By on September 17, 2014

PCOTY_091114_1313-lg

Ah, it’s the sad truth that the only way I’ll ever be on the cover of anything is if I’m wearing a helmet. So it is here, as I drag a loaner-helmet-wearing passenger around the Motown Mile.

So. What do you want to know about the Mustang?

A collection of PCOTY Mustang impressions can be found on the R&T site as of an hour ago. To what I’ve written there, I’ll add the following: This Mustang is a step beyond its competition into the bigger world of RWD performance sedans like the 3-Series BMW and its competitors. No, it’s not as space-efficient as something like an Infiniti Q50, but it offers a significant power advantage over those cars at an equally significant price savings.

On a fast back road, the Mustang really comes alive. It works with you everywhere you need it to. Even the brakes are better than they used to be — although if you really want to track the thing you’ll want to invest some of that price differential into a set of real six-piston stoppers. It’s a winner in every sense of the term. The wait is over, and it’s justified.

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164 Comments on “The Mustang Embargo Is Done...”


  • avatar
    CJinSD

    There was an embargo?

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    So we have to go to someone else’s website to read JB’s impression of the new Mustang?

    The only question I had was about the ecobost vs. the V6. Which was the better value and why?

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      Can’t tell you. Those questions will be answered by the full press preview. I only had the 5.0.

    • 0 avatar
      mikedt

      The v6 is cheaper but the turbo has more hp and torque – 300 and 280 vs 310 and 320. I think I’d trade the few ponies for the simplicity of the v6. Well that and it looks like the turbo and v8 require premium fuel.

      • 0 avatar
        01 ZX3

        Premium is recommended for best performance. However, it’s not required.

      • 0 avatar
        JMII

        However I’d guess the turbo has more tuning potential. Unless there is a supercharger for the V6 down the road. And I wish it came in a fastback body style. As I’ve posted before I’m sucker for turbo hatchbacks. I owned a Mustang before and would do it again if all the stars aligned. Just glad it finally has IRS setup so we can finally cross that off the list.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @mikedt – I do believe that the V6 went to the Spay/Neuter clinic before being placed into the 2015 Mustang.
        One mustn’t make the new turbo wonderkin look bad by offering an older V6 that was just as potent.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          @Lou_BC

          Such a thing fills me with rage.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          Oh noes! It lost five whole horsepower, for a terrifying 1.6% of its power output!

          (The actual reason is that there is a new, slightly more restrictive intake.)

        • 0 avatar
          mdensch

          I suspect that the change in HP rating on the V-6 was a marketing gimmick and that it’s identical to the previous V-6. The Ecoboost has to show a higher HP rating since Ford is charging more for it so they just measure the V-6 HP at a different RPM and it comes up 5 HP lower than last year. Unfortunately, you can’t get the Performance Package on the V-6 now so I’ll be looking at the Ecoboost when I trade my ’13 in.

          • 0 avatar
            segfault

            I suspect that the change in HP rating on the V-6 w”as a marketing gimmick and that it’s identical to the previous V-6.”

            Very possible. You’re allowed to under-rate horsepower/torque. BMW has been doing that for decades.

      • 0 avatar
        Loki

        Not to mention, no Performance Pack on V6. So no opportunity for better braking (unless you just swap em yourself).

      • 0 avatar
        S2k Chris

        I’ve never met a group of enthusiasts who are so interested in whether a performance car needs premium or not. WHO CARES???? It’s AT THE MOST $.50/gal more; at 15k miles and 20mpg, that’s $375 A YEAR. If you can’t afford that you can’t afford a new Mustang.

        Signed,
        A guy whose soul was crushed when his non-enthusiast dad bought a 1994 Integra LS instead of a GS-R because of premium :(

        • 0 avatar
          stuki

          Gas stations with a secure, uninterrupted supply of premium, tend to be collocated with donut shops.

        • 0 avatar
          tekdemon

          It’s not just about the cost you know. If the motor is making 310HP on 87 Octane it would suggest that there’s easily more horsepower available with premium fuel and a tune. If it’s already requiring premium fuel to make it’s power numbers then it’s going to have less available headroom for tuning.

          Now so far from what I’ve read the ecoboost mustang isn’t as exciting to drive as I was hoping, and it seems like it’s not that fast either.

    • 0 avatar
      duffman13

      Per ford’s website, the new V6 can’t be optioned with the performance pack, while the Ecoboost can. For me that would be a deal breaker, mainly due to the lack of a rear diff, but as with current stangs, the performance pack is a ton of stuff for $2k that you’d pay at least double on the aftermarket to replicate.

      But I mean come on. You gotta get the V8.

      That said, Base Ecoboost with the performance pack and Recaros stickers at $29.5, which is a hell of a bargain for that much car. A identically optioned GT costs $8000 more, which is a lot of track days.

      • 0 avatar
        mdensch

        I traded my ’11 V-6 w/o the Perf. Pkg. on a ’13 with the Perf. Pkg. (and the 6-speed) and it makes a big difference. You’re absolutely right about it being money well spent. The only downside is the tires cost more to replace.

    • 0 avatar
      Secret Hi5

      What about a comparison of the Ecoboost vs the *previous* V6?

    • 0 avatar
      3Deuce27

      That depends on what ‘you’ value

  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    People don’t cross shop a 3 series with a Mustang. If you graduated college and have a decent gig, you buy the BMW. If you went to trade school or less, you buy the Mustang.

    And the “retired” guy seems to be writing two blog post per day. Not complaining…just saying.

    • 0 avatar
      cackalacka

      Maybe it’s because I went to the North Avenue Trade School, but I’d prefer a pony and a big burlap sack full of money to a 3 series.

    • 0 avatar
      old5.0

      I would tend to agree that very few people cross – shop the two. Your reasoning, however, is utterly ridiculous.

      • 0 avatar
        Master Baiter

        A few clicks on this thing called the internet proves me right:

        “2005-2013 Ford Mustang: The typical 5th generation, S197 Mustang owner is a homeowner, has an annual household income of $72,115 and 68% are male.”

        BMW:
        Median Income: $169,828

        • 0 avatar
          PonchoIndian

          but…are they more educated? Kind of hard to go with the income number since that varies greatly based on geographic location too.

        • 0 avatar
          Jack Baruth

          That’s because…

          wait for it…

          you need more income to qualify for the lease!

          • 0 avatar
            Dave M.

            I’m going to go with the ‘retired guy’ on this as far as lease v. buy.

