By on July 1, 2014

09 - 1984 Toyota Camry Liftback Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinWe don’t normally put the words “Camry” and “rare” together in the same sentence, but this series is all about finding rare-but-not-valuable oddities (e.g., one of the very last GM J-body. When it comes to rare Camrys, there’s the seldom-seen-in-the-wild Camry All-Trac and the nearly-as-rare Camry Liftback, and I’d found exactly one example of each in wrecking yards prior to today’s find. Yes, here’s another first-gen Camry liftback, this time dressed in whatever Toyota called this strange metallic purplish-brown hue.
01 - 1984 Toyota Camry Liftback Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinBefore car companies got into the whole brevity thing and started slapping plain old LE badges on slightly-upscale trim levels, Toyota added these attractive Limited Edition gold badges on Camry trunklids.
05 - 1984 Toyota Camry Liftback Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee Martin228,126 miles was very good for a car built 30 years ago.
07 - 1984 Toyota Camry Liftback Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinThe interior isn’t bad and— this being a California car— there’s no rust. Why is this Camry in the junkyard? Perhaps the engine or transmission crapped out, or maybe the car got towed away for too many parking tickets.
10 - 1984 Toyota Camry Liftback Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinThe 91-horsepower 1S-L engine was enough for 1984, and for 1984 buyers of Toyota sedans.
06 - 1984 Toyota Camry Liftback Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinAir conditioning!


The lack of the macho-ness we expect in 1980s JDM car ads is disappointing here, but this is a Camry.

I’m sure the automobile industry longs for the days of fuel-economy testing that gave the early Camry a 44 mpg highway rating. At 47 mph with a tailwind, maybe.

Room for a rock group… or a group of rocks!

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

58 Comments on “Junkyard Find: 1984 Toyota Camry LE Liftback...”


  • avatar
    Volt 230

    This is in great shape, I’m surprised some mechanically inclined feller has not rescued this and fixed the motor, I would if I could.

    • 0 avatar
      agiguere

      We had an 86 sedan. There are still a few of these around here. Saw this one recently
      https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3918/14422057414_b35287a3fa_b.jpg

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Sam idled slowly out of the parking lot of the Rite Aid, the rear louvres dappling sun across the back seat. She couldn’t believe it…

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    My uncle had an 86 sedan Camry (dark blue/blue), which he ran to over 225K miles before donating it to Goodwill around 2000 or so. I remember riding in it as a child, and thinking how different the interior was from my mom’s Dynasty (or earlier 85 Regal).

    Those metal door handles had a nice precise action, the doors making a nice WONK sound when you closed them. It had a different smell too – not that American car smell I was used to.

    And then I remember a couple years later, getting into my aunt’s Corollo-Nova via those plastic door handles, and spotting some similarities inside. Hers had a sunroof, which made it cooler than the Camry in my mind.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Don’t Stop Believin’

    Wait, even better: youtube.com/watch?v=9jK-NcRmVcw&feature=kp

  • avatar
    MAGICGTI

    Hate to break it to you, but that cheesy “Limited Edition” badge is a stick-on from Pep Boys, Autozone, etc. You’ll find them on many vehicles, typically decade+ old Asian tin cans.

  • avatar
    zach

    The Camry has pulled midsized duty for 25 years, it’s an easy target but you have to at least admire it fulfills it’s missions and million and millions agree, there’s my defense of the mighty Camry.

  • avatar
    zach

    World’s better than anything GM, Ford and Chrysler were foisting on us in the early 80′s, Chevy Citation anybody?

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      Oh, I’d have taken a RWD Chrysler Fifth Avenue over this. EPA rated at 17/25, 14-20 actual, but gas was cheap, only $1.22/gallon. Your choice of tufted leather or crushed velour, still available in bordello red!

    • 0 avatar
      iNeon

      Except 1984 is the middle 1980s, and your selective memory can’t erase the existence of fantastic little cars like the late K, P and H-Body Chryslers, the Ford Taurus, or even GM’s stupidly long-lived intermediates like the C-Body Ninety-Eight, all released 1984-1986(some for the 1987 model year, admittedly.)

      The Taurus was full of win, but even a little P-Body makes this car look depressingly dour.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Chrysler “H” body? Blasphemy. There can only be one “H” body, so sayth the Lutz.

