By on December 11, 2006

57.jpgWhenever I show up at my weekly poker game, the boys (being boys) are always interested in what I'm driving. How much? How fast? Not this week. This week, all my friends piled into the driveway and laughed. Can you blame them? Ford's new Expedition EL is so large I had to park it diagonally to keep its butt off the street. The wheels come up to my thigh. One 6'5" friend couldn't see the roof. Remember King Kong Bundy? He now wears dubs.

Despite the comedy (if you attached flippers to an EL, a sperm whale would want to hump its back), the Expedition is a handsome beast. Yes, the grill is only slightly less confrontational than the business end of a DASH 9 locomotive. But it flows smoothly into the massive hood-bulge, especially with the box checked for matching body color. The [optional] blingtastic 20" chrome wheels give the EL pure proportionality– even if everything behind the rear-doors is a single sheet of glass. And yes, despite it all, the EL's still got street cred; seven fast & furious teenagers told me how fly my ride was. Just don't look at its frumpy tuchus.

cargo-big.jpgIf the outside is gangsta's paradise, the inside is Harry & David meets Sharper Image. The seats are the best offered in any American SUV. They may have as much to do with proper driving as John Kerry does with Army recruiting, but two-hours on the road feels like fifteen minutes in bed on a Sunday morning reading the papers. Gross Ford binnage abounds. Unless you touch them, the plastics– dyed a deeper shade of drab– don't offend. So don't.

I really fell for the piece of dead tree ringing the upper half of steering wheel. It made me think I was holding the tiller of a Lexus. Or a Riva. Or a minivan on stilts. The EL can legitimately claim enough head, shoulder and leg room for eight adults AND enough cargo capacity for all the stuff they're likely to schlep. And it’s all so easy. Press the plipper twice and the tailgate swings open automatically. Hold two buttons down for about twenty-seconds and the third row falls flat. Although the load-in height is too high, it’s still a Suburban salesman’s worst nightmare. 

ford_expedition-1222.jpgAs you’d expect from Ford’s luxury land yacht, the Expedition is geared-up with gizmos. The bigger, brighter radio and navigation touch-screen is a model of ergonomic ease. Gamers score three power points. A rear-view camera is notable by its absence. It’s a huge, silly misstep; my $49.99 phone can shoot video and a Bighorn Elk could hide behind the Expedition's power liftgate. And the much ballyhooed air-conditioned seats are less cooling than a ceiling fan in Notre Dame cathedral.

If Mazda's CX-7 is the Marvin Harrison of the SUV world, and Porsche’s Cayenne Turbo is LaDainian Tomlinson, then the Ford Expedition EL is John Madden: a bit clumsy, self-satisfied and happiest when cruising. True, the EL’s multi-link, independent rear-suspension and RSC (Roll Stability Control) let you take a bit of speed into a corner– make that “turn"– but you'll feel a whole lot better if you don't.

On the positive side, the EL swallows road imperfections like bon-bons, even if it tends to jiggle at highway speeds. (Let's blame the motion on our 4X4 tester's 6155 pound curb weight.) While the Expedition doesn't waft like a truly dignified luxury vehicle-– no dirt-hauler based SUV does — helming the beast makes you feel like the captain of an oil tanker on the open sea. If something gets in your way, it’s something's problem.

1.jpgThe Expedition’s 5.4-liter big block V8 shares its basic components with the TTAC-debatable Shelby GT500. Unlike the mad Mustang's supercharged motor, which sounds like a circular saw opening a propane tank, the EL’s 300hp mill is eerily quiet. The Triton™ powerplant generates enough torque to amble about town, tow 9100 lbs. of lifestyle gear or both (365ft. lbs. of twist at a leisurely 3,750rpm). The Expedition EL’s intuitive six-speed auto makes the most of the SUV’s oomph, downshifting at the flick of an ankle. Not that you'll ever have to pass anybody, since everybody gets the Hell out of your way anyway.

The Expedition's tall-geared transmission helps peg the monster’s mileage at a not completely derisory 15.6 mpg– at speeds up to 100mph. (Sorry, but it's my job officer.) So should you buy one? No. The Expedition EL is so large it's silly. I know, you “need” to haul a large family while towing the Lusitania. But why not purchase Ford's underrated Freestyle for chump change– which offers almost as much storage/seating– and use the money saved on gas to rent a slip at your favorite marina? Why not indeed.

[Jonny and RF discuss the EL in the podcast below.] 

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

154 Comments on “Ford Expedition EL Review...”


  • avatar
    JJ

    So…

    What would be the fuel economy while you’re actually towing a boat with 8 people in the car?

  • avatar
    CSJohnston

    Jonny,

    I think you’ve pretty much summed up the whole issue with large SUV’s. Incredibly practical but for 90% of the time, a minivan can do the job. However, no one will ever think a minivan is “fly” (yet) and that’s why this truck will sell to more than its core market. Our head says Freestyle, our pride says Expedition EL.

    Sad but true.

    Nice SUV though…

  • avatar
    jazbo123

    It’s a shame that our US domestics are so good at building perfect vehicles for the previous decade’s marketplace.

  • avatar
    ash78

    I’ve always had a soft spot for the Expedition, for some reason. Maybe it’s the “thinking man’s Navigator” status. But all bets are off when I look over at the bumper of one, sitting right at my eye level, as the mom driving balances her text messaging and beating the children.

    Also, I despise wood on steering wheels for more reasons than I care to list right now. Always a bad idea.

    Can you fit a 4×8 sheet in the back?

  • avatar
    mikey

    Good piece Johnny,
    I like the truck.This baby is what the domestics do best.
    In order for the big 2.5 to survive they gotta build and sell what the competition isn’t’
    If this is what you like folks buy it.

  • avatar

    I drove one of these a few weeks ago, but haven’t yet written up my impressions. You pretty well sum them up.

    I especially agree on the front seats. They are incredibly comfortable. Also have to agree on the amount of room–makes those of us who are only 5-9 feel like we’ve stumbled into a land of giants. The advantages of an IRS for packaging are proven by this vehicle.

    Ford slashed the price of the Expedition this year, so it’s now much less expensive than GM’s big trucks:

    http://www.truedelta.com/prices.php

  • avatar
    HEATHROI

    On the positive side, the EL swallows road imperfections like bon-bons, even if it tends to jiggle at highway speeds. (Let’s blame the motion on our 4X4 tester’s 6155 pound curb weight.

    Is the tester the person driving the beast?

  • avatar
    William C Montgomery

    My sister recently traded in her old Expedition for an ’07. Despite 11mpg (and to my surprise), she loves it. She hauls around her 5 kids and about 6 times a year takes road trips half-way across the Rocky Mountains to visit grandma. Her husband also uses the rig to take their son’s Boy Scouts troop camping a couple of times a year. I would not buy an Expedition – I do not have the need – but it works really well for them.

    CSJohnston: I think you’ve pretty much summed up the whole issue with large SUV’s. Incredibly practical but for 90% of the time, a minivan can do the job.

    So what are you supposed to do the 10% of the time that you need the SUV capability? Own a second vehicle that you only drive when you absolutely need the capability that only an SUV can provide? Most people cannot afford to own a minivan to drive during the week and an SUV for weekends and camping trips.

  • avatar
    starlightmica

    Most people cannot afford to own a minivan to drive during the week and an SUV for weekends and camping trips.

    If gas prices go through the roof, I’m sure someone will start a national chain of Rent-A-Guzzler to fill that need.

  • avatar
    jerseydevil

    So what are you supposed to do the 10% of the time that you need the SUV capability?

    well then i would need a huge suv convertable, cause what am i supposed to do if i need to drive eight people and all their stuff and one of them wants to see the moon as we are driving? Am I supposed to say “No”, or ” I can’t”.? How sad this does not come as a hardtop convertable!

  • avatar

    Nice review. I’ve always preferred Ford’s SUVs to GM’s or Chrysler’s(Jeep excluded) or any of the foreign makes. If I was in the market for something like this, this would be at the top of my list. We don’t build much right here in this country, but we do know our trucks.

  • avatar
    Jonny Lieberman

    And Jerseydevil nails it.

  • avatar
    Sajeev Mehta

    Well said, JL. The transmission really makes it, first gear is insanely short! Compared to other large SUVs, I’m amazed at how nice that 3rd row is. Full size adults happily spend hours back there.

  • avatar
    jerseydevil

    also its missing a fifth and sixth row. Am I supposed to have my 14 kids wait until i get back? How rude.

  • avatar
    jerseydevil

    what if i need to tow TWO boats and three small houses to stay in while i am camping?

  • avatar
    jerseydevil

    I’ll stop now

  • avatar
    KixStart

    “So what are you supposed to do the 10% of the time that you need the SUV capability?”

    It depends. What made you think you needed the capabilities of the SUV, after all?

    If tow capability isn’t the issue, the answer to this is usually take two cars instead of just one. Or add a trailer (trailers are incredibly cheap to own and operate). Or tie stuff on the roof.

    If tow capacity IS the issue, did you get tow capacity for your current boat or for the boat you hope to buy someday? My minivan will tow 3500lbs. How big is that boat, anyway?

    We go Scout camping, too. Two years ago, we took our Troop trailer everywhere. Then we started a program to lighten up. By switching some equipment and taking just what we need instead of anything we might possibly want, we now go everywhere in a short parade of cars and minivans and the trailer stays home (except for our week at resident camp, where it’s useful as a bear box). The planning discipline required to select and fit the gear into a few minivans is good for the boys.

    No, we don’t leave the comfy collapsible chairs for the Scoutmasters behind – that’s definitely a “need” item!

  • avatar
    jl1280

    Can you say or spell: stupid, greedy, ignorant, useless, ugly, or any other similar words. Is there any recognition of global heating, CO2, oil depletion? Looks like not until it will be too late.

