By on October 8, 2014

1978-jeep-wagoneer

Town & Country PHEVs not your bag? Jeep’s Mike Manley might have a Grand Wagoneer waiting for you in late 2015 for the 2016 model year.

Motoring.com.au reports the three-row, seven- to eight-passenger SUV will serve as the brand’s flagship, competing against the likes of the Mercedes GL-Class and the upcoming BMW X7 as Jeep grows its market share in the United States, Brazil and Australia.

Speaking of the BMW X Series, Manley says the Grand Cherokee proved to all that Jeep could “compete at the very premium end of the segment,” citing the cross-shop between it and the X5 in the U.S. market as “phenomenal.” He’s also considering models aimed at the X4 and X6, believing such vehicles would be beneficial to the lineup:

If you consider the styling of Cherokee and Renegade, there’s perhaps [even] more of a market in D [segment] than E SUV [for sportier models]. I think it can fit with the brand.

As far as sales go, Manley says Jeep is on its way to selling over 1 million units in 2014, with a goal of doubling that number by 2018. When asked about 2015, however, all he stated was that there was an expectation for Jeep to continue climbing up the global market trail.

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79 Comments on “Manley: Jeep Grand Wagoneer On Its Way...”


  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    I don’t know if this is a good move by FCA.

    Jeep is a budget vehicle that challenges vehicles from Korea in cost and bling.

    Jeep attempting to break into the prestige market could be fraught with danger.

    Jeep should keep it simple like it has been. The Grand Cherokee is a good cheap 4×4 SUV.

    I don’t mind that it is using an old Mercedes Benz platform, but the reality is a Jeep is no BMW, Mercedes Benz, etc or any other prestige vehicle.

    Keep Jeeps as they are, mostly as a cheap family orientated vehicle.

    • 0 avatar
      Maymar

      The Grand Cherokee actually rides on the current ML-Class platform (not an “old” variant). Other than that, it’s available with similar levels of features, and interior quality is closer to the ML/X5 than the previous-gen GC. It’s not inconceivable that with a few small improvements, it could be very competitive with high-end vehicles.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      The Jeep Wagoneer carries a lot of brand cache as it is with old renovated versions being outrageously expensive and a weekend darling among the wealthy “old money” and it’s posers. This is a brilliant move by Jeep and if done right, which I have no doubt it will be, ought to be a big success and a welcome flagship for the brand

      • 0 avatar
        ect

        With all due respect, I wish people would learn the difference between “cache” (something hidden) and “cachet” (prestige).

        Nothing personal to you, I see it all the time on this site.

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          Sorry, ec().. Oh, you don’t mind that I borrowed your “t”, do you? :P

        • 0 avatar
          petezeiss

          This is America. We don’t censure misspelling of French words. It’s not our job to police all the unnecessary and unpronounced letters in their language.

          But those do make it clear why the French and Poles have been historical buddies.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Yeah, we have enough of our own unnecessary letters to keep track of, but not like the colourful Canadians who labour uunder a buumper crop of “U”s they muust keep uup with

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      The Grand Cherokee is already a viable alternative to the “premium” AWD SUVs. Mercedes and BMW can’t match Jeep’s 4WD reputation for ruggedness. The upgraded interior and more refined suspension for on-road ride were all that was needed to make the GC an attractive choice. After all, M-B and BMW are entering a segment Jeep already owns.

      As Thornmark mentions below, the old full size Wagoneer was sold in the ’70s and ’80s mainly to the well-to-do for pretty much the same reason. The interior was well appointed but restrained compared to the crushed velour luxobarges of the era, and was seen as a genuine go anywhere vehicle. That market is still there, and will look seriously at the Wagoneer as a more reliable SUV than any Land Rover model, and for less money.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      I’m not sure you have a very good perspective on this Al, being in Oz and all. Around here, Limited and Overland models reach $50k and beyond and people in the ritzy suburbs of the Midwest can’t get enough of ’em. They easily go toe to toe with the ML Mercedes, X5 Bimmers, and various Lexus and Acura SUVs.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        You know I think I view these as different levels than other people.

        The Overland and Limited GC would be equivalent to an MDX, RX, or ML.

        The GL is sort of with the GX on it’s own little plane (of leftover truck based mid-size things).