        “The H-body Dodge Lancer and Chrysler LeBaron GTS were well-tuned variants of the basic extended K-car platform, sold from 1985 to 1989.”

        http://www.allpar.com/model/lancer.html

        • 0 avatar
          iNeon

          hahahaha I’m having a moment with this.

          You’re telling me an H-Body Chrysler isn’t an H-Body Chrysler by linking a page which establishes it as an H-Body Chrysler?

          Do I have this correct?

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I’m just linking to display what the models were for those who were unaware (such as myself). However the Church of 3800 refuses to recognize this lesser “H” body.

      • 0 avatar
        zach

        The Taurus was a huge win but Ford didn’t nurture it like Toyota did the Camry, and the early Tauri? Wasn’t particularly reliable.

        • 0 avatar
          iNeon

          Mechanical maladies can be rectified quite readily– pig ugly, can’t.

          • 0 avatar
            zach

            Apparently not in Fords case, they used the same weak tranny In these well into the early 2000s.

          • 0 avatar
            jhefner

            “Apparently not in Fords case, they used the same weak tranny In these well into the early 2000s.”

            Not quite; while the AXON transmission had issues at it’s release in 1986; by 1994 they had most of them resolved and from that year forward they were reasonably reliable. My 1994 Taurus is 19 years old with 190,000 miles, and the transmission is yet to be rebuilt.

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        But I wouldn’t WANT a fantastic little car, or even a long lived intermediate. The Fifth Avenue was a largish compact that had all the luxury cues from yesteryear in a tight package. People bypassed them because of $1.22 gas which seemed outrageous compared to a dozen years before (little did they know what would come later), and took those fantastic little cars, or in the case of older people, the long lived intermediates. I was very young back then, but I knew pretentious pseudo-class when I saw it, and it was wonderful.

      • 0 avatar
        SaulTigh

        I’m a Ford man, but even I’ll admit that this Camry is a better car than the Taurus, which didn’t even come along until 1986. Tauruses are good cars. I drove a ’90 and a ’93 each to about 180,000 miles and I know the ’93 then went on to 225,000 in the hands of someone else before the engine and transmission grenaded in the same week. You also had to have the right engine in the Taurus (3.0 Vulcan) if you wanted to go for longevity.

        Still, for about 10 years there from ’86 to ’96 Camry’s were probably just about the best 4 door sedan going.

        I started driving in ’92, and if I could go back in time I’d have saved up my money and convinced my dad to find a 1990 Camry V6 (24V, DOHC!), and I bet with the way my family takes care of cars, I might still be driving it today.

        • 0 avatar
          jhefner

          I too would not argue with you that 86-96 Camry was as good if not outright better than the Taurus. And on my 60 mile trip back and forth to work; I always see at least one or two, sometimes more of the 1991-1995 Camry; not quite so many of the 1996-1999 Taurus; but at least one on most trips.

          But the Taurus and the Audi 5000s was and remain my personal favorites because they ushered in the “jelly bean” era and were good looking cars in their own right; like today, the Camry looks rather plain in comparison.

          (I perfer the looks of the 5000s sedan over the Taurus/Sable sedan, but prefer the Taurus/Sable wagon to the 5000s wagon.)

    • 0 avatar
      ReallyRandy

      Gotta disagree with jhefner on this. I’m on my 11th Taurus, with 182k on it. The AX4N transmission has been replaced three times on it. And several of the others had to have a transmission replacement because they were crap. But, I’ve had eleven of them. Either I enjoy torturing myself, or I really love tauruses.

  • avatar
    Volt 230

    When I finally dumped my ’80 X-car Buick for an 86 Camry was like going from a Malibu to a Volvo 260

  • avatar
    Wscott97

    Not to be off topic but that paint job actually looks really good. It makes me curious on how it would look if It got a car wash and a nice coat of Nufinish.

    I think if I was to ever send one of my cars to the graveyard. I would give it a decent detailing in honor of the many years and miles the car served me.

  • avatar
    OzSRV

    With that many miles it must be just plain old worn out.

  • avatar
    Felis Concolor

    Another great memory is triggered from my years growing up on Maui.

    In late summer of ’84, my father and I hopped into his Chevy pickup truck and headed down the mountain to see what sort of new vehicles were available. The ’81 Audi 4000 had recently been sold off, triggered by that most imperative indicator of obsolescence among European imports: flickering headlights. Anyone who drove German in those days knew that was the harbinger of serious and rapid decline in the wiring harness, and dad made certain every potential buyer arrived at mid day, the better to hide the vehicle’s impending doom.

