By on January 26, 2016

Flint_River_in_Flint_MIchigan

Flint, Michigan’s water system is in dire straits thanks to a bad decision made by emergency managers. Now lead that’s seeping into drinking water is poisoning thousands of children in the city.

That, Dubuc Motors really wants you to think they are related to Tesla, Jeep might be going commando, Porsche will continue to beat others over the head with a stick, and reviews for the Cadillac CT6 have hit the interwebs … after the break!

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Flint’s water system is a disaster, literally

Whatever water it was that made Carrie Underwood stronger, we’re guessing she didn’t get that water from Flint, Michigan. The former auto manufacturing hub is undergoing an epic crisis that could leave thousands of children with lead poisoning thanks to the city’s corroded water system.

According to The Economist, a bad decision in April 2014, made under the watch of emergency manager Darnell Earley, saw Flint’s water source switched from the relatively innocuous Lake Huron to the highly corrosive Flint River. That corrosive water ate through the lining of Flint’s water pipes and began to expose lead tubes. Said lead was then delivered to the taps of residents’ homes.

A state of emergency was declared by Michigan governor Rick Snyder on January 5. The federal government later did the same on January 16.

Yet, the most damning thing about it all was why it happened in the first place. The corrosiveness of the water could have been remedied by a treatment that was deemed too expensive. Its cost: $100 per day. In contrast, Earley was paid $180,000 a year as Flint’s emergency manager.

Thanks to that targeted cost cutting, some 9,000 children under the age of six are now at risk for lead poisoning, which can later cause “aggressive behavior, learning disorders, Attention Deficit Disorder, hearing loss, anaemia, kidney damage and lower IQ,” reported The Economist.

“I am sorry, and I will fix it,” Governor Rick Snyder said during his state-of-the-state address on January 19. “You deserve better.”

Thanks to Earley’s fantastic work in managing Flint, Synder has appointed Earley as emergency manager of Detroit’s public schools.

No shit.

[Image: “Michigan National Guard” (CC BY 2.0) by The National Guard]

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This amount of ugly comes with a $25 million price tag

Dubuc Motors is really, really keen on getting you to invest in their now years-long Tomahawk project and they only need $25 million to make it happenDon’t let that money burn a hole in your pocket. You know you want this.

I covered the Dubuc Motors Tomahawk in late 2014. It was vaporware then with some incredible claims: all-electric, all-wheel-drive supercar; made in North America (Quebec to be precise); and it proclaimed to be Tesla’s cousin.

Now it’s getting even worse. From a Dubuc Motors press release:

Already boasting accolades and recognition internationally, Dubuc Motors has arrived to “complete the Tesla line” and the electric vehicle market.

At least they aren’t still claiming to build a taxi and SUV off the same platform as they were before. I’m sure an all-electric supercar owner really wants their pride and joy to be related to a vehicle people puke in on the way home from a Saturday night kegger.

Hendrick+Military+Jeep

More Willys than Willys

The Wrangler may be heading back into areas of conflict driven by American servicemen and women by way of Hendrick Dynamics and BAE Systems.

The Hendrick Dynamics Commando, based on the Jeep Wrangler, is designed to be an “ultralight ground mobility vehicle” to support the Global Response Force, reports Allpar. GRF will extend an official request for proposals for such a vehicle later this year.

Sign us up for a civilian version of … oh, wait.

911 Turbo S

Manual 911s — forever

Porsche isn’t going to be a sheep in the sportscar herd and follow the likes of Lamborghini, Ferrari and others into dual-clutch oblivion. Speaking with Porsche engineering boss Erhard Mössle, Car & Driver reports the manual 911 is here to stay.

From C&D:

“It’s a unique selling proposition for Porsche to have a manual in the 911 range, and I think we will fight for that as long as possible,” he told us. “Even if it’s only 10 percent of the market, it’s important for some customers and for some markets, especially the U.S., to have that kind of gearbox.”

Good.

2016-Cadillac-CT6-Front-05

The reviews are in, and the Cadillac CT6 is …

… Good? Bad? We have no idea.

However, other websites have the details on Cadillac’s XTS replacement.

Here’s one from our corporate overlords at AutoGuide (where I nabbed this image). Here’s another one from AutoBlog. And Jalopnik. And Car & Driver. And Motor Trend. And Automobile. And Ward’s Auto. And Cars.com. And Motor Authority. And the Freep. And the NY Daily News. And Consumer Reports. And TFLCar (you know, they’re the same high-brow journalists that did this). And SlashGear. And DigitalTrends.

[Top image: By U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, photographer not specified or unknown [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons]

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161 Comments on “TTAC News Round-up: There’s Something in the Water in Flint, Quebec Company Still Trading on Tesla’s Name, and Our Cadillac CT6 Invite Got Lost in the Mail...”


  • avatar

    Until Detroit and Flint are fixed…we shouldn’t have a single dime to import a single Syrian – especially to live off taxpayer dollars (welfare)

    Thank you FUTURE PRESIDENT Trump for monopolizing the media narrative and forcing us to focus on important issues such as infrastructure and border security YOU KNOW THE LEGITIMATE ROLES OF GOVERNMENT.

    • 0 avatar
      VoGo

      Except that Trump actually refused to comment on the Flint water crisis, while Sanders and Clinton pledged support.

      • 0 avatar

        More welfare handouts to people who have already been betrayed by the Establishment.

        Hillary and Sanders?

        ISN’T OBAMA STILL IN OFFICE?

        WHERE’S THE EXECUTIVE ORDER FOR FLINT???

        You can fly Syrians 10,000 miles to my backyard and let them live off MY $50,000 in TAXES BUT YOU CAN’T FIX FLINT’S WATER?

        This country is being betrayed from within.

        It’s like when the Trojan Horse arrived and the son tells the father: “BURN IT”

        I can’t believe people can be so stupid as to let their infrastructure crumble while spending bigger and bigger on absolutely non-essentials and DOWNRIGHT STUPID purposes.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        There’s nothing to support, heavy metals are extremely difficult via chelation to remove from the human body. The most they can offer is fakery from more fake f***ers and billions in more debt, those people and their health are screwed.

        “Right, because Obama can fix the whole water system in Flint with his magic wand”

        He can publicly condemn the entire thing and direct the attorney general to investigate and issue arrest warrants for ALL guilty parties. They can ALL spend years in the greybar motel INCLUDING those who at EPA did NOT investigate this earlier and any guilty parties within the Karegnondi Water Authority and Flint City Govt’. GUILT IS UP AND DOWN THE CHAIN OF COMMAND, it doesn’t just rest with one guy whether its Ray DeGiorgio or Darnell Earley. 28 wants to see a whole swath of gov’t workers at all levels who failed and are guilty in f***ing jail.

