By on October 31, 2014

photo (7)

(N.B. This review was penned by my grandmother, Yvette Lerner, posted under my account)

When my husband, daughter (Derek’s Mum) and I left England in 1961, we left behind a beautiful MG Magnette. Upon arriving in Canada, my husband went out and bought the first car he could find with a V8 engine. We had left behind the damp flats, the rationing (which still went on when we got married in 1953) and the grey weather for a new life, and my husband felt that the transformation wasn’t complete unless we had a big, 8-cylinder American car to go with it. We wouldn’t drive anything smaller than a V8 until 1973.

In 1965, I got a Mustang 2 door with a V8 and a stick shift. From then on, it was all Chrysler products, culminating in my husband’s pride and joy, a 1970 New Yorker with a 440 V8 as big as our kitchen table. My husband was a clergyman, and we never had much money, but we did love cars. My husband had variously lusted after both a Mercedes-Benz and later on, an Audi owned by my cousin, but he felt that it would be inappropriate as a Rabbi to own a German car when so many of his parishioners had survived Nazi concentration camps just a few decades earlier.

American cars were the default choice. We didn’t even know about Japanese cars, until one day in 1973, when a man in our congregation asked us if we wanted to come and look at a new car he was selling. It was called a “Honda Civic”. It had a tiny 4-cylinder engine and drove the front wheels. When I first saw it, I thought it looked like the little car that Fred Flintstone drove. But with gas prices going nowhere but up, we took a chance on the little Honda.

Our neighbors laughed at us. I even affixed a bumper sticker that said “Stop honking, I’m pedaling as fast as I can”. But we were happy. It was great on gas, and sure enough, when winter came, we were the only ones who didn’t get stuck. In 1991, my husband replaced a 1979 Chevrolet Caprice (with a 350 and aftermarket sway bars) with a 1991 Honda Accord that was briefly owned by Derek’s father, as a Honda company car. My husband drove the Accord until he died in 1998. I ended up trading that car in on a 2000 Honda Civic

If it were not for old age, I’d have kept the Civic. It has enough room for all my groceries and it doesn’t cost me very much to maintain. I keep the car tuned up according to Honda’s schedule, and it’s zippy enough to get me around town. But at 81, I have broken my hip and my pelvis, and I find it hard to get in and out of such a low car. The Civic also has crank windows, and reaching over to wind down the passenger window (something I do often – I love to pull over and chat with friends and neighbors) gets tiresome.

The last few years have been kind to my retirement accounts, and left me feeling comfortable with buying a new car. When Derek was a young boy, my husband and I always had to take him to different dealerships so that he could look at all the new cars – I decided to call in a favor and have him help me look at a new car.

I have to admit that I’ve always liked the Fit since I first saw it, but Derek urged me to look at some others. I did not like the Kia Soul that some of you suggested. It’s too weird for me. The Hyundai Accent looked nice, but I found the driving position to be a bit tough (I’m only 5’2″ and seeing over the instrument cluster and hood caused me to crane my neck far too much). The Kia Rio was the same, and the Mazda3 had the sort of long, blunt hood that I don’t like.

The Fit ended up being, pardon the word choice, a good Fit for me. It sits just a bit higher up than the other cars, which is a lot easier for someone like me to get into. I like that the hood seems to drop down, so I get a nice, clear view of the road. Derek thought that the touch screen would be a bit challenging for me, but I have my own iPod and Android Tablet, and have figured out how to use both on my own! The best part for me is the Magic Seat. Instead of having to put everything in the trunk, I can fold the rear seat cushions upwards, and put things like walkers (don’t laugh), house plants and other parcels on the footwell.

The CVT transmission took some getting used to. I also wasn’t happy with the way the accelerator feels, but Derek told me that all cars feel this way (something about a computer, but my car uses a cable). I don’t find it as responsive as my Civic, but there is a lot more power. I wish I had a sunroof, but the Fit has power windows, locks, a much better stereo (I love music) and is a lot safer. It’s amazing to think that 15 years ago, I paid about $16,000 for my Civic. I didn’t pay too much more than that for my Fit, but I get so much more car, even when you think about inflation (and as a pensioner, I do).

