By on January 7, 2015

2015 ford-f150 rouge factoryPickup trucks soared to their highest total of 2014 during the month of December, climbing 18% to 237,635, equal to 14% of the overall auto industry’s new vehicle volume. Truck sales jumped 6% to 2.3 million in 2014.


• GM twins outsold F-Series in December

• F-Series outsold GM twins in 2014

• Ram makes biggest market share gains


Full-size trucks generated 88.9% of all pickup sales activity in December, down from 90.1% a year ago as General Motors contributed more than 5500 Colorado/Canyon sales to the mix, strengthening the small corner of the market held by small/midsize pickups.

Led by big GM improvements, the full-size sector grew by 30,522 units last month. The Chevrolet Silverado and GMC Sierra combined to outsell the Ford F-Series, as it transition to a 2015 F-150, by 6918 units. Joining GM’s surge, Ram P/U sales shot up 32% to 44,222 units, making December the third month in 2014 that Ram sales shot beyond the 40K mark.

Truck
Dec.
2014
Dec.
2013
%
Change
2014
2013
%
Change
Ford F-Series
 74,355 74,592 -0.3% 753,851 763,402 -1.3%
Chevrolet Silverado
57,837 42,593 35.8% 529,755 480,414 10.3%
Ram P/U
44,222 33,405 32.4% 439,789 355,673 23.7%
GMC Sierra
23,436 17,854 31.3% 211,833 184,389 14.9%
Toyota Tundra
10,519 10,988 -4.3% 118,493 112,732 5.1%
Nissan Titan
869 1284 -32.3% 12,527 15,691 -20.2%
Total
211,238 180,716 16.9% 2,066,248 1,912,301 8.1%

Over the course of 2014, the F-Series outsold the GM twins by 12,263 units. Predictably, Ford suffered market share losses. Perhaps less predictably, it was Ram and not GM which managed to eat up the larger chunk of Ford’s lost share. Ford’s share of the full-size category slid by more than three percentage points; Ram picked up slightly less than three percentage points.

Truck
Dec.
2014
Share
Dec.
2013
Share
2014
Share
2013
Share
Ford F-Series
35.2% 41.3% 36.5% 39.9%
Chevrolet Silverado/GMC Sierra
38.5% 33.4% 35.9% 34.8%
Ram P/U
20.9% 18.5% 21.3% 18.6%
Toyota Tundra
5.0% 6.1% 5.7% 5.9%
Nissan Titan
0.4% 0.7% 0.6% 0.8%
Full-Size Share Of
Total Pickup Truck Market
88.9% 90.1% 89.1% 87.9%
Full-Size Pickup Share
Of Total Industry
14.0% 13.3% 12.5% 12.3%

GM’s market share improved more noticeably at the end of the year, however. In December, for example, GM’s share of the full-size truck market jumped from 33.4% to 38.5%, year-over-year.

What impact can smaller trucks have in 2015? Will Ford be forced to incentivize their aluminum-intensive F-150 in order to hold its position? Will fuel economy be a concern by the second-half of 2015 as it was in the first-half of 2014? Might Toyota see its revamped-but-not-all-new Tundra stumble as the market expands? Can a new Nissan Titan make headway?

Timothy Cain is the founder of GoodCarBadCar.net, which obsesses over the free and frequent publication of U.S. and Canadian auto sales figures.

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52 Comments on “Cain’s Segments: Full-Size Trucks In The Year 2014...”


  • avatar
    schmitt trigger

    Let me see… Nissan Titan 0.4% of market. And declining.

    This embarrassing fact had been discussed previously, but it is nevertheless surprising to see that Titan sales are essentially noise.

  • avatar
    stingray65

    So for about the 30th year in a row, the two best selling full-size pickups were also the two best selling vehicles in the USA. RAM makes it 3 out of the top 3 being full-size pickups. I suspect about 90% of the profits for Ford, GM and Fiat/Chrysler come from those sales, so I expect there is dancing in the streets of Detroit that fuel prices are down to keep the sales of those profit-centers healthy.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    I would not have guess that Toyota lost marketshare (incrementally) on the Tundra in 2014.

    I would guess that Ford’s fortunes will reverse in 2015 with the new F-150.

    I don’t understand why Nissan is revving the Titan, they are irrelevant in the category.

