    I like it! Most will view this with scorn though. It’s small and it’s a diesel… What next? A manual version…!
    With the stump pulling pulling power + economy of the diesel, it’s smaller, easier to maneuver footprint and practical utility that will accommodate 85% (more?) of owners needs, what more could you ask for?

    • 0 avatar
      chainyanker

      How about something that doesn’t look like a cartoon character?

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        Oh, no this looks nice, but I get your “name”, so OK

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        This demographic likes things that are over the top and cartoonish. Example: Ford F150 SVT Raptor.

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          Yeah, the Raptor is nice

        • 0 avatar
          CJinSD

          There are lots of Raptors around here. Most of them are silver or white, devoid of bodyside graphics, and practically invisible compared to the typical brodozer.

          I don’t care for the ZR2 hood bulge at all, but a production spec bumper is likely to address any other aesthetic concerns I have with this pickup.

        • 0 avatar
          Beerboy12

          What demographic?

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            “What demograpic?”

            People who buy offroad lifesyle trucks. The Raptor is the alpha of full sized trucks.

            The Raptor, like a Porsche, Corvette, etc, is often more about being seen than actual performance. There isn’t anything wrong with that, it’s just reality.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Can’t you have both, looks and performance or are these “lifestyle” vehicles always the pretty girl who can’t cook?

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            You can have both. The Raptor is certainly capable. As are cars like the 911, Mustang, Camaro, Corvette, etc. Someone will always have something more capable though. There is always that guy that throws a bunch of money at a TJ Wragler or a New Edge Mustang.

            You can make a SN-95 Mustang as fast as the new one, and I guess it would be a great track car, but that’s about it.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            So, even though the Raptor is “cartoonish” it’s capable… kind of like Roadrunner, “Beep,beep!”

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Yes, it’s capable. When you are the king, people are going to come for your crown though. They’ll be plenty of people around here, Jalopnik, or the sewer known as pickuptrucks.com, that will hate on the Raptor. The truth is, Raptors don’t last two weeks on Ford lots, and they can’t build them fast enough. For the last year, Ford has been making at least 5 per hour. That’s 44,000 trucks that go for at least $45K as soon as they hit the lot. When they get sent to China, quadruple that price.

        • 0 avatar
          Drewlssix

          That’s funny. I don’t think the raptor is especially outlandish. I see them around but they don’t always stand out. That might be down to the scifi looks of the other big trucks but they are pretty staid with any cosmetic changes directly related to function.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @Drewlssix – a Raptor does stand out. It is as wide as a 1 ton dually. Even if one doesn’t have the stupid splash graphics they are always easy to spot – well maybe for a truck guy they are easy to spot ;)

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            If I had a Raptor I would want it to stand out a bit. Not unlike a Corvette or a Wrangler. It’s a special vehicle and should look the part

      • 0 avatar
        Beerboy12

        This be the concept show car… Thinks the for sale version would be a bit toned down, yes?

      • 0 avatar
        agroal

        I agree. The new GM twins look nice but this one is just a poser truck. It will be a daily driver for Chevy fans who can’t afford the full size trucks and/or have a small penis! The diesel is a nice option but I’ll keep my ’11 Tacoma 2.7L 4 cyl. 5-speed manual,Access Cab,4X4. A great basic truck. Understated reliability. That’s what’s always been the best thing about small Jap pickups.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      The diesel only mirrors the power of the GM gas 5.3 V8. Except the V8 gasser would cost 1,000s less up front and 1,000s less down the road. If they still offered it, as did the old Colorado/Canyon.

      V8 midsize pickups were the only ones that interested me. I don’t see a point otherwise.

      • 0 avatar
        frozenman

        The V8 in this would be awesome in this without much of a fuel penalty, but then I would have to consider a GM product again. If Toyota would only option the 4.6L in the Tacoma/4Runner I wouldn’t be able to resist buying one. Are we the only ones that see a 8cyl as desirable as the diesel?

      • 0 avatar
        SC5door

        I sometimes miss my 5.9L Dakota…..until I had to stop at the gas station.

        • 0 avatar
          NoGoYo

          I’m still stunned that my friend’s 5.9 R/T Durango gets like 12 mpg…I know it’s a SUV, but 5.9 liters is not that enormous when it comes to a V8.

