By on July 21, 2014

2014-06-29 07.58.35

The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines muscle cars as “any group of American-made 2-door sports coupes with powerful engines designed for high-performance driving.” Wikipedia goes further, and says that “a large engine is fitted in a 2-door, rear wheel drive, family-style mid-size of full-size car designed for 4 or more passengers. Sold at an affordable price, muscle cars are intended mainly for street use and occasional drag racing, and are distinct from two-seat sports cars.”

I am here to report that my 2014 Dodge Challenger R/T hits those definitions very squarely on the head.

2014-06-29 11.30.11
In fact, you could forget the words and just insert a photo of the Challenger. While other modern pony cars start with the intention of being a sports car and then throw in varying dashes of retro muscle car to ensure Boomer appeal, the Challenger starts out as a muscle car and throws in a heaping handful of American-style GT coupe. Those qualities are precisely why I chose to buy this car, and why I’ve enjoyed it so much in my 3 months and 3000+ miles of ownership to date.

Let’s start with what I bought: Here we have a 2014 Challenger R/T equipped with the 5.7 liter HEMI V8, Tremec TR-6060 6 speed manual transmission, and the 100th Anniversary Edition package. This package was developed to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the Dodge brand, and includes unique exterior colors and trim, special 20 inch wheels, “cloud print” Napa leather seating, a couple small special edition badges, and a number of other trim pieces and accessories. My car is also equipped with a power sunroof and the Super Track Pack, which for only $595 includes Goodyear Eagle F1 Supercar summer tires, a variable displacement power steering pump, heavier-duty brakes, and a “track tuned” suspension with Bilstein shocks.

It doesn’t matter where you go; this car simply cannot be ignored. It has grabbed the attention of countless small children, a gang of giggling Catholic high school girls, large groups of Harley guys, even larger groups of bikers (there is a difference), Sweaty Betty-clad young mothers running behind strollers, South Dakota farm boys, spiky-haired hipster girls, construction workers, elderly people, Cope-spitting cowboys, and every cop I’ve ever encountered. The car-crazy teenager down the block stares jealously as I roll through the alley. It has a presence.

The first factor in that presence is its styling, which to my eyes is as good as or better than the Mustang at presenting a modern car with throwback appeal. It straight up murders GM’s offering in this space, making the hokey, overdone, Camaro look like a cartoon. If you prefer the heritage look, you can get your R/T with more variations of racing and hockey stripes than you can handle. But my car, finished in the unique “High Octane Red Pearl” color with no stripes, sitting on big polished wheels comes across as clean, muscular, and decidedly grounded in 2014.

The more I’ve looked at my car, the more I love the little details. I didn’t always feel this way about the Challenger, and further consideration leads me to conclude that the car’s lines look best in darker colors. The domed hood with two “nostrils” calls back to the original 440 Magnum cars. The aggressive tumblehome recalls the full-sized “Fuselage” Chryslers of yore, and the distinctive swooping cutline is pure retro Challenger. The frameless front windows are big and provide an almost hardtop-like feel when rolled down. The B pillar is well disguised visually and the roofline somehow both flows into the trunk and adds a muscular squareness to the greenhouse. There’s no fussy chrome detailing to distract the eyes, and there are precisely two badges that identify it as a Challenger R/T, both small and applied stealthily on the grill.
2014-06-27 16.05.11
The second factor in the Challenger’s presence is its size. As Derek pointed out in his capsule review, this is not a small car. It looks big and it IS big. It dwarfs my wife’s Volvo S80 visually and dimensionally, and makes my beloved 1994 Camaro Z28 look (and feel) like a toy. The cowl is high, and the front bumper is waaaaay out there past the long hood. Care must be taken when navigating tight garages and parking lots, and the rear proximity sensors are essential when parallel parking. If you’re considering a lower-spec V6 car make sure you get them.