            I’ll even put my flame resistant suit on and say the Mustang owner is the greater enthusiast because they purchase theirs, not depend on a lease.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            @DaveM

            I think you will find plenty of Mustangs are leased. Certainly my local Ford dealers only ever advertise those low, low lease payments.

            How the way you finance you purchase has any impact on your enthusiasm is beyond me anyway.

            For what it is worth, I bought my current BMW, and I will be buying an additional one in the next year or two, assuming the Mustang doesn’t blow me away so much that I buy one of those instead. But it will take some doing to get me out of my planned 2-seres. Looking at the Ford website there is about $10K difference between the 228i and the EcoBoost Mustang configured the way I would want them, but the BMW has a LOT of things that are not even an option on the 2015 Mustang.

          • 0 avatar
            TMA1

            “but the BMW has a LOT of things that are not even an option on the 2015 Mustang.”

            But none of those things are four extra cylinders! A base 2 series cost $30 more than a base GT.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            @TMA1

            I have *zero* interest in the V8 Mustang. My interest begins and ends at the Ecoboost 4. I have one V8 in the garage already, and that is one too many, but we never got Range Rovers with decent engines in this country.

        • 0 avatar
          old5.0

          So, you’re comparing the entire s197 model run to…. what? How many people who make 150k+ also own a 10 year old 3-series? The only legitimate comparison is new – car purchases. Also, is that median income just for the 3, or BMW as a whole. I also notice you fail to provide a number indicating the percentage of new Mustang purchasers who are also college educated.

          Jump back on this “internet” of yours and try again. Thanks.

          • 0 avatar
            whynot

            That is the median income of BMW as a whole. Which, of course, makes the entire comparison pointless and does nothing to support or refute his point.

          • 0 avatar
            slance66

            You might be surprised. I have a 7 year old 3 series, that I’ll keep for awhile. Bought used/CPO. Lots of folks with higher incomes still don’t want to spend their money on cars. I see a mix of leased Range Rovers, Lexus’ and Audis and older pickups and other ordinary cars in my neighborhood.

            By the way, the only reason I wouldn’t cross shop a Mustang (especially the new one) is the lack of doors. If I was in the market for a 4 series I’d be cross-shopping.

        • 0 avatar

          You need that extra income to cover innumerable failures that occure shortly after warranty coverage is over. Oh, and $249 batteries, too.

          • 0 avatar
            DC Bruce

            FWIW, the “$249 battery” in my Z3 lasted 10 years. Even when I replaced it, it seemed fine; but the indy shop that does all the work on my car had a great deal on a replacement battery.

            I’ve never had a battery last 10 years in my life. Of course, the Z3 is the only car I’ve owned that locates the battery outside of the hot engine compartment, which may have something to do with it.

        • 0 avatar
          APaGttH

          You’re arguing the average fresh college grad is bringing down $170K a year.

          How cute…

        • 0 avatar
          bunkie

          I’d bet that those median income figures are household income, not individual. And I’d also bet that a good percentage of the male ownership population of the Mustang is single, more so than the BMW population.

        • 0 avatar
          mkirk

          You are comparing one model to an entire line of cars. By just saying “BMW” you average in the guys buying 7 series cars and M5s which I’ll agree, aren’t cross shopped. I bet if you look at the income for a Mustang buyer vs a 3 series buyer, while it may skew a bit higher for the 3 series it will be closer and unlike the 7 series buyer, some folks looking at a 3 may look at a Mustang.

        • 0 avatar
          fdesalvo

          Eh..Which 3 series are you comparing it to? There’s a huge monetary gulf between the lineup which could easily account for your assumption.

      • 0 avatar
        PonchoIndian

        can I get a copy of your letter, in word format please. That way I can just change the name and send it to my school. Obviously I wasn’t educated enough to do it myself and I want my free BMW too!

    • 0 avatar
      MrIcky

      Living up to your name I see.

      So sick of blobby BMWs. A little tired of Mustang trying to be a BMW. Still looks like some nice improvements here.

    • 0 avatar
      PonchoIndian

      Interesting way of putting it.

      I guess I shouldn’t be lusting after one of these since I graduated college and have a decent gig…
      Won’t catch me dead in a BMW. Might catch me dead in a Mustang though.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      I think you are correct that they are rarely cross-shopped in the past. The Mustang was fast, but it was really crude too. This new one seems a whole lot more sophisticated. I am awaiting the full reviews with interest. I have an (unused) law degree, drive a BMW some of the time, but have had a secret soft spot for Mustangs for a long time.

      You rationale is silly, beyond the obvious that a lot more people can afford lower-spec Mustangs than can afford BMW coupes, simply because they cost a lot less.

      • 0 avatar
        MPAVictoria

        I actually don’t think many people honestly cross-shop anything. They either go to one dealer and buy whatever is on the lot that catches their eye and is in their price range or they pretend to cross-shop but already really know what they want.

        Not everyone fits these categories but most do.

    • 0 avatar
      PonchoIndian

      80% of BMW drivers think their car is front wheel drive. Let that little statistic (from the CEO of BMW) marinate for a while :)

    • 0 avatar
      nickoo

      Went to college, then to war, then back to college for second science degree, then to grad school for engineering. I would take the mustang over the three series every day of the week. If there is one thing I learned after 7 years in school and still paying for it, it is that the value proposition wins over image every single time, even though I’d probably get a volt over another coupe, there isn’t anything else that compares to mustang in this price range, much like the vette at the next range up…also here in socal every third car is a 3 series, big whoop.

    • 0 avatar
      Carilloskis

      My dad cross shopped the 2011 M3 with the 2011 5.0 Mustang, and had an E46 M3 that he purchased new he makes really good money has a masters degree (makes significantly more than the average 3 serise owner) and decided to get the mustang, that perfermed very similarly to the M3, has a lower maintnce car better MPGs, cost less to buy and insure. Inteligent people looking at those factors would cross shop between the two. the Fit and finish on the GT premium is very european like in terms of form and quality of matriels. You show your ingonrance with a comment like the one above. Motor Trend did a great article comparing the Mustang to the M3 in 2011, you should give it a read.

      • 0 avatar
        SC5door

        Whoa there….S197 is and was not anything European in terms of materials. Dashboard? Hard plastic. Upper door trim? Hard plastic.

        I’ve been in Flat Rock, I’ve seen many of them born, not anywhere near European in terms of fit either.

        And I really like the Mustang.

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          @SC5door

          Sure the Mustang is comparable inside to a European car. It is very similar in materials and quality to my Fiat 500 Abarth! Except the leather FIAT uses is a whole lot nicer. But the dash, seats, doors and buttons are spot on between the Fiat and the Ford.

