By on November 4, 2014

Tesla Model S Burnout

Think your Tesla Model S is all that and a bag of Starbucks Pumpkin Spice Latte Doritos? That it says to the world that you’ve arrived? That you’re standing on the edge of a silver future? Consumer Reports says your car’s just “average.”

The publication took information from its recent Annual Reliabilty Survey — which Tesla cannot partake in full until it has a second model in the lineup, per the survey’s criteria — and found that the 1,353 Model S owners surveyed had similar service experiences as Consumer Reports had in its long-term tester. The comparison with other vehicles the same age as the premium EV helped it earn the “Average” ranking.

The majority of the reports focused on small problems, such as slow-retracting door handles and body-component issues. That said, the publication will continue to recommend the Model S to its readership, noting it was in good company with other high-end vehicles rated as such, including the Acura RLX.

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72 Comments on “Consumer Reports: Tesla Model S Ranked “Average” In Reliability Survey...”


  • avatar
    PonchoIndian

    I’m surprised it ranked that high. Every one of the long term vehicles the rags are driving has been pretty poor in the reliability department. I think Edmunds has had their drive unit replaced at least 3 times (and that would be something in the ballpark of $8K a pop).

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      One vehicle (Edmunds) does not a pattern make. Every brand, no matter the brand, makes a lemon once in a while. I know quite a few other brands that do so far more often.

      • 0 avatar
        PonchoIndian

        yes I realize that. But…if you do a little bit of research you’ll see that this has been a very common replacement for a large number of Tesla automobiles.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          “yes I realize that. But…if you do a little bit of research you’ll see that this has been a very common replacement for a large number of Tesla automobiles.”
          Show me the proof, as I have not heard this from ANY review site I’ve seen. With over 30,000 Model S Teslas on the road, if this were a pattern, I’m sure we would have heard a lot more about it before now.

          • 0 avatar
            PonchoIndian

            http://www.greencarreports.com/news/1093713_tesla-model-s-drive-unit-replacements-how-big-a-problem

            Don’t get out much do you Vulpine?

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            Maybe you should actually read the report you linked, Poncho; in most but not all cases it was the fastest and easiest fix for something that might have required more troubleshooting time than was economical.

            The supposed $15,000 changeout could not be verified–by ANYONE, so that one is just a bad rumor that may or may not have a grain of truth in it. It DOES appear that even then, the rumored issue was due as much to the car being used as a commercial vehicle which may have put excessive wear on components and even then may not have been directly motor related. Considering how easy it appears to change out the drivetrain, I find that rumored $15,000 figure quite unrealistic and I personally know through experience that electric motors are typically easy to rewind and rebuild to like-new condition so core costs are cut in half or below as long as the motor isn’t totally destroyed.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            @Ponchoindian:

            Granted, that’s bad but it’s one report. And apparently CR’s survey didn’t reveal any significant number of occurrences among other owners. Given the seriousness of the failure in question, they’d pick right up on that if it were a widespread issue, particularly given the car’s high price. Stuff like “total drivetrain failure / stranded in the middle of nowhere in $100,000 car” tends to stand out in drivers’ minds.

            Methinks Edmunds’ experience is isolated.

          • 0 avatar
            PonchoIndian

            FreedMike

            Please peruse the link I provided Vulpine. It isn’t an isolated problem.

            I’m sure Tesla will figure things out given time. I look forward to an affordable electric vehicle to do my 110 mile round trip commute in.

          • 0 avatar
            PonchoIndian

            Vulpine
            you must have missed the part where 1/3 of the folks on the message boards also had their drive unit replaced.

            I agree, someday we may actually see a real breakout of what the failure is/was. Until then you and I are both guessing on what the cost to fix the common issue really is.

            So, to answer your first snarky remarks, I added a source with numbers and you still think I’m blowing smoke. Until someone from Tesla tells the public exactly what failed etc…neither one of us is qualified to really make a guess at the cost. As it stands right now, the whole drive unit is replaced more frequently than say a Toyota Prius or Chevy Volt.

          • 0 avatar
            S2k Chris

            There was at least one magazine recently which had its drive unit replaced out of the blue during a regular service without them having noticed any ill effects. It may be that Tesla is killing its metrics by being over zealous in its warranty repairs. Which is fodder for internet commentators, but tends to breed customer happiness. I know which one is more important in the real world.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            @Ponchoindian:
            “…you must have missed the part where 1/3 of the folks on the message boards also had their drive unit replaced.”