Thankfully, that big exterior does not hide a cramped, compromised cabin. I have many happy memories riding in big, two door American cars growing up and the Challenger’s roominess and interior comfort was one of it’s key selling points for me. This car is wide and airy inside with all-day comfortable seats, and the fact that they are not heavily bolstered suits my 50L frame just fine. There’s a wide range of adjustment offered by the seat and tilting/telescoping wheel and I immediately found an ideal position for my long-legged, short-armed size. The windshield is broad and the though the sills are high you’ll feel none of the bathtub-like claustrophobia that you find in a Camaro. The back seats are perfectly comfortable for even generously proportioned adults, and though their leg room may be a bit tight they won’t be kinking their necks or bumping their heads due to the high roofline. While lift over height is high, the trunk is absolutely huge and the back seats fold down for extra space if needed.
2014-07-03 11.32.31
While the room inside is great, the materials and styling in my 2014 are showing their age and their origins back in the bad, old penny-crushing days of Cerberus-owned Chrysler. The blocky styling, gauges, and monochrome LCD displays are far behind current Chrysler Group standards. Though plastics were upgraded by Fiat to soft-touch materials over the years, there are still some cheap touches here and there that could only have been driven by cost. My car has the older touchscreen UConnect system that includes satellite radio but not navigation, but it sounds great and pairs flawlessly with my MotoX.

In truth I’m picking at details, and aside from the gauges you’re left with an impression of quality and design that is similar to that of the outgoing Mustang. Everything in my car is nicely finished and works well, and overall it’s a very comfortable place to spend time. I knew what I was getting into and I am happy, but the upgrades for 2015 will make the experience even better. My only complaint so far is a recurring rattle somewhere in the driver’s seat. It seems to be a common problem for many Challenger owners, and may be related to the headrest, seat frame, or hinge. I plan on having it addressed by my dealer at the first (4000 mile) service.

The Hemi V8 in my Challenger puts out 375 hp according to Dodge, and it does so with a quality that is all its own. It doesn’t have the classic small block feel of an LS engine, nor does it have the frenetic, electric feeling of the Mustang’s Coyote Five-Point-Oh. It pushes the car around effortlessly with a nicely balanced chorus of hushed mechanical noises, induction sound, and exhaust bass. It’s more than fast enough for me, and it springs away from a stop with an authoritative shove of torque. Tire-shredding burnouts are hilariously easy – just switch off the traction control, dump the clutch, and watch the smoke roll. The clutch is light and easy to modulate, and the shifter has short throws with a smooth, satisfying mechanical engagement in each gear. Subjectively, I think my car has loosened up a bit; it seems both stronger and quicker to rev towards redline than when new. The only potential complaint here is the exhaust note. It’s very subdued, almost too much so. I have not done anything with my car, but if you want the total muscle car experience you’ll want to spring for a Mopar or Magnaflow system to freak out all your neighborhood squares.

Before I get into the driving experience, let’s go back to the defined intent of a muscle car – “muscle cars are intended mainly for street use and occasional drag racing, and are distinct from two-seat sports cars”. I’d tweak that a bit – my Challenger is a car for the road. I’ve owned a number of alleged “road cars” over the years, but this car eats up mileage like nothing I’ve ever driven. It’s comfortable and quiet, and with Chrysler’s excellent automatic climate control and the wide selection of music available on satellite radio you can drive all day, stopping only for gas and bathroom breaks. In cruise mode you can even stretch those breaks out, as it’s possible to average 25-27 mpg in 6th gear at reasonable highway speeds.

The GT part of the equation becomes evident when you exit the Interstate and find yourself on a curvy two lane road. When hustled down the excellent selection of such routes in Eastern Minnesota and Western Wisconsin, the car seems to shrink around you and drive smaller than it actually is. It likes being driven hard, and controls its size and weight very nicely. For a big girl this car can really move with flat, neutral cornering at illegal (but reasonable) road speeds, huge waves of torque available anywhere on the tach to carry you through the straight sections, and confident braking when a roller or Sunday driver appears. Push harder and you’ll induce gentle understeer; harder still and the stability control (which I have no desire to try to totally defeat) will step in and keep things sane. I’ve never gone further than six or seven tenths on the road, but I’m looking forward to making some progress towards the ultimate limits during an October track day at Brainerd International Raceway. I’ll post an update after that experience.

