By on July 1, 2014

2015 Lincoln MKC

Today marks the day Mark Fields becomes CEO of Ford, taking up where now-former CEO Alan Mullaly leaves off. This day may also mark the day Lincoln begins its slow climb back from the brink, especially when Mullaly once considered killing the brand before Fields became its champion.

Bloomberg reports Lincoln, then struggling to find footing after years of assimilating Fords upmarket with no unique product in sight, would have gone the way of Mercury had not Fields and global marketing chief Jim Farley convinced Mullaly that the brand was worth saving. Now that he is CEO, Fields will be leading the effort to bring Lincoln up to fighting trim.

The first product of this effort is the MKC, which shares its mechanical base with the Ford Escape and its 2.3-liter EcoBoost turbo-four with the upcoming Ford Mustang. However, the crossover’s design is 85 percent unique to itself, and has premium features on par with its competitors — BMW X3, Audi Q5, Acura RDX — including soft-touch leather and parallel-parking technology. The crossover follows the MKZ — whose delayed roll-out over technical gremlins prompted the debate over Lincoln’s fate — and will be later joined by a redesigned MKX and the replacement for the MKS.

The MKC will be aimed at drawing buyers from premium brands like Cadillac and Lexus, Ford owners wanting to move up, as well as young first-time buyers and empty nesters looking to downsize. The road back to the top will be long, however; though U.S. sales climbed 21 percent during the first half of 2014 with 37,251 models leaving the showroom, annual sales are 65 percent down from the brand’s peak in 1990.

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77 Comments on “Lincoln Nearly Axed By Mullaly, Saved By Fields...”


  • avatar
    BuzzDog

    Glad to see that Lincoln is getting some unique products.

    Perhaps Fields can work on model names that don’t begin with “MK.”

    • 0 avatar
      talkstoanimals

      Amen. It is nearly impossible to keep straight which “MK[]” belongs to which car. That kind of identification confusion can’t help sales.

    • 0 avatar
      EquipmentJunkie

      I will second that “Amen”! The current model designations are even more forgettable than Acura’s. I hope changing the model names will be one of Fields’ first marks of his tenure.

      I’ve never owned a Lincoln, but always had a soft spot for them after seeing Oliver Wendall Douglass’ distinctive Continental on Green Acres. (I’m sure there was a subliminal Eva Gabor element in there, too.)

      • 0 avatar
        rpol35

        I’m going to “third” that sentiment! One of the reasons for Lincoln’s irrelevance is that no one knows what the hell model Lincoln is referencing with the ridiculous name nomenclature.

        Note to Lincoln, it’s OK to not follow the “monkey see, monkey do” mentality of auto model badging.

    • 0 avatar
      GoFaster58

      Other brands have confusing model names such as BMW, Audi, Mercedes etc. I agree it is confusing but Lincoln is not alone.

      • 0 avatar
        hreardon

        I don’t see what’s so confusing at BMW and Audi’s naming scheme (A3>A4>A6>A8; Q3>Q5>Q7; 3-series, 4-series, 5-series, etc.). Merc, on the other hand, has been a trainwreck as far as naming schemes (CLS, CL, C, C-Coupe, SL, GLK, etc.)

        Lincoln’s is just flat out messy. My understanding is that they were trying to stick with the “Mark XXX” as in “MKVIII”, but it’s both antiquated and confusing. I get it that MKC is “MK Crossover” and MKX is….uh…..erm, I dunno….

        They should have stuck with “Zephyr” and “Continental” and “Towncar”.

        • 0 avatar
          Kyree S. Williams

          Well, it’s not even that. Lincoln adamantly defends the fact that “MK” does not stand for “Mark”…even though the first car to use the nomenclature was originally introduced as such.

      • 0 avatar
        whynot

        BMW’s and Audi’s make sense because generally bigger number = bigger car. Although they, especially BMW, are starting to muddy the waters some; but still people recognize that 3/A4 < 5/A6 < 7/A8.