  • avatar
    Sajeev Mehta

    If tow capacity IS the issue, did you get tow capacity for your current boat or for the boat you hope to buy someday? My minivan will tow 3500lbs. How big is that boat, anyway?

    KixStart, let’s put it this way:

    How many transmissions do you want to run through?

    How many melted front brakes are to your liking? Oversized brakes are very necessary for towing the Big Dog toys.

    Considering used boats are dirt cheap, you can have a nice 26′ boat for 15k or less, buying a worthy tow vehicle that also performs minivan duties isn’t as dumb as it sounds. Your minivan’s 3500lbs will tow the trailer of a 26′ boat, but not much else. Not to mention Minivans don’t punch a big enough hole on the freeway to compensate for something so large and unaerodynamic. Bigger is better in this case.

  • avatar
    Jonny Lieberman

    Sajeev — no one is saying that the truck isn’t capable — they are asking why people “need” Big Dog Toys.

    And don’t call them communists or whatever — it is a legitimate question.

  • avatar
    SherbornSean

    Jerseydevil,
    Wait for the Carrera version which can take the ‘Ring in less than 9 minutes

  • avatar
    UnclePete

    starlightmica said:
    If gas prices go through the roof, I’m sure someone will start a national chain of Rent-A-Guzzler to fill that need.

    It’s called UHaul. :-) I rent an Econoline or pickup from them for $20 a day and 59 cents a mile when I need to haul stuff. The local Lowe’s has a truck I can rent for $20 for 75 minutes plus gas. So far I have been able to avoid buying another truck by using these alternatives.

  • avatar
    CSJohnston

    William C. Montgomery

    A bad use of syntax on my part. Let’s put it this way, for the small percentage of the market that needs both the people hauling and equipment hauling power of a large SUV, then there is no substitute.

    However, if you’re using your large SUV as on over-engineered minivan and only truly need something like an Expedition or Suburban on very few occasions (eg. you want to rent a trailer to take the brood camping one summer), it may be more sensible to rent a vehicle in those instances.

    Just a thought.

  • avatar

    Great review. Lousy truck. Terrible car. Why don’t they stick a diesel in there?

  • avatar
    Cowbell

    Johnny, let’s please not start the “what people need” question again. It goes nowhere, and there is never a good answer. I’ll sum it up so maybe we can avoid it:

    1. “I have a 4 kids & a boat/bad weather”

    2. “You don’t really need an SUV for that”

    1. “No one needs a porsche/M/AMG/Miata, but no one on this site complains about that.”

    2. My sports car isn’t as dangerous as your SUV being driven by mom with cellphone/kids/make-up/insert cliche”

    1. “No one in America needs most of the stuff they have. No one needs big house/TV/steaks/a yard.”

    Can’t we just agree that when it comes to cars people want what they want, and to some extents, almost all the cars bigger than a Yaris aren’t neccessary in the hunter-gatherer sense of the word?

  • avatar
    Sajeev Mehta

    Sajeev — no one is saying that the truck isn’t capable — they are asking why people “need” Big Dog Toys.

    People need big toys for the same reason we need to voice our opinions on the internet. Questioning it is rather pointless, its gonna happen no matter what.

    (insert Chevy pickup “Our Country” melody here)

    The concept of getting one vehicle that does a good job impersonating a minivan (luxury, safety features, etc) and a F250 Superduty (towing with decent brakes, durable transmission, etc) actually makes sense when you need to tow over 5000lbs of pleasure boat, a race car/trailer/tires/tools, etc.

    And the last time I saw the Green Party on campus (Nader spoke) the fleet of “green” rides in the parking lot were 10+ years old and polluted way more than a ULEV-II certified Expedition.

  • avatar

    Considering how often I snipe at reviewers here, I may shock some when I say that this is a good review!

    Yes, large SUVs are silly…but down here in the Southwest where construction and/or ranches commonly involve getting people and stuff to places ahead of paved roads, a lot of them get usage that would cancel the front CVs of a Sienna or Caravan. I find a big SUV to be a fantastic 2nd vehicle, but I agree that using one for urban commuting is pretty dumb.

    The conclusion is maybe what I agree with most-the Freestyle is usually available for big discounts, has proven to perform better than its numbers suggest in numerous comparos, and swallows huge quantities of people/stuff.

    I’m not sayinig there’s no place or need for big SUVs…but I think a lot of backlash would go away if they were bought by more people that really used/needed them.

  • avatar
    SherbornSean

    Cowbell,
    Are you available to sort out the Middle East peace process?

  • avatar
    mikey

    If I could figure out how to build an afordable vehicle that meets everyones needs or wants,I would be the first GM employee to move from the shipper/reciever desk to Bob Lutzs office.
    It works for the scout master, it works for mom driving in the mountains.It don’t work for the guy in the city living in the condo.
    Unless we ban cars, the tree huggers won’t be happy.
    I prefer smaller,not small more nimble vehicles I live in the burbs where the car is king.I see everything from KIAs to monster SUVs everyday.I live in southern Ontario where it cost 100$ to fill up a Yukon. I just saw 2 of em drive by.
    Freedom of choice works for me

  • avatar
    Sajeev Mehta

    I’m not sayinig there’s no place or need for big SUVs…but I think a lot of backlash would go away if they were bought by more people that really used/needed them.

    Zanary: that’s the truth. Problem is, people don’t buy these things at gunpoint. They want them.

  • avatar

    Sajeev-

    -thanks for that most recent post. It’s nice to see someone else noticing the same things for a change. I’ve tried making similar observations on different auto boards for YEARS…but some inner-city-types are just determined to hate big SUVs even when their practical uses are spelled out.

    I find it hilarious that many of the “car enthusiasts” of the internet have so much hatred for the kinds of vehicles that bring the 356s and the MG-TCs to the shows in the first place.

  • avatar
    Jim H

    Last I checked…many of the quality sports cars that got rave reviews on this site are in the same gas mileage range as this SUV. If you are hualing 6 adults…that’s either 2 or 3 sports cars…and a much higher consumption of gasoline.

    If we are going to break down “needs”…then lets all admit that the majority of the sports cars that make most of you giddy as if you are viewing your first dirty magazine are every bit as inefficient and wasteful as this SUV…but probably even more expensive.

    For some…driving a sports car makes them feel alive. For others, denying their own selfish desires to ensure they can haul everyone else (and everything) around to soccer, boating, fishing, business meetings w/clients, take the family camping, help folks move, etc., etc., etc. makes them feel alive.

    I don’t find fault in either group…nor should any of you.

  • avatar
    jazbo123

    Can you say or spell: stupid, greedy, ignorant, useless, ugly, or any other similar words. Is there any recognition of global heating, CO2, oil depletion? Looks like not until it will be too late.

    jl1280:

    Don’t sweat it. Per Al Gore we have just over 9 years left until the end of the world…plenty of time.

  • avatar
    Jonny Lieberman

    Ah, yes… Cain vs. Abel.

    Anyhow, this truck is so big people laugh when they see it.

    They simply laugh.

  • avatar
    KixStart

    “greenies … 10+ years old … less pollution than an ULEV II Expedition…”

    Except that CO2 isn’t regarded as a “pollutant.” Yet. However, it’s now a recognized problem. Those 10+ year old cars aren’t throwing out anywhere near the carbon that this beast is.

    The days of the limitless frontier and unbounded resources are over. WIth 6 billion + people on the planet, everything you do affects me and vice versa. I can control my carbon emissions, up to a point but without everyone’s cooperation, some bad sh!t is gonna happen. We have a disproportionate impact on the planet and it’s unreasonable to expect the planet to have systems to compensate for human ingenuity. There isn’t 6 billion of any other large animal on the planet and they don’t light cookfires and dig up and burn dead dinosaurs.

    A friend happened to recently take me for a ride in his Expedition. It has a trip computer. I started to punch the buttons and it called up the gas mileage. 12 mpg! He noticed, “Change that, willya? It’s just depressing.” This guy doesn’t have a boat. Two kids grown and moved out. What the hell is that thing for? Get a Civic!

  • avatar
    shabster

    Cowbell:

    Bingo!

  • avatar
    doctorv8

    Funny that you found the ventilated seats ineffective. The ones in my 05 Navigator make me think I wet my pants within about 2 minutes.

  • avatar
    Jonny Lieberman

    DocV8 — maybe mine were defective — but they simply didn’t work.

    And I could have used them.

  • avatar
    Sajeev Mehta

    I can’t remember the last time I saw a 26′ boat under tow on the way to the lake district.

    I’m sorry you play in a smaller pond than I do. Here on the Gulf Coast you see the large number of 20-30′ boats. Even a 4000lb boat + trailer being towed at 70mph is a lot of demand for a minivan’s braking system. Not worth the risk, esp with kids and cargo too.

    Those 10+ year old cars aren’t throwing out anywhere near the carbon that this beast is.

    If that’s true (I don’t know) they certainly throw out way more NOx and other worse pollutants. Do you really think older cars are better for the environment than newer SUVs?

    This guy doesn’t have a boat. Two kids grown and moved out. What the hell is that thing for? Get a Civic!

    Did he listen to you?

  • avatar
    Dave M.

    I’ll start worrying about dictating what people drive when I see following:

    1. The Hollywood clan pull their Prius’ up to mansions of no more than 500 square feet per person in their family.

    2. The NY media use subways instead of taxis, limos, and personal vehicles. (Even I, a country bumpkin, can easily get around on the subways there….)

    3. A national recycling policy concerning the re-use of plastics, glass and paper.

    4. A 30% reduction in paperwork coming out of our local, state and federal governments. For starters.

    Otherwise, STFU and STFD. I’ll drive what I want/need/wish to drive.

  • avatar

    Ah, yes… Cain vs. Abel.

    Anyhow, this truck is so big people laugh when they see it.

    They simply laugh.