    Our first stop on the new car parade was at the local Honda dealer. The Accord was the little darling of the automotive press, and dealers had tacked on ridiculous ADP to their window stickers as a result. In some cases their asking price was 30%(!) over the official sticker, and they refused to budge, even going so far as to disparage anyone who questioned their extortionate practices. Though father was very well off at that point and could have easily handled that sort of markup, he gave them the finger and we headed over to the local Toyota dealer to see what they could do.

    The first guy we met at the dealership was a gregarious oriental man who we knew as Mel. He listened to my father’s brief rant against the Honda dealership, and then lit the room with an infectious smile. Quickly setting up a test drive in a loaded ’85 Camry, he disappeared with my father for a half hour while I sat in the lobby and twiddled around with a puzzle cube. Upon returning, Mel wrote out a deal which impressed my father so much he immediately purchased a loaded Camry _plus_ a loaded Tercel for my younger brother (good thing he brought me along!). We then paraded our new vehicles back to the Honda dealer and got right up in the general manager’s grille about how he had lost us as customers and wasn’t it a shame he missed out on selling 2 new cars that day.

    Mel would go on to even greater heights of salesmanship, including becoming the first authorized dealer in Hawai’i for BMW’s then-new 750il. For those who aren’t familiar with how crazy that is, just imagine someone living in Beverly Hills being forced to drive all the way to @#%%^ing Barstow in order to purchase their new V12 status symbol. When BMW hinted that he should replace his beloved Toyota Supra with something wearing a roundel to maintain his most favored status, he obliged them but not quite in the direction they intended, opting instead for the very first BMW M3 in the state.

    While the Camry was slow even by the standards of its day, the engine was smooth, quiet and would run forever on small amounts of fuel. The chassis was definitely tuned for comfort, and while it would never become a corner-carving champion, it would still track straight and handle winding and unsettled roads without unsettling the occupants. With especially cushy seats in the front and rear, it truly was a compact luxury car, and long before the Lexus plan was revealed to the world.

    That “ECONO/AC” switch was a particularly clever bit of uselessness; a 3 position push button was designed to work with a compressor circuit that attempted to give you cool air without taxing the engine, but actually performed the converse, giving you reduced fuel economy with no cold air. When in its straight blue AC setting, it could handle HI’s humidity with ease, although the low output of the engine ensured I would first get up to speed before engaging that power sucker.

    The only major systems failure happened in ’90 and involved the extraordinarily expensive coil-in-cap system used on that engine. At the time, a service replacement part cost $125 and there were no aftermarket replacement units available. OUCH!

    That Camry would go on to become the automobile my father would own for the longest period of time, and eventually turned into the car they kept around for my use whenever I would fly back to Maui to spend a couple weeks each year visiting and catching up with friends and family. It was slow, but in Hawai’i if you’re driving for more than an hour you’re either cruising or lost. One year I arrived to see the fuel gauge showing 1/4 tank, and simply drove it without adding any more gasoline for the time I was there, seeing just how far I could go once that bright orange fuel warning activated. When I departed that time, I mentioned how thrifty it was to my father, and he ensured I was greeted with that glowing orange bar the next year I returned to the island.

    I eventually flew back to be confronted with an empty carport, and my father apologized for parting with the Camry and forcing that horrid Volvo “I should have gone for the SHO Taurus” 760 Turbo sedan on me. He explained it later as giving them an excuse to foist the Volvo off on the rector at St. John’s after he had passed away, which happened a year later.

    For those who remember them, that first generation of Camry in the US cemented Toyota’s reputation for comfort, quality and value. I certainly miss that car more so than most others I have driven.

  • avatar
    zach

    Our 1999 Camry was a tank with almost 300,000 miles when it was rear ended in 2013, very little problems with it, a leaky valve cover and an alternator are all I can remember.

  • avatar
    TheyBeRollin

    Looking at these pictures… Why is this car in a junkyard? I see a replaced rear bumper and a little damage to the front bumper, but the sheet metal is good with only light surface rust in a few spots. There’s some weather stripping coming out of the back windows, too. Aside from these, this car looks perfectly serviceable, provided you can find parts to fix it. This is easily one of the cleanest junkyard cars we’ve seen in this series.