        The LX and X5 are above, with Range Rover. The GC does not compete in this field. If they want to put the Wagoneer here, they need to be VERY careful to make it very premium. And it needs to cost less tthan an X7, because lets face it, it still has to say Jeep on the front.

        • 0 avatar
          MLS

          Your views make little sense.

          The Mercedes GL is full-size and competes most directly with the original Range Rover, Lexus LX570, Infiniti QX80, and Escalade. While the base price is low for the class, MSRP escalates quickly with options.

          The BMW X5 competes directly with the Mercedes ML and both are a full class beneath the Range Rover in price and prestige. Lexus’ most similar offering is the GX.

          Based on equipment level, the Grand Cherokee competes with a wide array of vehicles, from mainstream mid-size SUVs up through the Germans’ mid-level offerings and even the Range Rover. Like the Suburban’s, the Grand Cherokee appeal transcends its mainstream brand.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            YOUR views make little sense.

            There, see how easy?

            The GL is pathetic, and is NOT cross shopped with the RR, LX, QX, Escalade. Those people have G-Wagen money.

            They are views.

        • 0 avatar
          danio3834

          Luckily for Jeep, SUV shoppers aren’t that rigid in their comparisons.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      In North America, Jeep largely is a premium brand. Yes, they do sell cheap models too, but their best sellers move at premium prices. As Manley points out, the JGC is cross shopped with costly German marques, and for good reason. They have all the bells and whistles to compete.

    • 0 avatar
      TheEndlessEnigma

      “Jeep is a budget vehicle…”

      What?

      Have you priced out Jeep products lately? Wranglers are budget priced? Cherokee is budget priced? Grand Cherokee is budget priced?

      Ummm….no.

      Who cross shops Jeeps with Hyundai or Kia?

      • 0 avatar
        VoGo

        I think the reason we are having this conversation is that Jeep has a confused brand strategy. You can’t claim to be a premium brand, and then sell a stripper Compass or Patriot for $16K.

        I have always maintained that the best corporate home for Jeep is with a global brand expert that can take Jeep global with a consistent branding experience. Someone like LVMH or Proctor & Gamble or Harley Davidson.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        He’s talking about Australia, the known center of the Automotive Universe.

    • 0 avatar
      zerofoo

      Big Al,

      No disrespect, but my wife’s 2014 GC Laredo with cloth seats and no sunroof was almost $40k out the door with taxes and extended warranty.

      If I wanted Leather, Nav, and a sunroof, I would have been well into the 40s and god-forbid I wanted a diesel – that would have pushed it well into the 50s.

      That’s not a cheap vehicle.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        What Jeep vehicles BAFO is exposed in Oz is not the same line of Jeep vehicles that are marketed en masse in North America (US, Canada and Mexico).

        Our 2012 Grand Cherokee Overland Summit 4X4 had a MSRP of $49,995 or thereabouts, with the V6. But at that time (Nov 2011) the dealers were still willing to discount them to move the metal.

        Things have changed. The popularity of the current Grand Cherokee and the demand for them encourages dealers to sell them for 3-5% OVER MSRP and tack on a bunch of dealer-installed options no one wants or needs, like Silicone treatment of the paint, running boards, roof-rack, etc etc etc.

        • 0 avatar
          VoGo

          Are the Compass and Patriot sold in Australia?

        • 0 avatar
          mikey

          I went over to the Jeep Canada site and tried to build a nice GC for under 50,000 Loonys. I don’t know much about Oz ,but up here in Canuckistan, 50K is a lot of dough.

          @HDC Did you trade your 2012 GC in? I know your a Toyota man, but we’re you happy with the GC?

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            @Mikey, “@HDC Did you trade your 2012 GC in? I know your a Toyota man, but we’re you happy with the GC?”

            No, we kept the GC and gave the 2008 Highlander to my 17yo grand daughter in El Paso, TX, for her use, when my wife got the 2015 Sequoia Platinum.

            Best of all, I didn’t have to pay for the Sequoia! Not one cent.

            The family business bought it for her as an accelerated depreciating asset since she took over running the operation on 1 Oct 2014 when her dad and mom retired from the business. They all voted for it, except my wife, who abstained.

            So, the best laid plans on my part went all awry. I was worried about being able to scrape enough money together along with the trade-in value of the GC to pay for the Sequoia. Turned out, my worry was for nothing.

