GM Strong In China

Bertel Schmitt
by Bertel Schmitt

GM had a better November in China than at home in America. Back home, sales rose only 3.3 percent to 186,505 units in November. In China, the world’s and GM’s largest market, GM sold a total of 260,018 units across all joint ventures, up 9.7 percent compared to November 2011.

GM China November 2012Nov ’12YoY11 monthsYoYGM China260,0189.7%2,593,64210.4%Shanghai GM136,44420.6%1,220,8878.7%Buick70,17217.4%593,153Chevrolet63,01215.3%627,411Cadillac3,2608.4%27,073SAIC-GM-Wuling118,536-0.5%1,318,47312.5%Wuling108,304-0.5%1,217,282Baojun10,23270.0%?FAW-GM4,8374.2%50,3451.0%Black: GM data. Blue: Calculated from historical GM data

GM had a better November in China than at home in America. Back home, sales rose only 3.3 percent to 186,505 units in November. In China, the world’s and GM’s largest market, GM sold a total of 260,018 units across all joint ventures, up 9.7 percent compared to November 2011.

January through November, GM booked 2.59 million units in China, up 10.4 percent. In 2011, GM sold 2.55 million units in the whole year, a number exceeded a month earlier this year. Passenger vehicles sold through Shanghai GM are up strongly. Sales of Buick, Chevrolet and Cadillac as a whole are up 20.6 percent. Sales of SAIC-GM-Wuling are weak. In the past, we used GM’s China sales as a leading indicator for the Chinese market. With the dislocations caused by the partial boycott of Japanese brands, that indicator is rendered useless at the moment. It stands to reason that Shanghai GM sales profited some from Japan’s misery in China.

Bertel Schmitt
Bertel Schmitt

Bertel Schmitt comes back to journalism after taking a 35 year break in advertising and marketing. He ran and owned advertising agencies in Duesseldorf, Germany, and New York City. Volkswagen A.G. was Bertel's most important corporate account. Schmitt's advertising and marketing career touched many corners of the industry with a special focus on automotive products and services. Since 2004, he lives in Japan and China with his wife <a href="http://www.tomokoandbertel.com"> Tomoko </a>. Bertel Schmitt is a founding board member of the <a href="http://www.offshoresuperseries.com"> Offshore Super Series </a>, an American offshore powerboat racing organization. He is co-owner of the racing team Typhoon.

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  • Blowfish Blowfish on Dec 06, 2012

    Have the Nippon jin forgotten all those big ticketed investment in Middle Kingdom? or simply already wrote it off? still no signs of mitigating the situation. can japan afford to exit MK's vast market when everybody & their cousins trying to get close for a bit of the market?

  • Philadlj Philadlj on Dec 06, 2012

    Yes folks, the new, quintessentially American Malibu is selling about as badly in America as the quintessentially Chinese Baojun is selling in China.

  • Theflyersfan Well, if you're on a Samsung phone, (noticing all of the shipping boxes are half Vietnamese), you're using a Vietnam-built phone. Apple? Most of ours in the warehouse say China, but they are trying to spread out to other countries because putting all eggs in the Chinese basket right now is not wise. I'm asking Apple users here (the point of above) - if you're OK using an expensive iPhone, where is your Made in China line in the sand? Can't stress this enough - not being confrontational. I am curious, that's all. Is it because Apple is California-based that manufacturing location doesn't matter, vs a company in a Beijing skyscraper? We have all weekend to hopefully have a civil discussion about how much is too much when it comes to supporting companies being HQ-ed in adversarial countries. I, for one, can't pull the trigger on a Chinese car. All kinds of reasons - political, human rights, war mongering and land grabbing - my morality is ruling my decisions with them.
  • Jbltg Ford AND VAG. What could possibly go wrong?
  • Leonard Ostrander We own a 2017 Buick Envision built in China. It has been very reliable and meets our needs perfectly. Of course Henry Ford was a fervent anti-semite and staunch nazi sympathizer so that rules out Ford products.
  • Ravenuer I would not.
  • V8fairy Absolutely no, for the same reasons I would not have bought a German car in the late 1930's, and I am glad to see a number of other posters here share my moral scruples. Like EBFlex I try to avoid Chinese made goods as much as possible. The quality may also be iffy, but that is not my primary concern
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