        Where are the STATIST justice warriors on the carriage of criminal justice for their own citizens in their own country?

        The mainstream silence is deafening.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          The left wants Snyder’s lynched without a trial and the right wants to blame everyone but the Snyder administration. I’m just sitting here, stuck in the middle with you.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            This isn’t a left right thing, its a whole bunch of people screwed up thing and other people are permanently damaged as a result. I want a Justice department capable of administering justice, which I realize is difficult with the criminal incompetence of the past ten years. I want those guilty parties in jail and not just one patsy; BRING ME EVERYONE.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Well, we have a Justice Department that sells assault weapons to known Cartel members. So, I mean, don’t expect too many good ideas from them,

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Let’s petition the gov’t of Canada for a takeover. If anyone could put the crooks in jail (inc DC) and fix the situation, its them.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            28CL: Canada will have trouble bailing itself out in the coming years, let alone having a scrap of leftover coin to bail anyone else out.

            USD is going to $1.60 to $1.70 CAD by 2017.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Yes we can… make USDCAD go to $1.70. I cannot wait to visit the Canadian ballet.

          • 0 avatar

            @Deadweight: You’re comment regarding the Canadian dollar unfortunately reveals how little you know about economics. Parity with the USD was killing us. Manufacturing was leaving, tourism dollars out the door, etc. The only reason we had parity was because of over-reliance on a resource-based economy (oil), and a low dollar helps our secondary and tertiary economies massively.

            I can’t guarantee Canada’s economy is on the up-and-up, but I can certainly say that the dollar is not an accurate indicator. Try again.

          • 0 avatar
            tresmonos

            EChid:
            try again. Your economy is f*cked. Your dollar’s worth is a reflection on your economy’s value. Food is going to become incredibly expensive and already has (you import about 80% of your food). The value of your housing has been shooting through the roof and your wages are stagnant. Labor intensive heavy manufacturing IS STILL LEAVING due to the high infrastructure costs. Gold will be more expensive to you and we’ll be stockpiling it with pocket change. Welcome to your new world. Once the Chinese stop buying up your real estate, the homes your people have been relying on for retirement value (which they’ll sell to escape your high priced landscape to warmer weather in the cheap US south or Mexico / Central America) will collapse and all that debt that families in Ontario have been doubling over the past 5 years will cause banks to fail. Canada is a time bomb waiting to happen. Your new president is even for a higher inheritance tax – the last hope any Gen Y’er has in your country for not working until they’re dead.

            I remember living in Toronto shortly after 2008 – and everyone commented on how sorry they felt for Americans in the new recession like economy. Well, I’m here to say I already feel sorry for your youth. How in the hell will they be able to afford housing? God help them if what I typed above is actually right. I loved living in your country, but there was no way I could envision being enslaved to a mortgage in order to be a resident there. I have also never seen so many twenty somethings living with their parents because they couldn’t afford to live on their own – wait, I have… when I lived in Mexico City. Your population has been either in denial or blind to this. I hope the Bank of Canada can figure out how to navigate your new-found seas.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            Echid – parity actually hurts resource sectors exporting to the USA. it makes our resources less attractive.

            What tresmonos is saying about real-estate applies more to large metropolitan centres. I just read that Vancouver is one of the most expensive places in the world to buy a home. His “Chinese buying up real-estate” comment is especially true in the GVRD region. When the British lease to Honk Kong was coming to an end we saw a huge influx of wealthy Asians.

            About 10 years ago (IIRC) an economist said that one should not buy a home in Calgary, Toronto, or Vancouver. It was just too expensive. Calgary is expected to see a minimum 30% drop in house prices if the oil collapse continues much further. Alberta politicians squandered the Heritage Fund and they are now f^cked.

            Canadian debt ratio’s are probably worse than American ones in 2008. A 1% increase in interest rates would doom large swaths of society to economic ruin.

            There is a reason why the Bank of Canada is keeping rates down. I do fear that what tresmonos says may be closer on the horizon that what anyone would care to admit.

        • 0 avatar
          MBella

          Agreed 28. Everybody responsible right up the chain should be charged.

          One of the things that isn’t being discussed is the reason for the lead in the first place. The really old pipes that were designed to be replaced 100 years ago. This affects all of us in the metro Detroit area, and not just Flint. It’s the reason for our high water rates, because 2/3 of the water leaks out before it leaves Detroit.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            100 year old water pipes lurk beneath many US cities, because hey if it ain’t broke why spend the money incrementally to fix it? Wait now we have to fix it all at once…

            But we’ve got:

            Trillions blown killing people in Iraq.
            Billions blown killing people in Libya.
            Billions to blow killing people in Ukraine.
            Billions to blow killing people in Syria.
            Billions to blow importing people from the countries we decimate whom citizens DON’T WANT because there are already NOT ENOUGH JOBS.
            Billions to blow propping up colleges via student’s backs which would fail otherwise.
            Billions to blow on health insurance carriers which year after year provide less care for more money.
            Billions to blow on social welfare scams to pay people not to work.
            Finally, trillion upon trillions given or loaned to MEMBER BANKS and FOREIGN FIRMS to keep them in the Petro-USD game. M1 money supply doubled from Dec-08 to Sept-15 and those are just the figures they are telling us about.

            But roads, bridges, and pipe infrastructure in the US?

            Sorry kids, fresh out of paper and ink.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Don’t get me started on the water pipes, or the age of the sewers. He!!, most of my neighbor’s have Clay lines from their houses to the sewer. Those lines have 50 year life expectancies and all the houses on my block were built in the late 40s.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            28-Cars-Later – there is more money in “disaster capitalism” then there is in looking after your own people. Looking after your own is socialist and we all know that is the root of all evil.

      • 0 avatar
        TrailerTrash

        Well…except here is a bigger, more important point…NOBODY here knows what the friggin heck they are talking about concerning Flint.
        Especially not the media.

        This is a city that failed its people. It has been in receivership since it could not pay its bills.
        It continually votes democratic.

        And…those political hacks that have been in charge are trying to skate again.

        http://hotair.com/archives/2016/01/26/flint-water-crisis-a-stimulus-project-gone-bad/

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          I know exactly what I am talking about regarding Flint. The city was certainly in shambles, but the state was running Flint between 2011-2015. They are ultimately responsible. They also didn’t react quickly, or at all, when issues occurred. Nothing changes that fact.