            The GC is parked on our property and has only been used once since 1 Oct. I still roll around in my Tundra daily for all my transportation needs.

            To answer your question, yes we were happy with the GC — it has been trouble-free and all I did to it was periodically change oil and filters and slap on a new set of tires at 25K because the OEM Goodyears sucked. The GC now has 59+K on the clock.

            Michelin is so much better riding, better wearing and better gripping on all surfaces. Not cheap, but well worth the extra price based on real world wear and tear.

    • 0 avatar

      I see Al has been responded too. But I will mention I was talking to the jeep dealer that services our company fleet vehicles the other day, he mentioned that the previous gen GC typically had transaction prices in the low 30’s the current gen he says averages about 45K to me that sounds premium.

    • 0 avatar
      Firestorm 500

      @ Big Al: If you think Jeeps are “cheap”, you need to make a visit to your friendly local Jeep dealer and check out the window stickers.

    • 0 avatar
      mikeg216

      The jeep grand wagoneer when it went out of production in 1991 had the buyers with the highest income and net worth of any vehicle in history, no your wrong try again.

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      Your whole post shows how clueless you are as to what is reality in this country. You’ll find all kinds of mulit-million dollar homes in Minnesota with loaded Jeep Grand Cherokees parked in the garage. And why not, they are just as nice as any Mercedes, Land Rover, BMW or the like. No one and I mean no one in this country cross shops a Kia or Hyundai with a Jeep GC.

    • 0 avatar
      05lgt

      Of the 3 jeeps purchased within 2 doors of my house this year one replaced a jeep and 2 replaced BMW’s. My sample is small, but it seems Manley may be citing real data.

    • 0 avatar
      05lgt

      Of the 3 jeeps purchased within 2 doors of my house one replaced a jeep and 2 replaced BMW’s. My sample is small, but it seems Manley may be citing real data.

  • avatar
    thornmark

    The Jeep Wagoneer model pictured above actually was bought by well-heeled customers who had the highest income of any massed produced vehicle buyers in the US.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      We bought a Grand Wagoneer used and it was not a good experience for us. It needed fixing all the time; the transmission, the hubs, the electrical system, etc. And this was in a time before vehicles became computers-on-wheels and complicated.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        @HDC

        No one ever said they were any good, they just had a certain something that appealed to a lot of wealthy folk. And still does – there is a decent market in wildly expensive refurbished ones. They were generally kind of pieces of crap. At least those in my circle of friends and family. But they were a great way to get to the lakebeach house or to the ski mountain. Poor people don’t do either of those activities, I grew up with an awful lot of folks who did both.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          You’re right, they had panache. Ours leaked so much oil and other fluids I had to park it on the dirt behind my house.

          But then something unexpected happened. I had bought it from a GI at the White Sands Missile Range when he left the area but his First Sergeant searched until he found us and expressed his interest in buying it from us.

          I told him what I had paid for it (which he already knew) and what it had cost me to repair it and keep it running.

          He paid for all of it, plus gave me $250 for my troubles.

          Turns out, he had four of them and was a collector of Grand Wagoneers who after his retirement moved from WSMR to Truth or Consequences, NM where he restored old cars until his death.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      It was the Escalade of its day, almost the only thing propping up the withered husk of AMC in its final days, and the reason Lee Iacocca was sitting at AMC’s deathbed with a pen and several pounds of legal forms.

      • 0 avatar
        NoGoYo

        And apparently the Wagoneer was so priceless as is that Chrysler didn’t even replace the old AMC 360 with their own LA series engines!

        Even though the late 80s TBI Mopar 360 would have been more livable and gotten a little better MPG…

  • avatar
    993cc

    I don’t follow Jeep closely, but what does their experience with the Commander say about the prospects for this proposal?

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      The Commander didn’t do the concept of higher-end luxury SUVs any justice. All signs point to the new Wagoneer being in a different league.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      They…don’t wanna talk about the Commander.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      The Commander was designed while Daimler-Benz owned the company and was purposely held below Mercedes’ equivalent model. Even the new, larger Wrangler was built to have a Mercedes G-class twin. Now that Fiat has replaced Daimler, there’s no longer any in-house competition to enforce a lower level of luxury for the models. As such, Jeep can now compete with Daimler at every level if it so chooses–and I think they will.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      The Commander was way overpriced and had old-design issues. People I know who had owned a Commander traded them for the 2011-2015 Grand Cherokee, albeit in upscale 4X4 trim like Limited, Overland or Summit, and with leather everything.

