By on January 26, 2010

The Mazda6 Wagon, long the only “real” station wagon in an American market that’s crossing over from SUVs to CUVs, has been updated… but not for the US.

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81 Comments on “What’s Wrong With This Picture: Mazda6 Wagon The Dog Edition...”


  • avatar
    ash78

    Why would Mazda dare to infringe on the sales of their popular, award winning CX vehicles?

    They won’t. Everything is aligned (CAFE and buyer perceptions) to NOT offer this to us.

    Which makes me a sad panda.

    • 0 avatar
      AccAzda

      Can I ask if you are also on jalopnik, as the same s/n?

      And I thought I was THE ONLY one who believed that the 6 hatch and wagon were infringing on the SUV / CUV shit!

      HAHA, good luck trying to get Mazda sales people to admit that effup.

  • avatar
    Mark MacInnis

    I’d like to bitch-slap the Mazda official who said no to the US market for this….

    • 0 avatar
      Ernie

      You can’t even get the Mazda6 in a Manual above the Touring trim in the 2010 models.

      I have the Grand Touring model (2009) in a 6MT. They can have it when they pry it from my cold, dead hands . . .(or someone gives me a loaded 535 xi w/MT)

    • 0 avatar
      Richard Chen

      Mazda sold a whopping 200 wagons/month, more than half of them to fleets. Even the Mazda5 sold avg >1500/month, bouyed by $4/gas and cash for clunkers.

      As the current NA Mazda6 is different (read: larger) than the JDM/EU Mazda6, I can’t blame them for not developing a completely different NA wagon, as CUVs bring in more revenue.

    • 0 avatar
      tlc123

      i feel your pain man

  • avatar
    DweezilSFV

    A shame. The previous Mazda 6 wagon was one of those “just right” designs that was pretty from every angle, especially the rear. And oddly, better looking than the sedan.

    Perhaps this new 6 just isn’t homely enough for the US market

  • avatar
    Roundel

    Honestly, how much extra expense would it be to offer this here along with the Sedan? If the perception is what it is, this won’t hurt the CX line at all. People are going to buy the SUV’s, that not a postulation, its fact. But offer this to people who dont or cant afford the extra expenses (especially in gas) Its like there are forces out there at work that try and make sure that station wagons just don’t work in the US, its like the damn automakers are all colluding to make sure of it!

    • 0 avatar
      AccAzda

      Ive been pulling out my hair debating this with my other personalities…

      Mazda bailed on the last gen 6 hatch and wagon simply because they didn’t have enough selection.

      They had the Escape for Mazda, the CX-7 and the CX-9 (keeps waiting for the pointless CX-5). Where as all they had for wagons.. was the 6 and hatch.

      P.S
      This debate enters my head constantly.. when I see the 3 sedan being driven around.. when they could have gotten the hatch… drives me CRAZY!

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    My understanding was that, like the Opel Vectra and Saturn Aura, the Euro and JDM 6 shares styling and it’s fundamental platform with the NADM 6, but the actual car is smaller, both in size and wheelbase, unlike the old 6, which was the same vehicle in all markets. A wagon or hatchback version of the NADM 6 would require significant investment.

    Given that the new 6 is selling better, you can’t really fault Mazda’s logic.

    • 0 avatar
      Ernie

      I fault them for no stick in the V6

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      The take rate was so low on the V6/stick combination that it wasn’t really worth offering.

      Enthusiasts can wish all we want, but the truth of the matter is that Mazda has to pay the bills. If Bob Lutz was the kind of person who would admit to being wrong, he’d tell you that catering to enthusiasts when you’re a mainstream brand is a really good way to flame out.

      Or, to put it another way: BMW has trouble moving manuals, especially in North America. Mazda has no chance.

    • 0 avatar
      Ernie

      If that is indeed true, then Mazda really needs to quit the car industry. Catering to enthusiasts is really all they’ve ever done well.

      It’s not considered much of a niche overseas. Several of the girls (ladies?) I spoke to at my son’s daycare drive older sticks and prefer them; I wouldn’t call them enthusiasts.