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            IIRC, they had 4 speed autos and something like a 3.92:1 axle ratio. Combine that with full time AWD in a vehicle that weighs 4700lbs, that’s about what you’d expect. The Magnum 5.9L had none of this variable valve timing or cylinder shutdown fuel savng technology that we’re used to today either.

      • 0 avatar
        Beerboy12

        The 2.8l diesel mirrors the power of a 5.3l gas engine… Err… That is my point. Plus MPG’s. The difference would be so vast it would absolutely make the price difference worth it.

    • 0 avatar

      I scoffed at the idea of a mid-sized truck when I was younger. I only had eyes for the full-sized ones. Now that I’m older and I’ve had extensive seat time with these full-sized trucks, I have discovered that I really do not like driving them. A mid-sized truck, however, could really work for me.

  • avatar
    VW16v

    Beautiful new truck with up to date engineering. Hopefully GM can keep the cost down.

    • 0 avatar
      celebrity208

      Cost. That has been and will be the achilles heel for the DuraMax in this truck because, I suspect, as you option a Colorado out with a DMax you’ll quickly move into mid-level V8 Silverado territory.
      Maybe I’m wrong…

      • 0 avatar
        VW16v

        True, you can already get an crew cab LT silverado for $30k. and it gets 24mpg hwy with the 5.3 .. I see big rebates with in 6 months. Good for the consumer.

        • 0 avatar
          87 Morgan

          24 mpg?

          Sure it does as a two wheel drive only down hill with a strong tail wind.

          My neighbor has a beautiful 14′ extended cab blue 4×4 short box half ton, traded his 03′ same color same options. The 03 had 170k and he couldn’t pass up the deal. Which really bummed me out was eying the truck for my kid who will need a rig in four years….

          The 03′ according to him did 1- 2 mpg better real world driving

          He gets a solid 16 in daily around town and some highway to work..

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            Guys are missing the point of buying a truck like this, MPG is NOT the point of this truck. Off roading with decent mpg is the point.

            Put a lift and tires on a Chevy with 5.3 and see what happens to your mpg.

            Small trucks and big trucks are for different buyers and buyers that look at this consider size first and mpg second. Small truck buyers see a big truck’s size as a liability. (and large truck buyers see a smaller trucks size as a liability)

            If this truck retains its stock cargo capacities it will be on par with a Power Wagon. These trucks are rated for 1500 lb and so is a well optioned PW.

            This truck will kill a Power Wagon off road. It will run rings around a Raptor in any tight environment.

            I have a full sized truck because small trucks do not meet my current needs but I’d buy something like this in a heart beat if I no longer needed a bigger truck.

            No one complains about MPG with those trucks. This truck even in 4×4 mode will double the mpg of those other trucks in 4×2.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            Crap – the spam-bot ate my post. MPG is important but size is much more important. Guys buy small trucks because they view bigger truck size as a liability. That is no different than large truck buyers seeing the smaller size as a liability.

            This truck is 4 inches wider than stock but still narrower than a stock full sized pickup. It is also considerably narrower than a Raptor.

            MPG is a factor but put a mild lift and aggressive tires on a full sized truck and see what happens to mpg.

            A Colorado even in stock trim with a diesel should easily better the Ram Ecodiesel since the truck is lighter and smaller.

  • avatar
    Nick

    If I ever reach the point in my life where I can go back to doing outdoorsy stuff, this would be perfect for me.

  • avatar
    crtfour

    Cool. I love 4wd trucks in which you can actually tell they are 4wd and with real ground clearance. That’s one reason I hang onto my T100 4wd.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    Dislike, 20 lbs of plastic cladding doesn’t all of a sudden make a already in production pickup somehow offroad oriented.
    That and the corvette raked windshield will assure that teens will be posting how much better offroad their 20 year old ZR2 S10 is than everything actually made for offroading for another 20 years.

    What’s the rear skid plate for? Is it protecting a IRS diff?
    Still don’t understand how anyone can get excited with cheap fading plastic over actual steel.
    How many people change OEM bumpers to plastic? None.
    Steel? Not uncommon.
    Hint hint, if your not going to go steel to begin with, the ZR2 package is little more than an appearance package, as any real off-roader can build an actual offroader multiple times more capable for less money using a normal 4×4.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      I learn more from you about trucks while you step all over their cool then anyone I know

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @Hummer – the most hardcore off-roaders rarely ever start with a new truck. So what’s your point? They want to build their own and they don’t care about sheet metal.