Derek told me that a lot of his colleagues seem to think that the Fit isn’t as fun or as nice as it used to be. I don’t get to drive a new car every week, but I do like to go fast (I told the salesman to make sure the “ECON” button never comes on) and I know that the Fit drives a lot better than my Civic, or any of the cars I’ve rented recently (a Mitsubishi Lancer, a Nissan Sentra and a 2013 Honda Civic). Thank you all for helping me pick a new car!

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101 Comments on “Capsule Review: 2015 Honda Fit, Grandma Edition...”


  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Nice article, seems it was Fit for Grandma.

    • 0 avatar
      Astigmatism

      Hey-ohh!

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      As with the Scion xB, I’d imagine that “Fit for Grandma” is not the tag line Honda would want for this car. It’s so practical that it appeals to just about every age group.

    • 0 avatar
      Syke

      I found myself agreeing with Grandma in just about everything. Three years ago I needed something new that I could haul around my invalid wife, walker, wheelchair, and Lord know what else we’d need on our errands. It came down between an ’06 Fit and an ’05 xB. The sales person at Car Max even dug the store’s emergency wheelchair out of the back room (Patti wasn’t with me on this trip) so I could test out fitting and removing it.

      Despite the Magic Seat, I liked the xB a little better, it was a grand cheaper, and it turned out that it was easier for Patti to get in an out than the Fit.

      Car buying for the aged and infirm is a whole new set of parameters. Something you’re all going to find out one of these days.

      • 0 avatar
        Russycle

        Thanks for posting this Syke. I’m looking for a senior-friendly vehicle as I’m my mother’s primary chauffeur these days. I’ve been leaning towards a minivan, but just got a line on an xB a friend is selling. I believe you have both, what do you recommend?

  • avatar
    Astigmatism

    You’ve got a lot to live up to, Derek. Grandma sounds like she’d fit right in with the B&B, if she hasn’t been lurking here under an alias already…

    • 0 avatar
      SC5door

      The user: amdnarg looks suspicious.

    • 0 avatar

      Agree! I like her. She’s writes very nicely, has a genuine love of cars, and I’m just sorry she (and you) lost your grandfather the rabbi so long ago. May she have many happy miles and years.

      I think it’s great that TTAC has an article from an older person describing the–excuse me!–fit. As Syke says, the needs are definitely different.

      One minor thing: the 16k she paid for the Civic is 22k today, so she paid a lot more for the Civic than the Fit.

    • 0 avatar
      Russycle

      Indeed, the Caprice with a 350 and after-market sway bar comment struck home.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    So how can be get Ms. Lerner onto the writing staff?

    Enjoyed the report, I love hearing older generations tell their experiences and memories, hope you enjoy your new car!

  • avatar
    davefromcalgary

    Awesome article.

    I have always admired the space utilization in the Fit combined with its reputation for reliability. When my lady needs to replace her old beater Accent (bought before I was in the picture), my recommendation will be a newer Corolla or Fit. She is not an enthusiast but is extremely conscientious regarding care and maintenance, which I think combined with a known tough to kill car should make for a real long runner.

  • avatar
    jrasero23

    My grandparents on my fathers side always had American cars such as Cadillac and Lincoln, but when my grandfather passed when I was young and my grandmother needed a car she got a civic and she had a blast with it. The Fit used to be that kind of car since it got terrific MPG, had great utility, but also was very nimble and fun to drive.

    I don’t think you can go wrong with a 2015 Fit but after driving one I was a little let down. Maybe this is because I love the last generation Fit but for me the CVT isn’t fun and so far has so so reliability. Engine noise also seems to be increased for this gen and not in a good way. I just don’t feel the driving dynamics anymore. Now the car has slightly better materials, more features, better MPG, and offers an EX-L trim. Simply Honda took a dynamic niche car and vanilla-ized it.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    She could certainly start a new career as an auto journalist. What a well written and concise description of all the key points.