          • 0 avatar
            TrailerTrash

            You did not read the post I added.
            Or you would not continue your stubborn stance.
            The city made decisions forcing the steps.
            Or at the very least…the issue is MORE complicated and others more guilty than you and the media claim.
            Who woulda guess, right?

            Oh…and by the way, many cities DO repair their aging pipes. They do so because they are not run by one party liberal politicians…they plan. They tax according to voters approval. They present the plan to voters and get it passed.
            My own community just hit us up for a charge and long term sewage/water pipe repair.

            I guess we could just wait and demand emergency funding.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            Using a link to hotair to support an argument is the internet equivalent of wearing a “kick me” sign. It only reflects poorly on you.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I read the other post. Everyone knows that Flint has been in rough shape for over a decade. It’s been poorly managed. That doesn’t mean that the state of Michigan didn’t drop the ball. The could have done almost anything else and been in a better spot. When GM pulled off the water in 2014, the EM should have took that as an opportunity to make a change.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      So the wannabe “comb-over in chief” now has a reason to ban Syrian refugees?

      Nice of him wanting to shield those poor Syrian children from the serious side effects of lead poisoning….. unless that lead happens to come from a firearm.

      Yup gotta keep those Hispanics out too. At least Trump can afford the increased price of American food once he does that.

      • 0 avatar

        Maybe Trump should make me his campaign advisor!

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          “Maybe Trump should make me his campaign advisor!’

          “Jokes don’t effect me.

          I’m a sociopath.

          I don’t even cry at funerals.”

          Yup…….. looks like a perfect suck up to work for Trump.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        “So the wannabe “comb-over in chief” now has a reason to ban Syrian refugees?”

        Yes, he does. The reason is that he’s a jerk. Jerks usually don’t give a rip about people suffering. He’d probably have turned back the boats with Jewish refugees too.

        • 0 avatar

          Not the same situation.

          There is no correlation.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            What, it’s less objectionable because there aren’t any gas chambers involved and the death count is less in Syria?

            Because otherwise, Assad is doing pretty much the same thing Hitler did, just on a smaller scale – he’s indiscriminately mass murdering anyone who opposes him.

            Where’s your conscience? Where’s Trump’s?

          • 0 avatar
            RHD

            Wow, the ultra-right wing mouthpiece is derailing the discussion from the very first post. Just a hint: you aren’t changing anyone’s minds on this site, and politics aren’t what TTAC is about.
            But you did score a point by being quicker on the keyboard than DW with his rants against Cadillac.

        • 0 avatar
          VoGo

          I will say this much for Trump – he’s better than one alternative.

          I just read on AB how Ted Cruz is trying to woo Iowa farmers with his proposal to ‘free’ the market for ethanol laced gasoline. He wants to force the EPA to stop limiting ethanol at 10% or 15% and allow the free market to sell gas which is 25% ethanol from corn.

          Because every car owner will line up to pay even more for gasoline that is 25% ethanol, so it can chew up all their engines after 10K miles.
          Because free market.

          • 0 avatar

            According to former Mexico Ambassador to the US Arturo Sarukhan, there are 30 million undocumented immigrants in the US from Mexico alone.

            According to our own administration, we need them to “do the work Americans do not want to do.”

            Well, fine. With these 30 million workers, none of this should be happening. We should have more eager workers than necessary to fix Flint’s water system, all our crumbling infrastructure and pump our fuel into our Vipers.

            According to the USDA, who only have numbers available through 2012, there are ONLY 1.1 MILLION PEOPLE IN TOTAL IN THE ENTIRE FARMING INDUSTRY.

            Somebody is a big fat liar. A lot of somebodies. We would have no issues whatsoever replacing lost migrant workers in the farming industry.

            A sizable number of these illegal immigrants are receiving housing assistance, food stamps, free health care, utility assistance… There’s more but I’m tired of thinking about it all.

            Then there’s the women and children Syrian refugees we’re accused of being afraid of. 9 million have left Syria so far. 4 Million more want to. 13 million out of a total population of 23 million. They are not all women and children. Statistically impossible.

            I could go on refuting the usual liberal trolls posting here on these subjects but why should I? They’re a lot smarter than I am which they’ve pointed out more than once. They’re just too smart to be bothered by those troublesome things called facts.

            I exit this discussion with this: Any of the top 5 Republican contenders would handle these issues better than they’re being handled now. I don’t know what specific issues I would have with any of them beyond my primary concerns. We have to quit giving people things. We have to quit treating illegal immigrants better than we treat our own people. We have to get over all this ridiculous political correctness that’s so pervasive We have to make sure we’re not letting murderers into the country because doing so makes us feel good. We have to do a better job of raising tough kids. Our current crop of collegiates need “safe rooms” where they don’t have to hear people say bad things. My father’s generation were 18 years old , fighting and dying in places like Normandy, Midway, Iwo Jima, Arnhem and Berlin and kicking Hirohito and Hitler’s back sides. The pansies we raise now couldn’t do any of it. Give me someone who can fix these big things.

            No candidate can tic all your boxes so there’s going to be something to dislike about any of them.

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            Your generalization of all Millennials as “pansies” is incredibly refreshing and will no doubt be the catalyst of renewed discourse across the generation gap. Why does it matter what your father’s generation did in the past?

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            E-anything doesn’t “chew up” modern drivetrains at any mileage, 10K or 100K. And you can trust me because I’m part of the Big Corn Ethanol Conspiracy.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            Drzhivago138 – all of those “pansy” millennials raised on video games don’t need to be tough guys to save the USA. Put them to work flying Predator drones ;)

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          FreedMike – “Jerks usually don’t give a rip about people suffering.”

          More specifically, he does not care about suffering because there is no money in it for him.

          If there was a way to profit from suffering he would…… It works for Halliburton and Blackwater.

          • 0 avatar

            Drzhivago138 – Why does it matter what my father’s generation did in the past? Really?

            His generation secured your freedom.

            Mine did a lot to damage your freedom.

            We’re raising a generation that is not equipped to defend your freedom in any way.

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            I mean that as, “Do the deeds of your parent’s generation mean it is necessary to trash-talk a few bad apples in my generation?”

            We are entering the transitory period of history where we learn how to solve differences and “defend freedoms” without killing millions.

    • 0 avatar
      kmars2009

      The REPUBLICAN Govenor of Michigan is the one to blame. HELLO?!? Republicans always blame others for problems THEY CAUSE!