    All marketing departments declare, “based on what our customers told us…” but clearly Ram got it right, and GM and Toyota are just tap dancing around the fact they got it wrong. GM missed the mark on the refresh, but it isn’t anything that cash on the hood can’t solve. Toyota has it’s head in the sand on its fuel economy and power numbers compared to the competition.

    Too early on the 2015 F-150 and the Colorado/Canyon twins to declare anything.

    • 0 avatar
      blackcayman

      “I don’t understand why Nissan is revving the Titan, they are irrelevant in the category”

      They truly are irrelevant…

      When they introduce a new truck with a Cummins 5.0 V8 Diesel, they might garner some praise and sales (judging by the response to the Ram 1500 EcoDiesel).

      Hard to believe they could move up a spot in annual sales though against the Tundra.

  • avatar
    STRATOS

    The Toyota Tundra would sell more if Toyota designed and put in a pushrod engine like their Nascar type.Kind of backwards engineering.Program the ecu to make it shake at idle speeds,as though it had a hot cam. This would excite all pickup buyers.

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      In my trucks, I’ll take a roller cam push rod V8 over that boat anchor under the hood of a Tundra any day of the week. Give me one benefit of the Tundra engine over what is in the GM trucks. Fuel economy? Nope! Performance? Nope! Refinement? Nope! Longevity/durability? Nope! Less low end grunt? Yep! But hey I’m sure it pulls hard all the way to 6K, just what I want in a truck. An engine bay so tight you couldn’t drop a paper clip trough it. Yep!

      • 0 avatar
        DubTee1480

        I ran into an acquaintance from high school and he was extolling the virtues of his brand new Tundra over his late 90’s Chevy. One of the mind boggling things he chose to point out was that the heads on the Toyota V8 were massive compared to the heads on the Chevy. I tried explaining why to him but I may as well have been speaking a foreign language. He also said that the seals were pulled through the engine (wut?) and that it was “sealed for life” (WTF?).

        • 0 avatar
          Carlson Fan

          Highdesertcat likes to compare his new Tundra to his ’88 Chevy. He’s convinced a new Chevy isn’t any better than what they built 27 years ago.

          Me, I spent 11 years/197K with a Toyota compact PU truck. Good truck and I would buy the same truck again if I had it to do over. That said it had its problems and was far from perfect. I was underneath that truck plenty fixing things so I got to know it pretty good.

          I can’t drink the Japanese cool aid on the front porch wearing my made by Toyota rose colored sun-glasses. My wife’s 2001 Highlander was utter crap. Toyota makes good vehicles but they are no better than anything else on the road when it comes to my wallet.

          In the end buy what you like and/or have good luck with.

  • avatar
    hudson

    The relative incentive for taking the risk (perceived or otherwise) for an Aluminium Ford is less than 2/3rds of what it was ~6 months ago. Even when gas was at the previous high what I read was people eager to buy the last of the steel Fords. I’d expect that if gas prices don’t go back up soon, Ford is going to really regret the Aluminum gamble.

    • 0 avatar
      Truckducken

      Conundrum: it’s fuel economy improvements like this that will help keep fuel prices low.

      Meanwhile, the aluminum initiative is driven by CAFE more than by consumer demand. No reason yet to assume Ford has anything to regret. One month of massive GM cash on the hood ain’t telling me nothing, nor is a somewhat supply-constrained YTD Ford sales number. Let’s check on this situation again in mid-2015…

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      The F-series will be fine. They cannot make them fast enough.

    • 0 avatar
      carguy67

      De Lorenzo (autoextremist.com) says: “What a lot of people don’t realize about the new F-150 is that beyond the aluminum story and its towing capability prowess is that it’s a fantastic driving truck. This is the one factor that everyone is underestimating. Once these trucks get to the dealers in volume, watch out.”

      Will be interesting to see how this plays out.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Full-size pickups: how to get people to pay big cash without expecting as much refinement or quality as they do in any other vehicle.

    A luxury car that costs $40,000 more than a basic car in the same size/bodystyle class had better be damn near perfect, or it will get trashed in the media. If it’s even sort of like a cheaper car in general plan (think Cadillac XTS or Lincoln MKT) it doesn’t get taken seriously.