      I was *trying* to buy a 2006 Sonata when they hit the market and the dealership told me they didn’t even *MAKE* a stickshift. When familiarized with their own sales material, they told me they WOULD NOT get me one even though it was their base model.

      I told them to call me when they found one – he said to call him when I changed my mind. Lovely. I don’t buy the “demand” angle. People buy less because less are available. I get that you can’t offer it on every model, but if they (theoretically) were available, I think the US demographic would be quite different.

      Mazda bills it as a sport sedan. It’s only (cost & performance) competitor has a V6 stickshift (Nissan Altima) — I just liked the Mazda better.

    • 0 avatar
      Steven02

      Ernie…
      Even sporty cars like the Corvette, Mustang, Camaro (not sure about the latest model yet, but previous ones) etc have sold great numbers of automatics than manuals. The demand isn’t there.

    • 0 avatar
      Ernie

      Yeah, I know, the Taurus SHO is on that list . . . Mary Kay edition as it were ;)

    • 0 avatar
      James2

      @Ernie

      Not defending Mazda here (kind of) but I read somewhere that the Duratec 3.7 on the new 6 is not designed to mate with a manual. And since there’s no real payoff Mazda (or Ford) decided not to spend the coin to redesign the block.

  • avatar
    Lemmy-powered

    Station wagons died in ‘Merica right around the same time that people decided that consumption was better than production, debt was better than saving, and men began to aspire to Dockers.

    Sad, really.

    • 0 avatar
      Mark MacInnis

      Lemmy-powered: +1 ;^]

    • 0 avatar
      Dr. Nguyen Van Falk

      Haha, right on.

      The consumption over production wasn’t a choice with cars though. ‘Merica’s cars were so insultingly awful for so long most people wrote them off, and had every reason to do so.

      Dockers and a BWM with AWD and a slushbox. Shameful.

    • 0 avatar
      George B

      I blame trafic congestion. Getting stuck in stop and go traffic has increased demand for automatic transmissions and enough height to see over other cars. Higher gasoline prices shifted demand from truck based SUV tall station wagons to car based CUV tall station wagons, but there was no retreat in the ride height arms race.

    • 0 avatar
      Dr. Nguyen Van Falk

      That reason for the increase in ride height is interesting. I used to have a Jeep Cherokee and switched to a ZX2 and although the Cherokee wasn’t all that tall for it’s off roading prowess, it was definitely an adjustment when I couldn’t see over any car on the road. However it really doesn’t matter and actually makes driving more fun. But looking at the popular cars in ‘Merica, fun is last on the priority list.

    • 0 avatar
      Ernie

      Ability to see around cars was high on my wife’s list . . . which brought us to an SUV. I went from a CR-V to the 6 . . . now it’s more of a “peek-a-boo/jab” kinda driving ;) — seriously though, every now and then I get behind something big and it’s only a problem if they’re an erratic driver (hard, sudden braking due to tailgating, wobbling etc.)

      My only problem in stop-and-go traffic is my right-knee. The brake-gas-brake thing gets REALLY tiresome. When I’m driving the wife’s auto, I’ve started popping it into neutral rather than feathering back to the brake. Oddly enough, the MPG gets better at the same time :)

    • 0 avatar
      Spike_in_Irvine

      You would not have to see over cars if you could see through them. My complaint is against the black tinted rear windows. They’re probably illegal but who checks – they are ubiquitous.

  • avatar
    ktm_525

    Hey the Volvo V70 is available for a couple more months before it gets cancelled for NA. Will BMW offer the 5 touring with the redesign?

    RIP wagons.

    • 0 avatar
      Dr. Nguyen Van Falk

      VW Jetta Sportwagon. Available with stick and Petrol or Diesel. Too bad it comes with the VW ownership experience. There’s also the Passat Wagon, no stick or diesel, but it’s still a proper wagon.

      Subaru made wagons, but I don’t know what the hell to call the outback and forester now besides Kirstie Alley; ugly and obese.

      There’s a 3 series wagon too. It really is a shame there’s not something like the early 90’s Taurus wagon. Mid size, v6, with expansive interior and back-back seat. That was the last true wagon.