    Sales of both the Expy and the Navigator are up since the refreshes…so some of those laughing people are also writing checks to Ford.

  • avatar
    tms1999

    I have not kept up with the offering of things to drive in the 5000+ lbs, so please let me apologize for this silly question.

    Wasn’t there an Ford Excursion even bigger than this? Or did they just kill the name (a habit of Ford) and rename the Excursion to Expedition EL?

    In other news, lifestyle is a choice. You do not need and SUV, even for towing a boat, because you do not need a boat in the first place. People buy oversized monster truck because they can, not because they have to.

    Put another way, if fuel economy was a concern for consumers, then the fuel efficient cars would be more expensive than the gaz guzzler. Expedition: $15,000, Civic: $25,000.

  • avatar
    jerseydevil

    yeah what if u have a 200 ft boat, two mother in laws the combined size of a winn-dixie and need to bring four cows along cause the kids need fresh milk, and we gotta stop at the mall? HUH? HUH? Then what?

  • avatar
    greenb1ood

    As a Ford Employee who used to be in charge of pricing wood steering wheels, it saddens me everytime I see a review where the wood is believed to be fake.

    There isn’t a single Ford steering wheel with faux wood, as it is not allowed. As you would expect, Ford pays a hefty premium to include real wood on all it’s products, and apparently all that money is going to waste.

    GB

  • avatar
    Jonny Lieberman

    The Excursion was based on the beefier super-duty (F-250) chassis.

    It wasn’t longer, but it sure was heavier.

    7,190lbs. curb weight.

    7.3L engine

    8mpg

  • avatar
    geeber

    The end of the world has been around the corner as long has I have been alive.

    Global cooling, Paul Ehrlich’s constant gloom-and doom predictions (all of which turned out to be wrong), the threat of nuclear winter, the Club of Rome’s predictions that we were running out of resources…on through the latest worry – global warming. Somehow, we are still here, and the environment in developed countries is cleaner than ever.

    If anyone doubts that, I’ll take him or her to Donora, Pa., where people DIED in the late 1940s from a cloud of pollution (generated by steel mills, coal- and wood-fired home furnaces and vehicle exhaust) that settled over the town.

    And I don’t mean that they died years later…they died immediately, some almost dropping dead on the street.

    Let’s just say that no one in Pennsylvania has dropped dead from air pollution in the decades since.

    Someone once said that the environment is too important to leave to the environmentalists, and I’m beginning to see the wisdom of that statement. Years of overheated predictions of disaster (which are often geared to fund-raising efforts by lobbying groups), combined with some questionable science, are undermining their credibility. In my job I see this firsthand.

    Of course, people who worry about global warming and preach the need to reduce fossil fuel use don’t do their credibility much good when they use higher fuel prices – the one mechanism that CAN reduce use and encourage conservation – as a tool to beat up oil companies and people who happen to be in charge of government at the time.

    (Not referring to posters on this site – I’m talking about national figures.)

    Of course our world isn’t perfect, and there are problems that need to be addressed.

    Demonizing big SUVs and the people who drive them is hardly productive, however, especially since the whole segment appears to be in a long-term decline.

    Here in Harrisburg, Pa., the local Cadillac has Escalades (the new 2007 model that was supposed to help save GM’s bacon) stacked up like cordwood around the lot with “$4,000 off” scrawled on the windshield. The new Expedition doesn’t appear to be selling much better.

    The hype in GM and Ford press releases nonwithstanding, it doesn’t appear that these vehicles are all that hot. “Hot” vehicles don’t need $4,000 knocked off the sticker price. If anyone doubts that, we can visit the local Honda dealer and price a Fit – if he has one on the lot, which is doubtful.

    I have the feeling that within five years the segment will have shrunk to where it was in the 1970s – they will be specialty vehicles bought by a few people who really use their capabilities – and we will have moved on to the next “crisis.”

  • avatar
    doctorv8

    tms,

    The old Excursion was based on the larger 3/4 ton F250, whereas the Expedtion EL is just a stretched regular Expedition, that is loosely based on the F150, but with an independent rear suspension (which it has featured along with its Navigator sibling since 2003).

    Jonny,

    I wonder if they’ve switched seat ventilation systems. Most of the German cars I’ve sampled with seat coolers pull the air through the seat, whereas the Lincoln trucks have always been like sitting on an air hockey table. I’ll have to sample an ’07 for myself…this is a huge feature down here in Houston!

  • avatar

    The late Excursion was on the Superduty chassis, whereas the Expy is based on the F-150.

    Funny thing about the Excursion…it sold in relatively tiny numbers and largely seemed to go to people with real uses for it. All the snarling and hacking by the press and online would have had you believe they were selling the the tens of millions monthly.

    I’ll never understand the point of hating inanimate objects.

  • avatar

    The thought of one of these behemoths doing a “ton” in the same county I’m in scares the bejeezus out of me.So what happens at 100 MPH if you move that wooden tiller a few degrees to starboard, or port?

    Otherwise, I agree with jazbo123, this is Detroit fighting to win the last war. This kind of product may have been a winner in the 90s, but we’re in the latter half of the oughts now. Where’s the mid-size sedan that gets 40 MPG? Where are my hyper-efficient turbo Diesels? Where are my sports/commuter fun cars?

    And Zanary, I *drive* the old Jag to the show thank you very much. The only time it is towed is when it breaks down. For some reason, that only happens on the way home. ;)

    –chuck

  • avatar

    Zanary….I couldn’t agree with you more. In a similar instance, I love pointing out to people that “hate truckers for clogging up the roads”. How do you think everything in this country gets to where it needs to get to? The clothes on your back, the food on your table, the car in your driveway, all delivered by truckers.

    Big SUVs, although 80% used frivolously, are a necessary evil for 20% of the people who buy them.

    P.S. Zanary, did you used to post on the Autoweek boards under the same name?

  • avatar
    jerseydevil

    why in the world would I pay my good money to install a swimming pool in my back yard when i can just fill up the back of the ford? High diving anyone?

  • avatar
    Jonny Lieberman

    greenb1ood:

    I apologize and we’ll change it ASAP

    I called it fake because why would you install real wood in a vehicle that has a $0.39 sun-glasses holder?

  • avatar

    Yeah, I was on AW…I’m on MT, and BON most commonly, although on BON the name changes slightly.

    I remember you from there…one of the few that remained reasonable most of the time!

  • avatar
    William C Montgomery

    Jonny,

    One question remains. Did you and the boys set up a table and play poker in the back of the EL?

  • avatar
    Jonny Lieberman

    William C.

    We could have.

    I did take three journalists from a Buick event to a Ford event.

    Supreme comfort.

  • avatar
    KixStart

    “… How big is that boat, anyway?”
    “… 26′ …”

    I can’t remember the last time I saw a 26′ boat under tow on the way to the lake district.

    I know people with SUVs and boats. They definitely got tow capacity for their next boat and the SUV will be rusting at the salvage yard before they get that boat.

  • avatar
    wsn

    Got to agree with Cowbell.

    Driving an Expedition is no more shameful than driving a 911 Turbo. If carrying one dozen beers in a SUV is wasteful, so is driving a supercar in 10mph traffic. Yeah, both may see 1% chance of being used to its full potential.

  • avatar
    CAHIBOstep

    There seem to be a few carmakers that have successfully convinced consumers that there is such a thing as a “perfect consumer.” This is someone who buys a vehicle that does everything perfectly because it is one those carmakers’ vehicles. Those that buy American SUVs in particular are self-indulgent or stupid.

    I say that is mostly marketing and rhetoric. Most people don’t care as much about the environment as they do about winning the battle to be perfect. Different vehicles suit different needs and desires. That is just common sense.

    As an inner-city type who has owned two SUVs that got single-digit fuel economy over the years, I realize more than ever that I am an inherently flawed person.

    Having said that, I was much better at parallel parking when I drove those SUVs. I have busted several turn signal lenses on my current four-cylinder wagon over the years. The hood always feels shorter than it really is for some reason.

  • avatar
    Robert Schwartz

    Bankruptcy will be condign punishment for Ford’s management.

  • avatar
    greenb1ood

    Jonny:

    I’ve asked myself the same question many times.
    Why any Ford product should have a steering wheel with wood is beyond my comprehension.

    However, I do think that the MKZ and MKX were done very tastefully and in a way that enhances the flow of the interior.

    Thx.
    GB

  • avatar
    ash78

    The closest thing to a “perfect car for everyone” would be a BMW 535d (diesel) wagon. My own favorable opinions aside, if you look at it from pure practicality and appeasement of all needs–for example, if some commies took over and we all had to have the same personal car to suit all needs–that would probably be it.

    When I was 16, I was forced to sit down with my dad and write out the needs I had for a car, the restrictions, etc. Most people never do anything like that–they buy more or less on impulse and are shocked over the next few years (if not by gas prices, by lack of usage of the SUV traits) and many end up trading in on something else. About half of my friends and family have done this exact thing.

  • avatar
    wsn

    Replying ash78:

    The closest thing to a “perfect car for everyone” would be a BMW 535d (diesel) wagon. My own favorable opinions aside, if you look at it from pure practicality and appeasement of all needs–for example, if some commies took over and we all had to have the same personal car to suit all needs–that would probably be it.

    You are completely off the mark. The BMW 535d is far from “perfect”. It has a price tag that is very inperfect—actually downright stupid for most Americans (who earn on average about $40k).

    The perfect car for the Americans is the Camry. The perfect car on the world stage is the Corolla. Consumers have spoken.

  • avatar
    JJ

    Can’t boat owners just leave their boats at docks…?

    I remember my parents owned a little sailing boat (don’t know the exact size but it was only really suitable for 2 people for more days or maybe 4 people when used one day) when I was about very young. It was docked in Friesland with easy acces to various rivers and the Northsea.

    Why bother hauling them around all the time?