Compared to the immediate competition, I believe the Challenger provides a unique proposition. It feels like a more complete and less compromised car than the Camaro, with more room for passengers and cargo and styling that is both more cohesive and more mature. It’s more of a GT than the Mustang, which feels like a harder-edged sports car in every way. When it came down to it, the decision was easy for me and I would make it again in a heartbeat. The Challenger was the right car at the right time for me, and my only real regret is that I waited so long to add a modern muscle car to my garage. If you don’t drive one you really don’t know what you’re missing, and we are lucky to live in an era where each of the Detroit 3 offers a unique and compelling choice.

So what’s next? More miles, more experiences, and more fun. For the first time I have a “fun car” that my wife has absolutely no objections to riding and road-ripping in. And though I will freely admit that I’m still in the honeymoon period, my Challenger can make even my short drive to work feel fun and special. No matter how you define the phrase, this particular muscle car has found a very happy place in my life.
2014-06-27 19.00.57-1

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

58 Comments on “Reader Review: 2014 Challenger R/T 100th Anniversary Edition...”


  • avatar

    I’m not a big fan of giant 2-door cars. I’m a 4-door sedan guy. glad you love it.

    “Tire-shredding burnouts are hilariously easy – just switch off the traction control, dump the clutch, and watch the smoke roll. The clutch is light and easy to modulate, and the shifter has short throws with a smooth…”

    Manual transmission???

    I AIN’T GOT TIME FO DAT!!!

  • avatar

    The only downside of having a Challenger will be everyone asking whether or not it’s a HELLCAT…or driving close to see whether or not it’s a HELLCAT…or making calls and inquiries on Ebay to try to figure out how to make it as fast or faster than the HELLCAT.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke

      Heh..funny you mention that!

      The Car Craft Summer Nationals were here in the Twin Cities this weekend, and I was hanging out with a friend as he had his Challenger SRT 392 tuned at the Petty Garage trailer. In the hour I was there no fewer than 12 people stopped by to ask about getting their Challenger or Charger “over 700 at the wheels.”

      The Petty guys said the same thing every time – “we can do anything if the check is big enough.”

      • 0 avatar

        I’m not sure why everyone and their mother thinks they can handle 700 horsepower in a rear-wheel-drive car…especially 700 *unmitigated* horsepower. People are way too cavalier about that sort of thing. I can understand the Hellcat, which is *meant* to have that kind of power, but if you modify you car for 700 horsepower, don’t bring your deathtrap anywhere near me.

        • 0 avatar

          Drive an SRT. They are designed to be easy to handle so long as you leave traction control and sport mode on.

          Their front heft and stiff chassis makes steering very predictable. Even the event you hit bump-steer.

          I’ve never had a problem even in winter. The traction control and ESC are brilliant.

          • 0 avatar

            Exactly. The SRT models were engineered to have high levels of *controllable* horsepower. So was the Hellcat. They weren’t some hack-job approach done in somebody’s garage. I’m talking about people who modify their cars with no earthly idea what it takes to handle such modifications…

    • 0 avatar

      If I had a Hellcat, I’d probably de-badge it.

  • avatar
    davefromcalgary

    Like those rims. Agree that darker colors suit the Challenger better.

    • 0 avatar
      nrd515

      I couldn’t disagree more! I don’t see how you can say that after seeing it in these, the “ultimate” (IMHO) colors:

      http://www.blogcdn.com/www.autoblog.com/media/2009/11/chal_detyel_630.jpg

      I wanted a Detonator Yellow car so bad, couldn’t find one without a sunroof within 250 miles. My friend has a 2012 Yellow Jacket SRT, and while I like it, the slightly darker yellow just doesn’t “hit” like DY does. He agrees, but it was the only yellow available in 2013 (It was a leftover).

      http://www.mibz.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/11/2009-Dodge-Challenger-HEMI-Orange.jpg

      I’ve grown to love this color. In the 3.5+ years I’ve had it, I still think how great it looks every time I see it.

      http://www.allpar.com/photos/dodge/challenger/mopar/moparized.jpg

      I don’t like the hood scoop on the TorRed one at all, but the color is great.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      I’m no extrovert, but I love that Hemi Orange paint.