          The current Mustang vs. a BMW inside – not even in the same universe. Hopefully the new one will change that. If it is as nice as an uplevel Fusion inside that is probably good enough. But that is still no BMW, even the cheap ones are nicer.

          • 0 avatar
            SC5door

            I found the 500 having decent material quality, compared to the Mustang yes. (500L, no. 500L doesn’t hold a candle to a KIA Soul either)

            But the entire argument was the 3/4 series vs. the Mustang which the BMW wins hands down.

          • 0 avatar
            stuki

            Cloth trumps leatherette, which is what BMW saddles you with unless you upspec. I’d personally go so far as to say cloth trumps leather as well, but leather is much nicer to nice cloth, like the wool used it suits, and especially to fur. Wool trumps cloth, leather, leatherette (and Alcantara in all but the most manic of performance cars), but I don’t think you can get it stock in any car outside of Japan.

        • 0 avatar
          APaGttH

          Oh for the love of God enough of the hard plastic argument.

          I can still in a $250K Ferrari and point out the hard plastic.

          I have a co-worker with a 530i – I can point out the hard plastic – including on commonly touched surfaces.

          Hard plastic – who cares. Does it look better than a Coleman cooler? Does the fit and finish look quality? Does it squeak, rattle, vibrate? If I rest my arm on it does it get hot/sticky or does my elbow get sore after an hour.

          No?

          Who the flip cares.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            I care. There is hard plastic that looks cheap, and there is hard plastic that looks expensive. The dash and door panels on my Fiat looks appropriate for a $20K car. It would have no place in a $40K car, and looks nothing at all like what is in my BMW. The current Mustang’s interior is made of the same stuff as the Fiat. And that is OK for a base $23K Mustang, but not if they think they are going after $40K++ BMWs. The premium interior in the more expensive current Mustangs is a little better, but only a little.

            This stuff MATTERS when you want to play in the premium leagues, and it certainly matters if Ford thinks they will sell in Europe. It’s one of the big reasons to buy a premium car in the first place, WAAAAY more important than performance numbers for most buyers. Afterall, in traffic with speed limits a base Corolla will get you there in the same amount of time as the most badass Mustang on the planet, in the real world.

          • 0 avatar
            racer-esq.

            “And that is OK for a base $23K Mustang, but not if they think they are going after $40K++ BMWs. The premium interior in the more expensive current Mustangs is a little better, but only a little.”

            The interior in the 2015 does look a lot better.

            And it depends what “going after” means.

            If it means selling at the same price, like Cadillac dreams of, then the interior better be even better than the competition.

            But if it means stealing customers by giving them a $20K better value then it is a different story.

            The 2011+ Mustangs have been taking young professionals that would have bought a BMW, but didn’t want to waste their money, and the 2015 Mustangs will be doing an even better job with the improved interior and IRS.

            Still, there are limits. When I bought my 2012 for $20K even there was a GT 500 convertible on the floor for like $75K including market price adjustment. The dash and door panels that were perfectly acceptable for $20K were way out of place for $75K.

      • 0 avatar
        bunkie

        Last time round, I also cross-shopped the Mustang GT against the previous-generation 328i. I liked them both, but, in the end, practicality and utility won out and neither car made the cut.

    • 0 avatar
      VCplayer

      People don’t cross-shop them now, but Ford is clearly trying to position the Mustang to begin competing with the 3 series and like vehicles. In North America that isn’t going to really take off, but in Europe where BMW is just another car company in a lot of people’s eyes, it has a shot.

    • 0 avatar
      msquare

      The only reason the Mustang was not cross-shopped with the BMW 3-series is because it was seen as crude and unsophisticated by comparison. It could generate numbers, just not with the finesse of the BMW. And indeed, BMW charged more, but you got the feeling more went into it than the Mustang, which was meant to be cheap speed.

      I’m guessing once word gets out about this new Mustang matching the BMW in categories where it previously didn’t stand a chance, it will definitely be cross-shopped. Some people will rule it out because they need four doors, others just like BMW’s, but some who like the Mustang’s style but were turned off by its crudeness will be won over.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        @msquare

        Exactly this. The current Mustang is crude. It makes great numbers, but it has no finesse. Some people like that and buy them. Other people are willing to pay for the sophistication of something else. The new Mustang sounds like it would be sophisticated enough to satisfy me as a toy car, at which point the main thing that will have me buying a 2-series over one is that you can’t do European Delivery in a Mustang as an American.

        Ford had best have a decent diesel to put in it if they think they are going to sell them in Europe in anything more than handful volumes. Most mere-mortal priced BMW coupes are diesel over there.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          Yes BMW owners unanimously voted for finesse over crude. But I’ll take crude over numbness and isolation any day and 2X on Sunday.

          You can keep the frustrating understeer too. Another byproduct of “finesse”.

      • 0 avatar
        challenger2012

        Sir You are correct. In the past, the Mustang was not up to BMW quality and performance. That has changed. Furthermore, it will be hard to justify the BMW3 cost, if a Mustang gives you the same performance, ride and quality for about 2/3’s the price of the 3. I hope to see some brused egos of BMW owners as they stammer to explain how a car for the masses (Mustang) out performs what they drive.

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          No matter what you drive, there will always be something cheaper and faster. Sometimes the ambience outweighs the numbers. If you are a race car driver and all you care about is going really fast, then maybe ambience doesn’t matter to you. I have other priorities.

          I think it is great if Ford can manage to make something that drives as nicely as a BMW for less money. But TANSTAAFL always applies – in the past it was that to go fast for cheap it was crude. My expectation is that the new one will be nowhere near as cheap, and the insides still won’t be quite as nice, but it will be a great drive.

      • 0 avatar
        burgersandbeer

        I think another reason the Mustang was not historically cross-shopped with the 3-series is both of these cars are often daily drivers, and a 3 series is much more practical. It has more passenger space in a smaller, lighter package, as well as a trunk with an opening big enough to use. The same is probably true of older 3-series coupes and the current 4-series, though to a lesser extent. A potential BMW customer might decide to save money with a less expensive brand, but they are probably looking at higher trim Fusions, not Mustangs.

        Mustang vs 2-series with a handful of options is interesting though. The better packaging of the 2-series is a strong plus for me, but I doubt I’m in the majority. My guess is the ’15 Mustang has closed the sophistication gap enough that I could probably deal with the added bulk to save maybe $10k.