        Mercedes has been using their model names for so long now that everyone is familiar with the core C-, E-, and S-classes.

        Lincoln's however seems to lack in logical reasoning behind why they chose a letter (except MKZ because it was originally the Zephyr), and they are all over the place (why is the MKX a CUV and not a sedan? Why is it using a higher letter than the larger MKT? etc).

      • 0 avatar
        hubcap

        This thread is an amusing diversion. We actually have people stating that if the names were more memorable, their cars would follow suit.

        From where I’m sitting, I think that if the cars we’re desirable, the names wouldn’t be much of a problem at all. Not that I’m a fan of the current naming structure but placing Town Car, Continental, Zephyr, Cosmopolitan on current Lincoln vehicles won’t help.

        Build a great car and the accolades and sales will follow. In time.

        • 0 avatar
          gottacook

          “Town Car” is in use today, as the livery variant of the (I had to look it up) MKT. I’ve seen a few, with “T O W N C A R” lettering slathered on them – it’s not a very convincing label for a car shaped like that.

          I don’t think anyone in these periodic discussions of Lincoln model naming has suggested placing traditional names on the present cars. Usually what’s been advocated – and I find this agreeable – is to introduce a proper large and powerful sedan with the Continental name, perhaps even using that as the marque and dropping “Lincoln”. The name Lincoln itself is such a relic – how many of the other marques named for long-ago presidents are still around?

    • 0 avatar
      turboprius

      Infiniti used to make sense. It was letters, then the engine. (QX56, because it had a 5.6 V8, G37, because it had a 3.7 V6, etc). But then, with the 2014 scheme, they took the logic out. At least there’s a 3.5 badge on the QX60.

      Honestly, Lincoln, Acura, and Infiniti’s names are a lot easier than BMW and Mercedes. I honestly do not know whether it’s a 328i or 335i out on sale right now.

    • 0 avatar
      cdotson

      Until Lincoln does get model NAMES can we just refer to Mark Fields as MKF?

      • 0 avatar
        bomberpete

        Now THAT’s funny! But now that his Ford check is safely deposited I don’t think Pete De Lorenzo would find it so funny. Actually, that old curmudgeon finds nothing funny: http://www.autoextremist.com/

    • 0 avatar
      mjz

      As I recall, Fields was the one who endorsed the MK blah naming system in the first place.

      Here’s my suggestion:

      MKZ becomes Mk3 (Mark 3)
      MKC becomes Mk4
      MKS becomes Mk5
      MKX becomes Mk6
      Range topping “big” sedan would be Mk7
      MKT becomes Mk8
      Rear wheel drive specialty “halo” sedan based on Mustang (with suicide doors, and available as a 4 door convertible too) would be Continental.
      Navigator stays Navigator.

      All wheel drive versions of each would have an x after them, i.e., Mk3x.

      All sedans are odd numbers, all crossovers even. The naming system makes use of Lincoln’s heritage “Mark” but does so in a logical easy to understand way.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        That makes more sense due to a hierarchy, but its just as bad. I don’t think its that difficult to come up with real model names.

        • 0 avatar
          MrGreenMan

          Keep the letters on the back but put an ostentatious cursive script in gold or silver on the front driver door lower quarter:

          “Zephyr”
          “Compact Crossover”
          “Sedan”
          “Xtreme Crossover”
          “To The Cemetery”

          Maybe I don’t understand what the third letter means, either.

    • 0 avatar
      cpthaddock

      +1000

  • avatar
    Clarence

    I don’t see how the MKC the “first product of this effort” to revive Lincoln, nor do I see how this is a true competitor to the X3 and Q5. This article needs more Truth and less Ford spin. Lincoln is a barely-there competitor to Cadillac and Acura.

