By on October 29, 2014

autonation direct

Automotive retailer AutoNation is pulling used vehicles off the lot that may be affected by the ongoing Takata airbag recall.

Automotive News reports 400 vehicles will be pulled until their airbag units — which could violently scatter metal shrapnel through the entire cabin upon detonation in a climate with high humidity — are replaced.

CEO Mike Jackson, meanwhile, called upon all automakers to act as one in deciding how best to handle the issue, citing conflicting guidance from the latter, ranging from telling drivers not to allow passengers to ride shotgun, to not worrying about the possibility due to its alleged rarity:

There should be some entity that says to the industry: “Look, every individual manufacturer doesn’t get to make a decision here. This is what we are going to do.” And you would say maybe that’s NHTSA but NHTSA has been a Tower of Babel.

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12 Comments on “AutoNation Ceases Sales Of Used Models Affected By Takata Recall...”


  • avatar
    Superdessucke

    Dumb q but if I live in say MI and 2 years ago I bought a car from my local dealer that had previously spent 8 years in a humid climate, does my vehicle get fixed in the recall?

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    I think this issue is a huge sleeper thus far, intentionally underreported by the media, and absolutely of the type of safety issue that has automakers, and especially retailers, frozen in their tracks (catatonic) or hopelessly clueless about what to do.

    Basically, Takata is the 800 pound gorilla of the airbag suppliers, and allegedly (or admittedly – by Takata itself) defective airbags, which are overcharged and can turn into metal shard/fragment spewing grenades/mines upon deployment, are installed in cars as old as 2002s to new ones (several automakers issues stop sell orders on new cars due to this issue recently).

    So far, the official line from most automakers is that this is an urgent recall issue in states or territories with hot temperatures &high humidity year round (e.g. Florida), and vehicles in those climes should be recalled and have their airbags replaced immediately (though there aren’t enough Takata parts to even accomplish this at present, and airbags are apparently not backwards compatible).

    Even automakers who are not now officially recalling vehicles with affected Takata airbags installed are advising owners of these vehicles to (a) not put a forward facing child seat in the front, ever, and (b) not let ANY passenger sit in the front seat (BMW is urging this, for example).

    REALLY?

    This is going to be absolutely fascinating to watch play out.

    • 0 avatar
      Superdessucke

      Yes but these days with e-bay, Auto Trader, Craigslist, and of course dealer auctions, cars don’t just stay in one area as much as they did maybe 20 years ago. It would be perfectly normal for a car from New Orleans to go to auction and end up in New Jersey at the end of its lease term.

      I guess that could be tracked but it sounds like a logistical nightmare to me. IMHO. Some of these cars are over a decade old. They could have been in and out of humid states. How long in a humid climate does it take for the defect to arise?

      As to not riding in the passenger seat, the term “shotgun” couldn’t be more appropriate, LOL!

      • 0 avatar
        eamiller

        This is exactly the problem. They need to do a fleet-wide recall, but that will be hugely expensive, but it’s the right thing to do. Nobody has defined how long the airbag can be exposed to high humidity before it is a problem. In a country like the US where we have greatly varying climates in relatively short driving distances, this is a huge problem.

  • avatar
    velvet fog

    When did NHTSA’s role shift from protecting consumers (assuming that was ever it’s purpose) to protecting automakers? It looks like the way this was handled was designed to let automakers minimize recall costs instead of making sure no additional motorists sustained injury.

  • avatar
    ClutchCarGo

    Something just occurred to me, what is going to be done with the defective units as they are pulled out? Can a repair shop defuse these things for safe storage and disposal? Do they need to place them in hardened containers until the bomb squad shows up?

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    My comment won’t post, but I’ll try once more: Some automakers are going so far to avoid having to recall vehicles with these affected airbags as to have their service departments deactivate both driver and passenger airbags.

    It’s a really crazy situation. I think something close to 48 million vehicles are affected globally.

    The next biggest supplier of airbags has 10% of the market share and production capacity of Takata, and again, these airbags are not backwards compatible, so it’s not as if any airbag can be used to replace a defective one (even a new Takata one can’t necessarily be used for this purpose).

  • avatar
    petezeiss

    A few Takata officials need to publicly apologize (tearfully!) and step down into some reverse-amakudari jobs. Then everything will be OK.

  • avatar
    Firestorm 500

    My climate here in land-locked Arkansas is hotter than the Gulf Coast states, and at least as humid if not more so.

    I’ve got an ’02 Accord that I’m driving from the back seat until this blows over.

    Just kidding. My car was called in by Honda about 1 1/2 years ago and checked by the dealer. This was for the driver’s side airbag. They took it out and checked the number on the back of the module. It was not one of them. Took them about 20 minutes.

    Remember, this recall is not new.

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