        Ford has some appealing products, but I don’t know how they consistently make them huge on the outside and cramped on the inside.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      The new Mustang is intended for export. It will need to compete against the 4-series, regardless.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      The troll is living up to his name.

      I went well beyond college, have plenty of income, and would buy a Stang rather than a 3- or 4-series in a heartbeat, if only because absolutely everyone else in my age bracket with income seems to have either a 3- or 4-series or an A4/A5.

    • 0 avatar
      VoGo

      I went to a top grad school. I would take the new Mustang over BMW any day of the week.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “If you graduated college and have a decent gig, you buy the BMW.”

      Are you from 2002?

    • 0 avatar
      VenomV12

      M.B.,

      I think you could have worded things better but truthfully you are correct. Just because a handful of guys on an automotive enthusiast site who fit the well-off, more educated demographic might choose the Mustang over the BMW, that does not mean it speaks for the group as a whole. The reality is that if you have a certain education level and work in certain professions, it is much more likely you will be driving a BMW over a Mustang. Generally your colleagues and peers will frown and look down on you unless you are pulling up in something special like a Shelby or Saleen. Other than that they are going to ask you if you borrowed your son’s car.

      i don’t get the whole retarded leasing vs buying arguments. Putting aside the tax advantages from leasing, it is not like you are getting the car free. It’s not like a $100 bucks or so a month now makes these cars so attainable that anyone on earth can now buy them. Just like interest rates, if the interest rates on a million dollar mortgage dropped from 4% down to 0%, that does not mean you can afford the house now, it’s still a million dollar house.

      Quite frankly if you work in a profession that requires you to wear a suit and to meet clients, you are going to look downright silly pulling up to meetings in a Mustang. Pull up in a Ford GT, the reactions will be completely different. Both Fords, both 2 door sports cars, both perceived very very differently by people.

      • 0 avatar
        bunkie

        Funny, I ran my own IT consulting business back in the mid-late ’80s and no one seemed to mind my ’85 Mustang GT. I had a few clients ride shotgun with me. It lasted until the birth of my daughter when it made way for a Maxima SE. To this day, I miss the GT.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        “Generally your colleagues and peers will frown and look down on you unless you are pulling up in something special like a Shelby or Saleen.”

        Certainly not true, at least here in Seattle. I am in one of those professions and, while some of my colleagues (particularly the younger ones) drive 3-series and the like, many more drive ratty old Hondas and Subarus. I’ve never had a negative comment or look at my $40k Pontiac (at least since I left DC). I could drive a Mustang GT, at least a newer, non-mullety one, without a second thought. Snobbery is real but not nearly as universal as many of your comments make it out to be.

      • 0 avatar
        racer-esq.

        “Quite frankly if you work in a profession that requires you to wear a suit and to meet clients,”
        This person either has a company car or works in a downtown financial center and cabs it to clients. Rental cars for business trips.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @VenomV12 – there is a lot of truth to that. A friend of mine’s son was close to being promoted to a VP in an oil company. He was told to buy a pickup and stop carpooling because it did not fit with the company image. He got the truck and is now in a better office.

        Corporate and social culture often dictates what you drive. A Mustang does not fit the image of an up-and-coming executive.

      • 0 avatar
        PonchoIndian

        Venom…just a couple of points

        The use of phrase “retarded leasing vs buying arguments” would certainly get more sideways glances from snotty co-workers than pulling up in a Mustang.

        Second point, anyone who really matters in a large company isn’t going to see you pulling up anyway. They are either driven in by limo, or have a place to park their (very) overpriced luxury car near the front door. They aren’t going to see the minions driving in in their C (cheap) Classes, 3 series wannabe rides or the Mustang. The only people who will see you are co-workers who have probably leased their cheap class and have no real car sense at all.

        Lastly, I work with a gentleman in his early 60’s who has a phd from MIT in metallurgy. Our company also had a hand in supplying materials for the superconducting super collider. My co-worker drive a 2007 Mustang GT.
        The so called “important” people (including those from other companies) I have been around who see him pull up in it just say “hey, Mustang GT, that’s great”.

    • 0 avatar
      redav

      Well, all I can say is that our chief engineer drives a Mustang, and he bought it to replace another Mustang.

      Sure, one data point & all, but in all honesty, $70k+ salary isn’t exactly bad for a college graduate with a decent gig. Sure, there are other jobs that pay better, but it’s well above the median, and there are plenty of college educated folks who would gladly take that salary.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      They will now. Mustang was lewd and crude before. Now the only thing the Bimmer has over the Rustang, at the same price point, is the badge. If you care more about impressing people with a badge than enjoying driving you deserve to get ripped off in buying a 428i. From a performance standpoint a Mustang GT is a no brainer.

      This isn’t to say the 428i is a bad car. If you want something luxurious it’s the better choice. But to say people don’t cross shop them because you are a badge whore is silly.

    • 0 avatar
      3Deuce27

      Reg; “People don’t cross shop a 3 series with a Mustang” You don’t, I do.

      I crossed shopped a 3-series and a Mustang in 85′ and bought the SVO.

      I also possess three degrees and considerable more higher education, and gross over $150.000 in retirement, and I will probably be buying an Ecoboost. I also own several 10 year-plus BMW’s. A friend of mine, a very well educated gentleman worth millions, owns about 40 Mustangs, along with Ferrari’s, Porsche’s, Jags, etc. So your purported and anecdotal car buying demographic is pure gobshite… or misplaced ego.

  • avatar
    davefromcalgary

    Ugh. I’m sure its a great car but the Fusion front end ruins it for me.

    • 0 avatar
      gmichaelj

      Agreed on the letdown from the front end. But, if recent history is any indication then perhaps they will change that in a couple of years.

      I think what we have here is a marketing problem: the Ford brand (hence “family look”) is seen as more important than the Mustang brand. At least they seem committed to the tri-bar taillights.

      Maybe it’s just me, but it seems like the advertising people also prefer the rear-end as well: I don’t seem to see as many other car ads showing the rear as much. Maybe this is the J-Lo of pony cars.

      • 0 avatar
        gmichaelj

        EDIT: also going on upfront is the snorting bull look, and a bit of a throw back to the 99 (which I think looked much better). I am afraid the sales success of the Camaro, and others, have unfortunately contributed to the Angry Look. Of course after market won’t work, because they go even more for Angry Look.

        Why can’t I edit my own comment?

    • 0 avatar
      VCplayer

      You could just think of the Fusion front end as being derivative of the 70s ‘Stang, which it very well could be.