  • avatar
    CaptainObvious

    I haven’t had the pleasure of driving a V-8 Challenger, but have rented two V-6 powered Challenger’s over the past couple of years and will attest to its comfort, swagger and back-road prowess. Driving through upstate New York back roads a few years ago I was surprised to look down and see how fast I was going.

  • avatar
    CaptainObvious

    And thanks for not getting blacked out rims!

    • 0 avatar
      turboprius

      My sister’s ex has(d?) a black SXT with the blacked out rims, and it was gorgeous. I do agree, black five spokes would look tacky on this one.

      (The reason I have a “d?” is because he was talking about getting a purple SRT-8, and I don’t know if he got it or not).

  • avatar
    raph

    Huh thats, interesting you consider Mustang to be a bit more rough as a GT car Luke, did you have a direct comparison in mind when you wrote that? I’ve found the early (05-09) S-197 cars to be entirely to soft for my liking. I haven’t had a chance to check out a later Mustang since I’m not the sort to just waste a dealers time with meaningless test drives ( although I’very got my eye on a 2011 or 2012 Boss sitting on a car lot after the last few, payments on the Shelby if it’s still around and the price is right)

    If the Mustang is entirely to hard edged I think I’d be pretty let down with the Challenger’s ride

    • 0 avatar
      Luke

      The Mustang GT I test drove was a new 2014 6 speed manual and only two options: the rear sensor package, and the GT Track Pack. It was all black everything with the basic radio and cloth seats. I have the feeling someone at the dealership ordered it for themselves because every other GT they had was a fully loaded GT Premiums with leather, navigation, etc.

      I drove the car a couple times and absolutely LOVED it, but did find it to be harsher riding than the Challenger. If I didn’t have my upgraded Gen 4 Camaro the choice would have tilted towards the Ford. It’s a remarkable car with a remarkable engine.

      • 0 avatar
        VoGo

        Great review, Luke,
        And great taste with the ordering book – the MT and that red are awesome. I wish you many years of joy in your Challenger.

      • 0 avatar
        Pinzgauer

        It was harsh because of the track pack. Its basically an approximation of a Boss for people who couldn’t or wouldn’t spend the money on a real Boss. Its going to be stiff. A regular GT doesn’t ride like that. But with the being said, my Boss rides great, but I have the dampers on setting 2 for street driving.

        What killed the Chally for me was the horrible dash and guage cluster. It felt way too cheap for a car over 40k (SRT8). So glad I didn’t buy it seeing the ’15 updates and Hellcat motor, I woulda been kicking myself.

  • avatar
    319583076

    Did I miss the part where you discussed the manual 1-4 lockout? Does this “feature” bother you?

    A couple of other thoughts. I see Tire Rack is blowing out the OEM rubber for these @ $145/tire right now. A screaming deal compared to the $268/tire regular price. Ouch!

    Thanks for reminding me about the great roads in Eastern MN/Western WI. A couple of years ago I made several runs on 2-lane highway between Rochester, MN and Eau Claire, WI. I did them in rental mules, but the roads were good enough that it didn’t matter. I’d love to hustle a Challenger down 60 into Wabasha and then follow the Chippewa River north on 10.

    Great shot from behind the wheel – the grain elevator is pure Americana.

    Thanks

  • avatar
    kvndoom

    Great review, and sweet ride! Glad you chose a REAL transmission too.

    I like its size and interior spaciousness. Family-friendly two-door cars are a rarity. The 2011 Accord coupe I had was close, but the seats were atrociously uncomfortable. I understand that the 2013+ refresh fixed that.

    I like that shade of red, and that says a lot for me, because red is my least favorite car color. Enjoy it!