    • 0 avatar
      hreardon

      Clarence,

      While based only on initial reviews and a cursory overview of one at a local Ford/Lincoln dealer, it seems that the MKC is every bit as competitive with the likes of the Cadillacs and Acuras of the world, less so than the Audi and BMW, but still a solid entry.

    • 0 avatar
      whynot

      Lincoln is doing far worse in the eyes of enthusiasts than they are actually doing in the real world. They are only about 20,000 off of Cadillac and Acura, which when you consider how old most of their current lineup is and how much simpler it is than say Cadillac’s (no coupes, station wagons, high performance versions of anything) isn’t too bad. Lets not forget that the MKZ, despite being a “fancy FWD Fusion” is currently outselling the ATS.

      The MKC will probably do well, although likely not as good as the SRX, which I believe is only behind the RX in its segment.

      • 0 avatar
        hreardon

        Agreed, whynot.

        I think that the MKC has the potential to be their real breakout product, especially for those who find the SRX a bit polarizing in its looks.

        The crossover segment is the #1 growth area right now and the MKC ticks all the right boxes with the exception of ‘branding’. If Lincoln can fix the branding issue they should be able to begin the slow slog upward from the abyss.

      • 0 avatar
        Dan

        Cadillac has sold 82,000 vehicles this year through June. Honda hasn’t released June numbers but Acura was sitting at 67,000 through May, a month in which they moved another 15,000, so they’re likely over 80,000 now too.

        Lincoln has sold just 44,000.

        • 0 avatar
          clivesl

          In fairness to Lincoln and their future prospects, Cadillac and Acura are getting those numbers with fuller and newer lineups than Lincoln.

          As others have said, build the cars, the rest will follow. Audi was not a luxury marque even 15 years ago. The last two Lincolns have been class competitive, that’s all you can do right now if you’re Lincoln.

  • avatar
    VenomV12

    I agree that Lincoln can and should be saved. I don’t think it would take that much to turn that marque around to be honest. Ford has the money and the platforms to do it. The last Lincoln I really liked was the LS, I know a guy that owns a Lincoln dealership that still drives one to this day. Their crossover lineup is not bad and once they bring the cars up to snuff, I think Lincoln will be just fine. I don’t know whether it is worth it to update or keep the Navigator but I got into a “brand new” one the other day and it felt like it was about 10 years old.

  • avatar

    THE LINCOLN MKC might sell, but it’s a pathetic product. It looks poorly pieced together and sold at a price that doesn’t justify it looking poorly pieced together.

    Meanwhile, HYUNDAI/KIA are turning out “LUXURY CARS” at that price.

  • avatar
    FractureCritical

    I don’t consider any revival at saving Lincoln a serious effort until I see a sedan version of the Mustang offered up. i’d love to see a leather lined baleen grinning whale of a sports sedan go out and eat high dollar BMW’s at the track, just like the previous generation Lagona Seca Boss 302’s could do.

    • 0 avatar
      Dave M.

      I agree with the Mustang sedan idea. I was disappointed that Mercury never took advantage of the 2005 Mustang redesign to bring out a new Cougar (to erase that 1999 poser); the new chassis with IRS would certainly have the dynamic legs to be considered ‘sporty’ for a sedan.

    • 0 avatar
      Joe McKinney

      Funny thing is, the current Mustang is based on the old Lincoln/Jaguar DEW98 sedan platform. The platform was extensively re-engineered and given a new platform code, but the Mustang is essentially a coupe variant of the Lincoln LS. DEW98 had IRS, though this was replaced with a live rear axle on the Mustang.

  • avatar
    Stumpaster

    Sorry, but this is a pile of PR poo poo:
    “and has premium features on par with its competitors — BMW X3, Audi Q5, Acura RDX — including soft-touch leather and parallel-parking technology”

    Tell me what it will have underneath the skin that would differ it from Escape. Leather and electro gizmo is just an add-on. Will there really be a difference from the expensive Escape, in suspension, tranny, steering?