            You’ve made a total headcount of everyone who’s ever posted on a message board about a Tesla has had this problem? That must keep you busy.

            (Excuse the sarcasm)

            If this were a widespread problem, I doubt that the thousands of people who completed CR’s survey would have just omitted it. People tend to voice complaints about silly stuff like “complete drivetrain failure on brand new $100,000 dream car”.

            Unless, of course, you think CR’s just covering up. I’d find that unlikely.

            Again…methinks the incidents are isolated.

          • 0 avatar
            PonchoIndian

            Freedmike
            haha
            No, it said 1/3 in the article I posted. I accept your sarcasm and raise you 1. There were even accounts of owners on there 5th drive unit in 12K miles (this is from a Tesla Club website)

            I believe this is where I ask…can you read? :)

            I’m not questioning CR’s statistics. Plenty of other people on here to do that. I’m just providing sources from what I’ve read. Somehow even with sources people tend to believe what they want. I’ve got no skin in the game so it doesn’t matter to me either way!

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            @S2KChris

            Tesla going overboard on warranty repairs is all fine and good, but the problem is that it doesn’t scale. They will never be able to afford to be a real car maker doing that sort of thing. It will bankrupt them.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            You mean this one, Poncho?
            “Tesla owner forums gave scant comfort. A Tesla Motor Club poll of 87 Model S owners revealed that a startling 28 of them had had their drive units replaced, a rate of 32 percent.”
            So 32% of 87 people had drive units replaced; the author clearly noted that

            “For one thing, most drive-unit replacements are the result of funny noises–not an actual failure.”

            And that…
            “The drive-unit problem seems limited to early production cars, built during a period when Musk concedes ‘we definitely had some quality issues.\'”

            Keep in mind that 30% of 87 cars might not be all that newsworthy, but if it were 30% of now nearly 50,000 cars, don’t you think the uproar would be a lot louder?

            Meanwhile, the article YOU referenced seems to refute your viewpoint better than it supports it.

          • 0 avatar
            PonchoIndian

            Vulpine
            Actually, if you go back to my original comment you’ll see that everything I’ve posted has been supported by the link I provided. Not sure how that one isn’t crystal clear.

            I’m not crapping all over Tesla, just stating that the reliability hasn’t been all that great yet…and look at that, I have supporting evidence, including the original article on this blog.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @Poncho: You mean THIS original statement?
            “yes I realize that. But…if you do a little bit of research you’ll see that this has been a very common replacement for a LARGE number of Tesla automobiles.”(emphasis mine)

            Out of 50,000 Model S Teslas (plus or minus) on the roads, a large number would equate to something like 10% or more. Since your article only IMPLIES a large percentage and then refutes itself by limiting the issue to the first run or so, you have been actively trying to state that the car is far more troublesome et al than fits a CR “Recommend” status.

      • 0 avatar
        redrum

        TrueDelta.com has the 2013 Tesla Model S ranked quite poorly:

        http://www.truedelta.com/Tesla-Model-S/reliability-1095

        http://www.truedelta.com/blog/?p=1495

        “The Tesla Model S continues to require many repairs, over three times as many as the average 2013 model.”

    • 0 avatar
      jeoff

      Sometimes the CR algorithm, while not intentionally biased, just does not make sense. I remember a while back, the Honda Oddesey was the top recommended minivan, although its transmission was made out of tissue paper–an observation supported by the CR data–but, I guess since the van scored high on everything else–it was recommended. Having Tesla evaluated by a system designed for internal combustion powered cars may mess with their algorithm even more.

      • 0 avatar
        jmo

        How would you rate the Honda? If over 10 years and 100k miles it have one $3000 problem how does that compare to a Town & Country that had 5 $300 problems.

        • 0 avatar
          VoGo

          It’s times like this that we miss Michael Karesh.

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          By your criteria that would make the Town & Country twice as good

          • 0 avatar
            jmo

            You have to weigh the time an aggravation of 5 dealer trips. I’d say it’s a wash.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            I have $1500 in my pocket that begs to differ

          • 0 avatar
            jmo

            ” I have $1500 in my pocket that begs to differ.”

            A valid point. But, only if you value your time at $0.

          • 0 avatar
            jeoff

            My 2004 Nissan quest ranked very poorly by Consumer Reports–and mine has earned most of its black dots–all 6 of its reading lights, visor mirrors, and countless other trim parts have fallen off, the odometer and fuel gauge don’t work–even the digital clock has never been able to keep time well, and then there is the power door and lift gate… But, the transmission still shifts and the engine still runs–if I had a problem with either, I would say goodbye. Sure, t’s a dumpster on wheels, but the wheels work–sometimes that does not show up on CRs recommendations.