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    That’s a very nice-looking car. I really like the muted 100th anniversary paint color, and those wheels match it well.

    It’s interesting to me that the clutch is so easy, which is good to hear. I found the clutch on a Dart to be fairly heavy. I’ve never understood why clutch actions aren’t more refined after 100+ years of engineering them.

    Many happy miles to you.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    The 100th anniversary exclusive High Octane Red is one of the best colors this car has ever been sprayed in. Looks fantastic, I desperately want a ’15 with that color. Sadly, doesn’t look to be available.

  • avatar
    ChiefPontiaxe

    I’ve always thought the Challenger falls squarely within the definition of “pony car” since it is a direct competitor of the Camaro and Mustang (the latter which defines the term). The Charger (if it was a coupe) would be considered a muscle car).
    Since coupes have pretty much gone the way of the Dodo, I’m not sure whether any true muscle cars (think original Pontiac GTO- intermediate body, large engine) exist today.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke

      I had an hour plus conversation with my wife about this exact topic over the weekend. I agree that there are few, if any, muscle cars left. Keeping in mind the definition I cite from Merriam’s, I would argue that the Challenger is the last car around that can legitimately be called a muscle car. Bear with me here…

      The Camaro and Mustang are indeed pony cars, and the original Challenger was very much a pony car. The pony car was and is it’s own class of automobile, generally derived from the platform or parts of an existing compact car, and generally set up as a personal-sized performance car. For the current Mustang and Camaro I think this definition still more or less fits.

      The modern Challenger gets lumped in with the modern Mustang and Camaro, but it is a much larger car in all dimensions and doesn’t really fit the same mold. Also, the modern Challenger is built on the same platform as Chrysler’s full-sized cars, further distancing it from it’s pony competitors and roots. Thus I believe that it’s more appropriate to call a modern Challenger a muscle car than a pony car, though the marketers may differ and it’s clear what cars it competes with.

      If Dodge were being entirely accurate, they should have named the modern Charger “Coronet” or ‘Monaco”, then called the modern Challenger the “Charger” in order to stick closer to their 60’s ancestors. The current Challenger in spirit and execution is a lot closer to the second generation B-body Charger than it is to the first-generation pony car Challenger; that is, a full-sized personal coupe and muscle car.

      (rant over)

      • 0 avatar
        ChiefPontiaxe

        I see your point completely, but shouldn’t the modern Camaro be in the same category since it shares the Zeta platform with the full sized Pontiac G8 and Chevy SS?

  • avatar
    RogerB34

    Curb weight or doesn’t it matter?

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    So does that mean a pre-Clydesdale Mustang is a sports car? Then a Pinto-stang is a sports car? The Fox body? The current Mustang and Camaro which are “compact” and “sub compact” by the EPAs estimation? At least by the Wikipedia definition.

    Good looking Challenger BTW.

  • avatar

    Nice car. Nice color. Nice watch.

  • avatar
    krohde

    Really nicely done review, Luke. Anybody who’s owned a muscle car knows how hard it is to be brand neutral and you strike me as a guy that gave all three cars a fair shake and ended up with the one that suited you best. I got my pony/muscle car almost three years ago but, having wanted a Mustang since I was 14, only looked at one.

    However, having read plenty since and lived with my car for over 50,000 miles of driving, I think I’d probably buy a Challenger if I did it over again AND was completely brand neutral. The extra 5″ of backseat room would be huge and make the car much more usable for a family car, which is nice. I wrote a 60K mile review of my car here (http://www.kylerohde.com/2014/04/04/2011-ford-mustang-gt-the-60000-mile-review/) – maybe it’ll reaffirm your decision that you made the right one.

    Here’s to many more miles of enjoyment out of that car – I grew up in southern Wisconsin and know those fantastic roads of western WI well!

    • 0 avatar
      Luke

      Thanks so much for your comment! My dad is a Chevy guy, and growing up I was a Chevy guy too and to very recently always considered myself in that camp. I adore my 4th generation F body and will never give it up, and I really, really wanted to love the Gen 5 Camaro. There are just so many compromises there, and it was clear from mile 1 on the test drive that it wasn’t the car for me.