    My attempt at a story for this car:

    Don was a simple, quiet, frugal man. He was a heavy equipment operator and had been one since he landed a union apprenticeship when he was 19. Working up through the ranks, he earned more than his contemporaries that went into other blue-collar work, but he was never comfortable spending money on ostentatious trucks like his coworkers. After all, he lived in a city and had a family, so a truck was not very practical, even if it looked more normal at the work site.

    In the early 80s, with his first son in college two teenagers still at home, he was in the market for a car to handle his long drives out to the work sites and family transportation duties when he was home.

    He was uncertain when he first time he laid eyes on it. It was a Toyota and his coworkers would mock him. Even among less-patriotic groups it was not a conventional choice, doubly-so in a four-door hatchback trim in an indescribable color. Still, he didn’t like paying a premium and it was October 1984, so the dealer was trying to get rid of their existing stock, with this car languishing on the lot, so after some hard negotiating he brought home his champaign brown Camry.

    As the years passed, the Camry became a reliable friend, clocking over 100k miles together before Don retired five years later. From then on, he and his wife made many road trips to see their children, clocking 100k more over the following 20 years before his wife died of cancer.

    Being alone in the old house, he decided it was best to move to a retirement community. He didn’t need most of it and never thought about that old Toyota being “something”. He was still within a short drive of the church they attended all those years, which brought him comfort.

    After Don died, this was one of the few things that didn’t go in the estate sale. Though it was still running, none of the children wanted it, so they simply sold it to the local junkyard for the going rate for old cars.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      “Why is this car in a junkyard?”

      Probably because even in running condition, they’re pretty worthless. If it was traded in at a dealer it could have ended up here, or even a few minor repairs causing the owner to give up on it. Run of the mill 80′s midsize/econo cars have no value outside of the few people who prize them for some inane reason. It’s really no different than the ’84 Tempo that made it to the junkyard under it’s own power.

      • 0 avatar
        TheyBeRollin

        I just envision this car still being used to ferry some itinerant farm workers or a poor family through the Central Valley. I’m sure someone out there would pay $300-400 just for the tires with some remaining tread and a clean-looking engine.

        The background and light surface rust says “California”, where cars can keep running almost indefinitely (and cheap personal transport is critical to a huge portion of the population). This just feels like a car that someone with money simply junked due to age when they had to do something with it, hence the story.

  • avatar
    krhodes1

    These liftbacks were pretty common in Maine back in the day, at least as much as the 4dr. But we New Englanders LOVE our 5dr cars. That color was common too – I had a friend with one who referred to it as “Sesame Street Purple” for some unknown reason. His parents evidently liked the color, as the Toyota replaced a Pontiac that was pretty much the same hue. Whatever the Pontiac version of the Citation was called, complete with 4spd stick!

    • 0 avatar
      ChiefPontiaxe

      Pontiac Phoenix

    • 0 avatar
      cpthaddock

      The Liftback was also the most common variant in the UK. My gut tells me that it was not too long after this model that Toyota began localizing models and styling more.

      Back then, Japanses cars stood out for two big reasons – they rusted faster than they depreciated and suffered from rather bizzarre styling that seemed like a cariacature of US cars, which were alien to our shores. This was also the time when their reputation for mechanical reliability and duraability started to firmly establish itself, so much so that even the hitherto freakish seeming names attached to some cars lost it’s sting (looking at you, Datsun!)

  • avatar
    iNeon

    Purple-Brown falling toward the red spectrum is often referred to as Peuce, or Puce– derived from the French word for flea. It is the color left on bedsheets by flea excrement/bleeding.

    Most call it rosewood or mahogany today.

    There were a lot of early Mercury Sables painted this color– beautiful things.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      “There were a lot of early Mercury Sables painted this color– beautiful things.”

      True that. There sure were a lot of brown skirted Sables at one point. There’s a whip you just don’t see anymore.

  • avatar
    johnhowington

    hell that thing looks untouched. i bet it even starts and runs. take it to mexico and trade it for some taco and water.

  • avatar
    zach

    Ford knocked it out of the park with the 80s Taurus design wise, then came the 92 camry, poor Taurus died through neglect.

    • 0 avatar
      jhefner

      Sorta; the 1990-1995 Taurus was only a mild redesign but still sold well; the 1996 Taurus was a major redesign based in part on taking a 1992 Camry completely apart, then trying to match it in terms of quality with details like triple door seals.