        • 0 avatar
          pbxtech

          I had a Town and Country. It was way more expensive than $3000 over the seven years I had it. I don’t think that would cover the power steering racks I went through.

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          @JMO

          Poorly, IMHO. You often can just ignore $300 problems if it is in a system you don’t care about. You can’t ignore a transmission that doesn’t work. It is also a LOT easier for most people to manage a few hundred dollars a year vs. one big hit.

    • 0 avatar
      ckb

      I’m also surprised its ranked that high because 11 years ago this car company didn’t exist. To be on par (or better) than the worlds oldest manufacturers with a car designed completely from scratch (ok, they knew it’d have 4 wheels and where the steering wheel goes) is quite an achievement. Especially given the complexity of the system.

      • 0 avatar
        PonchoIndian

        I like Tesla, don’t get me wrong.

        When is it okay to beta test using customers. If this were GM, Ford or Chrysler people would be swinging from the rafters screaming “I told you so”.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        It doesn’t surprise me at all. Despite all the high tech in the Tesla, the basic drivetrain isn’t all that different than a rechargable electric drill. Not a whole lot of moving parts to foul up.

        My big question is how all the electronic doodads will hold up over time. Given that CR has picked right up on the failings of other manufacturers’ electronics, I’d say it’s so far, so good for Tesla.

  • avatar
    Detroit-X

    ‘Small problems’ cause worries of bigger problems in the future. If Tesla can’t get the small stuff right, then what about the expensive stuff? (Like the drive unit.)

    Reliability aside, I don’t understand the fuss about this car.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      How about the simple fact that you don’t have to put gas in this car… ever?

      That’s a rough average of $50 saved every week or about $2600 per year “tax free” earnings.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        @Vulpine

        Which should be completely irrelevant to anyone who can afford to drop *$100K* on a car. Want to save money? Buy a Prius or a Volt. Want a nice car and still save money? Commute in a Leaf and buy a loaded 5-series for trips. Heck you could buy a Leaf and a Hellcat for the money. The idea of buying a Tesla to save some paltry sum in gas is completely laughable.

        The Tesla is a very expensive big-boy toy at this point.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          You make too many assumptions, krhodes. I’m looking into the future and in only 2-3 years there will be a 300-mile plus Tesla at about the same price as that Nissan Leaf; three times the car for only a little more.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            I’ll believe it when I see it. They can’t make any money on $100K cars, how do you think they are going to make money on $40K cars? Where is the $60K going to come out of? The Model S is already lacking compared to it’s competition, making it a little smaller isn’t going to save much money. The battery won’t be much cheaper either, nor will a little bit smaller motor.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            ” They can’t make any money on $100K cars…”
            Making assumptions again? Or do you have data to back this up. Based on their own quarterly reports, they definitely ARE making money on those “$100K cars” but instead of just taking the profits they’re putting them right back into the company to expand production capability and other aspects of the design, manufacture and support of their current and upcoming models.

            And quite honestly, the Model S HAS no competition. No other EV has its range or comfort and even if you assume $1500/year for gas over 10 years (which is low for a vehicle that size) its luxury and performance levels are superior to most cars priced that $15K less.

            Oh, and the Model S starts at $65K, not $100K, which means it’s significantly superior to almost any $50K car currently on the roads as well as the safest at any price.

      • 0 avatar
        VenomV12

        Christ, I hate Tesla apologists like you and your [email protected] math. Let’s ignore that this is a 5 series sized car with 3 series amenities selling for S-class money. An average car with so so gas mileage will run you only about $150/month. Even the 2015 Tahoe I just bought has been getting about 16 mpg in pure city driving. Electricity also is not free, especially when you are charging at your house. Also to efficiently charge your six figure Tesla either at home or at the Supercharger, you must buy $5,000 worth of equipment, last time I checked $5,000 was not free. Price a Tesla Model S 60 and get it to the point where you can charge it for “free” and tell me how much that cost you?

        You can go buy a loaded Audi S6 that is fast as stink, better interior and more features than a Tesla including massage seats for about $80,000 and have about $40,000 left over for gas and I can drive it to Canada, Mexico, anywhere and not ever once having to worry about getting stranded.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          Now who has the bad math? “An average car with so so gas mileage will run you only about $150/month.” I might note that a 3-year lease of such is typically $250/month while the overall cheapest lease I’ve heard of is $199/month. The average purchase of said car runs closer to $500/month at today’s rates, which is why both leases and purchase financing are getting stretched to 7 and 8 years to pull the monthly rates back down again.