      This truck is for those that want off-road but don’t want to spend all their time pulling wrenches…..

      or it is for those that want image.

      I rarely ever see Raptors, Power Wagons or ANY Hummer ever looking like they ever actually get run hard and put away wet.

      I’d buy this over a Raptor, Power Wagon, and even a Jeep Wrangler Unlimited.

      1,500 lb payload, the ability to run down a back country road at a good speed and a decent fuel range.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        Maybe I’m in the minority, but when I bought my H2 originally, I did it fully aware any offroad damage was under warranty, and it got the mess beat out of it knowing it could take it, and could be fixed without any cost to me if something did wear out.
        So yes, we exist, those who buy brand new vehicles and use them as intended, don’t take one segment of buyers as representative of all for any particular vehicle,

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      @Hummer,
      I agree with Lou on this one. Even in Australia guys who go off roading generally buy a vehicle several years old.

      The rear skid plate is in lieu of where the tyre was placed. I you have ever off roaded you would have realised you scrape assend and spare. But, as I’ve noticed their is a lot of hot air around what you a base your comments on.

      This actually looks like a reasonable of road machine. Most who buy this will go to the mall in it anyway like all of those unscratched and shiny Raptors, Hummers and most SUVs and pickups I see when I visit the US.

      But, the diesel will do very well off road, better than any full size truck, even a Raptor. A Raptor might out perform this vehicle on a w!de open desert track.

      My BT50 is quite similar in it’s setup as this truck. It off roads very well for a pickup. There are several guys at work who have full size trucks and they will not off road in them. They get hung up easier, are too w!de and long and their fuel range is restricted due to their fuel consumption.

      If you have ever off roaded you will also know that a diesel is a far superior engine to use, not just because of FE, but it offers far superior traction idling and crawling.

      Out of my 3.2 diesel off road I’m averaging around 24mpg. That is off road track work. Generally in high range 3rd and 4th gear at up to 40-50kph. Just idling, just a slight bit of throttle furnishes you with much more torque than a gas engine.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        Sorry I don’t use pickups with under bed tires, even still that makes no sense, these photos contain shots of tires in the bed, and none the less, who seriously put a skid plate over a spare tire?

        Your one to be speaking of “Hot air”.

        I never said anything anti-diesel, I know you have to reach a quota here, but your reaching.

  • avatar
    jjster6

    Quote from above – “and locking rear differentials.”

    I believe the concept has lockinf rear AND front differentials!!!

  • avatar
    Fred

    When I first saw this it was pretty close to being the size as my “full size” 1999 Silverado. Now that they added 4″ to the width and jacked it up, it probably a bit bigger. Guess the true compact truck is dead and buried, at least in America.

  • avatar
    Carlson Fan

    Offer that I4 turbo diesel in your 1/2 ton PUs and SUVs GM!

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      From what I hear people saying the Ram diesel is pretty underpowered from a day to day standpoint, but to cut that number by almost 100HP? Did you fall off your rocker?

      Give them props though for not using some fruity “Eco” name in the diesel designation. Now if they can correct their BS gas engine designation.

      • 0 avatar
        Carlson Fan

        HP is meaningless to me in a truck without looking at the torque figure. I don’t buy trucks to drag race, I buy them for towing.

        • 0 avatar
          Carlson Fan

          And a motor producing 200 HP w/400 lbs of torque would be underpowered in a 1/2 ton truck? Not for me it wouldn’t, especially at the low RPM it makes those numbers.

          • 0 avatar
            bumpy ii

            Those are about the numbers the Cummins Rams had in the mid-90s. They somehow managed to get down the road okay.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            @Carlson Fan – The 2.8 diesel would do OK in a 1/2 ton, especially of the aluminum body variety, But the Cummins of the early/mid ’90s Dodge trucks had huge nutz, so to speak. Even though the 2.8 diesel has similar power figures, it doesn’t compare. Just like today’s pickups with Cummins, Power Stroke, Scorpion and Duramax, have the power figures of big rigs from the early “90s, they also don’t compare.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @Hummer – people unfortunately expect a 3 litre diesel to act like a V8 or a 6.7 litre diesel.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    The truck looks quite good. It needs a bull bar for off roading. The bull bar will allow it to go through to more places by pushing the fauna and flora aside.

    For the dedicated off roader the 2.8 diesel will be a gem.