      It would be interesting to see a wagon like the old ramblers. 2 door with a rear seat and a proper wagon tail. Like an extended 2004 Civic Si or Volvo C30. It would never sell because I think I’m the only person in the world who desires something like that.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      Is Volvo cancelling the V70 for NA? Do they sell even a single one of their other cars here?

  • avatar
    Ernie

    Ed, congratulations, you’ve managed to get my hopes up and drop them with a picture and a sentence *sigh*

    ash — I’ve said it a few times, but the 6 is the nicest car Mazda has. Every tire rotation I do I can’t help think it’d make a killer X6 (stylistically) alternative.

    When we were test-driving different vehicles last spring, the CX-7’s ONLY redeeming quality was the non-premium fuel turbo engine. Since we already got my hopes up when I saw that shot, lovely variants would be (particularly if you could choose your ride):

    1) Mazda 6 Wagon (FWD or AWD)
    2) Mazda 6 CUV (sedan or wagon) (AWD only)

    OR they could just make an AWD MT only wagon and call it a MazdaSpeed6 . . . I’ll take two.

    • 0 avatar
      tlc123

      Bought a blue 04 6 Wagon, V6, 5 spd manual gear box, best of both worlds if you ask me, was looking a Passat (no stick of any kind in the V6) and the Volvo (drove like a pick-up truck), had a BLAST with my three teenagers and two Golden Retrievers putting 30k a year on the little beauty, traded it in for a black 6spd, 6 cyl, 06 6 wagon (haha), gorgeous car, already have 70k on it (btw the 04 and the 06 were about the same price) when i bought the second one my dealer warned me it could be the end for me and my love of 6Wagons, says in the four years he offered them he only sold 4, 2 of them to me…….so now I will find out whether they have longevity as well, if the 6 wagon doesn’t come back I will consider a speed3 but they’re too small for my family….THIS mama loves to DRIVE and drive I do with 3 kids in three different counties at three different must see sporting events who all have to be picked up at exactly the same time……me and my mazda weave in and out of the pathetic suv and minivan mom’s effortlessly and nearly without detection…..incredibly have only gotten 1 speeding ticket…makes me very glad i bought the second one now i know i’ll NEVER have a third! love you mazda6sw! ps i don’t really need 4wd, lived in upstate ny all my life, already KNOW how to drive in the snow!

    • 0 avatar
      Accazdatch

      TLC123

      Hearing you talk about your Mazda renews my faith in people.. and in women drivers.

      Id buy you a beer…

    • 0 avatar
      tlc123

      Accazdatch, Well, I do enjoy a nice cold beer, and don’t worry, I won’t spill it on the upholestry!

  • avatar
    bomberpete

    Hey gang, this is no preserve CX sales conspiracy. The last-gen 6 wagon was offered for 3 1/2 model years and sales were lousy. Great vehicle. You can criticize Mazda marketing, or say the masses are asses all you want, but that’s a fact. You can’t blame Mazda for not wanting to go down the same path again.

    • 0 avatar
      Ernie

      Mazda’s marketing is just, odd. I didn’t even know the MazdaSpeed6 was an AWD vehicle or I’d have hopped on that bandwagon :( That was a huge point in it’s favor; an AWD badge or better marketing campaign would have helped.

      The only conspiracy I know of is for the CX-9 . . . the nicest options that Mazda has are only on the high trim CX-9 and Mazda6. The CX-7 would be a lot nicer vehicle with advanced keyless and blindspot monitoring system.

      On the upside, I read an article that said they’re going to stop trying to “out honda” honda and so on . . . maybe they’ll buck trends.

    • 0 avatar
      James2

      I can criticize Mazda marketing. Has anyone ever since a single ad for the either the 6 hatch or wagon? Bigfoot sightings are more frequent. Even with the current Mazdas I think they rely more on word-of-mouth than anything.

  • avatar
    Autojunkie

    Wow Ed…

    Having a hard time reporting positive news about GM today? They announce that they will have 100% of the TARP money paid back in June 2010 and you make no annoucement of this news?

    I’m amazed… I honestly think that you, and other writers on this site, want GM (and Chrysler) to fail. You go out of your way spread the negativity and ignore any positive news.