      The resulting 1996 design was controversal (probably to put it mildly); and to make matters worst, they raised the price. At the same time, Toyota did some decontenting with the 1996–2001 Camry, and at the same time lowered their prices. Car buyers were already complaining about the high prices for new automobiles, the combination of the looks of the redesign along with the higher price caused the Taurus to give up it’s sales crown to the Camry. Ford reacted by releasing the decontented Taurus L and with a more conservative redesign in 2000; but yes; by then, Ford had lost interest in the Taurus and was focusing on their more profitable SUV and truck lines instead. But that is why you still see a lot of 1992-1995 Camrys and 1996-1999 Taurus on the road even today.

      • 0 avatar
        zach

        Perfect summation, I actually liked the refresh in your avatar, it looks like a cleaner design imho. The 96 was just odd.i had totally forgotten the 96 and it’s price premium over the outgoing model.

      • 0 avatar
        Dan

        The biggest reason the third gen Taurus fell so far had nothing to do with the Taurus. The 80s through early 90s Camcords were JDM sized shoulder to shoulder sardine cans. The Taurus dwarfed them.

        Taurus falling off pretty well exactly coincided with Camcords being sized up for the US market.

        • 0 avatar
          jhefner

          The above account was given in “Car: A Drama of the American Workplace” by Mary Walton; and I have yet to hear anyone disprove it.

          Selling a larger Camry for the American market began with the XV10 of 1991–1996. The Taurus sales began to weaken due in part to the mild refresh of 1991-1995, but the Camry did not surpass the Taurus until after the 1996 refresh of both cars; when the 1996 redesign failed to turn around Taurus sales. Camry first surpassed Taurus sales in 1997.

          • 0 avatar
            jhefner

            According to Wikipedia, “This generation (1991-1995) sold just as well as the first, and became the best-selling car in the United States, a title it would retain for as long as this generation was sold.[7] When production ended in 1995, more than 1,400,000 second-generation cars had been sold.”

            So Taurus sales remained strong through most of the 1991-1995 years as well.

          • 0 avatar
            ReallyRandy

            I have that book. It’s excellent.

        • 0 avatar
          Dan

          The 92 Camry was less small than it had been but still a couple inches smaller than the Taurus in all directions inside. It was riding on a 102″ wheelbase. Today that’s a Versa.

          The Accord was still on the 67″ wide JDM platform until the 94 redesign, which was still smaller than the 92 Camry.

          Midsize Camcords are a newer phenomenon than you’d think.

          • 0 avatar
            jhefner

            Dan;

            According to Wikipedia, JDM got the V10 from 1990-1994, and the V20 from 1994-1998. But the rest of the world got the wider XV10 from 1991-1996, and the XV20 from 1996-2001. The XV20 was sold in the North America starting in 1997.

            This is beginning to turn into a contest; and I don’t want it to. It is a foregone conclusion that the excellent quality of the XV10 and the larger XV20 (if it is larger, I don’t know) made for increased Camry sales. But is also a forgone conclusion that Ford’s miss-handling of the 1996 redesign also caused a drop in Taurus sales; it appears the Camry was indeed the recipient of those lost sales.

            Another factor with the 1996 redesign is that it made the 1996-1999 Taurus look smaller than the previous generations; when in fact it was slightly larger in length. (The first four generations basically had the same hardpoints.) That too contributed to a drop in Taurus sales compared to the larger Camry.

            (I always thought the 1996-2004 Taurus wagon was smaller than mine, when checking the actual dimensions proves it is slightly larger. One Ford official claimed they made it look smaller to appeal to women, which was a clear mistake when you look at all the ladies driving SUVs today.)

      • 0 avatar
        iNeon

        A single nit– the first-generation base model was Taurus L– when it went to the rounded body, they changed it to Taurus G.

        I get the reasoning; L<MT-5<GL<LX<SHO isn't as linear as G<GL<LX<SHO, but then they went and made the LX the base model and I realized it was just someone's dumb idea.

        Have any other companies been so dishonest during a mid-cycle refresh? Making last years full-tilt model this years loss-leader is a pretty poop thing to do when you're selling cars in the numbers Taurus sold. Bet they made a lot of money on old people that year.

        • 0 avatar
          jhefner

          It is my understanding that Ford took a lot of heat from the automotive press on the 1991 refresh; it looked too similiar to the previous generation; even though every body panel was different (on the sedan at least; the wagon was the same from the firewall back.) But it obviously still sold very well.