          To be quite honest, if I have to stretch a new-car financing out to 8 years just to pull the payment down, THEN maybe I would lease instead of buy. But so far, that is not something I’ve needed to do. Even my latest purchase was paid off in 5 years and stayed under $400/month–for a $35K vehicle.

          • 0 avatar
            S2k Chris

            “Even my latest purchase was paid off in 5 years and stayed under $400/month–for a $35K vehicle.”

            Err, 60 x $400 = $24,000…trade in, down payment? You’re $11k light.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            I do believe he means $150/mo in gas, not $150/mo for the car.

          • 0 avatar
            VenomV12

            You are really not too bright Vulpine, are you? How about read the comment you wrote first that someone replied to you about so you understand what you are responding to, like krhodes1 did. Jesus.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            What? People don’t trade in their older cars? I didn’t say HOW I did it, I just said I did it and that’s the point; people don’t HAVE to pay ridiculous monthly payments to own their vehicle and unlike a leased vehicle, they don’t get financially penalized if they go over the contracted annual mileage.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @krhodes: “I do believe he means $150/mo in gas, not $150/mo for the car.” — Then he should have said that himself, no?

            I will admit that the average CAR (and smaller SUV/CUV) gets about 30 mpg, they also carry smaller tanks–like around 12 gallons or so. I will also accept that at the current price of $3/gallon that’s only about $36 per fill up. BUT, that average car still gets gassed up an average of once per week which means roughly $120 per month for fuel _at current prices_. Since I don’t assume fuel prices will remain this low but instead expect them to rise again to $4/gallon or more, monthly fuel prices WILL rise to $200/month or higher even for those cars with so-so fuel mileage.

  • avatar
    GoFaster58

    Sounds like a pattern to me if the drive unit has been replaced 3 times on Edmunds Tesla. There’s several Tesla’s running around in my town and it’s just butt ugly. I’d rather have a Jaguar.

    • 0 avatar
      S2k Chris

      Which is funny since I think the XF looks like the Tesla’s uglier older sister.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      As stated before, it’s not a pattern unless it affects a lot more than just one car, or even 1% of that model. Considering there are 50,000 Tesla Model S sedans on the road today, that 1% would be 5,000 cars and to be quite blunt, 5 thousand complaints would be far more visible than we’ve seen so far.

  • avatar
    energetik9

    I put very little value in anything coming from Consumer Reports.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    Yawn! It’s Consumer Reports

  • avatar
    VoGo

    We should probably put this score in perspective vs. the scores of Tesla’s competitors like the S-class, 7-series, A8. Jaguar and Maserati. Which make Tesla look relatively reliable.

  • avatar
    akatsuki

    The difference is most Tesla buyers know (1) they are on the bleeding edge, (2) Tesla is a new company and (3) Tesla is doing right by everyone by replacing things quickly and efficiently with no hassle.

    Chrysler would go bankrupt trying to match the level of service my friends have gotten from Tesla.

    • 0 avatar
      S2k Chris

      When I was in MBA school, we did a case study on the 1989 Lexus recall, right after the brand was launched (http://www.autonews.com/article/20071029/ANA06/710290323/early-defects-ironically-showed-lexus-commitment-to-quality)

      Someone needs to update that case study and replace it with “Tesla drive unit replacement vs. Porsche’s handling of failed IMSs”

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      Tesla will go bankrupt trying to do this level of service once they sell real numbers of cars.

      • 0 avatar
        akatsuki

        Presumably by then they will have a handle on their production problems and not need to provide that level of service. But now, when you are building a brand, it is essential – something that a lot of wannabe lux brands (e.g., Cadillac, Lincoln) could learn from.

      • 0 avatar
        VenomV12

        Let’s not even go that far krhodes1, I would like to see how far Tesla would get if people like you and I stopped subsidizing their cars? I would like to see a study on that. There’s a lot of ugly fuzzy math involved at Tesla that I think someday is going to rear its ugly head.

  • avatar
    stingray65

    Given that it has no gearbox, only one moving part in the electric motor, and relatively few technology gadgets compared to luxury competitors, average does not seem like such a great performance for the Tesla.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Re: Model S drivetrain issues…

    1. Tesla says there are two primary problem areas:
    a. An improper shim in the drive pinion that generates noise.
    b. A loose motor cable that vibrated if not clamped down.