    Hopefully the US pickup market can become a free market and allow some competition in like the VW Amarok, BT50 and the next Mitsubishi Triton.

    The newer midsizers are finally becoming as refined or even more refined than the full size trucks.

    Why would you want a V6 full size 1/2 ton when you can buy a diesel like this that will give you at least 30+mpg on the highway and 26-27mpg mixed.

    Better than 4cyl FE with V8 torque all down low and good for work. Even drop the engine in a Silverado, this would also make good use of those 369ftlbs of torque.

    “Gotta love it”.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    The truck looks quite good. It needs a bull bar for off roading. The bull bar will allow it to go through to more places by pushing the fauna and flora as!de.

    For the dedicated off roader the 2.8 diesel will be a gem.

    Hopefully the US pickup market can become a free market and allow some competition in like the VW Amarok, BT50 and the next Mitsubishi Triton.

    The newer midsizers are finally becoming as refined or even more refined than the full size trucks.

    Why would you want a V6 full size 1/2 ton when you can buy a diesel like this that will give you at least 30+mpg on the highway and 26-27mpg mixed. Even use the engine in a Silverado and make good use of those 369ftlbs of torque for towing, off roading and work.

    Better than 4cyl FE with V8 torque all down low and good for work.

    “Gotta love it”.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      No way will it come with a standard bull bar – and no way will it come with the built in winch in the concept.

      In the case of the bull bar, it would never pass required passenger impact safety standards.

      Now an after market accessory, that’s a different story…

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @APaGttH – the Power Wagon has a 12,000 lb rated winch. As long as location has minimal effect on crumple zones it will be fine. This truck will most likely have a much lighter 8,000 lb winch.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      @BAFO – Nothing against the diesel, but gear reduction of 4Lo and the regular V6, is all the engine it could ever need, off road. Anything more is dead weight.

  • avatar
    JMII

    Finally! Not only are they building mid-sized trucks again but someone realized the best engine for this application is a small diesel. Wonder what MPGs this thing will get?

  • avatar
    Luke42

    How are you supposed to haul stuff with that silly spare tire in the back?

    Even a poseur truck should be able to haul the occasional load of actual cargo.

    This one? Not so much.

    I’m eagerly awaiting the regular Diesel-powered Colorado. I miss my Ranger, and thought that the Diesel engine out of my Jetta would have been a great fit for it — so I’d love to see what GM has done with the actually-useful versions of this truck.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    It seems many people here use the manufacturers mpg’s when quoting figures.

    The reality is that a gas engine under normal driving conditions will consume a lot more fuel than what is show by the manufacturer, more so than a diesel. I have owned both in off road vehicles and this has proven to be the case, every time.

    Diesels tend to not change significantly. This is illustrated just by looking at any site with people who tow using small light comercial vehicles and SUVs.

    Take the current EcoBoost F-150 towing a 6 to 7 thousand pound caravan. I’ve read many stories where people are returning 9mpg. An equivalent diesel will give you around 14 to 15 miles per gallon to achieve the same work.

    This fits in well with say the Pentastar Ram 1500. I’ve read articles where regularly people have an average FE of under 18mpg’s. The diesel Ram would never reach that kind of figure unless it’s towing a significant load.

    Diesel is the best engine for a pickup and particularly an off road vehicle. Off road 0-60 times are of little use unless you are racing.

    Even if the 3 litre VM diesel that’s in the Ram 1500 was fitted to a Powerwagoon the Powerwagon would still reach speed much faster than is safe in most any off road situation. 420ftlb of torque at 2 to 3 thousand rpm out of the VM or a Hemi is the same amount of power.

    V8 gasoline torque is no different to diesel torque. The same as a midsizer 1 500lb payload is the same as a full size 1/2 ton 1 500lb payload.

    A 369ftlb diesel in this pickup will make it exceptionally attractive. This is something new in the US. People will love the torque and ease of using the torque and especially the FE. It will be much cheaper on fuel than the V6 Colorado.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      @BAFO – You wouldn’t normally tow 6 to 7,000 lbs with an Eco Boost 1/2 ton, on an ongoing basis. Owners don’t mind an occasional 9 mpg for the sake of mostly unloaded mpg. A gas V8 or small diesel gives better (heavy) tow mpg, but a 3/4 ton is better advised for lots of that anyways. Either way, you’re gonna pay.

      When it boils down to mpg, you can’t overlook the totally costs of ownership. We’re not renting these things.

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