    • 0 avatar
      VoGo

      Stumpaster,
      By your logic, shouldn’t you be sharing with us the differences under the skin between the Q5 and Tiguan?

      Similarly the RDX and CR-V?

      • 0 avatar
        hreardon

        Q5 and Tiguan share absolutely nothing in common.

        Tiguan is built on the old PQ35 transverse platform shared with the previous gen Golf and Q5 is built with Audi’s MLB ‘kit’ architecture.

        Now, the current Audi Q3 and the Tiguan – those two share the same platform at the moment. Both will move to the MQB kit in the next few years like the current A3 and MK7 Golf.

  • avatar
    319583076

    I saw a Lincoln Edge (MK whatever) in traffic yesterday. I am alway curious who buys these things when I see them because they’re as rare as hen’s teeth. The answer is always the same – gray hairs.

    Lincoln is a zombie that doesn’t know what the rest of the world can plainly see – it’s already dead.

    • 0 avatar
      bomberpete

      Me too. I’d say there needs to be a barely-disguised concept of this at the 2015 Detroit show to replace the MKS. That’s what I think the strategy might be.

      If not, then we can all assume that Fields and Farley aren’t really serious about the Lincoln Motor Company. Which means they aren’t serious people, and that’s a cause for post-Mulally concern.

    • 0 avatar
      cpthaddock

      Don’t knock it, it’s kept Cadillac alive!

  • avatar
    crtfour

    I’ve never seen a younger person in one either. Ditto for the Lincoln version of the Flex….I can’t think of which MK that is.

    • 0 avatar
      StaysCrunchy

      I can’t either offhand… and I work in the parts department of a Ford/Lincoln dealership. I get exactly zero people in here looking to buy anything for their MKAnythings. I sell the crap out of floor mats, cargo liners, etc for every Ford model we sell but Lincoln customers are about the least passionate vehicle owners I can think of. Its old people buying an appliance, nothing more. Don’t get me wrong, I love Ford and Lincoln and I’m rooting for them both big-time, but I have a functioning pair of eyeballs and I just don’t see how anybody could cross-shop a Lincoln with any other luxury (or even near-luxury) brand, sorry. Hopefully that changes, but it’s currently what, July? We have DOZENS of brand new 2013 Lincolns on the lot with piles of cash on the hoods.

  • avatar
    raph

    Not a very confidence inspiring decision by Fields. It’s akin to keeping a cancer riddled mutt with a missing eye, four broken legs and no teeth in favor of letting your healthy kid fall down an elevator shaft.

    It’s to bad Mullally didn’t tell Fields to STFU and go sit in the corner on this, one.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      He was half right, attempting to keep the brand and existing distribution network vs paying to shut it down wasn’t the worst idea. The part where he was half wrong was keeping it but then denying to give it even one compelling product.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      OK, but it’s clear that every manufacturer needs some kind of “premium” brand, so what would your solution be – sell super-premium Fords? That dog won’t hunt.

      I think keeping Lincoln was the right move. Now we have to see what products Fields can bring to the table. If they’re good, then the brand has a shot. If not…then you’ll be proven right.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Brands can be premium in an of themselves, hence BMW and Mercedes-Benz, but I agree with compelling product any brand has a shot.

      • 0 avatar
        bomberpete

        Like I said, see what Lincoln brings to the 2015 Detroit show.

        If it’s a Hyundai Genesis competitor based on the new Mustang (center-pull doors, please!), then they’re on the right track.

        If not, the naysayers are right.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        In Ford’s case, a single brand strategy probably does make more sense.

        Lincoln will never fly as a global brand, and it would make no sense to try to turn it into one. Its US market potential is low, which makes it hard to justify spending very much on it here.

