Blame Sandy: Super Storm Found Guilty Of Raining On Chrysler October Sales

Bertel Schmitt
by Bertel Schmitt

Chrysler Group’s U.S. sales rose only 10 percent in October, the smallest gain since May 2011. As suspected yesterday, Super-Sandy has been fingered as the culprit.

Chrysler told Automotive News [sub] that “October sales were affected by the major hurricane and storm that pummeled the eastern U.S. seaboard early this week.” Dodge is up 20 percent, Ram 17 percent. The Chrysler brand gained only 5 percent.

Jeep sales are down 5-percent, which oddly was blamed on the hurricane, along with the discontinuation of the Jeep Liberty.

Ford sales are unchanged from October 2011, GM is up 5 percent. Toyota sales are up 15.8 percent. Jefferies analyst Peter Nesvold said that Sandy could have cost 100,000 unit sales in October. If that forecast would come true, there would be zero gains in October.

Read more: http://www.autonews.com/article/20121101/RETAIL01/121109995#ixzz2AzH3uVdF

We shall follow the October sales numbers throughout the day.

Chrysler Group LLC U.S. Sales Summary Thru October 2012

Month Sales

Vol %

Sales CYTD

Vol %

Model

Curr Yr

Pr Yr

Change

Curr Yr

Pr Yr

Change

500

3,720

1,965

89%

36,462

15,826

130%

FIAT BRAND

3,720

1,965

89%

36,462

15,826

130%

200

8,758

11,205

-22%

109,025

69,755

56%

Sebring

0

0

0

2,380

-100%

300

5,183

3,701

40%

58,813

27,077

117%

PT Cruiser

0

0

0

1,328

-100%

Town & Country

8,281

6,338

31%

95,850

78,255

22%

CHRYSLER BRAND

22,222

21,244

5%

263,688

178,795

47%

Compass

2,486

5,179

-52%

34,389

39,192

-12%

Patriot

4,209

3,581

18%

53,270

46,234

15%

Wrangler

11,310

9,892

14%

119,787

101,820

18%

Liberty

4,099

5,997

-32%

67,773

55,322

23%

Grand Cherokee

11,919

11,084

8%

123,994

96,853

28%

Commander

0

0

0

105

-100%

JEEP BRAND

34,023

35,733

-5%

399,213

339,526

18%

Caliber

92

1,840

-95%

10,113

32,430

-69%

Dart

5,455

0

New

14,709

0

New

Avenger

7,637

7,136

7%

82,376

52,164

58%

Charger

4,924

3,626

36%

68,409

57,779

18%

Challenger

2,686

3,097

-13%

36,309

33,254

9%

Viper

0

12

-100%

20

156

-87%

Journey

5,955

5,028

18%

65,306

46,734

40%

Caravan

10,603

7,100

49%

118,730

92,930

28%

Nitro

29

2,031

-99%

3,269

20,784

-84%

Durango

3,230

3,864

-16%

33,282

42,944

-22%

DODGE BRAND

40,611

33,734

20%

432,523

379,175

14%

Dakota

2

642

-100%

490

11,299

-96%

Ram P/U

25,222

21,037

20%

238,815

199,010

20%

Cargo Van

385

157

New

5,664

292

New

RAM BRAND

25,609

21,836

17%

244,969

210,601

16%

TOTAL CHRYSLER GROUP LLC

126,185

114,512

10%

1,376,855

1,123,923

23%

TOTAL CAR

38,455

32,582

18%

416,236

290,824

43%

TOTAL TRUCK

87,730

81,930

7%

960,619

833,102

15%

Bertel Schmitt
Bertel Schmitt

Bertel Schmitt comes back to journalism after taking a 35 year break in advertising and marketing. He ran and owned advertising agencies in Duesseldorf, Germany, and New York City. Volkswagen A.G. was Bertel's most important corporate account. Schmitt's advertising and marketing career touched many corners of the industry with a special focus on automotive products and services. Since 2004, he lives in Japan and China with his wife <a href="http://www.tomokoandbertel.com"> Tomoko </a>. Bertel Schmitt is a founding board member of the <a href="http://www.offshoresuperseries.com"> Offshore Super Series </a>, an American offshore powerboat racing organization. He is co-owner of the racing team Typhoon.