    A pickup that costs $40,000 more than a basic work truck just has to have a few fancy toys and some bad-quality leather thrown into the interior, and it gets rave reviews and sells tens of thousands of copies.

    Seriously, compare a loaded Audi A6 3.0T to a Honda Accord LX, and then compare a F-150 King Ranch to a F-150 XL. The price difference is the same. With this comparison you see just how badly the high end of the pickup segment allows the manufacturers to fleece customers.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      I’m with you I don’t understand the luxury truck market at all. I had to order my truck without leather because no dealers stocked any mid-range models. They were either all strippers (work truck) or ultra luxury barges (soccer moms? trophy wife? men worried about looking undersized?). Same vehicle but with different seat covers? Manufactures/dealers must love these things as they are total cash cows.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      A difference is about $20 with rebates, for top fullsize luxo pickups vs base stripper pickups. But bes!des leather, bling/style, and endless gadgetry/tech, you go from a regular cab to crew, rubber floors to carpet, 2wd to 4X4 and plain V6 to a V8. So you’re getting cons!derable substance for the extra cash.

      So what are you getting with high end German cars, vs the “base” cars they’re based on? Lots of profits for the German OEM mostly. The top (pre tax) profit BMW and Merc cars (3-series, 5-series, S-class, etc) trail closely behind US fullsize pickup profits, while only moving a tiny fraction of units. What does that tell you?

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        $20,000 after rebates? Transaction prices on the F-150 XL are right around $20k. On the King Ranch and Platinum they are above $50k (all 2014 models).

        An even starker comparison is between midrange and loaded trucks with the same functional configuration. (This time 2015 models as the 2014 configurator is gone) XLT 4×4, crew-cab, 5.5′ bed, 3.5TT: $41,420, most likely $35k or so after rebates once initial demand dies down. Platinum in the same configuration, with 701a, moonroof, and the options you’re likely to find on every Platinum on a dealer lot: $61,325, most likely about $55k after rebates. The difference between these trucks is entirely in the toys. There is no car lineup on the planet where two different trim levels of the same vehicle, with the same body and powertrain, are separated by that high a percentage of the price. And if there were, the manufacturer would be ridiculed in the press.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          Well then why not start with comparing similar layout trucks? Base XL 4X4 crew vs top luxo 4X4 crew cab pickups. The difference is much less than $20K this way, BEFORE REBATES. And base pickups come with a host of options too, unless you special order.

          But that takes away the DRAMA when you’re just isolating bling/style/tech hardware, engine and misc “upgrades”.

          But going from base 3-series to similar layout M3 truly is a $40K bump. Same with other top BMWs and Merc vs their similar layout “base” with vinyl seats.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            “Well then why not start with comparing similar layout trucks? Base XL 4X4 crew vs top luxo 4X4 crew cab pickups. The difference is much less than $20K this way, BEFORE REBATES.”

            What do you mean? That’s exactly what I did in the previous comment. Cheapest vs. most expensive trucks with the same cab, engine, bed, and drivetrain (both 4×4). You can’t get a crew cab XL. The difference between base XLT with only the 3.5TT upgrade and well-equipped Platinum was exactly $20k either before or after rebates.

            Your M3 vs. 320i example isn’t the same because those cars have different engines, transmissions, suspensions, other mechanical hardware, and body panels. The F-150s I specced are mechanically identical except for axle ratio and spring rate (the latter only because the Platinum is heavier).

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            The M3 is just different hardware to the base car, same as the top luxo pickups to base XL.crew cab 4X4s. Yes they do sell those. check again. Those start under $40K and top F-150s start around $55K.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            So with bigger rebates, the top luxo pickups are barely more than $10K for all the upgrades and bling, vs the basic but similar work edition. Maybe that’s why they’re flying off the lot. They can’t build the fast enough.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            A. Transaction prices show no evidence of bigger rebates on blingier pickups once you get past the work truck level. From midrange XLTs to high-zoot Platinums you’re looking at $6k-$8k off MSRP.

            B. Few Platinums are equipped to have a $55k MSRP. Pretty much every one will have the 701a “extra content” package. Most of them have a host of other options like spray-in bedliner, beds!de steps, bed extender (on 5.5′ beds), the towing package, and towing mirrors. $60k is a typical MSRP for a Platinum and $65k isn’t unheard of with the moonroof and some of the available frippery.