      Basically though, pedestrian crash standards severely hampers what they can do with the front end now if they want to sell the car in Europe.

      I love the look myself, but ~different strokes for different folks~

    • 0 avatar
      redav

      IMO, the Mustang has gotten uglier with each alteration since the second year of the retro renaissance (c. 2007-8). When I saw this one at the local auto show, I was amazed at how much I didn’t like it, especially the back end.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    Serious question: Does it still have the Chinese made Getrag MT-86 manual?

    The reason I ask is: http://www.bobistheoilguy.com/forums/ubbthreads.php/topics/3477581/3

    http://s171.photobucket.com/user/bdcardinal/media/14P51GT/3DEB1C7F-DD0F-43DB-9173-B61CF1426D6A_zpsguzc9sve.jpg.html

    I would not accept that manual, and won’t trade down to an automatic, either. So that, alone, is a deal killer.

    p.s. – White does the new Mustang absolutely no favors.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      The MT-82 manual is being carried over. It was significanly revised, but I’d bet it is still made in China. Wait for the next performance versions, maybe they’ll have the Tremec.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        The concern I have is the failure rate, which has been reported as high as 25% in the GT with the 6MT (the Ford Dealership employee on that thread I linked talks about this as he shows the packaging of the new seal he received right from Getrag of China).

        I don’t know where that 25% figure officially comes from, or if it’s credible, but have been leery of the MT-86 ever since the problems with it began popping up back in 2012.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          I don’t think the failure rate has been 25%. I’ve heard 4%-6%, which is still too high.

          You are still wise to be concerned. I am thinking about buying this generation of Mustang as well, so I am watching with great intrigue. I am trying to convince my wife that buying a Mustang is a better idea than having another child.

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            “I am trying to convince my wife that buying a Mustang is a better idea than having another child.”

            Why not both? I’m putting both my kids in a Challenger. Kids are pretty small for a few years, I always figured that’s exactly what the +2 in a 2+2 was for. Certainly not adults.

            Also, from someone who’s seen the data, the problems with the MT 86 aren’t nearly as widespread as some would have you believe. Outright failures requiring trans replacement or overhaul are pretty rare.

          • 0 avatar
            87 Morgan

            Seriously have another kid. Way too much fun to pass up the opportunity like that. With that said I have yet to read the mustang has forgone the rear seat.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          If there were a 25% failure rate, there would be riots at Ford dealers, and all their parking lots would be stuffed full of nothing but manual Mustangs.

          • 0 avatar
            CJinSD

            Wouldn’t they have to sell a bunch of manual Mustangs first? Except for Boss 302s and Shelbys, I don’t think I’ve ever seen a manual late model Mustang.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Really? More than half the stock of 2014 GTs at my local dealers are manuals.

          • 0 avatar
            VenomV12

            25% failure rate would be guaranteed Congressional hearings. lol

          • 0 avatar
            CJinSD

            Admittedly, I live somewhere that new Mustangs are primarily rental cars. That’s pretty cool that your dealer stocks manual cars though. A year or so ago, I was getting a car serviced at a dealer next to a Porsche store. I wandered into the showroom and was offered a test drive of a 991. They had no new cars with manuals and didn’t expect any that weren’t pre-sold for over a month.

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            “Wouldn’t they have to sell a bunch of manual Mustangs first? Except for Boss 302s and Shelbys, I don’t think I’ve ever seen a manual late model Mustang.”

            Believe it or not, at least for the 2012 model year, the manual transmission take rate on GT models was something like 50%.

        • 0 avatar
          APaGttH

          I can’t believe 1:4 failure rates – owners would be rioting with that kind of failure.

    • 0 avatar
      Boff

      I gotta chime in here. First, it is MT-82. Second, no way there is a 25% failure rate. That is insane. More like 25% of people that have been banned from allfordmustangs.com forums had an MT-82 failure.

      The gearbox itself is fine. There are two issues. One is the remote shift linkage (vs. solid mount) that allows significant deflection of the shifter relative to the transmission when you’re bookin’. Result: missed shifts, shift denials, gear grinding, etc. The second issue is that the clutch in many cars has to be pushed down a long long way to fully disengage the clutch. Result: gear grinding.

      I guess you could also add that many Mustang drivers are young or young-at-heart males that abuse their cars more than the average driver.

      The new Mustang has the same gearbox but a significantly re-engineered shift linkage that looks to be a semi-solid mount and definitely more robust than the current shifter (which I am getting rid of in my ’13).

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        I am not exactly Ford’s biggest fan given their pricing structure and past QC issues I’ve had with Ford products, but I was excited by the ’15 Mustang given the IRS, much improved interior (based on pics) & the power put down by the Coyote.

        It does tremendously dishearten me, however, that Ford is continuing to use the Chinese MT-86 when far superior units could be sourced for either not much more or even (likely) the same price.

        I don’t understand the logic of continuing to use that spotty transmission in what is one of Ford’s vehicles with the most loyal base of consumers, especially when the take rate on the manual transmission in the GT is as high as it is.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          @DeadWeight,
          The Getrag makes a great 6 speed for a truck.

          That’s what I have behind my engine in my BT50.

          So far it seems quite strong, the gear spacing would have to be one of the best I’ve have had in any vehicle.

          I can’t complain about it, but I don’t try to flat shift either.

  • avatar
    mikedt

    Damn good looking from the side. Hopefully the quality of the interior won’t be a major let down.

  • avatar
    BMWnut

    Yes, but is there a Mustang that makes 707 horsepower?

  • avatar
    Dan R

    New? It looks like the old one.

  • avatar
    sirwired

    Never on the cover of anything without a helmet? There are ways…

    What about the local “Slammer” or whatever they call the mugshot paper in your area?

    *ducks*

    *prays to avoid the banhammer*

  • avatar
    carguy

    This new Mustang launch has to be the longest in automotive history so it’s about time somebody actually talked about how it drives.

  • avatar
    n_tesla

    Get over yourselves comparing a Mustang to a BMW. I own a BMW e46. I never concern myself if a (insert name of car here) is faster in bench racer sessions. I’m too absorbed worrying about the crazy labor costs of directional bulb replacement.

    I configured my fantasy Mustang in Guard with EcoBoost, Manual and Performance Package. That’s crazy value.

    That “whooshing” sound you hear is the plummeting resale value of Miatas and FRS’ .

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      I don’t think a Miata buyer wants a 3800-pound car (as tested on a real scale by R&T) no matter how good it is.

