Citroen C4 Cactus Ushers In A New Kind Of Low Cost Car

Derek Kreindler
by Derek Kreindler

TTAC (well, mostly this writer) has been enthusiastic about low cost cars, which are sold in Europe and emerging markets as a kind of no-frills, back-to-basics type of motoring for people who might previously have been able to only afford a knackered used car or something with two wheels. But Citroen – whose parent company PSA has been conspicuously absent from this space – is about introduce a new kind of low-cost car: one that has more emphasis on style, and an even more intense focus on low cost of ownership.

The C4 Cactus, above, is based on the standard Citroen C4. But rather than attempting to compete with higher content C-Segment cars like the VW Golf, the new “C-Line” (of which the Cactus is part of) has been designed for the realities of motoring in urban areas and other less than ideal conditions. Those off-colored bumpy surfaces are actually rubber, and meant to prevent against door dings and scrapes, while the bumpers have what appear to be rubber surfaces as well. In cities like Paris, this is a huge deal – parking by touch is common, and cars get damaged as a result. The rubber surfaces aim to eliminate the need for pricey bodywork. Inside, the same ethos carries over, with stylish but hard-wearing surfaces and upholstery. Check out that gear selector too. Very simple, but very elegant. How French.

CUV critics, take note. The standard C4 has a regular ride height, but Europeans have become crossover crazy, and the raised ride height will pay dividends in traffic, allowing drivers a better perspective, while adding the requisite style quotient to compete with the Dacia Duster and more upscale rivals like the Rental Captur and Opel Mokka. Powertrains haven’t been announced, but there should be plenty of diesels.

With the Cactus, Citroen is hoping to create an automotive version of a “frugalista” product like Zara clothing – something with sufficient cachet that it can be considered cool, but at a price point that is attractive to mainstream buyers. Perhaps it will precipitate a swing away from the recent “premium” craze. Maybe not, but we can hope.



Derek Kreindler
Derek Kreindler

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  • Corey Lewis Corey Lewis on Feb 05, 2014

    I like this idea, and I think the styling is spot on. I highlighted my concerns with executing the rubber long-term above. Another thought is about the expansion/contraction in hot/cold which rubber does. Might make for some very rattl-y doors on bumpy roads. But I'd for sure drive a car that said CACTUS on the C-pillar and rear. I even like it in white/brown*. The wheels are awesome too. *Just like the C30 looked best in white/brown.

  • Victor Victor on Feb 05, 2014

    PSA has no problems designing exiting cars. What they need is volume. This C4 Cactus is one clever proposition, one that I would enjoy quite a lot.

  • W Conrad Sedans have been fine for me, but I were getting a new car, it would be an SUV. Not only because less sedans available, but I can't see around them in my sedan!
  • Slavuta More hatchbacks
  • ED I don't know what GM is thinking.I have a 2020 one nice vehicle.Got rid of Camaro and was going to buy one.Probably won't buy another GM product.Get rid of all the head honchos at GM.This company is a bunch of cheapskates building junk that no one wants.
  • Lostjr Sedans have been made less practical, with low rooflines and steeply raked A pillars. It makes them harder to get in and out of. Probably harder to put a kid in a child seat. Sedans used to be more family oriented.
  • Bob Funny how Oldsmobile was offering a GPS system to help if you were lost, yet GM as a company was very lost. Not really sure that they are not still lost. They make hideous looking trucks, Cadillac is a crappy Chevy pretending to be fancy. To be honest, I would never step in a GM show room now or ever. Boring, cheap ugly and bad resale why bother. I get enough of GM when i rent on trips from airports. I have to say, does anybody at GM ever drive what everyone else drives? Do they ever then look at what crap they put out in style fit and finish? Come on, for real, do they? Cadillac updated slogan should be " sub standard of the 3rd world", or " almost as good as Tata motors". Enough said.
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