By on November 4, 2014

2015 Ram 1500Overall pickup truck sales jumped 10.1% in the United States in October 2014 as six full-size nameplates collectively grew 9.5%. Growth in the overall truck world was aided by 2158 Chevrolet Colorado and GMC Canyon sales (up from 34 a year ago), a 1326-unit improvement from the Nissan Frontier, and the Toyota Tacoma’s 5% increase.

But the real money is made with the big boys. Ford predictably lost market share with its F-Series in October as the lineup’s core F-150 model changes over to an all-new model for MY2015. GM’s twins, the Silverado and Sierra, outsold the F-Series for a third consecutive month and expanded their market share to 36.5% from 36.1% a year ago.

Truck
October
2014
October
2013
%
Change
10 mos.
2014
10 mos.
2013
%
Change
Ford F-Series
63,410 63,803 -0.6% 620,447 623,309 -0.5%
Chevrolet Silverado
46,966 42,660 10.1% 429,119 403,435 6.4%
Ram P/U
39,834 29,846 33.5% 359,702 292,633 22.9%
GMC Sierra
18,564 16,503 12.5% 165,853 152,173 9.0%
Toyota Tundra
9,525 9,913 -3.9% 98,394 91,734 7.3%
Nissan Titan
990 984 0.6% 10,686 13,227 -19.2%
Total
179,289 163,709 9.5% 1,684,201 1,576,511 6.8%

Yet Ram’s 33.5% year-over-year increase in volume meant far more in terms of increased market share, as the Chrysler Group’s pickup range climbed four full percentage points compared with October of last year. The Nissan Titan held steady at a fairly inconsequential 0.6% – even Toyota Tundra sales are 10 times stronger than the Titan’s in a month when Tundra volume slid 3.9%.

As a group, full-size trucks accounted for 14% of all new vehicle sales in October. That’s up from 11.8% in the first half of 2014, 11.8% in July, 12.2% in August, and 13.9% in September.

Truck
October
2014
Share
October
2013
Share
10 mos.
2014
Share
10 mos.
2013
Share
Ford F-Series
35.4% 39.0% 36.8% 39.5%
Chevrolet Silverado/GMC Sierra
36.5% 36.1% 35.3% 35.2%
Ram P/U
22.2% 18.2% 21.4% 18.6%
Toyota Tundra
5.3% 6.1% 5.8% 5.8%
Nissan Titan
0.6% 0.6% 0.6% 8.1%
Full-Size Share Of
Total Pickup Truck Market
88.8% 89.3% 89.2% 87.6%
Full-Size Pickup Share
Of Total Industry
14.0% 13.6% 12.3%  12.1%

Timothy Cain is the founder of GoodCarBadCar.net, which obsesses over the free and frequent publication of U.S. and Canadian auto sales figures.

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33 Comments on “Cain’s Segments: Full-Size Pickup Trucks – October 2014 YTD...”


  • avatar
    Lie2me

    Chrysler/Jeep/Ram is beginning to scare me a little. I’ve always been a closet fan having had four Jeeps, but it’s beginning to look like it might be OK to like them openly

    • 0 avatar
      ect

      The last time I bought a pickup was 1989, so I don’t claim to know anything about this segment. Still, one cannot but be mightily impressed by Ram’s sales/market share growth.

      As well as Jeep’s, come to think of it.

  • avatar
    celebrity208

    Do you have take rate info for:
    The diesel in the Dodge?
    The ecoBoost v6 in the F150?
    The 4.3 v6 in the Silverado?

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      Ecoboost V6 in the Ford is 1 MPG off the Chevy 6.2L V8, fords regular V6 is a better comparison on fuel economy.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      Likely somewhere between marginal and shocking disappointment. I don’t believe diesel Ram 1500s are flying off the lot. I haven’t seen one in the wild yet.

      Initially, they were probably fast sellers, but brown diesel wagon with the manual syndrome?

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        Ram expected a diesel take rate of about 10 percent. Now it thinks 20 percent is more likely. Right now they’re capacity constrained.

        http://www.autoblog.com/2014/09/30/ram-increasing-ecodiesel-production-video/

        You’re not seeing them in the wild because you’re not noticing them — the only visible difference between an EcoDiesel and a regular Ram is a small badge.

        • 0 avatar
          Carlson Fan

          60% of EcoDiesel sales have been conquest sales. Not one bit surprised. Good to see RAMs 1/2 ton diesel is exceeding sales expectations. I suspect that GM will see similar success with their diesel midsize PU if executed correctly like the RAM.

      • 0 avatar
        Monty

        LOL – my wife’s employer recently bought a Ram ecodiesel p/u in BROWN.

        40 MPG on the highway. Yes, that’s in Canadian gallons, but still, 40 MPG in a fullsize pick up. Will wonders ever cease?

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @celebrity208 –

      The 3.5 Ecoboost accounts for 45% of the engines in Ford pickups.

      Ram expected 5-10% of their 1/2 tons to come with Ecodiesel engines but have ramped up capacity to 20% of trucks made.