  • avatar
    RideHeight

    If Shamu were a car… Dubuc!

  • avatar

    I’m in the market for a new Cadillac.

    The CTS has a down payment of $3500 with a $550/month lease.

    The XTS has a down payment of $3900 with a $670/month lease.

    The CT6 numbers aren’t in yet.

    The XTS is the best option.

    The standard engine in the XTS is the 3.6-L which gets decent mileage on REGULAR UNLEADED.

    The CTS 2.0-L requires premium and the 3.6-L option costs a whole lot more.

    A CT6 would be best purchased with the 3.6-L in AWD.

    The vast majority of Cadillacs sold here in the North East are 4-WD models. I seriously doubt the average retiree will go after the CT6 when the XTS makes so much more sense, unless they absolutely prefer the chiseled CTS-on-steroids-front-end, or they take long drives with people in the backseat.

    If the CT6 was available now I’d probably have already gone with it.

    On a side note, I’m surprised the Eqqus hadn’t sold better, but now that both the Equus and K900 are coming off lease and sold depreciated for $30,000 less – I see them more often.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      $670/month? With $3900 down? What witchcraft is this?

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      Are those MSRP numbers?!

      Regardless of CT6 invite or not, we know the best reading and commentary in here, at TTAC.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Down payment on a lease.

      Brilliant!

      (And this guy lectures us all on wasting money…)

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        You are correct sir. Just say no to putting money down on a lease.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          It’s like doing kitchen remodeling on your apartment, for goodness’ sake. I’m pretty sure the depreciation on the lease is a writeoff if you own a business, but the cap cost reduction?

          • 0 avatar
            bunkie

            Jeez, it’s simple math. Want a lower payment? Pay up-front. Don’t want to pay up front? Expect a higher payment. You will pay the same over the term of the lease. It ain’t magic or rocket science.

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      “The standard engine in the XTS is the 3.6-L which gets decent mileage on REGULAR UNLEADED.”

      If you’re leasing a new Cadillac, you should be able to fuel it with something better than denatured swill.

      • 0 avatar

        I’m paying top dollar for 93 on both my SRT.

        That’s enough till the HELLCAT 300 becomes available.

        This is for my mom BTW.

        • 0 avatar
          VoGo

          Your mom is an Uber driver?

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Ouch

          • 0 avatar

            Jokes don’t effect me.

            I’m a sociopath.

            I don’t even cry at funerals.

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            You’re not sociopathic, just Minnesotan.

            And it’s “affect” in this case.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            There’s no mean-spiritedness there, THERE.

            Even BTSR has joked in the past about Tyler Perry, tall hat wearing, “Big Momma’s House” types occupying his rear seat.

            TTAC is great because of the lack of racial or ethnic or religious bullish!t (though things can get weird with left-right/Repub-Dem politics and environmental debates).

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Not a meanspirited comment but you have a mean spirit which follows you around and occasionally takes over… right Kai-shek?

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            I detest Johan de Nysschen due to his incompetence, and I dislike Melody Lee and the Cadillac “The Arena” and SoHo marketing scheme due to their/its incompetence & illogic; no hatred, per se, but deep resentment due to seeing such a vast waste of resources.

            I HATE that there will be Chinese manufactured CADILLAC CT6 & BUICK ENVISION (for starters) exported to and sold within the United States of America.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            To clarify: I meant no insult to BTSR or his mother. I read the car was for his mother, and also that it was for a business, and I have read in the past that he was buying livery cars for others who drive for Uber. So I put 2 + 2 together.

            I don’t see how driving for Uber is an insult in the first place; in my book any job done with pride is a job you can take pride in.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      $3900 down and $670/month for a lease on an Epsilon sedan with the engine from a $25K rental car.

      Good thing you’ve got cash to blow.

    • 0 avatar
      suspekt

      I’m digging the CT6 on exterior looks alone.

      In pictures at least, it has a subtle presence lacking in every domestic and japanese sedan.

      They should do the right thing, and drop an LT1 in it and call it a day.

      The CT6 absolutely slays the new Continental in the looks department.

    • 0 avatar
      CarnotCycle

      “A CT6 would be best purchased with the 3.6-L in AWD.”

      HF-6 is a an impressive well-rounded motor, I can see why GM stuffs them in everything.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        It’s not good enough to be put into any vehicle remotely approaching $55,000, let alone $75,000.

        It’s a segment competitive V6 in the mainstream sedan and CUV field ($25,000 to $35,000 vehicles).

        There are MANY smoother inline and V 6s in the marketplace, even from a decade ago.

      • 0 avatar
        TrailerTrash

        I just can’t get my arms around a large RWD car, with long hood…and a 4 cylinder!
        It must look hilarious when you lift the hood!
        And why does it have to be RWD? Nobody in this class of buyers gives a damn about cornering or power around mountain corners. It seems an awful way to waste a modern FWD opportunity and reduce actual interior space because of this.
        And IF I am reading the review correctly, they do not offer AWD because this would have forced the height of the car to be higher than they wanted.
        To bad.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    Your CT6 didn’t get lost in the mail. They sent it to DeadWeight’s house, and he incinerated it…lol

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      There is a standing offer (Ronnie is going to communicate it to Johan personally) to allow me to review the CT6.

      I will be absolutely objective.

      I will need 10 days weeks to 14 days, minimum, with unfettered access to the vehicle, a prepaid VISA card in the amount of $250 to $350 with which to only purchase fuel for the CT6 drive test & powertrain evaluation, and full insurance for both property damage and personal injury liability as furnished by General Motors, LLC, in a commercially reasonable amount, insuring me for the entire duration of the evaluation.

      • 0 avatar
        VoGo

        I can see JdN in his Soho office contemplating his options. Either lend a CT6 to Motor Trend/Automobile/C&D – whom GM already has in the bag – with assurance of a very positive review, or lend to DW, with assurance only of an honest review.

        Tough call.

        • 0 avatar
          CarnotCycle

          “Either lend a CT6 to Motor Trend/Automobile/C&D – whom GM already has in the bag – with assurance of a very positive review, or lend to DW, with assurance only of an honest review.

          Tough call.”

          $350 Kardashian Gas Card is cheap compared to $$$ Motor Trend boffo Tuscany tour, and GM probably has an Excel spreadsheet macro somewhere making this decision in lieu of a real human, because GM.

          So there is chance.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            I will break the internet with my Cadillac CT6 review.

            It will garner at least 1/2 a billion hits on youtube or more.