      It’s funny to look at where I am now. I still love the Camaros and Corvettes I grew up with but after owning 4 Jeeps, consciously choosing the Challenger over everything else, and now shopping for a second generation Charger I guess I am a Mopar guy. I suppose I’d better buy the t-shirt!

      • 0 avatar
        krohde

        Personally, there’s too few of us muscle car/gearheads left so I’m cool with whichever one guys end up with. Beats buying a Camry!

        • 0 avatar
          nrd515

          If the Challenger hadn’t come along, I would have bought a Mustang, even though I’m a Fordaphobe. When I saw the drawings of the present Camaro, I was disappointed, to say the least. When I saw, and sat in the real car, I was mildly disgusted. Hideous. When I saw the Challenger concept, I said, “If they don’t build this, they are insane!”, and when it was announced they would build it, I knew it would almost surely a car I would buy someday. I was severely injured in 2007, and I had to get rid of my ’03 Ram, and since I couldn’t afford an SRT, I got a Charger R/T to get by with until Nov 2010, when I finally got the car I had wanted for 5 years. Almost 4 years later, I have no real desire for a new car, but if I was buying right now, it would be another Challenger.

  • avatar
    cpthaddock

    My point of comparison lies with National’s rental version (V6 + Auto) and from familiarity with those I commend you for a very fair and honest review.

    IMO upgrading the interior and gadgetary would see this car taking a few luxury cross-shoppers, but then again that might not be a good thing. As it stands, the Challenger is an entirely honest car and needs make no excuses at all.

    Throwing some read meat out there, who are the stereotypical drivers of Mustang, Camaro and Challenger in each part of the world?

  • avatar
    pb35

    Great review Luke, thanks for taking the time. I currently have a 2012 Charger R/T (R&T) and as a child of the 70s that practically grew up in a Chrysler showroom, the Challenger remains on my wish list. Two things prevent me from taking the leap, however. I have 4 y.o. twins and I suspect it might prove difficult to get the kids in and out of their seats. Second, the wife refuses to drive/learn a manual trans. We’ve been together over 25 years now and I have tried over the years, believe me. I don’t think I’d want one of these with a slush box even though the 8-spd is highly regarded. Maybe I’ll test drive a 6.4 R/T when they come out.

    Finally, related to nothing, we both have a Volvo next to our Dodge in the garage. Mine is a XC90 V8 Sport. I guess reliability is not a priority for either of us. CR be damned!

    • 0 avatar
      Luke

      Great minds think alike man! Our S80 is a T6 AWD and it’s been a decent car, but it has had it’s share of small, annoying issues. I’m hoping I can talk my wife into something more interesting the next time around.

      We are DINKs here, but if I had to get kids in and out of the back seat routinely I’m not sure I’d recommend a Challenger or any 2 door. That said, another reader had a great review of a Hemi Charger recently, and I can also whole-heartedly recommend that car. Very much the same feel, just more room!

      • 0 avatar
        pb35

        Yeah, I already have a 2012 R/T with the Road and Track package and Super Track Pak. It’s been good to me over 2 years and almost 18k now. I’d say the only weak link is the brakes but I would buy another one. We’ll see what’s in store for the 2015s when the order banks open up. I’m on the fence with the redesign but I bet I’ll like it just fine when I see it in person.

        Good luck with your car! The S80 is a nice cruiser too, nothing wrong with that. Safe for the wife too. Our XC has been good to us since we purchased it new in 2007.

  • avatar
    turboprius

    Great review. I think the R/T might be my favorite of the bunch, both for 2014 and 2015; good Hemi power, lots of features, and not overhyped.

    Oh, and there’s a stick shift for y’all. I’ll have to remember that I don’t brake with the left foot before I can even learn standard. (B&B in the Atlanta area, don’t worry, I haven’t gotten my permit yet). ;)

  • avatar
    hubcap

    Nice review Luke and its great seeing the reemergence and reinvention of the muscle car. I have to say that I like all three of the current crop but give the Mustang the edge and I can’t wait to see what the GT350 offers.