    Keep spreading the hate…

    • 0 avatar
      Rod Panhard

      Autojunkie, you need to get your numbers straight. GM says it will pay back the $8 billion in “loans” to the U.S. and Canadian governments in June. You seem to have forgotten the almost $60 billion that the US government extended to GM, hoping that one day, GM would be able to go private through IPO, and the US government may find willing buyers for GM’s stock.

      I may have been educated in public schools in flyover states, but it appears to me that Uncle Sam extended a loan to GM on collateral that doesn’t exist, with only a hope that GM will figure out some way to pay it back. Will your bank do that for you?

      I didn’t think so.

  • avatar
    mpresley

    This is very good news. They’ve managed to get rid of the goofy “what me worry” smile. But only for the rest of the world? Why does Mazda hate America? On the other hand it’s the only “real” wagon in America? I guess the Passat is unreal.

  • avatar
    carguy

    Seems logical – the last US Mazda6 wagon didn’t sell very well so why invest all that money (the US spec Mazda6 is different from the rest of the world) to continue with poor sales? The CX-9 is a great sales success and that is where Mazda’s US focus should be for family vehicles.

    • 0 avatar
      Ernie

      I *LOVE* the fact that 6 seats 3 comfortably and 5 (smaller people) better than a compact. It’s *just* the right size to give me lots of leg room driving and enough leg room for my wife in the passenger seat and son behind her. There’s a Lincoln-esque amount of space in the trunk . . . the next time the in-laws come to visit, that’s my last-ditch hiding spot for sure:)

      I also love the 5 star all-around (even rollover) rating of the vehicle. I was almost sold an Accord for utility . . . then I drove the 6 and fell in love with a car that was enjoyable to drive and actually fit my needs.

      CUVs are okay, but most companies aren’t making use of the space well. When we were buying a midsize SUV for the wife, the fact that I couldn’t sit for any period of time in the second row (comfortably) crossed several (rather large) vehicles off our list.

    • 0 avatar
      TEXN3

      It has a Lincoln-sized trunk because it shares several components with a Lincoln! Still a sedan, and lacking the utility of a wagon.

  • avatar
    criminalenterprise

    How could you claim this the only real station wagon left in the market? I can think of 3 or 4 off the top of my head.

  • avatar
    aoliveiro

    Once again, TTAC fails to live up to the name. The truth is BMW, Mercedes, Audi, Cadillac, Dodge and Volvo offer wagons, with the BMW available in a stick. You will apparently have to settle for a “fake” car though and I don’t understand what makes the Mazda “real.”

    • 0 avatar
      TEXN3

      You can scratch Dodge off that list, for the past few years now.

      VW and Subaru still offers wagons, with a stick and AWD. Isn’t that what all the car enthusiasts blog they want?
      I have one, it’s great…and I narrowly missed out on a sweet Legacy GT wagon (yes, the elusive turbo+stick+awd trifecta).

    • 0 avatar
      Ernie

      Outback and Forester aren’t wagons anymore though. I keep mistaking the new Outback for Tribeca . . . on the upside, it’s 500lbs lighter and more aerodynamic than the Tribeca :)

    • 0 avatar
      TEXN3

      Outback still is, as is the Impreza wagon and it’s performance variants: WRX, STI.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      MB no longer sells the E wagon here. BMW won’t, at least from what I’m told, bring in the F10 (next 5) wagon. Someone above wrote Volvo is cancelling the V70 for NA. Dodge stopped building the Magnum. The BMW 3 is, in practice, no bigger than a Mazda 3, and slower (and twice the price) of a Mazdaspeed 3. Audi is still there, as is Cadillac, and, coming just in time for the demise of the 5, the Acura TSX. VW still builds the Passat and Jetta, which, except for real or perceived reliability, is pretty close to what the Mazda 6 was. Hyundai sells the Elantra. Subie’s Outback is still kind of a wagon, about as tall as an XC70, which most people consider wagons. The BMW 5GT is a hatch, despite what Bimmer salesmen tell 2011 5 wagon intenders. As is the Panamera. Slammed like a riced Civic, perhaps the Flex could sort of be passed off for a wagon as well….