            Johan and his minions need to decide if they really want to let a REAL REVIEW of the CT6 out for public consumption.

            Ye of little faith, Johan?

      • 0 avatar

        “I will be absolutely objective.”

        I will get my hands on this car soon.

        Cadillac may wish I hadn’t

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    To save $100 per day, Flint EM Kevin Early imposed unlimited tragedy on many tens of thousands of Flint residents (especially developing children), billions in damage on the pipes and other underground and at ground level infrastructure (streets that will need to be ripped open), etc.

    What an imbecile.

    AFA the Cadillac CT6 is concerned, I just read 3 reviews of the new CT6 in the glossy, Tony Swan-esque car rags, all brimming with effusive praise for the vehicle, including even the BASE 4 cylinder (same engine used in everything from ATS to base Camaro to Buick Regal), 265 horsepower “full size” CT6, $56,999.99 “Flagship” (whose price rapidly climbs to near $90,0000 with a twin-turbo V6).

    They didn’t talk about ride quality, fit & finish, or other such things though, sticking to GM bulletin points about “exotic adhesive/composite bonding” and “Bose Panaray” 3,241 speakers sound system.

    I’m looking forward to both the 4 page pull-out and pop-up ads for the CT6 in those same magazines the next time I need a 4 wheel alignment, and seeing the first production crop of these CT6s break in half in the middle of their drivetrains around the 45,000 mile mark.

    • 0 avatar

      The XTS and CT6 I could seriously see myself taking long drives with.

      thing is, I don’t drive long distance – I FLY.

      As an everyday car, the CT6 is unnecessary for me – beyond my Uber partnership. I’d settle with an XTS as a daily Driver.

      I’d be fine with a 3.6-L.

      I’d never be able to beat any SRT with the XTS-V anyway…

    • 0 avatar
      VoGo

      Don’t know those CT6 reviews in the car rags – they are some of the best reviews money can buy!

    • 0 avatar
      philadlj

      Jalop’s Pat George called the CT6 a high-tech return to the brand’s original ideals: “Cars with lavish comfort. A smooth highway ride for cruising. Presence. An air of success. Resplendent American luxury, some might call it.”

      As for the base engine: “I found the turbo four a bit wanting. And thrashy. And unpleasant to listen to. This is a damn luxury sedan and you’re an American, don’t go with the base engine.”

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        “As for the base engine: “I found the turbo four a bit wanting. And thrashy. And unpleasant to listen to. This is a damn luxury sedan and you’re an American, don’t go with the base engine.”

        The ubiquitous GM 3.6 isn’t exactly a symbol of refinement. It’s okay in an Equinox or maybe even a SRX.

        To get it in a $65,000 Cadillac CT6 (close to Lexus LS460 MSRP) is a SICK JOKE, BUT THEN SO IS GENERAL MOTORS AND JOHAN DE FRAUDSTEN.

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          Sorry, just read Patrick’s sloppy-wet-on-Cadillac’s-pole (they flew him around in a helicopter FFS, so there’s that) review, and the mid-trim 3.6 liter CT6 is $75,000!!!

          WTF.

          Johan has publicly lowered expected sales to between 350 and 550 per month (90% of which will be to GM employees).

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Well management at the Tech Center, Milford Proving Grounds, and RenCen do need to replace their ELR company leases.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            Will Dal flip out when he realizes he could’ve had a 3.6 liter V6 CT6 for nearly 3x the price of the LS460 he purchased with its silky and uber-reliable V8?

            (Rhetorical; he won’t.)

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I can feel his anger brewing at being denied the chance to spend triple the amount of money for a vastly inferior product. Watch out!

          • 0 avatar

            With you there, Deadweight, the Jalopnik “review” was a pathetic fluffpiece.

  • avatar
    bball40dtw

    Darnell Early will have such career accolades “Poisoning the Children of Flint” and “Suing Public School Teachers to Make Them Work in Buildings that Should Be Condemned”.

    What a resume.

  • avatar
    seth1065

    Sure the Flint story is a major F*** up and very very sad by why is it here?

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      He should have tied in the fact that GM stopped using Flint water because of it’s corrosive properties. Then it would have a nice bow on it. Plus, it was in October of 2014. People should have been mad about the Flint water them.

      http://www.mlive.com/news/flint/index.ssf/2014/10/gms_decision_to_stop_using_fli.html

    • 0 avatar

      Flint has long been connected with GM. Had GM expanded its presence in Flint, rather than scale it back as much as they have over the years, then maybe Flint wouldn’t have gone under and a bunch of children wouldn’t have been poisoned … or something.

      • 0 avatar
        TrailerTrash

        Again…nobody here knows what they are talking about.
        The devil in the details will come out…but research has to be done.

        The city has been a failure for awhile.
        It has been in receivership and unable to pay its bills for a long time.
        It continually votes democratic.
        A loser city.

        And in all reality, the screaming about the lead is a bit overblown. The city levels are in fact lower now that even 10 years ago.

        http://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/2016/01/22/flint-water-lead-poison-michigan-health-column/79019134/

        And the so called testing by the university that started the rumors/story of lead poisoning cannot be verified as it refuses to release its test.

        http://hotair.com/archives/2016/01/26/flint-water-crisis-a-stimulus-project-gone-bad/

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          You are aware that the USA Today editorial you linked was written by a GOP speech writer that has no point besides, “Well things used to be worse,” right?

          • 0 avatar
            TrailerTrash

            So, again, only those liberal in position get the right to post research and opinions.
            This is how we listen?
            This is how we discuss?
            We only listen to those we wear the same colors of?

            I have gotten the media points as well as the liberal.
            It is forced down our throats every day.
            And this is the USAToday rag…a liberal rag!
            So I go about searching for more information.
            Now how about you?
            How about a little counter thought?
            Can you handle it?

            How about one more….?

            http://reason.com/blog/2016/01/25/the-flint-water-crisis-is-the-result-of

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            There is a huge repository of articles at mlive.com. They were mostly written by reporters that live and work in the state of Michigan. They have been on this story since inception.

            Even if the KWA was nothing but a huge jobs project, it was happening with or without the city of Flint, and it still falls back on the State.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            It’s a big internet. How is it that this trash dude can’t find a decent source out of the bunch?

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            “It’s a big internet. How is it that this trash dude can’t find a decent source out of the bunch?”

            @Pch101 – Simple really. We do not search for the truth, we search for validation of our beliefs. It is most likely an extension of our basic survival instinct of not trusting someone different than us. Someone “on the right” will search the right for validation whereas someone “on the left” will search on the left. The other side is felt to be wrong therefor any other evidence is also wrong.