            C. My bad on the XL. You can get a crew cab XL, just not with the 3.5TT. I was trying to compare mechanically identical trucks, to prove my point as simply as possible: that you can hand Ford $20,000 in pure profit in exchange for a few electric motors, a couple hundred dollars’ worth of cheap leather, some chromed rims, and a bunch of software changes.

            At least Acura only charges you $3-5k for a blingier Accord… and they throw in a few more horses and a better transmission to boot.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            $12K off sticker is getting to be the norm, for the pickups at the top of the food chain. So even $50K transaction is a bit of a stretch. And there’s almost no reason to heavily mark down the base trucks. Or even stock many. Dealer must stock all the high end trucks they can afford, b/c there’s hundreds of combinations.

            With base trucks, take fleet white or take off. But no doubt, dealers force power windows (group), cruise, CDmp3, etc with base trucks. I wouldn’t take one without at least those.

            No matter how you slice it, there’s not much more than a $10K difference, for a crazy amount of bling, tech, gadgetry, style, performance and luxury, once the dust settles. Many feel it’s worth it. And a far cry from the $40K mentioned earlier.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Right now TrueCar in my area is showing XLT crewcabs at ATPs of $6.5k off sticker and Platinums just under $6k. Still a $20k difference at typical Platinum equipment levels.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Forget about Truecar in your area. You have to look for the dealer ads and visit the dealer sites. The $12K off sticker is for top luxo trucks only. And it’s definitely not for “just released” new models. You still have to buy at opportune times. But dealers have to stock a crazy amount of the top luxo trucks in every combination they can handle. Buyers of these don’t want to compromise on colors, options, packages, etc. Nor special order. And it’s more likely an impulse buy for these. So dealers are forced to drop ever increasing cash on the hood of these when they start to collect dust. Not nearly as true for lower trim pickups. Never mind fleet white “base”. So you’re looking a mid $40s for the top trucks when the dust settles and mid $30s for XLT 4X4 crews.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      @dal20402,
      There is are reasons for the huge profits in pickups.

      The first one is the protection offered to them. There is no incentive to source similar vehicles for sale in the US.

      Production must come from within NAFTA to compete in the truck segment. Cars don’t have these constraints. Cars are sold in a more or less open market.

      The second one is development costs. How many years does a pickup platform last compared to a car?

      The third one is culture and resources to afford to operate pickups.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        @BAFO – Pickup trucks are crazy expensive to build. Endless variations/combinations with engines, axles ratios, trim levels, and an exhausting list of options/packages, etc. Stacks of different frames (and part numbers) just for each wheelbase.

        Kinda extinguishes the profit potential without tremendous volume sales. It’s the only thing that makes them possible.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          It would be easy enough for any of the Big 3 truck OEMs to limit build combinations. Choose one “towing/locker” axle ratio and one “F/E” ratio for each engine. Reduce overlapping trim levels and appearance packages, and eliminate standalone options in favor of a few big packages (say, one “towing” with big mirrors, hitch, +1 springs, and axle ratio; one “tech” with nav, BSW, and ACC; and so forth).

          So far, none of the makers have done that, because they think it’s more profitable to allow the mix-and-match. So it can’t be *that* expensive. Or, alternately, the mix-and-match allows for very high option prices. Porsches and full-size pickups, it turns out, are sold the same way.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            It’s pickup’s obscene profitability that allows the mix & match and complete spec customization. But that profitability still depends on high volume. Or the OEM’s ability/willingness to subs!dize poor selling trucks with their high volume cars and shared platform SUVs.

            Porsches just cost a lot.

    • 0 avatar
      mic

      These trucks nowdays are like putting lipstick on a pig and taking it to the prom. Trucks like pigs have their place but a pig is a pig no matter how much you dress it up. Detroit has taken the American consumer for a ride and fleeced them to historical proportions by convincing the general public that the have to comute to work in a truck, hauling a load of air there and back, in order to be an American or cool or manly or whatever. If Americans ever wake up trucks will go back to being dirt cheap farm and work implements they were for decades until the big three hired competent advertising firms. Keep drinking the Kool-aid like good little lemmings.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        Sorry, but you don’t speak for the American public.