      What I think many wagon fans really long for, is not just ‘a’ wagon, but a fairly large one, built by a manufacturer with a wide dealer network, a fairly unblemished quality reputation, with enough focus on fun to drive to distinguish itself from a CUV, and a non luxury nameplate price. Wagon people are practical folk, which is why they want a damned wagon in the first place. For most, Euro pretensions and tiny “sport wagons” just aren’t where it’s at. Of course, by this standard, pretty much the only qualifiers would be an Accord or a Mazda 6, with perhaps a Taurus for those not hung up on a stick.

    • 0 avatar
      JoeEgo

      Right: a practical, non-compact wagon. One that does not pretend to drive off road, sacrificing height, weight, and gas mileage in the name of image (Outback, Pacifica, Taurus X, Crosstour, etc). One that cannot be optioned over $50k.

      All the manufacturers pretend to bend over backwards for fuel efficiency while they continue with the CR-V, Escape, Highlander, CX-7, etc.

      How about wagon versions of some mid and full sized cars?
      Accord
      Camry
      Malibu
      Mazda 6
      Taurus
      Fusion

      And (dare I hope?) the Commodore Sportwagon. You can take Pontiac, but you can never take my FREEDOM!!!

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      What wagon people on this site need to understand is that the low-roof wagon is disappearing, even in Europe.

      Put it this way: even the biggest of the old full-size wagons couldn’t hold a candle the Sienna, Caravan or Oddy in terms of useful interior space, and the handling and ride prowess of a modern minivan is more or less on par with a full-size, front-drive sedan.

      Smaller wagons are similarly being displaced by crossovers and MPVs. Even in wagon-friendly Europe, we’re starting to see high-roof MPVs eat into wagon sales because, surprise, they’re more practical and truly what more people want. Take the Mazda6 wagon: what, exactly, does it offer over the Mazda5? Not cargo space, not fuel economy and not necessarily handling. Other manufacturers are falling suit because, as the sales figures are showing, people prefer to own CUVs and MPVs.

      The 6 wagon is just as much an ego-stroker as the CX-7, just in the other direction: it says “Look at me, I’m sporty and yet practical”, which, if it were true, would have landed you in an MPV. Fair’s fair, but wagon fans need to stop with the moral superiority and understand that, truthfully, the low-roof wagon that was borne out of the long/low/sleek 1950s school of design has truly run it’s course.

  • avatar
    dswilly

    The best and only sports wagons in the US is are the 3 & 5 series wagons from BMW, both available with 6MT’s

  • avatar
    mpvue

    everyone always bemoans a discontinued model, but when it IS available, no one buys it. enthusiasts make up a very small part of the market and you can’t build a whole company around them.
    I like the Mazda6 wagon also, but I’m very happy w/ my Mazda5 manual, and it seats six!

  • avatar
    ash78

    The problem with wagons is that they’re almost always offered in a very limited configuration.

    How about a car company picks a model and build it ONLY as a wagon? Yes, impractical.

    But if I’m a typical American walking into a Mazda dealer in 2003, I either want the super cheap, fleet-style model (base sedan), the full loaded model (also a sedan), or the MS6 (sedan).

    The wagon ends up languishing somewhere in the middle with no real identity.

    The MS3 was done right–wagon only. I actually thought the regular Mazda3 was wagon only, since it took about 6 months before I ever saw a sedan version when the car was new.

    • 0 avatar
      Ernie

      Subi made a lot of money that way :)

    • 0 avatar
      Dr. Nguyen Van Falk

      Right you are. However, what car has it’s own platform that’s not a German luxury car? Even those are being mutated into SUV’s now.

      A wagon only design isn’t really necessary, especially since the removal of the rear-facing back seat. An extended trunk and roof line doesn’t need any extra safety equipment, just some new glass and sheet metal. That’s what I don’t understand about the dearth of wagons; they’re much cheaper to make that CUVs from a car chassis. Please correct me if I’m mistaken about that.

      CUVs can be sold at a higher profit though and soccer moms determine the design trajectory of every car available in North America unfortunately. The American society is geared to please suburban soccer moms. It’s quite disappointing and boring to a city-dwelling male in his 20’s.