    Also glad to hear that the markets have been good to her retirement funds. Wish that I could say the same.

  • avatar
    mjz

    Nice article! Good choice!

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    Great review, especially given that Mrs. Lerner is attempting to explain her reasons for choosing the Fit to a different demographic group, which she does successfully.

    I still maintain that you should have purchased a Charger Hellcat, though, Mrs. Lerner, with all due respect, Ma’am.

  • avatar
    Sjalabais

    A great read!

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    Your Grandma sure knows her cars, is that where you get it from, Derek?

  • avatar
    raresleeper

    Great article :)

    You’re grandmother seems like a sweet lady.

    I had two perfect grandmothers, man. Grandmas are the best.

    Enjoy the Fit!

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Fit is go

  • avatar

    Glad she enjoys it, seems pretty much ideal for her!

    Great talent your grandmother displayed. Give her my heart felt congratulations!

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    Has anyone driven the stick shift ’15 Fit on the highway? Is it still as buzzy in top gear? The old one was 4000 rpm at 80mph.

  • avatar
    86er

    I think we’ve found our new Editor-in-Chief!

  • avatar
    KixStart

    Is there a TTAC Article Hall of Fame? Because we’ve got a new nominee here.

  • avatar
    Pch101

    “I did not like the Kia Soul that some of you suggested. It’s too weird for me.”

    I’m deeply hurt. How can a box on wheels with hamsters for mascots be weird?!?!?!

    • 0 avatar
      WheelMcCoy

      >> I’m deeply hurt. How can a box on wheels with hamsters for mascots be weird?!?!?!

      Ha ha ha! With the Kia Soul, Mrs. Lerner could have had a bumper sticker that said “Stop honking, my hamsters are running as fast as they can”

  • avatar
    tresmonos

    Great review. Great perspective and it’s very interesting to see someone in your age group lament the introduction of drive by wire. You seem like the kind of person who appreciates your personal connection to your car. Cheers and thank you for contributing to this website.

  • avatar
    petezeiss

    “I like that the hood seems drop down, so I get a nice, clear view of the road.”

    Yep, I knew you’d love the sight lines. Nice low Honda dash, too.

  • avatar
    Stumpaster

    Wow, just wow. Excellent story line, clean and concise writing, no auto journo cliches, covered all bases, not one grammar, spelling or punctuation error… Any chance that we can have Derek replaced with his Grandma? Or at least have her test drive more new vehicles that are not sedans (to save her bones)?
    Thanks in advance.

  • avatar
    This Is Dawg

    I just went back and read the whole thing a second time. That bumper sticker comment shows so much about her character in so few words.

    I agree with the above comment that we need a TTAC article hall of fame!

    Honda is lucky to have her.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    It’s great to get grandma’s perspective, sometimes the groupthink around here can get a bit suffocating.

    My grandma was into her cars as well and appreciated the many details they had to offer. Whenever I got a new or interesting car, I’d bring it by her place and take her for a drive in it. She especially enjoyed that after she could no longer drive after her 4th stroke. Not being able to drive any longer broke her heart more than anything, I think that was the beginning of the end for her.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      This time is approaching fast for all four of my grandparents. I really don’t know how it’s gonna go down. Not well, I suspect, as all four are stubborn.

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        The stubborn ones live forever. They’re also tricky. My grandmother’s sister drove until she was 96, though her eyesight wasn’t good enough for driving years before then. She had gotten eye charts and memorized them!

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Now I’m lusting after the 350 powered Caprice with aftermarket swaybars. :)

    I can’t see a Rabbi driving that but he’d never be late for a service.

  • avatar
    michal1980

    alot of grandma bias coming from the B&B. As if because someone is a grandma their work cant be criticized. Heck, because its grandma it must be praised.

    • 0 avatar
      petezeiss

      Yeah, we love Grandmas and we don’t like dorks.

      So sue us.