        Trucks simply make sense, cars are designed to be throwaway and look as such. Visibility is terrible in modern cars, and the tiny motorcycle engines powering them don’t offer much appeal.
        Manufacturers are convinced buyers of car want a sporty ride, they dont, sporty ride means poor ride quality, combined with electric power steering they drive rough and emotionless.
        Trucks also lack this stupid design that is plaguing current cars, that is sloping the roof so much the rear passengers must be children to fit comfortable.

        No the American public isn’t being fleeced, trucks ride better, perform better, cost less, last longer, and are cheaper to fix. I’d say your lying to yourself.

        The fact that they (D3) can get $10-20k profit on every single truck while still managing to make it into the top 3 sales list is indication enough that they are, a) properly addressing a very large group of consumers, and b) lack serious competition from other companies.

        • 0 avatar
          hudson

          I’ve driven trucks for 20 years and still do. My newest is the first one I’ve not wanted to set on fire within a year. AND I still prefer to jump into a car at the end of the day.

          The fact that most people CHOOSE to drive a truck for the image will never stop to boggle my mind.

          • 0 avatar
            jim brewer

            Well, its value. My biggest expense is depreciation. Second is insurance. Gas is now clearly third. Truck can segue from first to second to third car saving the friction of transaction costs. Its not as nice as a nice sedan, but then my commute is less than 20 minutes.

    • 0 avatar

      Nobody is being “fleeced” here. People buy what they like without asking the nabobs of the Internet. Que horreur!

      • 0 avatar
        mic

        They like what they like because they listen to whichever “nabob” is sponsoring Monday Night Football this week. Advertising has become a science and some folks got it down pat. Why do think record companies own radio stations? If they play it enough people will like whether its good or not. If you advertise it enough, people will buy it, whether they need it or not. If you can’t see that, you are a victim of it. Trucks are a fad until the car companies come up with a better profit making vehicle and then people will buy those. I knew people in the 80’s that would’nt even accept a ride from someone driving a truck because they didn’t want to be seen in one. Now those people own one. It’s perception and the cool factor. So you can talk all you want about choices and better ride blah blah blah but face it, you’re just spouting the company talking points about F-850 Bloatasaurus . Most truck owners that aren’t contractors or farmers etc own them because they have been convinced that they’re cool. But I don’t see anything cool in a soccer mom making an 18-point turn in the Wal-mart parking lot. Just my nabob 2 cents…

      • 0 avatar
        mic

        BTW I think it’s “Quelle horreur”.

  • avatar

    GM pummels Ford in the BOF segment if you include the 30,000 fullsize suvs and 5500 midsize trucks sold in Dec. Nice recovery by GM towards the latter half of last year. Good times are a comin with ignition gate behind them and low gas prices for all of 2015

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    I do have my thoughts on some of the above comments. I do think some are a little inaccurate.

    1. The comment regarding the Tundra V8. What V8 does Toyota manufacture to replace it? Maybe that’s why there is a move to the ISV Cummins. The ISV will be far superior to any Detroit Iron V8, especially for use in heavier vehicles.

    2. Ford blew it with the 2015 F-150. The snippets of tantalising information regarding the 2.7 EcoBoost and how this combined with the new lighter chassis and aluminium body would furnish good FE. What happen to this strategy? Ford now will use improved payload and towing as it’s main selling point not FE. The reason I mention this is the move to the new construction of the F-150 is primarily driven by FE.

    What will the average Joe/Jane think of this? 75% of pickup customers are after a SUV type vehicle. They don’t give a rat’s ass on payload and towing. I do think Ford has lost this one to a degree. I do expect our usual Ford apologist to contest my argument.

    3. I do think the next Titan will do okay. Nissan hasn’t oversold the truck like Ford had done. The Titan will be placed to knock off some of those SUV HD sales as well. The next Tundra might also fill in this niche as well. Even with the low sales the Titan doesn’t have a bad name or does the Tundra for that matter. So, from a marketing and promotion perspective it shouldn’t be hard to identify and profit from the positive attributes of these two new Japanese trucks. I see a good future for them.

    I predict the Cummins V8 Titan/Tundra will stagnate the “SUV” HD segment across the 3 producers of this style of vehicle. There are a significant number of “SUV” HD’s out there. Tackling this niche is a great move by Nissan and Toyota.