          It was because of the press as well as the quality of the XV10 Camry that forced Ford to do a major redesign. One team member compared completely redesigning the Taurus to repainting the Mona Lisa; and you can read Mary Walton’s book yourself if you want a blow-by-blow account of how they turned a full-tilt winner into a loss leader.

          (It was a decent read because the subject matter was of interest to me; but like the book “Taurus – the making of the car that saved Ford”), it dragged and sounded like a soap opera in some places. It was tidbits here and there that kept me reading; like the fact that they were originally going to once again graft the new nose on the old wagon for the wagon body style until someone commented that the clay model “looked like a refridgerator.” They ended up doing a last minute restyle instead; I would love to see that original clay model of the new nose on the old wagon.)

          • 0 avatar
            Drewlssix

            For a good idea just check out the same era escort wagon. What always struck me as weird (and the first fed malibus had this) was the purple “eyeliner” around the tail lights of that generation. SHOs iirc got body color trim there but the rest what ever color they were had that fleshy purple color on the tail lights.

  • avatar
    Bee

    Longtime lurker but finally felt like commenting. My mother had one of these about ten years ago. It was an ’85 LE in a monotone tan color, much like this one but with composite headlights. By the time it came to us it was a beater in every sense of the word but I remember marveling at how loaded it was. It had a digital cluster, sunroof, alloys, and what shocked me was that the AC still worked. She still fondly recalls it as one of her favorite cars.

  • avatar
    IHateCars

    “You stole my Jesus-fish, didn’t you?!”

    This one is screaming for a Crabspirits treatment….

  • avatar
    Ian Fox

    Oh wow. This was my first car. Mine, however, was a DX rather than an LE. That meant unpainted bumpers and scratchy seats.

    There were some good things about this car. It was super easy to do maintenance. I could very easily pop out a headlight and replace it. The stereo was easy to swap as well. No installation kit required.

    The bad? Well, the transmission didn’t last forever. The power steering rack had a high failure rate as well. Don’t even think about going up a steep hill with the A/C on.

    Still, it was a good first car, all things considered.

    See if y’all can find a Camry Diesel. Now those are mega-rare!


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Subscribe without commenting

Recent Comments

  • Re: Junkyard Find: 1959 DeSoto

    Lorenzo - Yeah, the industrial processes were still WWII vintage and wearing out, but hey – they gave us flashy design, acres of chrome, and tri-tone paint jobs in a...
  • Re: European Review: Peugeot 208 GTi

    Russycle - I like it…but not that steering wheel. At least the shift knob should be easy to swap. As for the gauges, I like MINI’s solution: mount the...
  • Re: Thank You And Goodbye (Sort Of)

    Jack Baruth - They don’t have that kind of money.
  • Re: Thank You And Goodbye (Sort Of)

    Pch101 - Bare Trees is a personal favorite, and what I like most of all is a Danny Kirwan instrumental: www.youtube.com/watch?v=6EbyRK Mzirg
  • Re: Versatile 2015 Mercedes Vito Van Puts Power To Front, Rear Or All

    CoreyDL - The first step on the road back to having multiple body style and options packages. I sold my flower shop last month though.
  • Re: Junkyard Find: 1959 DeSoto

    mars3941 - Someone mentioned the rust issues with these cars and Ford in 57 had it’s share of equally bad quality control. The rust issues were so bad with the 57 Fords a...
  • Re: Thank You And Goodbye (Sort Of)

    Lorenzo - Dang! Typical internet tubes – nothing stays the same. Here’s your tip on the love thing: the surface things are in constant flux, but the core of who...
  • Re: Millennials Start With Sharing, End With Individual Ownership

    This Is Dawg - These comments, as well as any other remotely political thread on this site, rapidly turn into “Everyone that isn’t...
  • Re: Thank You And Goodbye (Sort Of)

    bball40dtw - “Given some of the differences in opinion I have recently had with TTAC’s owners” Did they want to bring Doug back and pay him by the pun?
  • Re: Thank You And Goodbye (Sort Of)

    mdanda - I appreciate the honesty. Well done. I used to love this site back in the Deathwatch days, I even contributed an article or two, and I especially like the way you...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Authors

  • Brendan McAleer, Canada
  • Marcelo De Vasconcellos, Brazil
  • Matthias Gasnier, Australia
  • Tycho de Feyter, China
  • W. Christian 'Mental' Ward, Abu Dhabi
  • Mark Stevenson, Canada
  • Faisal Ali Khan, India