    • 0 avatar
      86er

      I’d take a little bit of “Grandma Bias” any day in the interest of balance over diatribes about how seniors have nothing to contribute, how their time has past, and how they’re nothing but a burden.

      I can find Senior Citizen Bigotry all day long on the megaphone of sociopathy known as the internet.

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      Yes, we are being very kind. Good manners and all, you know. Plus she appears to be quite bright and likeable and wrote a genuinely good little article about why she chose her car.

      I’m sure most of us wouldn’t object to some criticism if it’s done with respect. Specifically, what faults do you see here?

    • 0 avatar
      S2k Chris

      Aside from that fact that we’re just not being rude to an older lady, it’s kinda hard to argue with an article that explains why she bought a particular car FOR HERSELF.

      What, are we supposed to say her opinion of what she wants is wrong? It’s one thing to argue with a writer who is evaluating a car in abstract, but when someone says “I bought this with my money because I liked it the best” how can you argue with them?

    • 0 avatar
      Astigmatism

      I’m not saying you’re wrong (I think you’re wrong, but I may not be seeing my own bias), but your comment would mean a lot more if you pointed out any deficiencies in the article that you think we’re not criticizing because of grandma bias. You can be a total Giants homer and still be right when you say that Bumgarner’s performance in the World Series was one of the best ever.

      • 0 avatar
        Drzhivago138

        I like how a heated discussion has been ignited by a commenter whose name I don’t recall having seen before (although I’d be the first to admit that sometimes I don’t pay much attention to names) and hasn’t been seen since. Granted, it was only an hour ago, and FWIW, I’m neutral on the issue.

      • 0 avatar
        raresleeper

        I’m a little taken back by all of this.

        This guy had his grandmother write an article about this car, her experiences with cars, and the like.

        And what do we have here? An argument, about how nobody wants to point out errors or deficiencies in the article?? Really??

        Unbelievable. Smh.

        Little something called “courtesy”. Followed up with respect for your elders.

        Some have it, some don’t.

        • 0 avatar
          Syke

          This is the internet. Courtesy doesn’t count. Standing out does. Especially when you’re probably still living in your parent’s basement and couldn’t get a date if your life depended on it.

          • 0 avatar
            michal1980

            aww how cute look at all these personal attacks.

            I bet if I said I was some old great grandma you’d give me a pass.

            I’m saying that it shouldn’t matter who writes a review. Is the review good or not?

            But no all of you are so biased because some grand-ma wrote it, that you want to hand over TTAC to her.

            And based on what? That shes a grandma? Wow. Standards lowered.

            For example, what point is this sentence making?

            “I don’t get to drive a new car every week, but I do like to go fast (I told the salesman to make sure the “ECON” button never comes on) and I know that the Fit drives a lot better than my Civic, or any of the cars I’ve rented recently (a Mitsubishi Lancer, a Nissan Sentra and a 2013 Honda Civic). ”

            Other then being a run on thought?

            Theres other things that don’t add up, but you guys are too blinded by the grandma tag to listen.

            PS I’ve been around since fargo ran this site. douche bags

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            Well, he did call us all douche bags, so I guess he’s a good guy after all.

          • 0 avatar
            WheelMcCoy

            @michal1980

            >> For example, what point is this sentence making?
            >> “I don’t get to drive a new car every week, but I do like to go fast …

            Grandma is saying she’s not a professional auto journalist or reviewer, but that she still knows enough to recognize a properly fast (for her needs) and decent handling car.

            Also, she didn’t use the lazy auto-journo phrases like “go-kart handling,” “stab the pedal”, and “controls fall neatly to hand.”

            Go back and review the article (again), You’ll find that it’s refreshing and honest, which is a high standard many professional auto-journos covet, but don’t always achieve.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            “Well, he did call us all douche bags, so I guess he’s a good guy after all.”

            Yeah, even if he is a dork he’s “been around since ‘fargo’ ran this site” so, I guess that makes him…

            … a dork who can’t spell

  • avatar
    chuckrs

    Dear Mrs. Lerner

    Thanks for the delightful recollections of cars in your life and the decision-making process in getting your new Fit. May you enjoy it for decades.