        If Ford wanted a global luxury brand, then it should have kept PAG. Jaguar and Volvo have their drawbacks, but they would have been better suited to the task than Lincoln could ever be.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          PCH, no one’s going to buy a $60,000 Ford, unless it’s a Shelby Mustang or some duded up super duty truck. The brand has no equity at all in high-end (or even moderately high-end, ala Buick) luxury cars or SUVs. None whatsoever. The only mainstream brands (ala Toyota/Honda/Chevy/Dodge, etc) that have tried selling premium cars were VW (the Phaeton). Mazda (the Millenia and 929), and Hyundai/Kia; VW failed epically, even the product was clearly up to snuff, Mazda failed as well, and I think the jury’s out on Hyundai and Kia. In any case, I think Hyundai’s actual goal here is to eventually break off the luxury cars into a separate line.

          In essence, Ford would have shut itself out of the premium market altogether, and you can’t do that.

          And watching the fortunes of Jaguar and Volvo tells me Ford made the right call dumping them and keeping Lincoln.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            “The brand has no equity at all in high-end (or even moderately high-end, ala Buick) luxury cars”

            And Lincoln does?

            In any case, brand equity has to be built, regardless. The Ford brand has better odds of doing that than Lincoln ever could, particularly abroad.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Yes, Lincoln does have some equity as a luxury car – certainly more than Ford does.

            No one has succeeded trying to make a mainstream family car brand into a premium brand at the same time. Hyundai has come as close to anyone, but let’s be honest – the Genesis and Equus haven’t been runaway hits.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            Most of the world has never heard of Lincoln.

            For a luxury brand to work today, the brand needs to be international.

            Accordingly, Lincoln is the very worst choice on a list of unappealing choices.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Whatever you say, PCH, but the fact is the world HAS heard of Jaguar and Volvo and they’re bombing all over the world as well. So, you either take on the failed international brands, one of which has a poor reputation for quality, and one of which has a reputation for being dowdy, or the failed domestic brand that actually has some kind of history and heritage with American buyers, which is your main market anyway.

            Or, as you suggest, you try selling $60,000 Ford sedans. Best of luck with that.

            I know what I’d do.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            In most of the world, the luxury/ mainstream tiering that we have in the US isn’t much of a factor. For example, it’s possible for Daimler to sell a broad range of Mercedes cars outside of the US and get away with it; the A-class doesn’t prevent the company from selling S-classes.

            If Ford wants to move upmarket abroad, then it could. It would have to earn its place and that could take a couple of decades to achieve, but it could be done.

            The US is the outlier. But the only reason to keep Lincoln is to avoid having to buy out the dealer network. It’s better for Ford to do what it is doing now, and to allow the Lincoln dealers to starve themselves out of business.

          • 0 avatar
            geeber

            Looking at Lincoln from a purely financial perspective, I’m guessing that Ford could continue its current strategy with Lincoln indefinitely. Ford isn’t spending a lot of money on unique platforms or drivetrains for Lincolns. It thus gets a few extra sales out of basic platforms and drivetrains shared with garden-variety Fords.

            I like the MKZ and MKC, but, at this point, Lincoln appears to fill the same role that the Imperial filled for Chrysler in the 1960s. It sells to corporate loyalists who want something fancier and a little “different” compared to the parent corporation’s mainstream offerings. It does not, however, conquest many – if any – sales from the competition.

            Cadillac, unlike Lincoln, is taking the fight directly to the Germans, and is having a tough time right now. Sales of the much-ballyhooed ATS haven’t been all that hot.

            Regarding the dealer body, there aren’t that many stand alone Lincoln dealers left. The number I’ve seen is 172 Lincoln dealers that don’t hold a Ford franchise.

            Our local Ford dealer also has a Lincoln franchise. It’s where we take our Focus for service. The service and sales experience are certainly good enough for Ford buyers, but I’m not seeing how Ford is going to get dealers to provide drastically different levels of sales and service from the same facility. Today luxury car buyers simply expect a higher level of sales and service than buyers of mass-market brands.