      A Grand Wagoneer utilizing today’s Grand Cherokee tech should do well. It’s a niche currently filled by Sequoia and Armada. I would expect a Grand Wagoneer’s smallest engine to be a 5.7L with cylinder management, and the 6.4L to be optional.

      My wife’s 2015 Sequoia is larger and roomier than our 2012 Grand Cherokee, as the Grand Wagoneer would also be.

    • 0 avatar

      I know a guy who is very happy with his Commander, but he’s using it as off-road vehicle. It’s highly modified and I saw pictures of him crossing cracks in Moab that I would not dare in my Wrangler.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    After what I’ve witnessed with the quick descent in hope for a flagship cadillac, I lack faith even if Jeep doesn’t have a moron in charge.

    My guess, car frame, FWDbiased Single speed AWD, plastic bumpers, IRS, everything that may be allowed to crap on the original Wagoneer.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      Nope. Think Durango with high quality buttercream frosting and you’ll have the new Wagoneer.

      That would mean RWD/AWD and Hemi, but (sadly for Hummer) unit body construction.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        Durango isn’t even a fullsize, yes they may call it that but its midsize all day long.

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          It may not be Suburban full size, but it’s just a few inches short of Tahoe full size 199″ vs 204″ but a longer wheelbase @ 120″ for the Durango vs 116″ for the Tahoe. A full size vehicle in my book

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            Tahoe is also wider and slightly taller.

            But the exterior dimensions don’t matter as much as how its used. The maxima is the perfect example, when your behind a current gen in traffic, it looks like they took a versa pushed the sheet metal out horizontally below the windows to get a certain number.
            The Tahoe has room above the bottom of the windows whereas a Durango makes the driver feel like there in a midsize with the amount of room lost from its impractical decreasing width proportional to increasing height.
            My 87 S10 feels more roomy in the cabin.

        • 0 avatar
          MRF 95 T-Bird

          Consumers Reports, Cars.com etc categorize the Durango with other mid-sized 3-row crossovers such as the Pilot, Highlander,Traverse, Explorer etc.

          A few months ago Consumers Reports rated it near the top of the 3-rows above the Pilot and Explorer but just below the Highlander.

      • 0 avatar
        S1L1SC

        This (Principal Dan’s comment) – My only fear is that they will kill off the Durango and sell the Wagoneer only to get the higher Jeep transaction prices.
        There have been rumors for about 1-2 years that the Durango is reaching the end of the line. If they are expecting at 2015/2016 launch, then it will be either a badge job or the new model is switching from Dodge to Jeep?

  • avatar
    heavy handle

    I love how an exec can tease that an entirely new product “might happen” in 12 months! It’s way too late to abort this launch, so spare us the BS.

    Do they honestly expect anyone in the industry (including journalists) to believe that they are still toying with the idea of designing a new SUV when the final sign-off was likely given months ago and the tooling is getting delivered?

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      Do we KNOW all of that, HH? If so, where’s the evidence?

      • 0 avatar
        heavy handle

        I really doubt that Fiat can design and build a new car in under 12 months. The tooling times in this industry are too long for that.

        Any car that’s slated to come-off a regular production line next Fall is 99% signed-off today. They could theoretically call the whole thing off, but not without taking a monumental loss.

        Mike Manley’s making it sound like Jeep starts working on the 2016 introductions in the Fall, just after the 2015s hit dealerships.
        That may work in the fashion industry, but it’s definitely not the case in automotive.

        • 0 avatar
          frozenman

          Here is a prime example of the rampant BS that is inherent in certain automotive companies as compared to say a vehicle “launch” done by Honda/Toyota IMHO.

  • avatar
    hachee

    This has been a long time coming, ignoring the Commander of course, which was just poorly and weirdly executed. If they can do this like the GC, I have no doubt it will be hugely successful. I think it will absolutely be a viable alternative to the premium 7 seaters. While the old GW may have been seen as super premium, and while the GC may be cross shopped with the X5 and the like, I do think they ought to be smart about pricing, and offer a good range that perhaps undercuts the top tier models of BMW and MB a bit.