      • 0 avatar

        Egads, that’s porky. TBH, I think there’s more cross-shopping than fanboiz want to admit, but the light and nimble crowd doesn’t tend to go for the ‘Stang, regardless. The “I want a fun car” guys, though–maybe. Solid maybe.

        Personally, the Mustangs I’ve tried have all been a tad floatier than I’d prefer. More of a GT car than a Miata competitor.

      • 0 avatar
        Quentin

        Yup, this FRS owner (and nearly bought an NC on two occasions) has no interest in a chassis that is 1000lbs heavier. I’m sure it is a lot faster, but my meager 200hp finds me at extra legal speeds. Different strokes for different folks.

      • 0 avatar
        TMA1

        I want one of each. Just trying to convince myself that I need to have at least one practical car. GTI or Mustang GT to go along with the NC Miata?

      • 0 avatar
        3Deuce27

        Reg; “I don’t think a Miata buyer wants a 3800-pound car” Not as a sportscar, which a Mustang in any iteration, isn’t, but as a Grand touring car, yes.

        Miata Owner.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      I think more people will be cross-shopping Mustangs and BMWs than will cross shop Mustangs and those little wind up cars.

      That whooshing sound is the plummeting resale value of 2014 and older Mustangs, Camaros, Genesis Coupes, and a slight wind from G37 coupes, 335i coupes, and quite possibly E9x M3s.

      If there is anyone that should be worried, IMO, it should be BMW, MB, Lexus, Infiniti etc. The Shelby GT350 will be a rawer, faster, sharper driver’s tool w/a marginal loss in refinement/content/luxury. The RC F has been determined to be overweight and a bit inert above 8/10ths. M3/M4 is good, but they lost stripes with some on that fake engine note and powerband. Q50 Eau Rouge is going to be a nose heavy pig. Etc. For ~$60K the only better driver’s car might be a Boxster/Cayman, and those are much slower and way less practical.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        @SportyAccordy

        Ultimately, I think you are right that there will be more cross-shopping – heck I am looking forward to giving a new Mustang a go. But I very much doubt that BMW is losing ANY sleep over it at all, because right or wrong the Mustang has the exact same problem the Corvette does. It’s a GREAT car, it makes GREAT numbers, it’s a bargain, but it has the wrong image for a lot of people who could easily afford one. And reality is that image DOES COUNT. Always has, always will. There is plenty of room in the marketplace for all of them, buy what makes you happy.

        On the pure sportscar side of thing, I will freely admit that as impressive as the latest Corvette is, I would buy a slower more expensive Cayman over one any day and twice on Sunday. Because you can’t do Euro Delivery on a Corvette, and I don’t want to be associated with the type of people I see driving Corvettes. Which around here are either young Jersey-Shore types, or old farts. Exclusively. If that makes me a brand-whore I will whore away.

        • 0 avatar
          TMA1

          Where I live, there’s no association to be made with Corvette drivers, because there are so few of them. There are two 911 4S convertibles though near my work though, both driven by older women. Older guys tend to drive the Boxsters. Personally, I think the C7 makes a good argument for taking the more unique car.

  • avatar
    akatsuki

    So, here is the question. If it had 4 doors and a Lincoln logo on it, would it herald the renaissance of Lincoln? (obviously without the horrid Lincoln styling going on right now)

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      It would at least get me to step into a Lincoln showroom to have a look. Can’t say that about any of their current vehicles.

    • 0 avatar
      racer-esq.

      “If it had 4 doors and a Lincoln logo on it, would it herald the renaissance of Lincoln?”
      The Mustangs from 2005 through this new one are based on a heavily modified, evolved Lincoln LS/Jaguar S-Type platform. So at one point this was a four door Lincoln.
      Now that IRS is back with the platform this would be the basis for a sweet Mark IX.

    • 0 avatar
      redav

      Enthusiasts have the misplaced notion that luxury car buyers care about FWD/RWD. They don’t. If Lincoln can’t make it with FWD, they can’t make it with RWD.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        No doubt Lincoln is going to have to win with FWD/AWD vehicles. The exception will be the Navigator. If they can sell a bunch of MKCs and MKXs, then Lincoln will succeed. This is where buyers especially don’t care about RWD.

        That being said, I would very much like a 4-door Lincoln version of the S550 Mustang styled like some of the concept cars Lincoln has parade around auto shows. I can, however, be swayed by the next MKS if it a better stretched Fusion with the 3.5EB.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        It’s not so much that they care whether the car is FWD or RWD, it is that the sort of ride/handling/steering that one expects in a luxury car is more difficult to achieve in a FWD chassis. Especially when you try to put real horsepower through it. Even a FWD chassis that has optional AWD. Audi has managed it by using a longitudinal system that is really designed as (rear-biased) AWD first and foremost, and even they still seem to be a half step behind BMW and MB. Certainly I don’t care for how the big Audis drive, and the A3 just drives like the Golf that it is – which is perfectly OK in a small car. But when nearly EVERY car is FWD or FWD-based AWD, the RWD-based cars feel special.

        Lincoln, Volvo, and Acura all have fundamentally the same problem – they don’t ride or handle any differently than cars that cost $10-15K less, and even if the buyer doesn’t understand WHY that is the case, it is apparent to them. And then when they try to do big HP versions, even with AWD they just lose the plot entirely. There is definitely such a thing as asking a pair of tires to do too much. There is also the styling issues that result from all that hardware way up front – though again Audis longitudinal layout pays dividends for them there too.

        Conversely, I have no problem with the really entry-level FWD cars like the A3, CLA, and 1-series. They are small enough that they need the space advantages of FWD, and generally have not enough HP for the FWD-based chassis to be a huge problem. For me, 3-series size seems about the place that RWD becomes appropriate.

        Ultimately Lincoln’s biggest problem is that they have no products that don’t exist on the other side of the showroom in a form that is just about as nice for a lot less money. Why on earth would you buy an MKZ over a Fusion Titanium??

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      In a word, no. The things that make the Mustang great are irrelevant in the luxury market- no matter how much the B&B protest otherwise.