    • 0 avatar
      Ernie

      What I don’t get is this:

      Call it what you will, a CUV or SUV . . . after we traded in my CR-V, I came to realize that the only thing that gave it a “U” in the middle was having hatch glass.

      That was TRUE utility . . . didn’t even think I’d miss it until I tried to take a board home from the Home Depot that was as long as the vehicle and figured out it was a problem!

      What bright boy thought of taking that away?

    • 0 avatar
      Accazdatch

      ASH 78

      There is a deep seated reason.. for why wagons fail.
      The variation isnt enough.. to match the SUV / CUV.

      Case in point with the Mazda6, vs the tribute, CX-7 and 9.
      The SUVs / CUVs go on… because of variation.. and the wagon doesn’t, because of choice and variation.

      ————–
      Now Ernie:
      There is an actual difference in CONSTRUCTION for an SUV v a CUV.

      CUV is unibody.
      SUV is body on frame.

      The media gets it wrong.
      The people who drive the damn things get it wrong…

      Call it what it is.

      Exploder — B.O.F
      CRV – Unibody.

      The glass.. in the back is almost a moot point. I had to spent 30min coming home.. behind some YAHOO in a Edge (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ford_Edge). How it fails in design, is having a frame for the glass to extend out, so large objects can sit on the inside of the rear window frame… not hang out the back, under the hatch, limiting the rear visibility. (As if ya actually get ANY visibility through the rear of ANY SUV / CUV). Its the fact that 99% are tinted.. and listed as light trucks (defined b y a weight of up to 5000lbs by the NHTSA) by the NHTSA that tell you..these aren’t C A R S.

  • avatar
    MSil34

    To me, I like the look of the wagon a lot more then the sedan. The front seems to flow better with the rest of the vehicle. At the very least, the rear doesn’t look overwrought and exaggerated unlike some other manufacturers (I’m looking at you, Lincoln). I would definitely give this car a look if I had a family, but I understand why Mazda does not bring this to the states. For better or worse, CUVs have replaced wagons for a lot of companies. Perhaps this will change in the future, but certainly not soon.

  • avatar
    pb35

    I purchased a 2005 Mazda 6 wagon with a manual back in ’05. I traded it in 2007 for a V8 XC90.

    The Mazda was a stripper with no options but it was a lot of fun. It could fit almost anything I needed to throw back there. I had some clutch issues that the dealer was unable to resolve and it just didn’t feel like a “solid” car (thin doors, wind noise, trans whine on the highway) so I got rid of it.

    People used to ask me how I liked my Magnum.

  • avatar
    bomberpete

    @aoliveiro: You’re right on all fronts but one — what Dodge model do you consider to be a “real” wagon? The Journey?

    They discontinued the Magnum about 2 years ago — though I suspect there may be a couple of cobwebbed “new” ones lying around a dealer lot somewhere.

    Also, I suspect the enthusiast who doesn’t care about buying an orphan could get a nice deal on a Saab wagon now, right?

  • avatar
    bill h.

    Perhaps bomberpete, if you can find them….not that many 2009s were made, and the dealer stocks are pretty well depleted. But the next gen 9-5 wagon is undergoing testing right now if the spy shots are to be believed.

  • avatar
    bomberpete

    Thanks bill h., you’re probably right. As for a brand-new 9-5 wagon, that assumes there will still be a Saab brand sold in the U.S. At this point, isn’t that a dubious proposition?

  • avatar
    mtymsi

    Really, I can appreciate those that want a MT AWD wagon and I think every one of you in the country that wants such a vehicle has posted on this thread. In the meantime, back at the ranch, any vehicle manufacturer intent on staying viable can only offer vehicles that would sell to the other 99.99% of potential buyers. It’s really a no brainer to figure out why Mazda isn’t bringing the wagon model here, there’s virtually no demand.

    • 0 avatar
      Ernie

      What I *REALLY* liked about the Honda CR-V was that there was NO 2WD option for the Manual Transmission. Exactly the opposite of most competitors . . . the theory apparently was that someone who wanted a manual knew what they wanted and Honda didn’t have to make 2 drivetrains.

      The last year I owned my CR-V, I had several dealerships tell me there was no such thing :D One tech at Brewster Honda had to send someone else out to drive it in because he couldn’t handle a clutch!