        • 0 avatar

          No expert here. But the financial shape of the city was bad but it could be argued that the emergency manager did more long term damage to the people and future of the city then poor financials ever could have. The problems is his only job was to cut budgets not fix the city (so there is little doubt it will fail again) he also is not held accountable by the residents like there elected officials would be he is basically a slash and burn outfit as they would say in the 80’s. Virginia tech is running a study of the water since the fall and it is getting better but parts of the system with higher lead contents in the pipes are still showing way higher then allowable by law. They haven’t published the full data but parts of it are on the web. The blood study was published by the university but some of the data points are in question but in general the consensus (including now local and state officials) is that there were greatly increased lead levels in children in several parts of the city but not all.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      @seth1065: I wondered the same thing.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    Last week I was running about taking kids to lessons when I had noticed a Cadillac behind me. The front lighting and silhouette in the darkness looked like I was being followed by an Optimus Prime helmet.

  • avatar
    Wheatridger

    Flint’s troubles shouldn’t be minimized by anyone. I can imagine the fear and worry among parents of Flint’s children, because I, too, received the news that my young child had high lead levels, caused by paint dust in a partially remodeled historic home. My kid is doing fine and showing no ill effects, so we were lucky. We had the money and opportunity to do chelation therapy, and move elsewhere.

    This tragedy could turn parts of Flint into a depopulated zone. Estimates are that replacing the public water infrastructure may cost $100 million, and the private water pipes and heaters, etc, will cost much more.

    This may not be a car story, but it’s a car town. And this sort of thing shouldn’t have happened anywhere in America.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Flint already is a depopulated zone.

      Source: I worked in Flint for at least one day a week from early 2012 until the end of 2014.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        …and you lived to tell the tale. I’m impressed!

        Back in the ’80s I worked for a vocational school in St. Louis. We served (or as I later figured out, ripped off) poor inner city folks who were looking for basic career training. What better place for a new location than…East St. Louis!

        So they sent me on a mission there to scout the location. Yes, me, the white preppy Jewish guy. There I was, trolling the lovely streets of East St. Louis in my brand new Honda with the private college, I Heart NY and KSHE (local classic rock station) stickers on the back. I fit right in.

        The good news was that as a longtime Trekkie, I began to understand how Spock felt when people stared at him because he was a Vulcan.

        I had a meeting with the chief of police to discuss (highly legitimate) security concerns. He had no sooner told me that the city’s bad rep was overblown than I heard automatic gunfire from outside.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          But just like the large amounts of time I spend in Detroit, I get to go home to a nice house, in a safe, affluent suburb, that has clean water, neighbors I know, and a lack of blight.

          I did live in Detroit for almost four years. Now there is where I saw some things…

  • avatar

    A few points about the Flint water crisis. To begin with, while it’s a public health issue, it’s not a catastrophe. To provide some perspective, because of improved water quality since the passage of the Clean Water Act in the 1960s, the average American adult over the age of 40 was likely exposed to far higher levels of lead in drinking water than anyone in Flint is exposed to today. You’ll note that Americans over the age of 40 aren’t displaying significant signs of lead poisoning.

    While it’s important to get the lead out of Flint’s drinking water, there’s not much risk that Flint residents are going to experience worse neurological damage than my own generation of Americans experienced in our youth.

    The problem goes back well before the state took over management of Flint’s insolvent city government. The city of Detroit makes a lot of money selling water to suburbs and other nearby cities. There is a consortium of communities near Flint that decided to build their own water supply roughly parallel to the Detroit pipes, so they could save money over paying Detroit’s high fees.

    Flint was originally not part of that consortium, but the city is facing about a billion dollars in unfunded pension obligations to city employees – as in other Michigan cities a major political power bloc. Before the governor (a Republican) appointed an Emergency Manager (a Democrat) to take over Flint’s management, city government, the mayor and the city council, approved a plan to join the consortium. The pipelines for that consortium, though, weren’t finished, so the city decided to switch from Detroit to the long unused Flint municipal water system that draws water from the Flint River. That water is more corrosive than that supplied by Detroit so it causes lead to leach into the water. I believe that the source of the lead is from solder joints, not from lead pipes.

    Reason, the libertarian publication, says that one reason why the Emergency Manager went ahead with the city’s plan was pressure from local officials who saw the infrastructure improvement as a jobs stimulus program.

    In any case, the Flint water situation is almost the definition of a clusterfu<K. Goverment *AT ALL LEVELS* failed the people of Flint. City government, the state Emergency Manager and Dept. of Environmental Quality (and ultimately, the governor, where the buck stops), and the U.S. EPA failed.

    Pointing fingers, though, doesn't really help right now. Gov. Snyder is term-limited anyhow. Right now his job is to fix the problem.

    BTW, Flint has about 100,000 residents. A Pur brand faucet mounted water filter will remove 99.9% of lead. While that's not "five nines" clean, it's still pretty good and they only cost about $30 for the initial kit. A Pur filter for every Flint resident would only cost $3 million at retail, wholesale or mfg's cost would be less, of course. I'm surprised that Pur hasn't shipped enough filters to Flint as a goodwill publicity gesture. Or, alternatively, Trump or Bloomberg.

    • 0 avatar
      Jeff Waingrow

      Typical Schreiber slant. REPUBLICAN GOVERNOR SNYDER! Growing up, maybe that lead had more of an effect than you realize.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      You don’t even need 100K Pur filters. The contaminated water is isolated to certain areas. The letter from Dr. Robert McMahan, the Kettering University President, is a good fact based assessment of the situation.

      https://www.kettering.edu/sites/default/files/resource-file-download/KetteringWaterAlumniParents1242016.pdf

      And Ronnie, you are wrong, Snyder doesn’t deserve a chance to clean this up. His administration has a lot to do with why this mess occurred. He wants to be the CEO of the State of Michigan. Well, this is the kind of thing a CEO resigns over.

    • 0 avatar

      people have already died from Legionnaires that the city owned hospital has determined came from the infected water. although your narrative reads well, you aren’t 5 9’s there bro.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Something tells me that if it was YOUR kid who got poisoned with lead, it’d darn well be a catastrophe.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        What Ronnie just spouted off sounded like a Koch Brothers’ talking points memo.

        (Sorry – but not really sorry – for the blast of truth/reality, Ronnie).