      If Lincoln wants to do well, they need to look 10-20 yrs ahead, and aggressively pursue plug in hybrid cars. That’s where regulations are pushing, and that’s where the market is headed. BMW softening up the 3er says it all to me- buyers in the luxury market are growing less and less concerned with dynamics. People who want dynamics buy sports/performance cars.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        @SportyAccordy

        As I have said on here for ages, BMW has LONG built cars for two sets of buyers. They have built cars like the base 5-series that are just luxobarges, and they have built other models that are truly sports sedans. Right back to Mom’s old ’83 528e – that car was no more sporting than a 4dr Buick, other than it was still a German car, and thus needed a certain level of suspension competence in order to survive the Autobahn. But sporting it was not in any way. The 3-series has grown to be pretty much what the 5 used to be, and if you want what the 3-series used to be, there is now the 2-series. The 5 is the old 7, and the 7 is just ridiculously large. I really think that with the e9x cars BMW actually took the sporty end of things a step too far, and the reality of the market is that the base car had to be dialed back a notch. And they ARE fixing the dead steering – I had a loaner yesterday while my car was in for State Inspection and the steering was very noticeably livelier than in the early F3X 3’s.

        It may be dialed back a bit, but it is still a MUCH nicer drive than a Camry. Or an S60.

  • avatar
    Car-los

    Jack thank you, that was a great first glimpse to one of the most anticipated car release of 2015.

    As for the comment you made on needing to wear a helmet to be on the cover of anything, well, may be try a new hair cut and a shave. You never know, it might, just might, work.

    And by the way, talking about what R&T says, I really liked your article on the RR Wraith in the October edition, in fact I think it’s the best article on the Wraith I have come across. Is easy to give a bad review to what in my opinion is a monstrosity of car, but you gave your article a very original historic perspective where RR came full circle and for a change becoming the coachbuilder to somebody’s else chassis. I really liked that. All the best Carlos.

  • avatar
    jdash1972

    Why is it so ugly? Because it’s forgettable ugly. Every time they “update” the car it looks more derivative and non-descript. As if the best idea they had was to copy the Fusion. Is there a rule that all cars from a given manufacturer need to resemble each other?

  • avatar
    meefer

    Buy current or wait it out?

  • avatar
    Numbers_Matching

    The rear end styling looks like it’s dragging it’s a$$.

  • avatar
    superchan7

    Looking forward to Mustang GTs competing with BMW 4 series for sales.

    With a leathered-up interior, it’s still not as good as a 4er. But the price, the performance and the V8 engine more than make up for the refinement hit.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    I do like this new Mustang. From what I’ve read we will only get the higher performing Mustangs in Australia.

    I would really like to drive the 2.3 EcoBoost Mustang.

    Is there any figures for the fore and aft balance ratio all of the Mustangs configurations.

    But, you can’t beat Euro performance, not yet. The US still has a little way to go to match Australian everyday performance cars and utes. The US is slowly gaining traction in the area for chassis and suspension design.

    I really like the fact that Ford rid the Mustang of the Ram 1500 style rear end and finally decided to use IRS.

    • 0 avatar
      3Deuce27

      Oz… Don’t have any F-R weight ratios yet, but the Ecoboost is about 100 pds lighter on the front end, then the GT.

      The big selling point besides quicker point and shoot skills is its 32MPG combined mileage as reported by Auto Week. I suspect they got that wrong and that figure is 32mpg highway. These days, performance, handling, and good MPG, is hard to pass up.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        @3Deuce27
        Thanks.

        Out of interest I did look at what our 2 litre Eco Boost Falcon FE figure is.

        It’s a tad over 33mpg (US) or 8.5l per 100km. The two vehicles are very similar in size.

        The 2.3 Eco Boost is based on the 2 litre, so the 32mpg figure might be accurate’ish.

      • 0 avatar
        Quentin

        53F/47R on the Ecoboost as shown in the link below. The 32mpg combined quote is incorrect and I wouldn’t expect a 3650lb RWD 310hp vehicle to come close to 32mpg combined. With the long gears of the non performance pack, it is able to get a 32mpg highway rating via the EPA test protocol. (see link below)

        http://www.motortrend.com/roadtests/coupes/1409_2015_ford_mustang_ecoboost_23_first_test/

        Aus ratings of the Falcon are irrelevant to this discussion. Different protocol.

  • avatar
    Car-los

    When I saw the first spy photographs that started to emerge of this new Mustang I too thought with horror that ford was doing the same mistake the did with the 3rd generation Mustang that looked like a Ford Escort only that this time the new Mustang was going to look like a Ford Fusion. But the more photographs I see of this new Mustang incarnation the more I see the Mustang DNA in it, and to tell you the truth, the more I like it. May be it’s the Aston Martin element in it that saves the day. If any ford would be well suited with an Aston Martin look it would certainly be the Mustang.

    I think Ford is in the right track with this new Mustang and in time it will grow on you more and more as we get more familiar with it. Unlike that late eighties Mustang-Escort.

    Time will tell, any pretty soon I think.

  • avatar
    Buckshot

    You compare a Ford Mustang with BMW? Very odd. Here in Europe the Ford Mustang is a very small niche car, and BMWs are everywhere.

  • avatar

    As an owner of a 2013 Mustang GT here is my take on Gen 6 after the first media reports

    – The 0-60, 1/4 mile numbers are essentially a wash. However this was hyped to be better than a Boss, Boss had 444 hp. What gives? I have driven a Boss, raced a Boss, and Mr Ford this aint no Boss

    – It became more refined. As a European I get this attraction, as a European living in America, I don’t. I like the visceral experience the 2013/14 mustang gives, I suspect some of this may have been dialed out in the 2015, maybe Jack Baruth can enlighten us on this point. The old stang says American muscle, I feel the new car is trying to be more like an Audi A5/BMW M3 than the Boss.

    – Quiet? This will be music to the ears to Roush, Magnaflow etc, not to the ears of the driver. Part of the mustang experience is to hear the rumble. As for the EF4 sound, I just cannot see it in a mustang, to me it would rather like seeing a lion and hear it bark.

    – The cars are heavy, perhaps you can lose 100lbs without some of the fully loaded stuff on the testers, but still, the world is going the other way.

    – MPG. When the Hellcat can deliver 22mpg, it makes the new stangs lower than the last models mpg figures look lackluster

    OVERALL

    The Mustang seems to have gone more mainstream, not only in the looks, but in refinement. Some of what made a Mustang, a mustang, has gone. There are enough me-too cars out there, Ford does not want to make new Mustang another niche car. It succeeded in making a more globally acceptable car, but I bet there will be a few Americans who will want to put a bit of America back into the Mustang

  • avatar
    kvndoom

    I don’t mind that this car’s design was influenced at least somewhat by the Accord coupe. As recently as 2011, the Acord was the second most cross-shopped vehicle with the Mustang (Camaro being first, of course). The Accord has outlasted all its Japanese competition (Altima, Solara, RX8, probably GT86). Could its days be numbered if the Mustang pushes the right buttons?