  • avatar
    bfg9k

    Here’s a question about the IRS on the Expedition. I am told that trucks need leaf springs and a solid axle for towing and payload capacity. Using autos.msn.com vehicle comparison, the Expedition EL tows 9100 lbs and has a max payload of 1745 lb. The F-150 Lariat SuperCrew 4×4, with the same engine (I presume, same displacement and power), tows 7800 lbs, with a max payload of 1670 lbs.

    So, why again is it that IRS is no good for trucks? Why does the F-150 have such a poor suspension in comparison when capabilities are so similar?

  • avatar
    qfrog

    If I wanted a land barge I’d hunt down a DAF 95 X1 as seen on Jalopnik.com Now thats a sport utility vehicle I’d drive with pride.

  • avatar
    blautens

    Wasteful sports cars, wasteful SUVs…phooey. I drive a 400 + HP SUV tuned at Nuerburgring. Ahhh…if only it ran on stem cells instead of 93 octane unleaded…I’d have the hat trick and could call it a day.

    Well written review. Nice truck, for those who need or want one. Why the GMT 900’s don’t have IRS is beyond me…but I wonder how many people really cross shop the Expedition EL and the GMT 900s? This vehicle category always strikes me as oddly brand loyal…

  • avatar
    Sajeev Mehta

    Why bother hauling them around all the time?

    Its cheaper to leave it on your land (if you own an SUV and a big boat, odds are you have land too) and pay the towing costs rather than the marina fees.

    So, why again is it that IRS is no good for trucks? Why does the F-150 have such a poor suspension in comparison when capabilities are so similar?

    Cost and durability. Baseline F150s have to be cheap for fleet sales. Durability of a leaf spring is unbeatable: I can just hear actual truck users complaining about their weak kneed IRS breaking when their old truck did everything and never complained.

    I’d like to see an IRS truck with air springs (Navigator) for load leveling, but I know it would tank in the market. Everyone who buys trucks would crucify Ford/GM/Chrysler for the cost of replacement springs/compressors.

  • avatar
    ash78

    wsn

    The Camry doesn’t appease the enthusiast (as has been established many times in here). Hence my suggestion–enthusiast cars can be happily driven by appliancemongers, but not vice versa. And what’s $50k for a car if the communist government is giving them away to everyone? My point was that when people say they need a car that can do everything, many of them really miss the mark with their choice…which is part of the reason the US breadth of product offerings is still so relatively slim.

  • avatar
    Steve_S

    At least the Expedition has a purpose unlike a Cayanne S or Escalade. I just woun’t want to be hit by any of them.

  • avatar
    Luther

    Aside from the twin-hoaxes of Peak Oil and Global Warming, why do people object to SUVs?

    Anyhow, this truck is so big people laugh when they see it.

    You are so right Jonny. My neighbor just bought an EL and my first reaction was laughter. My neighbor also laughed when he saw me laugh and said “The funny thing is… I got it for $32K out the door.” Most people in my area prefer the Tahoe/Suburban over the Ford offerings.

    Heres a bigger laugh:

    http://www.rockcrawler.com/features/newsshorts/04september/international_cxt.asp

  • avatar
    Jonny Lieberman

    Everyone laughed.

    Also, the EL I had stickered at over $50,000.

    I reviewed it as such.

    $32,000… not too bad.

  • avatar
    Brendan McAleer

    I suppose if I were reading this arcticle on a solar-powered computer, just before jumping into a Prius I had converted to run on wheatgrass and good intentions to commute to my job as a grief counsellor for bereaved beef cattle, I would be justified in wailing and moaning about how bad this thing is for the planet, how much it exemplifies overconsumption, and how it mortgages the future of the very children who are currently watching a DVD in the 3rd row seats.

    The sad fact of the matter is that I’m the sort of person who, everytime I purchase a new vehicle, immediately tries to extract more power (and thus, less efficiency) out of the engine. If I ever met the environment in a dark alley, I’d probably punch it in its whiny, self-serving face.

    Let He Who Weareth the Hemp Trousers Cast the First Stone.

    That said, what does everyone suppose the “EL” stands for?

    Extra Lardy?

    Exxon Lover?

    Editione Leviathan?

  • avatar
    SunnyvaleCA

    >>> Robert Schwartz: Bankruptcy will be condign punishment for Ford’s management. not in charge will be the ones trying to find a new job.

  • avatar
    rodster205

    There are already companies that rent the tanks if you look hard enough. If we have them then I’m sure they are everywhere. I rented a Grand Cherokee for our beach trip last summer (just big enough for us), but there are Suburbans, Tahoes, ‘church’ vans (12 pass.), etc. out there. Call some of the ‘local’ car rental places, most of the airport chains don’t stock the big ones.

  • avatar
    doctorv8

    Brendan,

    When modifying a late model fuel injected motor, more power doesn’t necessarily mean less efficiency. Most motors come from the factory with minimal ignition timing and a relatively rich (ie safe) air/fuel mixture. Altering these can result in improved fuel efficiency and power.

    Case in point: the GT500…subject of much discussion on TTAC lately…can pick up 30-50 rear wheel HP with just a retune and no hardware changes. Steady state fuel efficiency would likely not be noticeably different….

    Except of course if the lead foot driver (like many of us) can’t resist dipping into the newfound well of power. ;-)

  • avatar
    Brendan McAleer

    DV8
    Except of course if the lead foot driver (like many of us) can’t resist dipping into the newfound well of power. ;-)

    I fear that this is the problem. Chip upgrades for most turbocharged engines do seem to have the effect of increased mileage as well as more available HP, especially if you’ve tuned for 94 octane.

  • avatar

    William C Montgomery:
    CSJohnston: >>I think you’ve pretty much summed up the whole issue with large SUV’s. Incredibly practical but for 90% of the time, a minivan can do the job.

    >>So what are you supposed to do the 10% of the time that you need the SUV capability? Own a second vehicle that you only drive when you absolutely need the capability that only an SUV can provide? Most people cannot afford to own a minivan to drive during the week and an SUV for weekends and camping trips.

    Rent one. And save yourself enough to own a Miata.

  • avatar

    Mikey: …Unless we ban cars, the tree huggers won’t be happy.
    Freedom of choice works for me

    I’m a tree hugger, and I’d be very upset if cars were banned. But at least in my neck of the woods, the greater Boston area, most of the people who buy big SUVs buy them as a fashion statement, not because they haul people all the time to go offroad.

  • avatar
    Terry Parkhurst

    Back in the fall of 1997, I drove a then-new Expedition about 160 miles south, where the Northwest Auto Press Association had its on and off-road SUV shoot-out called MudFest. It was intoxicating, or at least much less scarey than usual, to get to the point on I5 south, around Centralia-Chehalis, where it’s just two lanes; and the Class 8 rigs take each lane. I could look directly over at the drivers of the Kenworths, Peterbilts and Freightliners and almost – just almost – feel like one of the them. I never calculated fuel economy and frankly, I don’t remember much from the next two days, wherein which sometime I took an Expedition off road. It was competent, that’s all I can recall. The seats, as Jonny said, are great. The darn thing really is a cowboy cruiser. But now, almost 10 years later on, it seems to me unless you have a boat or trailer to tow, there’s got to be a better way to run down the freeway with the big rigs. But then again, I could be wrong.

  • avatar
    dror

    I just wish all truck based SUV’s buyers would know by what safety standards they are measured.
    I’m 99% sure they have no idea it’s actually a truck; or know the fundamental difference between FREESTYLE and a Ford Ranger.
    I have no problem with station wagons;
    I do have a problem driving on the HWY next to Hammers and Expeditions, especially when road conditions are not perfect and they feel like 4×4 will save them when they hit the brake at 70mph on snow.

  • avatar
    Luther

    $32,000… not too bad.

    Definitely a Ford-Death-Watch-Contributing price !!!

    The beast could use bigger wheels/tires to make it look more proportional though.

    I prefer an agile sedan but have no contempt for those who choose an SUV. An agile sedan is my morning coffee.
    (Caffiene, like a woman, will suck the life out of you over time.)

  • avatar
    Hoosier Red

    Clearly we need to establish the Federal Bureau of Personal Transportation. You will submit a request for a certificate to purchase a car and truck. The government employee will determine whether the car or truck you want to purchase is justified based on the size of your family, occupation, recreational pursuits, etc. Of course, there will be a delay of several months so that all the documentation can be verified. There will be a sizable fee required to verify the documentation. The bureaucrat will decide whether you really should be wasting precious resources towing that boat on weekends. Obviously, there will be heavy penalties including fines and imprisonment if you try to buy the vehicle without the proper certification. You know, with great ideas like this, I really should consider running for public office!

  • avatar
    mike frederick

    Yes I drive an H3.And I’ll tell you in northern ohio when the snow starts pilling up,this vehicle would be hard pressed to get stuck.

    I need a SUV because I have kids, I on occasion haul stuff- though not a boat.This has been one vehicle that fits the rigors of winter driving,transporting and hauling light loads on a trailer to the tee.

    Is the Expedition to much vehicle for me??? Yes, but I cant really blame someone in my circumstance for owning one.

  • avatar
    Luther

    Clearly we need to establish the Federal Bureau of Personal Transportation. You will submit a request for a certificate to purchase a car and truck.

    Geeez Hoosier Red…. Dont give the “Squabbling Parasites” in DC this idea……. Maybe a cabinet-level department.

  • avatar
    CSJohnston

    $32,000… not too bad.

    Definitely a Ford-Death-Watch-Contributing price !!!

    Is that $32K (USD) for a full-loaded Expedition EL (Eddie Bauer or Limited) 4×4 or an EL 4×2 and perhaps not so top-of-the-line?

    $32K from around $50K is a little tough to swallow even for a Ford SUV!

  • avatar
    Jonny Lieberman

    You know, in America, you are also free to make smart decision.