      ——
      AWD is sort of a waste, but I’ve always wanted an LSD. That’s another thing I’m totally shocked isn’t in every vehicle by now. What’s just plain scary is the number of people that think Traction Control and DSC is for TRACTION . . . sad.

    • 0 avatar
      TEXN3

      I disagree AWD being a waste, at least not out here in the western front of the Rockies. I have symmetrical AWD, two locking diffs, a manual, and no electronic traction devices. Plus, Yokohama Geolander tires for all weather conditions. It’s quite fun in the snow and dirt, as well as quiet on the highway going along at 80 MPH or so.

      Speaking of HIDs, they are nice and can be an easy upgrade to any car with projector-style headlights. So I’m told, my Sylvania Xtravision bulbs do as well as my old Mazda with OEM HIDs. It was a 2006 3 GT wagon which was fine in TX, not so much in ID…and started having major issues after 3 years, just another Ford product I regret buying. I wish I would have gotten a 6 hatch or wagon at that time too. Hope your 6 treats you well!

    • 0 avatar
      Dr. Nguyen Van Falk

      TEXN,

      What car do you drive? An MB Gwagon?

    • 0 avatar
      TEXN3

      2007 Subaru Outback MT, and a 1984 Volvo 760 GLE Turbo MT.

  • avatar
    bomberpete

    The Pacifica WAS a wagon – or not. Either way, it’s 2010, not 2007 and the Magnum and Pacifica are both TU as in muerta.

  • avatar
    carlisimo

    Let’s be honest here – this is a car that all of you want someone ELSE to buy. Mazda sold a Mazda6 wagon here and it was a flop. Why insist that they do the same thing again?

    • 0 avatar
      Ernie

      I’d been lusting after a Mazda for the last few years . . . the increase in size and crash tests on the 2009 Mazda6 got rid of my only real objections.

      Of course, I’m not loving the front, open diff in slippery conditions and WOULD like more power . . . the Legacy GT is now a very close competitor in the back of my head . . . it really needs HIDs though for me to truly consider jumping ship – I’ve gotten VERY used to seeing well in the dark.

  • avatar
    Steve Biro

    “carlisimoJanuary 26th, 2010 at 4:14 pm
    Let’s be honest here – this is a car that all of you want someone ELSE to buy. Mazda sold a Mazda6 wagon here and it was a flop. Why insist that they do the same thing again?”

    Well, in my case, my life doesn’t necessarily fit perfectly with automotive product cycles. I’d love to buy a V-6 Mazda6 wagon with manual transmission. But various events in my life ensured I couldn’t be in the market until this year.

    But it is true… cars equipped like this don’t sell well in this country. The problem for enthusiasts is that, as a result, we have to buy what the masses want – boring cars equipped for multi-tasking. Unless, of course, you have a lot of money. Then you can buy pretty much anything you want. It’s the American Way. :)

  • avatar
    stevelovescars

    I believe wholeheartedly that the lack of “demand” for wagons, and manual transmission for that matter, has more to do with dealers being afraid to order them as much as a lack of buyer demand. For example, this is a real conversation I had with the local VW dealer a few weeks ago while checking out the Jetta Wagon:

    Me: “So, do you have any of these with a manual transmission… I’d especially be interested in a TDi with a stick shift.”

    Sales Manager: “Oh, you’re one of THOSE people?”

    Me: “Huh?”

    Sales Manager: “Yeah, every week I get at least 5 or 6 of you people in here looking for wagons with manual transmissions… you’re just all fruitcakes or something. I mean, seriously, I can’t order these with stickshifts, they’ll sit around for months because nobody wants them.”

    Me: “I thought you just said that you had 5 or 6 people a week asking you for that combination?”

    Sales Manager: “Yeah, but you are all just crazy, nobody wants to buy cars with stick shifts…”

    I had a similar experience when I wanted a Mazda5 with a manual transmission. I ended up getting one from a dealer 30 miles away. After a couple of years when I sold it (and ended up buying a new one… long story), I was able to sell the stick-shift for more than I owed in about 2 days. I had a ton of calls from people who wanted to buy one with a manual transmission and had struck out at the dealerships. When I sold my beloved BMW 525iT with a stick a few years earlier, I had calls from my eBay listing from people all over the country.