            Given the amount of money Ford is investing in Lincoln (i.e., not that much), I don’t see Lincoln LOSING money. The tougher question is whether Ford keeps a brand that doesn’t really stand for anything right now, and whether Ford can ever craft a distinct image that gives Lincoln a reason for existing.

  • avatar
    Pch101

    You really ought to spell Mulally’s name correctly.

  • avatar
    Victor

    The mais goal for any luxury brand that is owned by a major OEM is to sell the same cars at a higher price point, while being used to implement new tech and to serve as an aspiration for those buying the cheaper cars. That is why Lincoln still exists. And why Mercury does not.

    That being said, it is silly to expect Lincoln to a) beat,or even go after the germans and b) release models that are much different from whatever Ford is selling. Yes they can mix and match just like they are doing here with this Mustang-powered Escape, and they can even use the Fusion platform to come up with a new coupe, but that’s it.

    It is rather obvious that if the MKC can hold a candle to the X3, then BMW is doing something terribly wrong. BMW and Mercedes are primarily luxury OEM who one way or another go down the price range to make more money, it is a whole other deal. Audi is sort of an odd duck on that behalf.

    Even if Lincoln doesn’t outpace Cadillac, they’ll still be selling more expensive Fords at higher profits. Beats the hell out of selling Ghias, Vignales or whatever european Ford thinks is hot these days. The enthusiast might resent Ford for having reduced the once-great Lincoln to Acura’s relevance, but there is no other way Lincoln would still be alive.

  • avatar
    akatsuki

    They should have axed it. I can honestly say I’d rather drive a Hyundai Genesis than any Lincoln offering. Which is a sad state of affairs for a once storied brand. They need to decide if they are in the market, and therefore going to be bold and spend money to revive Lincoln, or if they are just going to do me-too products that excite nobody.

    Cadillac has done an amazing job in creating a vision (from their concepts like the Miraj and Cien down to the ATS). Acura and Lincoln just have lost their way entirely and are in complete denial.

    • 0 avatar
      bomberpete

      Me-too CUVs are fine for paying bills in the short-term but no more.

      The Hyundai Genesis looks great. Not a German wannabe, but a traditional American luxury car built by Koreans, with Lotus doing what they do best, ride and handling. Read the NY Times review that came out last weekend. It is the benchmark that Lincoln must EXCEED to show they’re serious. It would make a real replacement for the dead-on-arrival MKS.

      Ford certainly has the capability. Whether they’re serious about spending the money or resources is an open question. If they aren’t, you’re entirely right and Fields will have a mess of his own making to clean up.

  • avatar
    RogerB34

    Lincoln isn’t going to make it.
    CR Sedans Luxury Midsized 15th out of 15 and $50k.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    I think what we’re going to see out of Lincoln is a brand slightly upscale of Buick – and, no, I don’t think we’re going to see four door Mustangs, or 2002 Continental show cars, or anything like that. We’ll see competently executed near-premium cars that are aimed at taking sales from Lexus, not BMW or Mercedes (or Cadillac, for that matter).

    Not good news for enthusiasts, but probably good news for Ford stockholders.

  • avatar
    wmba

    Talk about beating a dead horse … This is the very epitome of that syndrome. No amount of prodding by stick is going to get this beast to revive.

    The last sign that Dobbin had any life in him at all was the LS, a Jaguar S-type in drag. So of course they cut it when the moneyed types had just begun to discover a discreet American alternative in the near lux class.

    Time to send Lincoln to the glue factory, and for Fields to buy a couple of decent suits on his next trip to the UK by visiting Saville Row. He really dresses badly.

  • avatar
    Z71_Silvy

    The timeline of events here is amazing.