    The Challenger is kinda big but as you say it handles its weight well. What you say about the looks of the Camaro is funny mostly because I felt the same. But, to my eyes, the 1LE and ZL1 are two of the most menacing looking cars on the road today (below $200,000).

    Enjoy your ride and thanks for sharing your thoughts.

  • avatar
    pragmatist

    Mechanically it appears to be a damned nice car.

    Sadly, visually, it doesn’t hold a candle to the 70. Perhaps if they didn’t try to reference back to the original, it would have been better. But as it is, it can only be seen as a cartoonish caricature of the awesome original.

  • avatar

    Hey great review. If I lived in the US, this or a Mustang would surely be in my considerations when buying a car. Must be fun to drive this kind of car on a daily basis (and not worry about gas, size etc.).

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    The Challenger is truly a timeless car. It looks fantastic today, would have looked fantastic 20 years ago and will look fantastic 50 years in the future.

  • avatar
    Luke

    I want to thank all of the B&B for the nice compliments on my car and on the review itself. Everyone has a different taste in cars, and it’s cool to be part of a community where everything on the map is appreciated and celebrated. Truly, thank you all for the kind words and support!

    Thank you also to Derek and Jack for giving me the opportunity to share my story, and for making me a part of Challenger Week on TTAC! I’m looking forward to seeing Jack’s review of the Hellcat and Scat Pack cars.

    I will send an update in October when I hit the track! If anyone wants to join me (or coach me…ahem…Jack?) let me know and I’ll send you the details of BIR’s Driving School!

  • avatar
    burgersandbeer

    Nice review Luke! The way you describe this car is pretty much exactly what I’m looking for in a car. Living in a somewhat crowded area of the country, I do have reservations about its size, but at least that’s no secret; just have to make peace with the inconvenience that can come with that going in. The highway ride will offset it. Cars with small footprints that make excellent cruisers are rare to non-existent anyway; just the way it goes.

  • avatar
    canddmeyer

    I test drove three 100th anniversary Chargers, and none were the same, and all had issues. The first one I drove was a dog, and the steering wheel was misaligned although the vehicle tracked straight. The second one was powerful, but felt beat on. The weather stripping on the sunroof and door was misaligned, and the vehicle had severe bump steer. It didn’t help when I saw the porter scratching the tires as he drove it back to its place on the lot, which confirmed my beat-on suspicions. The third one has air conditioning issues. 0 for 3 on Dodge quality, and $35,000 that never left my pocket.

    I’m happy for those of you who got good ones.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      I’ll admit, that’s a concern I have about the Challenger – the build quality issues. I’ve stopped by my local VW/Dodge dealer a couple of times, and I can’t help but notice the poor alignment on body panels and panel gaps from doors that don’t shut properly. And these were $45K-$50K cars I was looking at.

      I like the Challenger more than I used to, and the 2015 looks to be a significant improvement, but I wish these issues weren’t so apparent to me when looking at brand new cars on the lot.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    “The Merriam-Webster dictionary defines…”

    And there’s where I stopped reading, because surely the rest of the review is as trite as that introduction.

  • avatar

    Nice review, Luke. I own the same car (minus the Super Track Pack) and feel the same way. It’s a hell of a machine for the money, and really shouldn’t be compared to the Camaro or Mustang. Sure, it gets out of its own way surprisingly well for its size, but it’s truly a GT car…*not* a sports car. Doesn’t matter, though, it’s fun to drive and has an attitude all its own. Cheers!


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Subscribe without commenting

Recent Comments

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributing Writers

  • Jack Baruth, United States
  • Brendan McAleer, Canada
  • Marcelo De Vasconcellos, Brazil
  • Vojta Dobes, Czech Republic
  • Matthias Gasnier, Australia
  • W. Christian 'Mental' Ward, Abu Dhabi
  • Mark Stevenson, Canada
  • Cameron Aubernon, United States
  • J Emerson, United States