    4. The GM twins. I do see the Colorado making very large inroads into the midsize market. That’s until the next Navara/Frontier/Tacoma/Hilux come into play. I do expect some of these newer, cheaper and much more refined midsizers take some sales away from the large/medium SUV/CUV segment. I also see some of the potential full size V6 customers moving to these very refined midsizers.

    5. As for cheaper gas prices. Apparently it takes on average 233 days for a person deciding to buy a pickup to actually go out and invest in one. So, engine choice/size will only really affect the people who already decided to go out and buy.

    6. The US will apparently receive the smaller, developing nation style of the D23 Navara/Frontier. This combined with a “larger” half ton gives a larger spread between the two vehicles. The midsizers like the new Colorado are very close in capability to a half ton.

    Remember most half tons are SUVs. They might carry 1 000lbs in the bed every now and then and maybe tow 7 000lbs one a year or so.

    The tendency for many commenters stating that you require a 2 000lb payload and a tow capacity of 10 000lbs are missing what the manufacturers are targeting with the 1/2 ton pickups. The money is in the fully blinged crew cabs. This is so the kids can be taken to soccer, go to Home Depot on weekends and maybe tow a boat and go camping once or twice a year. Then use as a daily driver during the week with only the driver.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Dude, the Titan is terrible and no one buys it. It can’t even outsell the Mazda2 in the US. A new version isn’t going to help much.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        @bball40dtw,
        Did I state whether they are selling well? Terrible? Boy, an overstatement.

        You must work for Ford. Did you create the marketing for the new F-150? Oversold by a large margin. Too many promises that can’t be delivered. Like FE. Ford can’t even use FE as a marketing instrument. Why? Because it didn’t deliver as well as the hype Ford has been laying on us.

        Ask yourself. Why aluminium and the lightened chassis? Is the primary reason to increase payload and tow ability? (What’s CAFE) When most pickups are sold as SUVs? Ford has screwed up. Yeah, I see it. The soccer mom taking her kids to a game is really interested in payload and towing. Or the father going down to Home Depot is going to buy 2 000lbs of screws and nails. He then might hook up his 5 000lbs fishing boat on an occasional weekend.

        My comment in relation to the Titan is they don’t have a bad name. There isn’t to many complaints. There are plenty of vehicles that don’t move in large numbers across the board. Some due to reliability and some due to lack of updating. The lacklustre Titan sales is due mainly to the lack of updating.

        So, the way I see it the Titan will improve markedly when the Cummins V8 version comes along. The consumer will see a coil sprung, V8 Diesel with the ride comfort of a luxo barge or an aluminium F-250 SuperDuty with a horse cart suspension.

        What would you invest your money in? A cart or a motor vehicle with many of the attributes of a HD and the FE of a 2.7 EcoBoost F-150, that has great ride comfort?

        The next Titan/Tundra will stagnate the lighter HD sales from the Big 2 and FCA. It wouldn’t surprise me if the light HD number decrease slightly as people move to the better “Japanese” pickups.

        Nissan (and Toyota) has a good name, irrespective of what you are stating.

        This might be too hard for a FoMoCo apologist like yourself to admit to. Just keep on selling Fords…….mate.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          When did I say anything about Ford or the F150 in my response? I stand by my criticism of the Titan. It is garbage compared to the F150, Silverado, and Ram. It is not a competitive product, at all. Dropping a V8 diesel in it won’t make it competitive either.

          Also, the suggestion that HD pickups will decline in sales as a direct result of a new Titan/Tundra is laughable.

          If I were to buy a pickup truck today, yes, it would be a Ford. However, that doesn’t mean I don’t see value in what GM or Ram are selling. They both have excellent products, but I like the interior, dash layout, 3.5EB engine, and solid feeling of the Ford enough to choose it over its competitors. I don’t like the interior of either the Ram or Silverado. That’s a personal preference, but if all three trucks are about the same price, it makes a big difference for me.