      I’m not sure what the take rate is on the Chevy 4.3.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        They ramped up capacity to go to war with the aluminum F-150 2.7 V6. I don’t believe there’s 2 buyers for ever 1 Ram 1500 diesel. They’re just battening down the hatches.

        • 0 avatar
          ect

          It’s not out of the question. The market sometimes delivers surprises.

          In the early 90’s both Ford and Chrysler did consumer research on potential demand for a 4-door minivan. In both cases, the research said the market had little interest. So Ford built the 3-door Windstar introduced in the spring of ’95. Chrysler added a 4-door version of their ’96 models, expecting that it might make up as much as 20% of sales.

          The market saw the 4-door minivans and wanted them. They represented 75-80% of Chrysler’s sales, and suddenly Ford couldn’t give Windstars away.

          So, it’s not inconceivable that the market sees the Ram diesel and says “yeah, that’s what I want” in greater numbers than the OEM anticipated.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    If I was in the market, short bed, standard cab Chevy for me. Red, of course. Near-base model, i.e. no black-out grille.

    • 0 avatar
      mikey

      @Zackman….Excellent choice. I don’t know about the USA, but around here, a short box, standard cab, Near-base..? You would have to factory order it.

      • 0 avatar
        Zackman

        Mikey, always good to see your comments on here. Still driving my 2012 Impala LTZ. 54,000 miles already, my l-o-n-g commute will do that, but what a nice ride to and from work.

      • 0 avatar
        Drzhivago138

        RCSBs have historically been available in base (Chevy W/T, Ram Tradesman, Ford XL), “economy” or “near-base” (Chevy LS, Ram Express, Ford STX), or mid-range (Chevy LT, Ram SLT, Ford XLT) trim levels. Per the Build Your Own section, a Silverado LS regular cab short bed would run $28,350 before any other options.

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    With Ford and GM jacking up their prices, more and more people will turn to Ram. It wasn’t like in the old days when Dodge trucks were junk, they’ve caught up.

  • avatar
    thornmark

    More than a few reviewers find the RAM to be a worthy contender – if not the leader.

    Discounting is rampant among all three makers. “Cepting maybe the RAM oil burner.

  • avatar
    Nicholas Weaver

    The Ram is a nice truck, and the V6 is probably the best base engine in the market.

    Of the trucks available today, I think the Ram wins totally on the V6 white-work-truck trim, although for the more luxed-out, V8 level I’d probably go with the Silverado. The current F150 is, well, ick in comparison to both the Ram and Chevy.

    The new F150 (just drove one on a short test drive today) however, is damn impressive. That 2.7L V6 turbo is a peach of an engine, and was indicating 18 MPG in the hands of a bunch of throttle-happy test-drivers. For most F150s purchased, if the buyer buys anything other than the 2.7, they are wasting their money.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      Nice, huh?

      • 0 avatar
        Nicholas Weaver

        Very much so. The interior of the new F150 is vastly improved over the previous one, with the XLT (midgrade) trim quite well done, with a nice info-screen in the dash.

        The flat rear floor on the crew cab is a nice touch, and overall its a nice big airy cabin. BIG too, the amount of cargo that can be fit in the back with the seats folded is impressive. The standard gray (not black!) is a good color choice.

        Overall, the interior has gone from class-draggard to every bit as good as a Silverado in mid-trim level.

        Drive is “yeah, its a good truck”: high, slightly floaty, and just typical. The engine is nice and strong: there is a replacement for displacement, its called a turbo. Especially with the low price delta over the base V6 of just $800, there is no reason not to pay for the small turbo over a standard V6. And nice and quiet as well.

        A few oddities: Only the remote-unlock tailgate has any damping, the standard tailgate does not (unlike the Silverado which has a damped tailgate on all trim levels), and the Silverado bumper step is something you really miss as well. The front optional side steps for the bed don’t slide back easy, so I’d imagine we see a lot just sticking out all the time.

        One thing thats odd is the feel of the body. Tapping the sheet metal really does feel different than a steel truck: it really vibrates different. Not bad different, just odd different. Its also clearly built-for-repair, if you look under the hood you see how the fender is bolted to the frame.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      I test drove a Pentastar Ram last summer. The engine seemed plenty powerful. The transmission had a real rough nasty downshift into first on several occasions.
      No thanks.
      I’ll consider one once they make a truck that sits at the top of the list in quality and durability.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    If Toyota ever wants to sell 200K to 250K Tundras a year, they need to address the problems with their product offering.

    Namely, the weakness of the 4.7L V8, that offers V6 power at V8 fuel economy, and the MPG numbers on the 5.7L V8.

    I recently was deep in the bayous of Louisiana, driving out to just about lands end. Stopping at a little place to find a first aid kit (the future wife took a nasty fall taking pictures) I observed two things:

    1) Everyone drove pickup trucks – our rental Chevy Sonic stood out like a sore thumb in the parking lot. I was half worried someone would park on top of it.

    2) There wasn’t a dominate brand. Ford, Chevy, GMC, Ram, Toyota, and yes even the Nissan Titan were all represented. There was more ‘merica that Japan – but even Titan to Tundra if was pretty even.