  • avatar
    Andy

    So…a Jeep Durango? No big whoop.

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    Dear Jeep,

    Base this Mother Trucker on the Ram 1500.

    You have one job.

    Sincerely,

    The world.

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    So when do we finally get to SEE the f***ing thing?!

    How do you have a vehicle coming out in a year and nothing to show of it?

  • avatar

    I think it is really sad that today’s Jeeps are nothing more than rebadged Fiats. The soul of Jeep has been ravished. It is simply not much of an American vehicle anymore.

    Italian know-how……………..

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      Trying to sell to just the North American market, or banking on an old school of thought whose proponents are rapidly aging and dying, is a losing proposition in a global economy. Frankly, I’m happy that the Wrangler will live on even if it means we have to “put up with” the KL Cherokee. And I have high hopes for the Renegade.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        If the global economy isn’t feeling US pickups, should they be stopped too?

        • 0 avatar
          Drzhivago138

          I wasn’t aware any economy was “feeling” US pickups, or any other car for that matter…:P

          But to answer your question, sellers of US pickups aren’t banking on a rapidly aging and dying demographic, but rather on the basic idea that Americans love large vehicles, which won’t be going away any time soon.

    • 0 avatar
      heavy handle

      So a 3 row SUV evolved from a Durango is nothing more than a rebadged Fiat? Which Fiat would that be, exactly?

      Actually, it would be really cool if Jeep re-badged the Iveco Massif. That’s a real 4×4, with Power Take-Offs and everything.

    • 0 avatar
      RedStapler

      As long as they don’t botch the Wrangler the soul of Jeep will remain intact; Jeep has somehow survived the bundling and occasional neglect of the previous owners.

      https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2009/06/the-jeep-jinx/

      Can any other living car brand claim such a checkered ownership history?

      If they can push a variant of the WK2 Grand Platform into the $60k+ plus segment good for them.

  • avatar
    stuki

    Jeep already have access to the Power Wagon underpinnings. Just enclose the Laramie edition of that, and be done with it…..

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      Makes too much sense. Killing off the Ram Charger was the most A$$N9 thing Chrysler has done. I’m convinced the were about to kill the full-size truck at the time. But that’s a whole other story.

      A range of fullsize SUVs from Jeep, Chrysler, Dodge was needed 25 years ago. And Ford is bringing back the OJ Bronco.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    When will TTAC fix this irritating problem. Or does this problem only occur to certain people?????? Hmm.

    I do thank the people for their responses. It appears to ones who use BAFO are the subjective ones. This does’t mean they are lesser people, just more unfortunate.

    I can see many responses that are subjective and emotive regarding personal views on FCA and Jeep products.

    I was actually considering a VM diesel Grand Cherokee. So, I do know where it fits in the scheme of thing here in Australia. There was a provocative comment regarding the Australian car market. To that person, yes the Australian car market is a litmus used by many manufacturers to test a new product. Apparently if a vehicle makes it in Australia it is more probable to be successful in other western countries.

    The Grand Cherokee was priced similarly to the Kia Sorento/Hyundai Santa Fe. Bling and quality were competitive between them. The Korean’s did have a slight advantage in bling.

    To the person who stated that Jeep overall quality had improved. Yes, this is quite true. But it has yet to match the Euro prestige or even the mainstream Japanese competitors, ie, Prado, Pajero, etc. These vehicle command a higher price and they aren’t prestige vehicles.

    FCA is pricing all of it’s products aggressively here. This is against ‘bread and butter’ brands not prestige. The quality of FCA vehicles also doesn’t fit with a prestige brand.

    Also, the comment stating that our Grand Cherokee is different, yes, the steering wheel is on the opposite side of the vehicle. There is no differences between our vehicles. Australia has a liberal car market and we even accept American vehicles built to American standards.

    I have never stated that the Grand Cherokee didn’t represent good value or that it’s quality was poor in relation to it’s pricing. The Grand Cherokee is good off road. But so are many other products.

    The Jeep Grand Cherokee is such a mainstream SUV/CUV it’s the biggest seller here. That should indicate this isn’t a prestige vehicle, it’s just a common vehicle, like a ute.