    Derek – if your Grandma has some further thoughts on cars – or life in general – I think she’d find a regular audience here. Guaranteed one at least.

    • 0 avatar
      Syke

      I can see where she could be a very interesting poster – giving a viewpoint from a generation older than just about all of us here, who’s not a burnout motorhead, but certainly doesn’t consider a car an appliance.

      It’d be different. I’d enjoy a couple of more submissions, especially thing regarding driving at her age. I’m less than twenty years behind her.

  • avatar
    ant

    Interesting to hear the comment about the drive-by-wire suckitude.

    I wish Honda would sell a trim of one of their cars with the older technology. The before mentioned throttle cable, old school power steering, and the great feel of the old wishbone suspension set ups.

    I would think that the SI would be a good car for this, along with a more traditional instrument panel.

    The MT ILX would also work too.

  • avatar
    sideshowtom98

    A very well written and interesting article. It was made very timely, because I helped my 23 year old step daughter look for, and buy, a car 2 weeks ago. She test drove the exact same cars. She also passed on the Kia Soul for the exact same comment, “weird looking”.
    She ended up choosing the Kia Rio 5 door hatchback. She passed on the Fit because she did not like the seating, she is 5’7″. The Fit was also $1400 more than the Kia, and the difference between the Honda 36 month warranty, and the Kia’s 10 year warranty were also a consideration.

  • avatar
    tjominy

    I reiterate all the praise for Mrs Lerner. What great insight and what a joy to read that review.

    This reminds me of when my dad helped his mother with her first car purchase after my grandfather passed. The result was a first gen Taurus SHO. It became a badge of honor among the grandkids to get banned from driving her car. Grandmas are great.

  • avatar
    Monty

    Mazel Tov, Mrs. Lerner, on the new purchase. I hope Derek becomes as smart and wise as you when he’s your age.

    Thanks for the well written review and concise decision points for choosing the Fit. Basically the same points I keep giving to my father when he suggests trading in his Mazda MPV for a new car, but he thinks the Fit is too small.

  • avatar
    SteveMar

    This is just the best! I love the idea of your grandmother scooting around in her Fit blasting her music with a big grin on her face. It’s also great to have the perspective of someone from her age group and sensibilities. I love car geeks, but it’s good to mix it up once in awhile

    Bring her back for a review after the first 3 or 6 months to see how things are going.

  • avatar
    319583076

    This post is why I <3 TTAC.

  • avatar
    STRATOS

    That roomy little (externally) car would be a perfect choice for any age group. As far as throttle response ,a lot of cars have become a bit boring because of the tip throttle response they program into it. The delay makes it safe (smoother) but not inspiring for enthusiasts.

  • avatar
    VW16v

    Great article and defiantly gets my vote to be a writer on this site. None biased review and pleasant to read.

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    Great car and nicely reasoned. The only negatives I’d have to say about the Fit are the road noise and its tiresome high-strung manners on the highway, but 14 years with a 2000 Civic has prepped her for that. It might even feel like a Lexus in comparison.

    Can’t beat that just-right seating height. I had a 1993 Civic in my 20s, and the low hip point was a bit annoying even at that age. You basically sat on the floor pan of the car. Worth putting up for in a sports car, but that Civic certainly wasn’t one of those.

  • avatar

    Reading this made my day.

    Mrs. Learner sounds like quite a lady. I hope the car serves her well for the next 10+ years, and that all of those find her in great health.

  • avatar
    wmba

    Just have to also say that this is wonderful writing with flow and no awkward phrasing, yet also concise and to the point. In fact, I find it probably the very best writing I’ve ever read on this site. After the first few sentences I just knew that finally, here was someone who naturally knew how to pen a word or two. Just wish the post was longer it was so enjoyable.

    Enjoy the Fit!

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    I wonder, does she now have British accent + Canadian?