    2. Tesla’s default repair for drivetrain complaints was to expediently replace the whole thing – with an eye toward customer satisfaction – but also because they didn’t understand the root causes for some time.

    3. Tesla has upgraded their powertrain warranty to ‘infinite’ miles IIRC, so aside from the nuisance of experiencing some down time, they don’t want this to be a concern for owners.

    While following the Edmunds car reports, I was very concerned that Tesla might propagate this issue into the Model 3. Now that they’ve publicly described the root causes, I’m confident this won’t happen.

    However, it’s worth mentioning that one of the Edmunds drivetrain replacements occurred in conjunction with a battery replacement, with no explanation given by Tesla. In this situation, the entire car died and rolled to a stop, at night in a bad part of LA – not cool.

    One of the Edmunds commenters noted that his RAV4 EV had its drivetrain replaced also – and it uses Tesla hardware.

    While this is not a minor issue, I believe Tesla has finally gotten control of it. Their quick-turn policy may have enthused many customers, but it has raises suspicions among many non-customers like me – people who eagerly await the Model 3.

    So I’m not surprised at the ‘average’ CR reliability rating. Drivetrain aside, there are many do-dads going wrong on these cars – sunroofs, GUI, door handles, suspension, etc. On the other hand, consider how many makes were bested by upstart Tesla.

  • avatar
    Patriotic_wish

    My Model S (P85+) was delivered on December 18th, 2013. A few days later, on December 23rd to be specific, I screwed up and attempted to interrupt an over-the-air software update in order to show the car to a friend — I crashed the onboard computer and with it, the car was immobilized. With family coming in for the Holidays, and an infirm mother to transport, I figured I was screwed, but called my Tesla service center in Dania (110 miles away) and asked for help. They picked the car up that afternoon and returned it, washed, charged and repaired the next day (ON CHRISTMAS EVE). For me, it was a Jerry Maguire moment — they had me with attitude, service and a sense of customer devotion that I never received after buying a small flotilla of Mercedes.

    I put my money where my mouth is…as I ordered a “D” version the day after it was introduced. I am quite certain those who pooh-pooh Tesla likely have never driven a Tesla and certainly haven’t owned one. It’s the greatest AMERICAN car that I have ever owned.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      On the other hand, you can’t brick a Mercedes just showing it off to your friends. That is some pretty stupid programming, right there. This is exactly the sort of thing that proves to me that Tesla is not ready for the big leagues. And yes, I have driven one. Yawn.

      You certainly will not see anything like that level of service when they are selling 100’s of thousands of cars a year. Not that they are particularly likely to get there.

    • 0 avatar
      VenomV12

      I have an S-Class, had a couple now and my service is just fine. Lexus will also do all the same stuff you mentioned with no issues so Tesla is not that special. Tesla also has a handful of cars on the road compared to the millions that other automakers do so of course they can coddle their buyers right now, call me when they have a million cars on the road and see if the hand holding still continues. Not to mention they are a fledgling car company that basically has to do these things or they will die.

      Greatest American car, eh? Get in your car and drive to Ottawa, let’s see if it can do it and if it can how long it will take. There are a lot of real world situations and emergencies that Tesla fails at and a car cannot be great if it has serious limitations. To me the point of electric cars should be about saving money by saving on fuel and the Tesla fails miserably at that. The Leaf does this, not the Tesla. I can buy a Lexus GS450h and drive around until the Earth implodes and the sun burns out with the price difference of those two cars if used for fuel and the car will be virtually bulletproof and I will get coddling service too.

      Riddle me this, more and more Teslas hit the road, you are on a road trip, supercharger has 10 spots, it takes 40 mins to get charged, 20 of you are at the supercharger, you are not one of the first 10, do the math on how it is going to take you to get out of there, still satisfied?

      At some point some pretty bad people are going to figure out that nice, well off people like you are essentially trapped at these supercharging stations for 30-40 mins and well, you can take a guess what will happen. Enjoy:) I can pull into a sketchy gas station in a sketchy town and either get some gas in a few minutes and be gone or not stay and move on to somewhere else, you, not so much.

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        >> To me the point of electric cars should be about saving money by saving on fuel and the Tesla fails miserably at that

        For me, it’s the smoothness, quiet, and the torque. But, I do agree with you about the cost difference between the Tesla and the Leaf. I went to the Leaf vs. Tesla because of the cost (plus some business related reasons) – and the fact that I could use the extra money to give the Leaf some really nice garage mates. Not to mention the accident plagued warzone of my commute – less stressful when your not driving something costing six figures in that mess. The Tesla was also a bit large for some of the cramped parking garages I have to use occasionally in Boston.