    A Wagoneer I do envisage to be cheaper than a Patrol or Landcruiser in which it will be competing. But it will need more than reputation to survive here. It will actually need to produce the goods. If it can’t be competitive against a Patrol or Landcruiser it will not be imported.

    Even the Chev Suburban was removed from our market due to poor performance and quality.

    The US does build some good vehicles.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    When will TTAC fix this irritating problem. Or does this problem only occur to certain people?????? Hmm….

    It will work sooner or later.

    I do thank the people for their responses. It appears to ones who use BAFO are the subjective ones. This does’t mean they are lesser people, just more unfortunate.

    I can see many responses that are subjective and emotive regarding personal views on FCA and Jeep products.

    I was actually considering a VM diesel Grand Cherokee. So, I do know where it fits in the scheme of thing here in Australia. There was a provocative comment regarding the Australian car market. To that person, yes the Australian car market is a litmus used by many manufacturers to test a new product. Apparently if a vehicle makes it in Australia it is more probable to be successful in other western countries.

    The Grand Cherokee was priced similarly to the Kia Sorento/Hyundai Santa Fe. Bling and quality were competitive between them. The Korean’s did have a slight advantage in bling.

    To the person who stated that Jeep overall quality had improved. Yes, this is quite true. But it has yet to match the Euro prestige or even the mainstream Japanese competitors, ie, Prado, Pajero, etc. These vehicle command a higher price and they aren’t prestige vehicles.

    FCA is pricing all of it’s products aggressively here. This is against ‘bread and butter’ brands not prestige. The quality of FCA vehicles also doesn’t fit with a prestige brand.

    Also, the comment stating that our Grand Cherokee is different, yes, the steering wheel is on the opposite side of the vehicle. There is no differences between our vehicles. Australia has a liberal car market and we even accept American vehicles built to American standards.

    I have never stated that the Grand Cherokee didn’t represent good value or that it’s quality was poor in relation to it’s pricing. The Grand Cherokee is good off road. But so are many other products.

    The Jeep Grand Cherokee is such a mainstream SUV/CUV it’s the biggest seller here. That should indicate this isn’t a prestige vehicle, it’s just a common vehicle, like a ute.

    A Wagoneer I do envisage to be cheaper than a Patrol or Landcruiser in which it will be competing. But it will need more than reputation to survive here. It will actually need to produce the goods. If it can’t be competitive against a Patrol or Landcruiser it will not be imported.

    Even the Chev Suburban was removed from our market due to poor performance and quality.

    The US does build some good vehicles.

    • 0 avatar

      Sorry Al, please bear with us…

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      ” Or does this problem only occur to certain people?????? Hmm….”

      I have noticed not seeing any comments from at least seven people I know in real life. Surprising, because these people are/were avid followers of ttac.

      Contacting them by phone or email only resulted in replies to me along the lines of, “Nahhhh, lost interest” or “Nehhhh, not into it any more.”

      Maybe this was one of the irritants that sent them packing. I don’t know because I’m not on enough to be irritated by this or other problems.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    I’m sure it only happens to YOU, BAFO. And the UAW is 100% FULLY responsible!

    Seriously doh, we’ll stop using BAFO when you start using the proper names for the UAW, FCA, BMW, USA, CAFE; EPA, OPEC, TTAC, FDA, FBI, MPG, MPH, AM, PM, LOL, etc, etc.

  • avatar
    baconpope

    Although a Grand Wagoneer would be interesting, it will not be a sales success. A Jeep pickup, on the other hand, is a no-brainer. You could easily move 15 – 20,000 reskinned Rams.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      I highly doubt a Jeep pickup would be a “reskinned Ram”. Now only would Ram division oppose such a move, but it simply wouldn’t have the caché that a Wrangler-based pickup would offer.

      • 0 avatar
        ect

        Not to be a jerk, but this word is so often misspelled on this site. “caché” is the past tense of the French verb “cacher” meaning hidden. “Cachet” means prestige, which is what you are trying to say.

        FWIW, I agree with your thought.

    • 0 avatar
      AJ

      Yes to a pickup over a Grand Wagoneer. I loved the Wagoneer’s back in the day. My grandpa’s retirement vehicle as a rancher back in early 80s was one. I just don’t think there is room for one with the Grand Cherokee. I feel like we’d get another Commander.


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