    Not just justify bad ones.

    Just saying.

  • avatar
    John Williams

    Otherwise, I agree with jazbo123, this is Detroit fighting to win the last war. This kind of product may have been a winner in the 90s, but we’re in the latter half of the oughts now. Where’s the mid-size sedan that gets 40 MPG? Where are my hyper-efficient turbo Diesels? Where are my sports/commuter fun cars?

    Blame CARB/EPA/NHTSA. Diesels are hard to come by due to CARB rules (which by default end up being the rule for the rest of the nation). As for the fun commuter cars, they’re being sidelined in favor of more profitable SUVs and soon, CUVs.

    And as a response to the pontification involving “proper vehicle choices”, I’ll just say that I’ll continue to purchase and drive whatever I want regardless of what others think — unless they want to foot the bill for the car payments, gas, insurance and wear/tear.

  • avatar
    pariah

    I think my favorite thing about this Expedition is the fact that Ford deemed it necessary to include independent rear suspension on a half-ton truck that’s more or less built for going in a straight line on a smooth highway, but not on the only sports car they make…

    *boggle*

  • avatar

    My main issue with SUV’s is this: They block my view on the road, are less agile and therefore more of a danger to other drivers, and if one was to hit me in my 30 highway-miles-per-gallon coupe or my similar mpg miata, I doubt I’d fair well.
    One response to this might be “so get a bigger car.” Thing is that given how much I drive, I can’t afford ot drive something that gets significantly less than 30 mpg, and on the highway mileage has a lot to do with aerodynamics, so it ain’t going ot happen. Also, I feel safer in a car that is agile and therefore better able to allow me to avoid accidents than one that is built like a brick and allows me to plow through accidents. Also, in the worst case I’d rather spin out than roll over.
    So, in some sense, I feel like the SUV fad has turned motoring into a sort of “arms race,” and, as such, I have trouble not flipping off the soccer mom in a Hummer or Yukon who is perpetuating this arms race.
    Just the other day in a place with construction near my home, I was stopped behind an explorer when it realized that the turn it wanted to make was blocked. So it backed up in order to be able to turn the other way. In my Miata, however, the driver was unable to see me, and I was unable to back up owing ot a lineo f cars behind me. It had nearly creeped back to my bumper with no intention of stopping before I snapped out of my dumbfounded panic and started honking. It really scares the shit out of me that I have to drive around under the assumption that noone can see me on the road.

    And before people start slamming me for my obviously selfish opinions, let me state that I’m more than willing ot put up with semi-trucks even though they pose the same dangers to me since a) almost everyone benefits from semi-trucks in terms of being able ot buy goods in stores and b) most truck drivers get extensive training in safety and road manners since most trucking companies wouldn’t want to deal with the expense and bad PR of having their truckers killing people left and right.

  • avatar
    SherbornSean

    How come SUV owners are so sensitive?

  • avatar
    Jim H

    Jonny Lieberman:
    December 11th, 2006 at 7:06 pm
    You know, in America, you are also free to make smart decision.

    Not just justify bad ones.

    Just saying.

    “smart” and “bad” are opinions. For those that refuse to buy non-American cars, that’s completely their right.

    I think it’s bad to justify spending $75+K on an Audi RS4 — but you sure did seem to love it and send praises it’s way. For that matter, I find it “bad” to ever spend more than $40K…but obviously there are thousands of folks out there that do it. I simply don’t hold everyone else to my standards.

    Just saying.

  • avatar
    William C Montgomery

    Starlightmica: If gas prices go through the roof, I’m sure someone will start a national chain of Rent-A-Guzzler to fill that need.

    UnclePete: It’s called UHaul. :-) I rent an Econoline or pickup from them for $20 a day and 59 cents a mile when I need to haul stuff. The local Lowe’s has a truck I can rent for $20 for 75 minutes plus gas.

    Rodster205: There are already companies that rent the tanks if you look hard enough… Call some of the ‘local’ car rental places, most of the airport chains don’t stock the big ones.

    David Holtzman: Rent one. And save yourself enough to own a Miata.

    What a wonderful idea since we all know how wonderful rental vehicles are (please read Andrew Dederer’s piece, Training Wheels, for the latest observation of wonderful rental vehicles). Rental cars are just the place where I want to spend long road trips or weekend trips to the lake. In fact, it is such a good idea, why don’t we rent cars every time we want to drive like hooligans so we don’t waste gas in fuel inefficient sports cars. Then everybody can motor about without class or distinction in practical Toyota Corolla’s. Better yet, our consciences would be clearer driving Yaris’ – rent a compact if you need a trunk.

  • avatar
    Jonny Lieberman

    I think “refusing” to buy non-American cars is a “bad” opinion to hold.

    Especially when the Ford Fusion is a Mazda built in Mexico, whereas the Camry/Accord is styled in Malibu and built here.

    But anyways, it’s very obvious you’ve never driven an RS4, Jim.

    It’s worth $100,000

  • avatar
    Jim H

    What’s the point of that Jonny? I’ve never driven an RS4 because I have no intention of buying one. I don’t write a column explaining to everyone how their opinion is “bad”…so what would be the point? :)

    I don’t think any car (talking consumer based here, not racing) is worth that…it still takes just a $1K piece of crap to total one in an accident, correct?

    But “worth” is opinion here. Does it cost that much? I have no idea what options you have on it…but doubtful. Is it “worth” it? No…again, it’s an opinion, and neither truth nor lie.

    P.S. I thought the 2-tone seats looked nice. Do they look as good in real life as in the picture?

  • avatar
    ZoomZoom

    Wow, That’s a big truck.

    I have no comments about the vehicle itself, except to say that people should be able to buy what they want to and can afford to buy. I’m really not opposed to somebody buying a gas guzzler, and I don’t care if they never tow anything.

    As for the prior points made about global warming and peak oil, I do have comments!

    EDIT: Sorry if some of this takes us off the topic. I usually try to stay on topic, but the earlier comments … well, I just had to speak up. :)

    1a. I still think that Global Warming has not really been proven. You can’t tell me that the world is heating up when significant parts of the world have COOLER average temperatures than they did in past decades/centuries, and when certain glaciers and ice formations are resisting melting, and even GROWING in some places.

    1b. If we can’t really prove that global warming is happening, how can we blame it on human activity? We can’t.

    1c. I find it amusing that once we had a couple of colder, snowier winters, “Global Warming” became “Global Climate Change”, and when we have a hotter summer, it magically transmogrifies back to “Global Warming.”

    1d. There ARE scientists that oppose the so-called “accepted assumptions” that the planet is warming up. And they have the proof to back themselves up. But these scientists often are shut out from discourse, and their views are ignored by “at large” university and grant/fund administrators, as well as the mainstream press.

    2a. Peak Oil is another matter. I think is a fact. What is debatable is the timing.

    Let’s start with the physics, folks. The Earth is (roughly) a sphere. We know that the crust is between 3 and 7 miles thick. Below that is mantle, which is mostly liquid iron and maybe some nickel. Common sense tells me that all oil that we will find will be in the crust, and not below that.

    2b. Even if the entire Earth were full of oil without any of that pesky molten lava stuff, the Earth is still only a finite mass.

    Let’s review.

    finite
    adj.
    1. bounded or limited in magnitude or spatial or temporal extent

    Okay, as I understand it, something having finite volume can only contain a finite amount of something else. An amount equal to the volume of the container. In kitchen-table terms, you cannot put 24 ounces into a 12 ounce cup.

    2c. The geologic forces that ceated oil took millions of years. And they are no longer occurring. Hence, if we draw up and burn only ten barrels of oil a day, we still burn more than is being made.

    2d. No matter how much is in the ground, when we use more than is being made, eventually there will be “no more.” Most kindergarteners understand the concept of “no more.”

    No more cookies.
    No more milk.
    No more candy.

    “No more” is very easy to understand, yes?

    2e. The world uses about 85 million barrels of oil EACH AND EVERY DAY.

    2f. To repeat 2c above in a shameless ploy for effect, ZERO barrels are being “made”.

    We can’t peek into the Earth with our eyes and see how much oil is there, so the only question is the timing.

    Global Warming? I believe it’s all just an international attempt to disadvantage developed nations such as the US so as to benefit corrupt nations that (due to their corruption) have abysmal economies. A social engineering effort, if you will.

    Or maybe just a fancy wealth-transfer program.

    Even if global warming is happening, and even if humans are causing it, can we really say that in the light of declining oil-in-ground-stocks that it will matter?

    Follow me for a moment here…

    Because whether it’s 20 years or 200 years from now, when we run out of oil (and/or cannot get any more out of the ground), our ability to mine for coal, gas, and nuclear fuels will be severely impacted, as will our ability to make fertilizers, preservatives, medicines, plastics, rubber, roads, roofs, and many metals, or to transport anything to market.

    At that point, the pollution rate will begin to sharply decline, yes?

    Alternate fuel sources? A noble thought, but they will not replace oil’s nearly infinite chemical properties. The carbon chain that stores energy also provides us building blocks for products.

    Follow the logic. We need oil for EVERYTHING.
    Follow the physics. Earth does not contain an infinite supply of ANYTHING.

    What can we do about it? I have no idea. Even if the entire US drove Prii, I doubt that it would significantly reduce world oil consumption, nor would it stave off the future depletion date by very much.

    I think that one generation or another is going to have a very difficult time with this, and I think pollution and so-called “global warming” will be truly insignificant in the face of it.

    Anybody interested in Peak Oil can just google it to find tons of information. You can also google “Hubbert’s Peak” to learn about the bell curve.

    As for environmental issues, there’s a great book called “The Skeptical Environmentalist” that I would highly recommend. I’m sure you can find it at bookstores or Amazon.

    I urge you all to read. Educate yourselves.