  • avatar
    flanken

    I do wonder what’ll be available when it comes time to replace my ’04 6 wagon. I get the feeling the offerings will be paltry. I can think of few things that would be as fun to drive with a 150-gallon aquarium loaded in the back (one of many cargo adventures of the last 6 years). I think the only thing I’d ditch from the current iteration is the 3.0L MZI engine, which manages to be both a somewhat gutless wonder and a fuel guzzler at the same time.

    Oh well. Glad to see the new one didn’t succumb to the Mazda happy face.

    • 0 avatar
      hp12c

      Same story here, as a proud owner of a ’04 6 wagon purchased new. After 70K miles I’m clueless as to what to replace it with when it’s time, although there’s really no excuse to part with it since it’s been so reliable. Heck if the car got stolen or totaled tomorrow I’d probably be on Autotrader trying to find the exact same car, or else an E39 BMW wagon with really low miles. Can you say needle in a haystack?

  • avatar
    krhodes1

    I have but three requirements for a daily driver that I am going to spend the money to buy new:

    1. Station wagon
    2. 2wd -prefer RWD but a good FWD chassis is fine
    3. Manual transmission

    I put my money where my mouth is – I bought an ’08 Saab 9-3 Wagon, WITH 6spd manual transmission. And I searched for it, traveled a long distance to buy it, and got less than of a discount on it than I would have on an automatic 9-3 wagon. And if it weren’t for the near $13K discount I got, I would have bought a Jetta Wagon TDI with manual transmission. But I couldn’t pass up a 9-3 for the same price as a Jetta – for the price I will trade fuel efficiency for more fun to drive, the Jetta is a little stodgy. So I guess I am one of those “crazy people”!

    The dealers certainly create this situation – if there was more supply, there would be more demand. At least BMW will still let you actually ORDER a car built to your specifications! Niether VW nor Saab allow this. My next car will be a European delivery 328i Wagon, with manual transmission, if they will still build me such in a few years. Actually, I am crossing my fingers that they offer the 320D wagon in the US. You bet it is twice the price of a Mazdaspeed3, and it is worth every single penny.

    And I guarantee that when the time comes to sell my 9-3, I will be beating the buyers away with a stick (no pun intended).

  • avatar
    johnny ro

    New 2006 Mazda 6 wagon looked good on paper but dash was kind of glitzy cheap plastic, and it hummed and thrummed a low frequency boom on the road, body resonating away. I could not listen to that and buy the car at about 16k with manual new. Sales guy said “There is no noise” “Wait yes there is, how did you know this car does that”

    -“I just found out”

  • avatar
    Kyle Schellenberg

    Let’s just wait until the term “crossover” starts stirring up negative connotations in the marketplace like “wagon” and “minivan” did before and then we’ll be on to the next great product idea.

  • avatar
    treedom

    BRING IT HERE NOW!!! I drove and enjoyed a new Mazda6 V6 the other day but just couldn’t bring myself to give up my wagon’s dog compartment.

    Don’t steer me to their CUV’s. Props to Mazda for the turbocharging and sophisticated suspension, but swapping a unibody for a ladder frame doesn’t entirely change the fact that even the best SUV/CUV is too tall, too heavy, and too poorly space-packaged compared to the equivalent car.

    I guess we in the performance wagon market are supposed to be satisfied with the underpowered used BMW 525s, 90k mi used-up Mazda 6s, and absurd Dodge Magnums with hatch areas no taller than a trunk (not suitable for dogs). The E-class Mercedes wagon is a myth on the level of the chupacabra, good luck ever finding a used one. There are really only two other alternatives, a used Saab 9-5 or a Volvo V70 with the high-pressure turbo — nice if dated cars, but good luck finding a high-pressure turbo version, and look forward to years of costly repairs.

    Sigh. I guess I’m going to have to bite the used Swedish bullet.

  • avatar
    bomberpete

    @treedom — Um, haven’t you heard of VW, Audi, and turbocharged Subarus? Or wait until Cadillac CTS wagons come off lease, or until someone else takes that depreciation hit.


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