  • avatar
    jetcal1

    Unlike some of our B&B, I neither look for or care about non-egregious grammatical errors. The different POV was a welcome read.

    Thank you for the post and for having to weather the few bricks that were thrown.

  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    Great article, although it leaves no room for sarcastic comments. So I can only give it three and a half stars.

  • avatar
    JLGOLDEN

    Excellent write-up, Grandma! I have attempted to transition my own Grandma from her 2006 Chrysler Town & Country into something more nimble, reliable, practical, and economical for her. The Fit’s driving position and cargo flexibility seem ideal, but my Grandma feels the need for “heft” and V6 power in order to have the feeling of confidence and safety out on the roads.

  • avatar
    CompWizrd

    As a second gen Fit owner (’10 Fit Sport), I’d also point out the Fit has excellent views out all windows, and very little in blind spots.. It’ll scoot in the city when you need the power, but it’s entirely controllable through the range.

    Sure, highway sucks. :)

    My wife hates my Fit (something about the seats, and lack of hamsters for getting on the freeway and that it’ll go exactly where you point it, as fast as you can point), and I hate her ’11 Focus (something about the lack of steering feedback and road handling), but we somehow tolerate each others car.

  • avatar
    Volt 230

    Honda should start an ad campaign for the Fit stating that it appeals to all age groups, I think it would be effective.

  • avatar
    James2

    When she was alive I wish my Grandma cared about cars. Her last car was chosen by my uncle, his criteria “the cheapest car that can make it up to Haleakala crater”: a Geo Metro. That POS was so loud it would break any sound-level meter.

    That POS has since been replaced by my other uncle with a Hyundai Accent. Don’t know how loud/quiet that thing is.

  • avatar
    olddavid

    I have an Aunt who married my Uncle in the late 40’s and came to Alberta as a young girl. She still speaks the King’s English in a very proper way, and makes the best Yorkshire pudding extant. I am guessing Grandma is very much like Aunt Nora. This was a nice method of humanizing you, Derek. This “man in the street” narrative should be a regular feature. I miss hearing from real people.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      This sentence here, “When my husband, daughter (Derek’s Mum) and I left England…” paints such a picture of who this woman is and that includes a fantastic Yorkshire pudding

      • 0 avatar
        olddavid

        Agreed. I think every Canadian either has a family member like this, or knows someone who does. The differences in the societies of each country make these characters that much more memorable. My dear Auntie will be 87 this year so our time together is short. Having her in our lives has enriched us beyond words. The world will be a different place without the presence of the “war brides” and their followers. Who will make the pudding at Christmastime?

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    Thanks Grandma, a very well written and informative article. Just keep your love of cars and new technology happening!

    My mother is roughly your age and she bought her Focus for almost the very same reasons you did the Fit. Easy on fuel, ease of ingress and egress and the Ford dealer is only a couple of miles away and it carries all of her shopping.

    I do drive her car when I’m over in the US. But it really doesn’t suit me. I actually preferred the diesel Yaris I drove in France as a driving experience.

    I hope your new car gives you years of good service.

    Thank you again.

    TTAC needs more of this. As society ages maybe us “kids” should also look at where more and more money will be in a decade or two.

  • avatar
    krhodes1

    Nicely done article!

    It IS interesting dealing with older folks and cars. In my family, my 67yo mum (also a grandma of 1) is the live-in caretaker of my 90-something year old grandparents. My Grandfather owned a succession of Ford Windstars, but Mom did not like driving something that big, having driven an old 528e for a long time. So when cash for clunkers came (and the Windstar was doing Windstar things), it was traded in for a Jetta sedan. Which proved too small and hard to get in and out of for the grandparents, though Mom liked it a lot. So it was in turn traded in on a VW Routan. Which was even bigger than the Windstars… Mom had a couple parking lot accidents with it, and Grandma started having hip problems that made it too hard to get in and out of – too tall. So that was traded for a Prius-V, which has turned out to be the perfect Goldilocks compromise of small enough for Mom to feel comfortable driving it, enough room for Grandfather, cane and/or walker, and Grandma can get in and out easily. Getting really old folks in and out of the back seat of anything with swoopy coupe styling is a chore, so the wagony Prius-V is perfect. The fuel economy is a nice bonus, she gets ~44mpg in suburban pottering around, but that was not a primary motivation.