    This isn’t an area where, “demographics,” come into play – and the educational/vocational choices are going to drive a decision one way or another. Not to denigrate oil platform workers, fisherman, and shrimpers – but I don’t think there are too many Tulane grads around this area.

    I also considered that the closest dealer for any of these brands was likely 30 to 45 minutes away – so even consumer bias of, “well, brand X is the closest dealer and I don’t want the hassle of driving to Port Sulfur,” probably doesn’t come into play here.

    Absent of a number of driving forces and in a wide open market – it seemed to me that the same relative demographic (Gulf coast shrimper, fisherman, or oil worker) drove a pickup truck and didn’t give a rats butt on what logo was on it.

    At least in the Delta, and based on a focus group of one.

  • avatar
    Nicholas Weaver

    Gah, posted a nice reply on the impressions on the new F150, the silly spam filter ate it….

    • 0 avatar
      Nicholas Weaver

      Very much so. The interior of the new F150 is vastly improved over the previous one, with the XLT (midgrade) trim quite well done, with a nice info-screen in the dash.

      The flat rear floor on the crew cab is a nice touch, and overall its a nice big airy cabin. BIG too, the amount of cargo that can be fit in the back with the seats folded is impressive. The standard gray (not black!) is a good color choice.

      Overall, the interior has gone from class-draggard to every bit as good as a Silverado in mid-trim level.

      Drive is “yeah, its a good truck”: high, slightly floaty, and just typical. The engine is nice and strong: there is a replacement for displacement, its called a turbo. Especially with the low price delta over the base V6 of just $800, there is no reason not to pay for the small turbo over a standard V6. And nice and quiet as well.

      A few oddities: Only the remote-unlock tailgate has any damping, the standard tailgate does not (unlike the Silverado which has a damped tailgate on all trim levels), and the Silverado bumper step is something you really miss as well. The front optional side steps for the bed don’t slide back easy, so I’d imagine we see a lot just sticking out all the time.

      One thing thats odd is the feel of the body. Tapping the sheet metal really does feel different than a steel truck: it really vibrates different. Not bad different, just odd different.

    • 0 avatar
      Dan

      I’m itching to test drive one of those, curious to hear your condensed thoughts if you’re willing to give that damned filter a second chance at eating them.

      • 0 avatar
        Nicholas Weaver

        I’ll try to split this to see if that helps.

        Engine: Testdrove the 2.7L turbo. This engine is a peach: all the power you really need unless you’re towing 4+ tons, responsive, and reasonably efficient (registered 18 MPG in the hands of who knows how many leadfooted-testdrivers). Its THE engine choice, especially at the very low premium over the base V6.

      • 0 avatar
        Nicholas Weaver

        Interior: About bloody time. Last gen was dismal, this one is nice. A good dash layout, the information screen is especially nice. The XLT trim is fortunately not black but either gray or brown, so it makes it lighter. The door sill is basically a second armrest, lots of power options. A real nice touch is the flat and very large load floor in the back of the crew cab with the rear seats folded. Its a lot of room in that space.

      • 0 avatar
        Nicholas Weaver

        Drive itself: Typical modern truck. You’re tall, slightly floaty, and no S2000, but it seemed crumulent, no worse nor better than a Ram or Silverado.

        Little touches: The interior is nice, with some trims having lots of 110, 400W outlets. The inverter under the back seat on the top trim one they had is pretty huge. A flat floor in the back of the crew cab is very nice and large.

      • 0 avatar
        Nicholas Weaver

        One thing odd: the body panels feel differently. Not bad, just different: tapping on the panels its really clear it isn’t steel. No rust on the bed tho? Big plus.

        The cargo management system looks OK, but I think bed rails are a better idea then mid-box cleats.

        The Silverado tailgate step in the bumper is a good idea, I hope Ford steels it on a midcycle change. The front cargo steps (optional) are silly: they work but they are really annoying to push back in: expect to see a lot continually deployed. The tailgate is ONLY damped on ones with the remote keyfob tailgate release.

        Overall, a winner I think. For white work truck, regular cab, stripped, I’d still probably get a Ram V6. But for a typical suburban truck (Extended or Crew cab, not the base trim), I’d probably get an F150 over a Silverado, IF the mileage is whats promised.

        • 0 avatar
          Dan

          Thanks for going to the trouble to type that up again.

          How’s the driving position? I can see the beltline went down a little bit but the B pillar moved forward and the hoodline looks higher. Is the overall effect more open, less open, about the same? I really dislike the bunker feel of the new GM trucks.

          They had one of these out on the floor at the car show I went to last winter, it was locked up tight so I couldn’t do anything but tap the panels but I noticed the same thing you did.

          • 0 avatar
            Nicholas Weaver

            It felt nice and open to me, a nice low beltline (the armrest in the door is right along the base of the window). It felt about the same to me, but it has been months since I testdrove the 2014 F150. It does feel a bit airier than a Silverado.

            OTOH, I’m comparing it to the tight cockpit of an S2000, ANYTHING is airy compared to my daily driver with the top up.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    I know, WordPress sucks, but thanks for your feedback

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