          • 0 avatar
            Shane Rimmer

            The problem the Titan has is that it’s laughably out of date, but the price doesn’t reflect that and everyone knows an all new model is just about to be revealed. I have a 2011 Titan that feels like a very good mid-2000s truck. It’s not garbage compared to the others, by any means, but it’s not competitive at all when it comes to technology and interior quality.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            @bball40dtw,
            The next Titan/Tundra with the Cummins V8 will take some of the light HD sales away from the Big 3. How much I don’t know. It can’t be otherwise.

            I do think the Big 3 behind the scenes would be worried about this. Tell what other reason Nissan and Toyota will be offering these trucks for?

            Nissan had made a clever move. It will offer a D20/22 size pickup and a larger 1/2 ton. The areas of overlap into different segments within the pickup market will work to their advantage.

            The next Taco will be much more heavily based on the Hilux. This is reputed to be in the same league in size as the new Colorado. So Toyota have a slightly different approach than Nissan in the pickup market.

            My HD comment to you is directly linked to the next Titan. Remember what the new Titan is targeting in the pickup segment.

            Finally, of course you will find a FoMoCo product most appealing. I wouldn’t expect any different from you.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            The Big 3 are not worried about Nissan. They are worried enough about each other. They one up each other every year. That’s the competition and who they are worried about. Nissan, and Toyota, can’t offer the diversity needed to hurt them in the HD area.

            You would think that I always prefer a Ford product but you’d be wrong. I have owned Ram and Chevy pickups. The last truck I bought was a Silverado.

            Shane-

            I’ll modify my statement. The Titan is two generations (feels like more) behind the Big 3 trucks and it shows. I’m sure its reliable and does the jobs that it is asked to do, but the only reason to choose it is if you want a truck, you don’t care who makes it, and you want it cheap. That is a perfectly fine thing, but it only gets the Titan so far.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Oh still me 90’s heart. That truck up there is colors straight out of 1994. I hope we aren’t returning back to the green trend. And I hope nobody chooses that color pallet thinking it will look good beyond two model years, because it won’t.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    I think we have a very good possibility of Ram overtaking the Camry to be the 3rd most popular vehicle next year.

    Edit:
    Oh wow, never mind the Ram outsold the Camry this year, how come we haven’t seen this mentioned, is this the first year that the top 3 sellers were all pickups?

  • avatar
    Shane Rimmer

    bball40dtw, I freely admit that the only reason I chose a Titan was because I could get more features for significantly less than comparable vehicles from any of the other brands – especially since I bought mine used. Nissan prices the new ones as if they are competitive, and they simply aren’t. It was a great truck for 2004, but it’s simply antiquated in 2015.

    What I don’t know is why they didn’t take advantage of any of the low hanging fruit available to them. It wouldn’t have been terribly expensive to refresh the sheet metal a bit in 2009 or 2010 and swap the live rear axle for the IRS from the Armada to beat Ram to the punch on a fullsize with 4-wheel independent suspension. They could have even offered the self-leveling system from the Infiniti QX56.

    What really killed the Titan before it became outdated, though, was the lack of any seriously budget-oriented models without a V6 or single cab option in the mix. I have no idea why they didn’t offer the Frontier’s 4.0 V6 in the Titan, either. I know it probably wouldn’t have helped fuel economy, but it would have given fleet buyers a cheaper option.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      The top selling BOF SUVs have solid rear axles.

      Unless Nissan wanted to cut it measly sales even more I doubt they would be as suicidal as to put IRS on a pickup.

  • avatar
    ect

    The last time I bought a pickup truck was 1989, so I don’t pretend to understand the current crop of offerings.

    I do find it amusing that the bulk of the comments on this article concern the Toyota and Nissan models, which have only a very small share of the market.

    I’d also be curious to understand why Ram sales have risen so dramatically over the past few years, compared to Ford/GM.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    I can hardly wait for the gas prices to jump higher than they ever have before; and you know they will. It’s just a matter of time. When they do, all these Road Whales will be headed for the used car lots and down to Mexico while the market falls through the floor due to their abysmal fuel mileage. When that happens, those South American compacts are going to start looking pretty good.

  • avatar
    OldWingGuy

    I get that as gas prices fall, more people tend to purchase less fuel efficient vehicles (unwisely perhaps, but it’s a free country).
    I believe I read on this site that Texas is the State with highest truck sales. Texas must be hard hit by the low oil price. Things in the oil patch are slowing up.

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