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 7 comments
  • Gentle Ted Gentle Ted on Nov 01, 2012

    Its easy to blame the Weather and yes even in the very last days of the Month of October, ahh it's hard to make such a case, could it be the result of Consumer Reports recently released comments about Chrysler Vehicles?

    • See 2 previous
    • Billfrombuckhead Billfrombuckhead on Nov 01, 2012

      @22_RE_Speedwagon To get an idea how bad things were at Chrysler last month, it was Chrysler's Best October sales since 2007!

  • Silverkris Silverkris on Nov 01, 2012

    It may be mentioned earlier, but in a few months there will be some storm damaged cars on the market which might not be labeled as such. Buyer beware!

    • See 1 previous
    • CJinSD CJinSD on Nov 01, 2012

      @billfrombuckhead Toyota is up 16% while Chrysler is up 10%. Toyota sells more vehicles than Chrysler, so that 16% represents bigger absolute growth too. They outperformed Honda and especially Nissan, but throw in Toyota and the result is reversed.

  • Dartdude Having the queen of nothing as the head of Dodge is a recipe for disaster. She hasn't done anything with Chrysler for 4 years, May as well fold up Chrysler and Dodge.
  • Pau65792686 I think there is a need for more sedans. Some people would rather drive a car over SUV’s or CUV’s. If Honda and Toyota can do it why not American brands. We need more affordable sedans.
  • Tassos Obsolete relic is NOT a used car.It might have attracted some buyers in ITS DAY, 1985, 40 years ago, but NOT today, unless you are a damned fool.
  • Stan Reither Jr. Part throttle efficiency was mentioned earlier in a postThis type of reciprocating engine opens the door to achieve(slightly) variable stroke which would provide variable mechanical compression ratio adjustments for high vacuum (light load) or boost(power) conditions IMO
  • Joe65688619 Keep in mind some of these suppliers are not just supplying parts, but assembled components (easy example is transmissions). But there are far more, and the more they are electronically connected and integrated with rest of the platform the more complex to design, engineer, and manufacture. Most contract manufacturers don't make a lot of money in the design and engineering space because their customers to that. Commodity components can be sourced anywhere, but there are only a handful of contract manufacturers (usually diversified companies that build all kinds of stuff for other brands) can engineer and build the more complex components, especially with electronics. Every single new car I've purchased in the last few years has had some sort of electronic component issue: Infinti (battery drain caused by software bug and poorly grounded wires), Acura (radio hiss, pops, burps, dash and infotainment screens occasionally throw errors and the ignition must be killed to reboot them, voice nav, whether using the car's system or CarPlay can't seem to make up its mind as to which speakers to use and how loud, even using the same app on the same trip - I almost jumped in my seat once), GMC drivetrain EMF causing a whine in the speakers that even when "off" that phased with engine RPM), Nissan (didn't have issues until 120K miles, but occassionally blew fuses for interior components - likely not a manufacturing defect other than a short developed somewhere, but on a high-mileage car that was mechanically sound was too expensive to fix (a lot of trial and error and tracing connections = labor costs). What I suspect will happen is that only the largest commodity suppliers that can really leverage their supply chain will remain, and for the more complex components (think bumper assemblies or the electronics for them supporting all kinds of sensors) will likley consolidate to a handful of manufacturers who may eventually specialize in what they produce. This is part of the reason why seemingly minor crashes cost so much - an auto brand does nst have the parts on hand to replace an integrated sensor , nor the expertice as they never built them, but bought them). And their suppliers, in attempt to cut costs, build them in way that is cheap to manufacture (not necessarily poorly bulit) but difficult to replace without swapping entire assemblies or units).I've love to see an article on repair costs and how those are impacting insurance rates. You almost need gap insurance now because of how quickly cars depreciate yet remain expensive to fix (orders more to originally build, in some cases). No way I would buy a CyberTruck - don't want one, but if I did, this would stop me. And it's not just EVs.
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