    As mentioned before, about the same time my great-aunt who lives next door traded her Odyssey for a new Impala for the same reason, as a short, very stout woman she could not get in and out of the van easily. She is 89, I think. Still lives on her own and drives herself around. Neither of my grandparents drive anymore, though I think my grandfather technically still has a license.

    • 0 avatar
      olddavid

      You touch on an interesting dilemma. My Father got his license renewed at 91. He had no intention of driving – he merely wanted the affirmation of relevance this gave him. When one is young, it is easy to postulate that a ceiling age for drivers be adopted. When you’re the object of these laws, you have a completely different perspective. One of the real guffaws he experienced before death was leaving DMV with that piece of plastic.

  • avatar
    KindaFondaHonda

    One Grandma was British, the other Hungarian. Each had their respective deep accents, but spoke perfect English. I loved both of them because one was nuthin’ but a barrel of fun and the other was just as old-world sweet as can be.

    I miss them dearly.

    One thing that is easy to forget is that Grandmas were youngsters too… and probably still think that way most times. My Grandparents loved to show us kids all the pictures of when they were kids like us. Because of this, I looked at my Grandparents differently than most friends of mine. They saw theirs as old folks. I saw mine as just like me… just with some grey hair and wrinkles.

    I miss them dearly. (Did I say that already?) Hmm…

    Treasure your young at heart Grandma, Derek. :)

  • avatar
    highdesertcat

    Dear Mrs. Lerner, thank you for your wonderful article. It was so reminiscent of my Dad leaving Portugal to come to America in 1946 and how he bought his first (used) car after he and my mom were married in 1946 America. So different from Europe.

    My dad’s family in Portugal had never owned a car and my dad owning a car in America was something special! After that first car, my dad owned a succession of used and a few new cars, finally culminating in the Yank Tank Cadillac Sedan de Ville.

    Congratulations on your new car. Enjoy it!

  • avatar
    Moparmann

    An EXCELLENT article! I can’t add anything that hasn’t already been said! Thank you so much! My late grandmother drove a 1965 Chevelle Malibu, 327 c.i. w/ a HUGE 4 bbl Rochester carburetor. When the gas pedal was floored, you could hear it coming for two blocks! It was replaced by a 1975 Dodge Colt. She remarked that the Colt just “simply did not have the get and go” of the Chevy!! BTW: My daily driver is a 2015 Fit Sport w/ the 5 spd manual, definitely not a problem to zip around in!! :-)

  • avatar
    BartBandy

    I loved this! Kinda reminds me of two BBC Top Gear episodes – one where the mothers of Clarkson/May/Hammond test drive three subcompacts and ultimately choose the Honda Jazz (Fit), and the other where they build the ultimate car for elderly people, with soft-sponge bumpers painted hearing-aid beige!

    As Syke points out, mobility for the aged is just the tip of the iceberg right now. Today I saw an elderly man using an electric moped on the sidewalk to get around. A variety of options that allows elderly people to maintain their independence and safely get around is required.

    Fortunately Grandma Kreindler has the spirit and ability to motor around with a cool new car like the Fit! Best wishes to her.

  • avatar
    tedward

    I’m happy that you were able to find a car that suited your needs so well. I loved my Fit for what it’s worth, even if it never quite had enough front leg room for us.

    I would like all the CVT defenders out there to take note that it was noticeable to the non-brown-stick-wagon-diesel advocate and really the only complaint this driver had about the car. Actually I would like the manufacturers to note this. The marketplace is too competitive for this kind of sloppy compromise. Other makes have seen this weakness, and even among the brands who offer CVT’s there is a growing body of quotes indicating that they do know they under-perform. Counting on customers not realizing something is wrong (or that others do better transmissions) is not a good strategy.

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