    Big Al, after saying he was fully committed to Mercury, shuts it down for being nothing more than rebadged Fords (that consistently sold better than Lincoln)

    Then, he turns Lincoln into what Mercury was…..and rather than do the one right thing in his career and shut the brand down, he lets moron number 2 convince him to keep it.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    Honestly, I don’t see this as being a conquest car. The MKC is very nice for a Lincoln and will probably do reasonably well on the market, but it’s not remarkable or memorable in any way. Now for someone who’s up-and-coming, this could very well work. But the only way I could see the MKC actually working to conquest shoppers of other luxury brands in significant numbers is if those luxury brands screw up big time or take a huge dip in customer experience (but then Euro-car buyers seem to like being subjected to pain, like some kind of BDSM cycle).

  • avatar
    danio3834

    We’ve flogged this pony more times than I can count now. Ford can bring back Lincoln, but they’ve gotta take the risk and invest in some product that is more than a top of the line Ford. If they can’t get a business case together to get some real aspirational metal on the market, or just forget it already.

    They had some really great concepts that if put into production would have done a lot to revive the brand. S550 would be a good starting point from platform utilization standpoint.

  • avatar
    bd2

    Mullaly got far too much credit and during his tenure, Ford and Lincoln were filled with poorly launched models, rife with quality issues.

    Ford’s turnaround should be much more credited to its Euro engineers and designers.

  • avatar
    JREwing

    The current status of Lincoln makes complete sense now. Mulally may not have gotten his wish to kill off Lincoln thanks to Fields, but he certainly wasn’t going to put any serious investment into it. It shows.

    Credit Fields for keeping Lincoln on life support, but now he has to make it relevant in the luxury market. Unlike others here, I don’t think it requires unique platform. But it does require greater differentiation from its Ford brethren.

    One excellent place Lincoln could differentiate itself is to incorporate hybrid technology across the board. Much as Audi distinguished itself with all-wheel-drive standard, so could (and should) Lincoln. Heck – combine the two concepts. Why have active differentials and extra axles – just use electric motors for the rear wheels instead.

    Bottom line is – give consumers something other than a pretty dress and a different badge.

    • 0 avatar
      bomberpete

      Lincoln sales YTD are 38K units. Given how little they are differentiated from Fords and with most dealers under the same roof, I suppose the sales are all profitable. Still, the MKC has to help turn the tide for Lincoln both in China and here. Without more on the horizon, Fields is gonna look pretty silly even w/o that rockin’ mullet.

      Of course, there’s sentiment attached. I would imagine the Ford family — which resisted letting go of Mercury in memory of dear old Edsel — has similar feelings for the namesake of our 16th President.

  • avatar
    Panther Platform

    I have owned two Lincolns and am a member of the Lincoln and Continental Owners’ Club. However the world has changed since Lincoln’s heyday and I think it is time for Lincoln to go the way of Mercury. My dream is that Lincoln does a new Continental with a detuned NA 5.0 liter V-8 and relatively soft suspension. Of course if they did periodicals and the internet would deride the car’s lack of power, lack of refinement and efficiency, poor handling etc. The car would not be desired except by dinasours like me.

    • 0 avatar
      bomberpete

      @Panther Platform: Have you driven a Hyundai Genesis? To me, it seems like what a modern Lincoln sedan should be. Waiting for a TTAC review, but read this one from NY Times: http://mobile.nytimes.com/2014/06/29/automobiles/autoreviews/2015-hyundai-genesis-review.html

      Genesis sales results will be interesting on two levels:

      – Whether buyers in that price class only care about brands and labels and snottily reject the Hyundai name, however small it is

      – If there’s a market for a sedan in this range that favors comfort over handling

      I’d be interested in your thoughts.

  • avatar
    Panther Platform

    @bomberpete: I have never driven a Genesis, but I have a grudging admiration for Hyuandai. I have driven a Sonata and have taken a close look at a Genesis – I’m very impressed. My emotional attachment to Ford and Lincoln clouds my judgment. My heart tells me to get another Lincoln Mark VIII, but I might take a test ride of the Genesis. It is a nice car.

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