        • 0 avatar

          You’re welcome to point out any historical inaccuracies. As best I can determine, that was the sequence of events.

          There’s plenty of blame to go around, but the folks that love big government would rather blame a Republican governor than the fact that all levels of government and both political parties failed the residents of Flint.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            And in other news, somewhat related to how (allegedly) the drinking/municipal water in Flint has roughly no more lead content than many U.S. municipal water supplies of the 60s and 70s (again, allegedly – I’d like to see the specific sources and data), the air in Flint is cleaner than it is in modern day Delhi, modern day Beijing, or circa-Charles Dickens London.

            Maybe Flint residents can prepare for careers as Chimney Sweeps to go along with their (alleged) 70’s era, lead-contaminated equivalent tap water!

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      “the average American adult over the age of 40 was likely exposed to far higher levels of lead in drinking water than anyone in Flint is exposed to today. You’ll note that Americans over the age of 40 aren’t displaying significant signs of lead poisoning.”

      You say this so blithely… but lead poisoning of exactly that cohort is one of the leading theories to explain the crime wave of the ’70s and ’80s. Lead at low levels affects impulse control. I’m 39, and often have a hard time concentrating, and sometimes I wonder about my own lead exposure. I also wonder if the pervasive inability of the boomer generation to consider the future is related to mass lead exposure.

      “While it’s important to get the lead out of Flint’s drinking water, there’s not much risk that Flint residents are going to experience worse neurological damage than my own generation of Americans experienced in our youth.”

      Again, you say this as though older groups didn’t experience meaningful neurological damage. They did.

      “Flint was originally not part of that consortium, but the city is facing about a billion dollars in unfunded pension obligations”

      Not the same bucket of funds.

      “Goverment *AT ALL LEVELS* failed the people of Flint. City government, the state Emergency Manager and Dept. of Environmental Quality (and ultimately, the governor, where the buck stops), and the U.S. EPA failed.”

      This is true, and I think it wouldn’t have been true if Flint’s residents were wealthier.

      “A Pur filter for every Flint resident would only cost $3 million at retail”

      And need to be replaced every couple of weeks with the water in the state it’s been in.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I’ve heard this theory and I wish I had saved the post I wrote about it. Essentially it is an interesting thought, but in the research I did the data it cited was incomplete. Something along the lines of it focused on youth crime in the maybe mid to late 50s but failed to include any data on persons born between 1924 and 1935ish who would have also been affected since they were born during or after the period lead was introduced into the atmosphere. I think the data also only comprised a few cities (New Orleans, Chicago, maybe New York) whereas more data would be needed to validate the hypothesis.

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          I picked both “liberal,” “neutral” and “conservative” sources/publications:

          The Impact of Childhood Lead Exposure on Adult Crime

          http://www.nber.org/digest/may08/w13097.html

          How Lead Caused America’s Violent Crime Epidemic – Forbes

          http://www.forbes.com/sites/alexknapp/2013/01/03/how-lead-caused-americas-violent-crime-epidemic/#372afa7763b2

          Lead Exposure and Violent Crime – Scholars at Harvard

          http://scholar.harvard.edu/files/jfeigenbaum/files/feigenbaum_muller_lead_crime.pdf

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            I’ve read that a quarter of the kids growing up in Providence, RI have lead poisoning – from living in apartments with lead paint. It really is sad to see the impact across the community in small cities that are already poor and struggling.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            It is sad, and pathetic, and runs against the ideal of egalitarian America, where people succeed or fail on their drive and merit (the ideal, remember),’not birthright or geography.

            Whether one is a conservative (ideology, not partisanship politics), liberal (ideology, not partisanship politics), or independent, we should all be able to acknowledge America is a profoundly unjust place and antithetical to its founding ideals, in current times.

            We need a revolution one way or another to shift closer to the paradigm of a meritocracy.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        Now causation doesn’t always equal correlation, but look at that graph:

        http://ichef.bbci.co.uk/news/624/media/images/74298000/gif/_74298891_lead_crime_gra624.gif

    • 0 avatar
      eamiller

      Ronnie,
      Unfortunately, your narrative about lead levels and the effect on the general population is profoundly misguided.

      While you are correct that we aren’t exposed to nearly as much environmental lead as we were in the pre-70s era, there is significant data that shows that the switch to unleaded gasoline has been correlated (yes, I know what that word means) to lower rates of crime (especially violent). Not only does this correlation hold in the US, it also holds in nearly every other developed nation that phased out leaded gasoline.

      The bulk of lead exposure in the industrial era is from the air, not the water. If you don’t have water with a pH imbalance, lead pipes don’t leach much into the water.

      So, yes, lead exposure is bad on both a macro and micro scale. Just because we were too stupid or ignorant to understand the effect of environmental lead on human beings back then, doesn’t mean we need to roll back the clock. Your logic is incredibly flawed, and your understanding myopic.

      I couldn’t give a rat’s behind which political party was in power when this decision was made, Snyder (and all other involved parties, regardless of political affiliation) need to feel the consequences of their decisions. First consequence should be a loss of their job. Second consequence should be a felony negligence conviction for each and every one of them.

      • 0 avatar
        Drzhivago138

        To add something on the topic of former fuel additives (leaded to unleaded gas), just this last season, we had to put sulfur on some of our fields for the first time in 40 years or more. The reason? You might have guessed: Pretty much every farm tractor or truck used for field work in the last 40-45 years runs on diesel. Before “normal” diesel was replaced by ULSD, sulfur in the air replenished the soil through rain. In just ten years since the switch, that cycle had completely tapered off.

    • 0 avatar
      carlisimo

      “You’ll note that Americans over the age of 40 aren’t displaying significant signs of lead poisoning.”

      It was a major factor in the rate of stillborn children and infant mortality. They didn’t make it to be over 40.

      And there are other minor effects that may be related to lead poisoning within being obviously caused by it, like erectile dysfunction and other “little” things driving up Medicare costs. Plus the possible connection to crime.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      “You’ll note that Americans over the age of 40 aren’t displaying significant signs of lead poisoning”

      That comment is completely open to debate… LOL

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      A PUR filter?? They’re only good for about 100-200 gallons before needing replacement. How many would you need in a house anyway? You’re not going want to shower with lead-tainted water and I don’t think they make them for showers. As far as I know, PUR filters don’t take care of the acidity issue, so what do you do to protect appliances from corrosion?

    • 0 avatar
      Xeranar

      Everybody already dogpiled Ronnie for his stupdity, I’m not going to bother with too much more than a light clean up.