  • avatar
    Jim H

    That is an interesting book…but keep in mind it was published originally in 1998 and most recently in 2001. Much of the data is out of date. :)

    We don’t need oil for “everything”…we are simply dependant on oil for nearly everything.

    If oil is a precious commodity, it’d be wise for us to start more stringent methods of conservation…regardless of global warming. You do realize that the oceans are warmer now than ever in recorded history? And you do realize that a result of global warming will actually be an ice age in Europe (due to trade winds) while most of the rest of the planet will rise in temp?

  • avatar
    WaaaaHoooo

    An RS4 is worth 75k or 100k until you go to sell it.

    At which point in time you’re probably thinking “bad purchase decision.”

  • avatar
    Jim H

    Good one WaaaHooo :)

  • avatar
    jerseydevil

    SherbornSean:
    December 11th, 2006 at 7:53 pm
    How come SUV owners are so sensitive?

    because there is no defense.

  • avatar
    NICKNICK

    The libertarian in me agrees that people should be able to buy what they want to as long as they have the means to do it. However, our roads are public, and as such will draw many different types of people and many types of vehicles. It is alarming at the least to think that the Expedition EL has as much kinetic energy traveling at 70mph as my car does at 105. The Expedition doing the “ton” is the same as my car going 150. Even worse: getting hit by my car at 105 would put a serious hurt on you–but it certainly wouldn’t penetrate your vehicle like a body-on-frame battering ram.

    As a driving enthusiast, I resent the coming police state (you may call it a nanny state if you will, but i calls em like i sees em). However, since we’ll all have UV sensitive bar codes tattooed on our foreheads and RFID chips in the backs of our necks, we might as well make good use of them. Let our chips tell the Man what we’re driving, what our skill set is, if the DVD player is on in the car, if the cell phone is in use, etc. You wanna buy a battle tank and play spongebob? Have fun doing 35. Midlifer with his first sportscar–you may go 55 (rookie skillset). Succeeded at Skip Barber’s and driving a Miata? Go 130 and have fun!
    Tractor trailer–assuming extensive driver training, 55.

    And all roads will be divided four laners to accomodate.

    And i’ll bring back the 20 hour work week.

    Vote for me (or hack the voting machines for me) in 2008.

  • avatar
    jerseydevil

    wsn:
    December 11th, 2006 at 2:12 pm
    Got to agree with Cowbell.

    Driving an Expedition is no more shameful than driving a 911 Turbo.

    Yes it is.

    Even the most stuffed shirt idiot corprate lawyer owner of a 911 would never say he “needs” it .

  • avatar
    Jonny Lieberman

    That’s a very good point — there is no justification for owning a Turbo.

    Except for the smile on your face each and every morning.

  • avatar
    chanman

    What, over 100 posts, and not one of them relates the Expedition’s ride with its “Road Hugging Weight”? For shame!

  • avatar
    roadracer

    You suggest a Freestyle as an alternative, but it’s not even available with a trailer hitch. Surely you jest?

  • avatar
    wsn

    Replying to ash78:
    The Camry doesn’t appease the enthusiast (as has been established many times in here). Hence my suggestion–enthusiast cars can be happily driven by appliancemongers, but not vice versa. And what’s $50k for a car if the communist government is giving them away to everyone? My point was that when people say they need a car that can do everything, many of them really miss the mark with their choice…which is part of the reason the US breadth of product offerings is still so relatively slim.

    1) Please do not change the targeted population of your statements. Your previous post stated “perfect car for everyone.” And now you are distinguishing enthusiasts from appliancemongers. I would not have refuted had you used enthusiasts in the 1st place.

    2) No government will hand out 50k to everyone to buy the E350d. In the extreme case that Bush becomes mad and indeed starts to hand out the money, the inflation would make the price of E350d soar. And then most people still would not be able to buy one. There is a difference between have a lot of money and having a great wealth.

    3) Although many people do make mistakes in choose the car they really need, in the long run and for the most people, the average choice will be rational. To conclude, most Americans need a Camry and most of them rightfully bought one.

  • avatar
    wsn

    That’s a very good point — there is no justification for owning a Turbo.

    Except for the smile on your face each and every morning.

    People smile for different reasons. Most of them are totally legitimate.

    Some smile because they have turbos and can pass anyone else with ease. Some smile because they had great sexes last night. Yet some smile because their SUVs look bulkier than anything else on the road.

  • avatar
    Ryan

    Everyone may have the right to buy whatever vehicle they want, however stupid or irresponsible of a decision it is. At the same time, there’s no reason they shouldn’t be reminded of how stupid or irresponsible they are for making that decision. Freedom of choice, freedom of speech, and so on.

    What bothers me about SUVs is (as has been mentioned) the justification of need. I need to tow a cruise liner, I need my single offspring to be safe (damn the offspring of people who can’t afford a leather-lined tank), I need it in case I have to drive the Rubicon in a blizzard. Just look at the guy here trying to defend his H3, when it sounds like an Outback would do just as well (although I’d like to see if really, anyone actually needs an H2 or an H3).

    And furthermore, where do you people go camping? When I was growing up, my family went camping every year, and we never owned an SUV. Hell, the first year we went, there were four of us crammed in an old Sunbird. And, hell, I took an Escort through more extreme terrain than any campground I’ve ever been to.

  • avatar
    HawaiiJim

    Ryan:

    So don’t buy an SUV.

  • avatar
    thx_zetec

    Imagine Fred is young single guy who never goes offroad, never tows. he drives and Expedition XL and is called irresponsible because he does not need its capabilities.

    Feeling guilty Fred buys a 6000 lb boat with trailer. Every weekend he drives this combo 80 miles to the lake, then uses the boat to burn 40 gallons of gas.

    Now by some of the logic I’ve seen here Fred is no longer wasting resources right – he is using the expedition what it was designed for (wasting resources?)

    Couple of posters have said that big SUV sales will collapse. Don’t count on this – Americans love the “big iron” and this is no fad. As pointed out looked at what the young generation thinks is cool. Today’s teenagers are tomorrow’s middle-aged 6000 lb SUV drivers (well probably 7000 lb by then)

  • avatar
    nino

    Everyone may have the right to buy whatever vehicle they want, however stupid or irresponsible of a decision it is. At the same time, there’s no reason they shouldn’t be reminded of how stupid or irresponsible they are for making that decision. Freedom of choice, freedom of speech, and so on.

    What bothers me about SUVs is (as has been mentioned) the justification of need. I need to tow a cruise liner, I need my single offspring to be safe (damn the offspring of people who can’t afford a leather-lined tank), I need it in case I have to drive the Rubicon in a blizzard. Just look at the guy here trying to defend his H3, when it sounds like an Outback would do just as well (although I’d like to see if really, anyone actually needs an H2 or an H3).

    My sentiments exactly.

    I would add that the driver of the 911 Turbo is more than likely a poseur as well. The difference being that he KNOWS he’s a poseur and doesn’t bore you with rationalizations of his “needs”.

  • avatar
    sean121982

    I don’t know…I still think a Dash-9 is much less-appealing than that…but perhaps that’s because obscenely huge SUVs aren’t always ending up in all my train pictures…

    Stay cool and trash Dash-9s!

  • avatar
    ekapus

    You know what’s funny? He didn’t slam the GM alternative: SD70.

    Living proof that there is no anti-GM bias!

    Or maybe someone had a bad experience with a blender before.

  • avatar
    geeber

    Jonny Lieberman: You know, in America, you are also free to make smart decision.

    Not just justify bad ones.

    Just saying.

    In America, you are free to define what constitutes a smart decision.

    Just saying…

  • avatar
    Jonny Lieberman

    6,000+ pound vehicles for consumer use can be a smart decision?

    Really?

  • avatar
    Hutton

    “Jim H: The difference is, noone questions the person that buys a 911…

    You’re missing the point. If you were to question someone’s reason for a 911 purchase, you would most certainly hear a list of “wants”. They wanted something fast, wanted something sexy, wanted exceptional handling, etc. A 911 (or any sports car) is an unnecesary purchase, but at least people are honest about it.

    An SUV is an equally unnecesary purchase, however, the SUV owners are constantly justifying their purchases with imaginary needs, as if it’s more valid to buy something you just want if you convince yourself and others you need it.

    My choice of vehicle is stupidly unnecesary, unless I were a career getaway driver, but I bought it anyway, because I wanted it. Why is it difficult for SUV drivers (or pickup drivers, really) to be similarly candid about their purchases?

    This is America, we all have the right to choose, so buy the tank if you want it. Buying things you want is great. Just don’t tell us why you need it.

    I realize I am not the first one to make this point in this thread, but it bears repeating.

  • avatar
    Jim H

    No, I got the point. Want and need are often confused in this society.

    “We needed a bigger house”, “we needed DSL”, “we needed cable”, “we needed a bigger car”. None of those are true needs…they are ALL wants.

    But if you ask the 911 porche owner…they will most definately say they “needed” a sports car…but they “wanted” the 911. Again, “need” is not the optimal word…but it sure is one they’ll use.

    For a family of 3 or more…a porche 911 makes absolutely no sense if that’s the main source of family transportation…they obviously “need” something bigger. Will an outback wagon work? Of course…but who the hell are we to set limits and decide which car they buy? Does the outback wagon make them feel safe? Does the outback wagon let them see above other traffic? Does the outback wagon provide any kind of privacy from other SUVs that drive by and peer in the windows? No? Hmmm….appears those “needs” aren’t met by a car.

    It’s their dollar. Let them spend it how they want…they certainly don’t “need” our permission or opinions! :) Should we educate? Absolutely. Should we legislate? Absolutely not.

    EDIT: If it were up to me, we’d set limits on size to much smaller than they are today…we’d set higher limits for gas mileage and emissions. But this would hurt not only the SUVs, but also performance cars. Would this be a direction we want to go?