        Right now, if you lease a Leaf in Massachusetts, Nissan has a 2,399 down $199/month lease on a Leaf S. With the $2500 check from the state, it brings the lease cost down to $129.55 a month. A Versa Sedan lease is $179 with $1,999 down. Even when you adjust for the extra money down, the Leaf is still cheaper. Hyundai Accent leases for $169 with $1,899 down. There’s a lot of cash – both government and Nissan, on the Leaf right now. I think they even have 72 month 0 percent. BTW – if you get a base S, make sure it has the 6.6 kw on-board charger and quick charge options.

        As far as supercharging goes, Tesla now has a CHAdeMO adapter, so that expands the number of supercharging locations. DC charging system prices are falling as well. The company I’m getting my 60 amp capable level 2 charger from has Level 3 chargers from $2k to 4k. Don’t know what the installation costs are though. So, if there are enough level 3 charging capable cars on the road, you’ll see convenience store / gas stations adding seating and DC chargers.

        Supercharging in my Leaf so far has been pretty good. The dealerships have free coffee, clean bathrooms, and free wifi. Hit the bathroom, grab coffee, catch up on email, then I’m on my way. Most of the time I don’t need to supercharge – in fact the factory 120 volt charger has been enough to charge the car overnight. I was even a bit on the fence for a while wondering if I even needed a level 2 at home.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        “Riddle me this, more and more Teslas hit the road, you are on a road trip, supercharger has 10 spots, it takes 40 mins to get charged, 20 of you are at the supercharger, you are not one of the first 10, do the math on how it is going to take you to get out of there, still satisfied?”

        Hmmm… Let’s see…
        So you’re assuming that a given Supercharger station has ten charging points. Ok.
        So you’re assuming that there are 20 people waiting on that Supercharger. Why? How far into the future are you projecting this figure? Just as an example, the current highest proportion of Tesla models on the road is in California where the typical Supercharger station has about 4 stands. Even with that relatively high population, I haven’t heard of any backups at any of their stations–even when a TTAC writer reported visiting one a few months ago. I would also point out that the Supercharger network is still growing and more stations will obviously be placed in high-density areas, just like gas stations.
        You are then assuming that the Tesla driver will feel “trapped” as he waits for a charging point–just as modern drivers feel “trapped” as they wait for an open gas pump at the local gas station/convenience store. (Hmmm… maybe those supercharger stations will also be at a convenience store/restaurant/etc…?)

        It seems to me that you are trying to manufacture a situation that is unlikely to occur for a MINIMUM of ten years and maybe not for much longer. Just as gasoline stations proliferated with the automobile, don’t you think recharging stations will proliferate with the EV? Most certainly even if everyone on earth owned strictly an EV you still wouldn’t need as many public recharging stations as we have gas stations in the US alone because for over 90% of those people, their typical drive would be well within the range of the current Model S, so would be recharged at home.

  • avatar
    Patriotic_wish

    Actually you can screw up an AMG Mercedes in any number of ways. I have a complete shut down of an E63 for now apparent reason with 2100 miles on the clock; the main computer went belly up. My S63 had a never ending series of hydraulic problems; it’s lots of fun to go out to a 140K car and find the tires sitting up in the wheel wells because a hydraulic hose (for the seond time) has failed. I’ll take you at your word about the “yawn”…methinks you could use a little Cialis or potentially testosterone supplementation if that was your only reaction. For what it’s worth, I’ve found that Tesla’s biggest detractors derive from the traditional automotive econo-system; dealers et al are particularly ill-disposed to the marque. On the other hand, I didn’t go into this deal expecting that S/N 22106 would be perfect — I expected teething pains as an early adopter. Accept my view or not, I have been surprised and rather amazed at just how close to perfect Tesla was able to get this product at such an immature stage in its development. Continue on as a Luddite krodes1…I personally take great pleasure in contributing my dollars towards a distruptive innovator…it should make everybody a little better..

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  • beachy: So, about this AWD system. Out West, where some state highways are dirt roads and other roads often cross...
  • Lightspeed: Civic and Corolla will spend all of eternity duking it out for best car of all time supremacy. Sentra...
  • B-BodyBuick84: Buy the Sentra- fun to drive with the 6 speed and great greenhouse visibility. Drive the Corolla,...

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