      Total lead exposure is a difficult number to discuss since they’re getting a CONCENTRATED dose and we’ve already seen 10 confirmed deaths. I’m going to call shenanigans on your number conceptually.

      I see so much hay being made of a Republican choosing to put a Democrat into a politically sensitive situation. Under what situation do you think that these labels make sense then? Do you think a conservative would install a liberal into a politically sensitive situation? It’s pretty clear that whatever the Manager’s actual politics are they aren’t lining up with the elected officials and general party platform of the Democratic party so we can put that to bed. It’s really kind of irrelevant the party of bureaucrats as statistics bear out a pretty basic reality: The person in charge sets the drum beat, everybody else marches. So without knowing the working relationship it sounds very much like the Manager is a personal ally or working ally regardless of his party affiliation.

      It also takes some pretty big cajones to make the ‘government failed’ when it was more or less an economic collapse combined with a lack of technical knowledge that made this happen. If government wasn’t being run by those who prefer to dismantle it and instead invest in it we would be a much different situation. But as a libertarian, you pretty much are so adverse to that argument it’s relatively pointless to bother with it.

    • 0 avatar
      TrailerTrash

      OMG!
      Ronnie!
      Why did you step into this high school lunch room??!!!
      You will be sorry for trying to bring facts and logic to this trash food fight.
      Not interested in facts! Facts, like to many notes in jazz, simply make things to complex!!!
      My haters above, and below, will now have you to rant upon.

    • 0 avatar
      jimbob457

      The TV news has been full of news about the sad Flint water problem. The ligical choices are to repair the damage OAND/OR to abandon those parts of town where repair is too expensive. People outside of Flint ought to bear most of the financial burden since they caused the problem in the first place.

      To me, the obvious solution is a two part effort. First, buy out those property owners where the cost of epair exceeds the pre-crisis value of the property. Next, raise property taxes on the remainder enough to amortize the money borrowed to do the needed repair.

  • avatar
    RideHeight

    I had no idea who Carrie Underwood is so I YouTubed “Something in the Water”.

    I think it inadvertently answers my long-standing question as to why so many female country singers have that chokey, strangly, adenoidal voice.

    I always thought it might be due to the poor childhood nutrition of an alcoholic’s daughter and resultant undeveloped larynx, but I’ll go with something in the water.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      I think it’s more indicative of any established genre (in this case, Nashville country) being restrictive as to how a vocalist is supposed to sing, act, how their songs are supposed to sound, etc.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      Not a fan of country (quasi-country such as SOME Johnny Cash excepted).

      Here’s as good as Country gets acoustically & visually:

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YGAQdKcVfDE

      Cherlene (aka Cheryl Tunt) from Archer.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        Also, trivia, Archer’s Cheryl Tunt is voiced by Judy Greer, who was born and raised in Redford & Livonia, Michigan (and whom my older sister knows personally).

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          Apparently Kristen Bell grew up in my neighborhood. It’s not like her and Dax Shepard (from Milford) hang out here though.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            Yep.

            Dax’s mom started a business after marrying her 2nd husband whereby she essentially did VIP catering and other services for GM events at Milford and other GM facilities, and Dax’s love of the internal combustion engine comes from growing up in the belly of the Big Three (he loves LS V8s and Lincolns alike).

  • avatar
    Chocolatedeath

    Dont really know what to think. If they have one at the Amelia Island event in March I will take a look.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Did you all look at the CT6 reviews? It’s not a Flagship it is a Flagbarer. Although if I remember my naval history when Oliver Hazard Perry had to abandon his flagship he merely transferred his flag to the vessel that rescued him and continued with a new flagship.

  • avatar
    VenomV12

    I am convinced BTSR is just a caricature, just playing a part, I just laugh off what he says for the most part as just that. In all honesty Trump while creating a dangerous environment in the process for now is the same, just playing a part. Trump has been a lifelong Democrat and I highly doubt there is anything to change that over the years. If anything he has made gobs of money during this administration so he certainly has nothing to complain about. He does know and stated it publicly that if he was to run for President he would do so as a Republican and say pretty much everything that is saying and he is basically showing that as long as you say what the Republican base wants to hear, they will support you and it is true. He’s probably get up to 60%, maybe 70% of Republican support if he came out and said he would start lynching black people like BTSR like they did in the old days:)

    • 0 avatar
      Xeranar

      I really wish BTSR was some crazy cool wild performance art piece. Instead, he’s just a demented loon with no sense of reality. He’s a walking cliche of the Republican base (sans the color…but you know, got to change it up once in a while).

      He really believes everything he says, his world is driven by how tiny his member his but how big his hellcat makes it sound. He’s a limp noodle gloating to the rest of us and it’s gotten old.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      VenomV12 – sociologists and psychologists have found that we all share the same hardwired genetic survival mechanisms. Ironically the general talking points of the political right hit 5-6 of those points. The left tend to hit about half that number. The more educated you are along with other factors like upbringing help foster the need to try to overcome those hardwired traits i.e. the fear of strangers triggering racism or homophobia for example.
      Trump as rich as he is could not easily run a political campaign from the left because appealing to that group for him would be a long and hard sell.
      Campaigning on the right just means triggering all of those primal fear points. Trump has spent 5.8 million whereas Jeb Bush spent 59 million. He is a performer, he knows ratings very well. Shock and awe works in finance, war, and politics.

      In Canada the Conservative party tried a less aggressive but in some respects similar campaign of fear mongering and divisiveness. It worked to consolidate the right but failed to divide the left into its centrist and far left camps. They therefor lost.

  • avatar
    redapple

    Base 4 in an Equinox is borderline loud and ruff and under powered. I wont do that again.

    30,000,000 mexicans do the work american wont do AT THE WAGE RATE CURRENTLY OFFERED (DUE TO 30,000,000 MEXICANS DILUTING THE POOL OF WORKERS AND DRIVING DOWN wages TO less than NATURAL LEVELS)

    This displaces our lowest level native born. Puts them on the dole.

    Mexicans send the surplus earnings back to mamma san back in the old country.

    These points cause massive destruction to the living wage rate standards and tax rates of the native born. Period. Fact.

  • avatar
    kmars2009

    The XTS will be sold along side the CT6 until 2018. That is what MSN is reporting. Honestly, who cares about Cadillac? The new Lincoln Continental is far better looking. Even the MKZ with it’s new nose looks better than any Cadillac. And don’t get me started on those names. Finally, Lincoln has come to IT’s senses, and is returning back to real names. After Continental will come Aviator.


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