  • avatar
    Hutton

    I’m certainly not an advocate of legislating what kind of car people should buy. I don’t even have the usual pistonhead hatred for SUVs, I used to have a Jeep. It’s just pretty interesting that so many SUV drivers have such long lists of justifications for their vehicles.

    I also think it would be interesting to investigate how quickly “high-seating-position” became a “need” for so many consumers in America. I’m not begrudging the high-chair-sitters among us, I just find the whole thing pretty curious. Might make an interesting article.

    EDIT: I’m a firm believer in capitalism, and believe consumers will decide the appropriate MPG for them (not the government). When people stop buying gas guzzlers, they’ll stop selling them. Ford (or anyone) should be lowering their emmisions and fuel consuption because it gives them an edge on the competition, not because they were forced to. I do wish people were a little quicker on the uptake, but meh, what can ya do.

  • avatar
    Jim H

    I think the folks in Colorado do it just to cut down on the chip marks on their windshields. :( My car is just 4 months old and I already need want a new windshield. :(

    Is their an aftermarket item to get that will help prevent chips, cracks, and craters? (Oh, i think there is something called “Clearplex”…but I don’t see any dealers of it here)

  • avatar
    wsn

    Replying to Hutton:

    I’m a firm believer in capitalism, and believe consumers will decide the appropriate MPG for them (not the government). When people stop buying gas guzzlers, they’ll stop selling them.

    Absolutely! IMO, even the gas guzzler tax is evil. Why 28mpg is OK while 29mpg is not? We don’t need smart guys from the government to tell us what the magical threshold of efficiency should be.

    Unfortunately, the government is doing exactly the opposite. Now I believe all the environmental policies are mere political shows for the common voters. The government’s true position is still promoting auto sales and employment. Remember how the government help the auto industry beat the railway industry? It never really stopped.

    In my ideal world, the government regulates by economical means only. The true price of gas should include the entire cost of highway/road maintainance + partial health care cost. By then, consumer choices will be rational, as a result of rational laws.

  • avatar
    Jonny Lieberman

    One question: who is talking about the government regulating anything?

    I’m saying that a 6,000lbs. vehicle is laughable and (to some) shameful especially considering that we’re mired in an oil-war at the moment, the kids are dying, etc., and all of a sudden I somehow comprise central planning?

    Buy what you want, but I’ll be standing on the street corner pointing and laughing, AND pointing out the Ford Freestyle.

  • avatar
    Hutton

    I don’t know if gov’t regulation was ever formally brought to the table, (though Jim H said if it were up to him, the size and emissions of these things would be restricted) but I suppose the mere exsitance of this vehicle implies a lack of decision making skills for a number of consumers.

    Which for some means that regulation is in order to protect people from themselves.

    I think all the pointing and laughing may be enough of a deterrent though.

    Maybe Ford dealers should provide it’s customers with a “I’d rather be driving my 9,000lb boat” bumper stickers, so we know who gets a pass.

  • avatar
    Lesley Wimbush

    Oy, Lieberman liked a truck!
    Good review Jonny.
    What a behemoth.

  • avatar

    NOTICE

    The Truth About Cars does not permit personal attacks on anyone involved with this site: writers, editors or commentators. TTAC has a zero tolerance policy in this regard.

    While we encourage vigorous debate, this is a forum for people who want to discuss ideas– not engage in a pissing match.

    I have already banned ten people from posting on TTAC. I have no hesitation whatsoever in doing so again to anyone who disregards the boundaries of civilized discourse.

    If you find a comment personally objectionable, do not engage. Email me at [email protected] and I will deal with it.

    Play nice or piss off. That is all.

  • avatar
    Pezzo_di_Merda

    “I’m saying that a 6,000lbs. vehicle is laughable and (to some) shameful especially considering that we’re mired in an oil-war at the moment, the kids are dying, etc., and all of a sudden I somehow comprise central planning?”

    Your politics betray you, sir.

    That’s exactly what you are doing, and you know it.

    Apples to Apples, how is the crummy mileage in the EL any different than the crummy mileage I (and many, many others) are getting in our Honda Odysseys, the mini-van from the self-proclaimed “good for the environment” company?

    When I trade this piece of junk for a 2008 Tahoe Hybrid, do I get a free pass? Since I don’t eat meat and the UN said just this week that cows account for more greenhouse gas production than all of transport, can I have my Tahoe?

    Where do you stop?

  • avatar
    Jonny Lieberman

    We’re not mired in an oil-war?

  • avatar
    Ar-Pharazon

    To me, the many comments in the replys here smack of the same ‘logic’ displayed by hate crime legislation . . . it doesn’t matter so much what you do, it’s more about what you think.

    SUV owners justify their purchase because they’re often put into the position of having to ‘justify’ their purchase. Sports car owners do not justify their purchase because they are rarely put into a position where they are asked to do so.

    Most people still wish they could own an expensive sports car, and the sports car owner is therefore somewhat ‘looked up to’ . . . “Wow, what a cool car! Wish I had one! How fast will it go?”

    SUV drivers, on the other hand, do not have such a lofty reputation.

    But consider this . . . at least an SUV driver can reasonably pull off a justification for the purchase. The question is whether or not you believe it applies to that particular person. Can you honestly say that any sports car driver could in any way ‘justify’ their purchase if put in that position? I doubt it . . .

  • avatar
    Jim H

    According to Bush…we are only in a war on terror. ;)

  • avatar
    Pezzo_di_Merda

    “We’re not mired in an oil-war?”

    sigh…

  • avatar
    Ar-Pharazon

    @Jonny Lieberman . . . “We’re not mired in an oil-war?”

    I never ever understood that supposed argument. When I see the oil flowing from that place into my gas tank, at an artificially low price, then I’ll consider that this was an oil war. Unfortunately, I don’t think this is coming soon. This war essentially reduced the amount of oil we’re able to get from them, so how can this be a ‘blood for oil’ war?

    Not to say it isn’t bad and stupid . . . it’s just not bad and stupid for that particular reason.

  • avatar
    Jim H

    I still think those two-tone seats look nice…has anyone seen these through human eyes rather than a cameras lense? What were your impressions?

  • avatar
    Jonny Lieberman

    I’ve seen the seats. And sat in them.

    They are excellent.

  • avatar
    nino

    @Jonny Lieberman . . . “We’re not mired in an oil-war?”

    I never ever understood that supposed argument. When I see the oil flowing from that place into my gas tank, at an artificially low price, then I’ll consider that this was an oil war. Unfortunately, I don’t think this is coming soon. This war essentially reduced the amount of oil we’re able to get from them, so how can this be a ‘blood for oil’ war?

    Not to say it isn’t bad and stupid . . . it’s just not bad and stupid for that particular reason.

    Look up the term “dollar hedgemony” and its relationship to oil trading.

    Also, look up the “Breton Woods Agreement” that tied oil trade to the US dollar.

  • avatar
    wsn

    Replying to Ar-Pharazon:

    To me, the many comments in the replys here smack of the same ‘logic’ displayed by hate crime legislation . . . it doesn’t matter so much what you do, it’s more about what you think.

    Totally agree.

    The arguement here becomes weird. SUVs are more shameful than sports cars only because some (not all) SUV drivers attempted to justify their “needs”?

    Let’s ignore all that, OK? Instead, focus on how you like or dislike the SUV. You may say it handles poorly. That’s a valid point. But you cannot say it’s more wasteful than a 911 Turbo, because it is not.

    Again, talk for yourself. Don’t let the behavior of other people dominate your reasoning. This is TTA Cars, not TTA SUV Drivers.

  • avatar
    Luther

    CSJohnston: Is that $32K (USD) for a full-loaded Expedition EL (Eddie Bauer or Limited) 4×4 or an EL 4×2 and perhaps not so top-of-the-line?

    It is an EL XLT… I think he said it stickered for $37K and he got it for $32 (Out the door).

    “We’re not mired in an oil-war?”

    We are in a war with murdering religious psychopaths (Hamas, Hezbollah, Al-Qaida, Iranian Mullahs) who want to take control of the oil throughout the middle east. With control of mid-east oil and nuclear bombs they then can kill millions (billions?) of people thru nuclear vaporization and starvation. I cant think of anything more important than defeating these freaks. People say that Saddam had no WMDs and that we should not have attacted him. Saddam + gobs of oil money = WMD. I hope America doesnt loose a city to a nuke before people figure this out, but I doubt it.

  • avatar
    Hutton

    wsn: The arguement here becomes weird. SUVs are more shameful than sports cars only because some (not all) SUV drivers attempted to justify their “needs”?

    Nah, a 911 that spends it’s time sitting in traffic, or in a garage and never hitting the twisties would be equally as shameful as an Expedition EL that never carry’s 8 people, goes off-road, or tows something ridiculously heavy. No bias. Both unfortunate.

    An analogy, for those of us who ski or snowboard:
    Equipment overkill. There’s always some kid who never leaves the bunny slope who is decked out in all the latest, greatest, and most expensive gear. Top of the line stuff, that is not suited for beginners. Ok, it’s his perogative to do what he wants with his money… but…. he’s gonna get laughed at. And he’d have more fun and an easier time on cheaper beginner equipment that is designed exactly for what he is really going to do with it.

    If you don’t have a monstrous amount of weight to tow, or a monstrous amount of kids to drive, and you buy this Expedition instead of a Freestyle…
    You are that kid from the mountain.

    If you drive slow, commute in traffic, in strait lines, and care mostly about looking pretty, and you buy a 911 Turbo instead of a Miata…
    You are that kid from the mountain.

    Free country. Your money. But people might think you’re a douche. No biggy. I drive a car with a giant wing on the back, so I’m used to looking like a douche.

    Let’s all just come to grips with why we buy the cars that we buy.

  • avatar
    jerseydevil

    Luther:

    if they didnt have any oil they would barely be noticed.