    The obvious advantages of the Stang versus Accord coupe:

    More power than the Accord? Check
    Better handling? Check
    More colors (with manual transmission)? Check

    Now if the interior refinement can meet or exceed Honda’s, and the back seat is more than just an afterthought (Jack’s claim that 3 6-footers can ride in the back of his Accord without wanting to kill him is impressive), then in my mind it’s a BIG winner.

    A 2-door car can absolutely be a family car if done right. I read some time back that the Mustang interior had considerable female design influence so that it wouldn’t just cater to single secretaries and the testosterone set. I absolutely cannot wait to get some seat time in one of these cars.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      “Now if the interior refinement can meet or exceed Honda’s, and the back seat is more than just an afterthought (Jack’s claim that 3 6-footers can ride in the back of his Accord without wanting to kill him is impressive), then in my mind it’s a BIG winner.”

      Not going to happen. The Accord has a transverse engine, a pretty short hood and a fairly flat floor; the Mustang wastes a lot of space being rear-drive.

      Consider, say, the E46 3-Series and Honda Civic: about the same size of car on the outside, but the rear seat in the BMW is not a fun place to be.

      “A 2-door car can absolutely be a family car if done right.”

      Not if you have to put a small kid into a carseat. :)

      • 0 avatar
        S2k Chris

        ““A 2-door car can absolutely be a family car if done right.”

        Not if you have to put a small kid into a carseat. :)”

        Depends on your usage. Would it make a good PRIMARY family car? No, absolutely not. But if mom drives a sedan/minivan/CUV and primarily hauls the kids, and just needs dad to do the occasional school run or whatever, yeah, no big deal.

        I drop my daughter off at daycare 1 day a week most weeks. I can drive basically anything with a back seat, and put up with a minor inconvenience of a car seat in the back with that frequency.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      “A 2-door car can absolutely be a family car if done right.”

      You have two choices if you want a 2-door car to have real room in the back seat:

      1) FWD
      2) Absolutely ginormous size

      The Mustang has neither.

  • avatar
    stanczyk

    How does it feel ?

    It probably feels a better car than the old one .. but design is loosing it’s ‘Musle Car-ness’ ..(it’s better for Mustang to ‘stay american pony-muscle ,
    than becomme ‘identity-lost’- Bmw 3/Audi 5 -‘chaser’..)

    They didn’t go fully ‘global-product’ .. yet (size and powerfull-engines..) ,
    but the next gen. will probably be 4-door, 1.4-Liter 4-banger little hot-hatch .. :)

  • avatar
    FormerFF

    Generous power, a decent chassis, and great parts availability at a modest price, sounds like the next great track day car.

  • avatar
    DC Bruce

    Interesting set of opinions in the article. My one experience with a post-Fox Mustang was a V-6 rental of the current version. I thought the car was a pleasant drive through the Olympic Peninsula, but felt heavy. The engine was nice, but not Mustang-like. As one would expect of a smaller-displacement motor, massive torque off the line was not available; but the top end was strong.

    I’m wondering if the turbo 4 is lighter than either of the large engines and yields benefits in the form of more even weight distribution. Neither the 4 or nor the V-6 is going to “sound like a Mustang.” Only the V-8 does that.

    The other question is whether either of the smaller displacement engines are going to be speed-limited because of other drivetrain weaknesses (the carbon fiber drive shaft on the current V-6). It’s too bad the V-6 is relegated to “secretary’s car” duty (no performance pack). While I recognize the turbo 4 undoubtedly has the fatter torque curve (especially useful with an automatic transmission), for me the V-6 would be the better drive (with a manual, if available). I’m just not wild about turbo charged engines’ power delivery — a little too unpredictable for me. And I’m betting in the real world, the V-6 beats the turbo 4 in fuel economy.

    I have a friend who has the current version of the GT with the 5.0 and all of the performance goodies. He recently traded it for a Focus ST; said he was tired of paying the fuel bills.

    • 0 avatar
      FormerFF

      ” Neither the 4 or nor the V-6 is going to “sound like a Mustang.” Only the V-8 does that.”

      A few weeks ago a Camaro with an aftermarket exhaust motored down the street. This particular one was a six cylinder one, and I’d have to say the sound coming out was all wrong. From a Nissan Z car or a BMW it would have been fine, but from a Camaro only that V8 rumble will do.

  • avatar
    3Deuce27

    Jack, According to my Ford 2015 Mustang ‘Dealer Packaging Guide’, the ‘GT Performance Package\'(Fastback only) includes 6-Piston Brembos with larger rotors on the front. It would be the first upgrade for me on an Ecoboost, which has 4-Piston front brakes.

    “its amazing how many drivers, even at the Formula one level, think that brakes are for slowing a car down”_ Mario Andretti

    In addition, from the Guide; Steering – driver-selectable effort electric power assisted (EPAS) with pull-drift compensation and active ‘nibble’ control.

    http://billbrownford.net/Vehicle-Orientation-Electric-Power-Assisted-Steering/

  • avatar
    wmba

    Just read Autocar UK’s review of the new Mustangs. They didn’t care much for the 2.3 turbo, noting a loud boom at 4,000 rpm.

    Both it and the 5.0 had an unacceptable low-speed ride on CA freeways.

    They recommend the 5.0, just like every car nut on UK car sites has fantasized. The general feeling for years has always been if you’re going to get one, why pi*s about with the four.

    http://m.autocar.co.uk/;fitScript=0/car-review/ford/mustang/first-drives/2014-ford-mustang-first-drive-review

  • avatar
    fdesalvo

    I ventured out of Jap-happyland one too many times. Ford can’t keep a drive shaft, rear diff, and trans output bearing from breaking on my 14 GT – I don’t race or launch the car either.

    Car was special ordered and at 2K miles, the warranty work was ordered and it took 2 months to complete. A week later, the sounds returned. he dealership that did the repair denies there’s an issue and the other dealerships acknowledge, but won’t touch lol.

    I’ve also had the worst exp with service techs here…Ford must hire angry drunks. No local dealership has completed work or maintenance without leaving parts off of my car or forgetting to button things up properly. Last straw was when they apparently used a brick wrapped in tinfoil to wash my car (without my permission). Black looks so nice!

    Sure is fast, but with the lousy quality and service from local dealerships being nonexistent, what’s that even matter? When you buy a Ford, you are on your own – at least that’s the case within a 50 mi radius of my apt in SoCal. The silver lining is Ford is being forced to buy this turd back. Can’t wait. Good riddens, best sounding car I’ve ever owned in my life.

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