  • avatar
    tincanman99

    So exactly how many of these things is Ford going to sell? You know the gas is going up as I type this. Its gone up considerably since the election and I doubt its finished.

    Is this going to the nail in Ford’s coffin? It has a high probability of being so. They need to get through their thick skulls the era of cheap oil is over. Get with the program.

    No matter how many government subsidies they get is going to stop the evaporation of their market share. I drive down tons of dealerships every day and every dealer has inventory out the wazoo. Particularly in SUV’s and trucks.

    The future is here and its not going to be pretty. I REFUSE to buy a car that does not get at least 25mpg. My next car is going to have a 4 cylinder engine. Lots of people feel the same way.

  • avatar
    Ar-Pharazon

    nino, I looked it up and read a few sites. I still don’t see how the current debacle in Iraq is related to this. I suppose perhaps you might argue that the intention to start this was somehow related to this idea, but obviously the end result does not. And I personally believe the intention was more likely as originally stated (a nut with WMD) or even a personal grudge (a nut who wanted to off daddy) than anything oil-related.

  • avatar
    jerseydevil

    duhhhh

    the confilct is related to this cause thats where the oil is that powers this grotesque thing. Among other grotesque things. We are awash in them. and the oil that powers them.

  • avatar
    nino

    nino, I looked it up and read a few sites. I still don’t see how the current debacle in Iraq is related to this. I suppose perhaps you might argue that the intention to start this was somehow related to this idea, but obviously the end result does not. And I personally believe the intention was more likely as originally stated (a nut with WMD) or even a personal grudge (a nut who wanted to off daddy) than anything oil-related.

    Al, I don’t want to start a political debate on a site that discusses cars. I’m sure that Farago and others won’t appreciate it.

    Think of the war on a global economic scale and the fact that the US now controls 40% of the world’s oil reserves.

  • avatar
    Captain Neek

    The “wants vs needs” argument is great, as is the “sports car vs. SUV” argument.

    However, when i see a middle-aged, balding, overweight male in a sports car (all porsches, MB SLs, 6-series convertibles, XKs etc) or an overpowered, oversized SUV (Cayenne, X5, ML, G, Lanscruiser etc) all I can think is…

    “Is there something amiss in the trouser department?”

    (for extra confirmation of the above, look in passenger seat for bottle-blond with “tastefully enlarged” breasts at least 20 years the driver’s junior).

    My concerns notwithstanding, I still believe you are free to purchase (and drive) what you like… ;)

  • avatar

    So exactly how many of these things is Ford going to sell? You know the gas is going up as I type this. Its gone up considerably since the election and I doubt its finished.

    Is this going to the nail in Ford’s coffin? It has a high probability of being so. They need to get through their thick skulls the era of cheap oil is over. Get with the program.

    No matter how many government subsidies they get is going to stop the evaporation of their market share. I drive down tons of dealerships every day and every dealer has inventory out the wazoo. Particularly in SUV’s and trucks.

    The future is here and its not going to be pretty. I REFUSE to buy a car that does not get at least 25mpg. My next car is going to have a 4 cylinder engine. Lots of people feel the same way

    Yeah, well, that’s YOU.

    It’s sooooooooo funny, seeing how many people find it “correct” to hate out on larger trucks/SUVs. The self-righteousness is running rampant, and these people are going to hate out on these vehicles in the name of…of…well, just because!

    I want you all to know that the rest of us appreciate the entertainment. Trying to tie them to Conservative politics is also ridiculously funny, as their rise to market prominence came during WHAT admitted-adulterer (and famous waffle)’s presidency? Thanks for playing!

    Look…some people buy dumb cars/trucks. Is hating out on the aforementioned older guy with the ‘Vette and the younger babe justifiable…or just jealously? If you get angry seeing a single person driving a big SUV…do you know, for certain, that that person didn’t drop off a huge number of people 10 minutes previously?

    Hating out on inanimate objects is dumb. Hating everything in a market segment just because it doesn’t fit your wants/needs is dumb AND completely pointless. Creating entire fictional characterizations of that segment’s demographic to justify your pettiness is like being stupid enough to drown in one’s own drool.

    The review cited the positives, while showing that the reviewer wasn’t specifically the target customer. In that, the review was FAR superior to many of the comments.

  • avatar

    “I’m saying that a 6,000lbs. vehicle is laughable and (to some) shameful especially considering that we’re mired in an oil-war at the moment, the kids are dying, etc., and all of a sudden I somehow comprise central planning?”

    Heh…this guy must absolutely hate anything made by Bentley or Rolls-Royce, given the above logic….

  • avatar
    Jonny Lieberman

    Zanary

    The name is Jonny. And there is no doubt that a big Rolls Royce is laughable and shameful — but that’s part of the marketing strategy.

  • avatar

    Okay, so space for up to 8 and the ability to tow is an inferior use of 3 tons?

  • avatar
    Jonny Lieberman

    Oh, absolutely, yes.

    Have you been in a Rolls? I highly suggest it.

  • avatar
    Joe Chiaramonte

    December, 1986: I had the keys to a Rolls Royce Corniche for a day. I was royalty.

    I would not want the keys to this thing.

  • avatar
    jerseydevil

    a friend has a roller. he thinks he’s the man.

    i drove it one day

    what a pig,. the car, i mean.

    maybe it was that it was a mid 80’s one.

    good joke

    “I have a rolls Canardly”.

    “Whats that?”

    “Rolls down the hill can ‘ardly get up the next one”

    HAHAHA

  • avatar
    Luther

    I almost backed a 22 foot U-Haul into my neighbors Rolls. You could say I came within 4″ of “driving” a Rolls-Royce.

  • avatar
    ChartreuseGoose

    I still think that Global Warming has not really been proven. You can’t tell me that the world is heating up when significant parts of the world have COOLER average temperatures than they did in past decades/centuries, and when certain glaciers and ice formations are resisting melting, and even GROWING in some places

    So go read the scientific literature. Every concern you have thrown out against the theory has been exhaustively modeled and explained in the literature. Your objections have already been dealt with, and in the most part arise from an incomplete understanding of the issue, so the onus is on you to become a little more informed. Half the people here self-importantly weighing in with their opinions on global warming are titanically ill-informed, and as somebody who has taken the time and effort to become informed – and to get a PhD in the subject- it’s irritating as hell to debate you sticks in the mud on talking points that were addressed by research that was published when I was still an undergrad.

    It’s clear that you haven’t the first earthly idea what global climate change really is, how it works, or on what basis the theory rests. That’s fine. If you’re not interested in the science and don’t have the time to become informed or expert, then you don’t have to – but to willfully misunderstand the topic and then weigh in as if your opinion is valid and meaningful, that’s irritating.

  • avatar
    Jonny Lieberman

    ChartreuseGoose:

    Post links!!!

    But, yeah, there is more scientifically vetted evidence of Global Warming than there is that the world is round.

  • avatar
    socsndaisy

    Congrats folks, Ive read enough. RF, thanks for the site. Im done here. This isnt worth it anymore.

  • avatar
    finderskeepers

    I have a soft spot for my 2005 Expedition Limited because its a nice comfy place to spend time. I almost always end up in crazy traffic jams on my way to work and back, and this use to stress me out in my last car. I would arrive home tensed up, with a sore back and gritted teeth. Somehow in an Expedition the outcome is different. You pop in a CD, open the sunroof, adjust the seats and sit back and enjoy the mayhem from your perch. I’m still not sure how some testers come up with 14 mpg, they must be stuck in traffic constantly. I can set the cruise at 55 mph and get 21.9 mpg, or 19 mpg at 65 mph. For sure that will never compete with a Prius, but for a family like ours that loads up every weekend for the cottage, with dog and kids in tow, its pretty hard to beat an expedition. Add the convenience of Advance-trac 4 wheel drive for Canadian winters, and the stability of RSC, it makes a pretty nice all season vehicle. The 5.4 litre engine is silent in operation and never seems particularly stressed, the torque is amazing. My wife loves the power adjustable pedals, the power fold third row, and the DVD system that keep the kids from fighting with one another on trips. I have two small gripes my Expedition, one is that I wish Ford had padded the top of the door where I rest my elbow while driving, it should have been padded like the center console. Secondly the navigation system is great in the city, but when you get way out in the country, the roads it knows are only the major ones. Many sideroads and secondary roads seemingly do not exist, and sometimes the navigation will take you out of your way (it will get you there, but the route might be convoluted at best). We have put on 77,000 miles in two years of driving (123,000km) and have only suffered the failure of the rear wiper motor, which was easily fixed by reaming out the hole in the glass. Keeping our fingers crossed that this reliability will continue, as long as I maintain her. Wouldn’t it be neat if one could be had with a Diesel-hybrid option?

  • avatar
    tirnaog

    Loved the review. Very funny.
    We are getting a limited soon, just order it.
    We have two BIG dogs, Bernese mountain dog and a Irish Wolfhound.
    Our wolfie sadly out grew the Freestyle.
    Best car Ford has at the moment.
    So Expedition here we go.


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • whynotaztec: That is a handsome truck especially in red. Too bad you can’t find one at a dealer.
  • TheEndlessEnigma: Looks like a disproportionate number of cuts are focused on IT and R&D. That makes sense. As...
  • TheEndlessEnigma: I really enjoy the “if you can’t afford to pay cash don’t buy it” arrogance...
  • bunkie: As I mentioned a couple of weeks back in the separate Lincoln dealership thread, my recent service experience...
  • 2drsedanman: Interesting article about Tesla cars from Detroit News: https://www.detroitnews.com...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributors

  • Timothy Cain, Canada
  • Matthew Guy, Canada
  • Ronnie Schreiber, United States
  • Bozi Tatarevic, United States
  • Chris Tonn, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States
  • Mark Baruth, United States
  • Moderators

  • Adam Tonge, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States