By on July 25, 2014

aston-martin-lagonda

 

If you want an Aston Martin Lagonda, you must meet two requirements

  1. Get an invite from Aston Martin
  2. Live in the Middle East

The new Lagonda will share its underpinnings and V12 engine with other Astons, but the sales and marketing process will be quite different.

Orders will only be taken from select clients who receive an invitation from Aston Martin. The Lagonda will be marketed in the Middle East only, and each car will be hand tailored to the buyer’s taste. It should also cost a bloody fortune.

One reason that bespoke cars are so popular in the region is that they are a rare chance for individuals to express themselves in a society that enforces conformity in most other areas of life. With dress, behavior, social customs and other outlets for expression under strict control, the automobile is one item that can be customized to reflect one’s personal tastes, though previously, this has manifested itself in option packages, paintwork or bespoke interior. This is the first time we’ve seen an all-new car conceived this this specific market.

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44 Comments on “Aston Martin Revives The Lagonda, By Invitation Only...”


  • avatar

    Hyundai Genesis -L

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      It’s a doppelganger for the new Genesis.

      Buy the Genny & save 6 gazillionty dollars & get a better warranty while not being instantaneously identified as a corrupt oligarch or someone on the corrupt oligarch “framily plan.”

  • avatar
    raresleeper

    If Paris Hilton/Nicole Ritchie/(insert random Holly-Weird 20-30 something female here) has a reality show premiering by the time the Lagonda is produced, they will be driving one…

    …and you will see them flipping off Paparazzi, smashing it, and getting a DUI in it.

    Its lost the allure to me already. No thanks.

    • 0 avatar
      VenomV12

      Paris has a stable of supercars, has for a long time, hasn’t crashed them yet. I think she hit the back of a truck with one car at super low speeds a long time ago because there were about 80,000 flash bulbs going off in her face, that’s about it. As much as I despise the Kardashians and their existence, they have tons of exotic cars and haven’t crashed any yet or gotten any DUIs. It’s a car, all sorts of people drive every car, I don’t see why a handful of people on TV driving one would affect you and how you feel about them in any way?

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Fix your headline spelling….

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    If you want an Aston Martin Lagonda, you must meet two requirements

    Get an invite from Aston Martin
    Live in the Middle East

    Every bad taste hip hop/rapper/baller just went: http://static3.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20121206184404/coasterpedia/images/b/b8/Okay_meme.jpg

  • avatar
    davefromcalgary

    That is one ugly car, from that photo.

    • 0 avatar
      jmo

      It looks fine other than the C pillar.

      • 0 avatar
        davefromcalgary

        Yup, the C-Pillar is the first thing that earned my ire.

        However, the nose, in profile, really doesn’t work either.

        • 0 avatar

          Based on the C-Pillar, I first thought it was a replacement for the Chevy Malibu.

        • 0 avatar
          3Deuce27

          It has all the classic elements of automotive style, beautifully proportioned.

          My visceral first impression was ‘very nice, elegant’, but if that rear deck were any shorter we would have to put a trunk deck/rack on and get a canvas covered wood trunk mounted with leather straps. And if it weren’t for Run Flats, we would have to add some side mounts

          I swear, some of the _too many_ TTAC commentors haven’t got a single aesthetic bone in their body, yet they position themselves to be the arbiters of design, arbitrarily declaring something ‘ugly’ without explaining why it doesn’t work, and that is just plain ignorant.

          That ‘C’ pillar has to hold up several tons of vehicle and a few more tons of bomb and bullet resistant ‘B7′ armor, and is part of the structural elements that support those loads. It is a part of a huge armature and deftly configured and rendered considering its structural requirements.

      • 0 avatar
        Siorus

        For some reason, i see a lot of Phaeton in that C pillar.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      I prefer this one:

      http://ts1.mm.bing.net/th?id=HN.608013545084685968&pid=1.7

      Or either of these:

      http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-MVdpnU-73sc/TZ1ZPu1jzBI/AAAAAAAAB0s/bT_3XjLGeV0/s1600/Aston+Martin+virage.jpg

  • avatar
    VoGo

    Top 10 Reasons the TTAC B&B won’t buy the Aston Martin Lagonda

    10. Not nearly exclusive enough – they are building like 100 of them
    9. Yes it’s a proper 4-door saloon, but rear-facing carseats barely fit
    8. I just blew my load on a Hellcat
    7. Aston used to be owned by Ford and Ford sucks! (OK that’s just Z71_Silvy)
    6. Waiting a few years, because we only buy used cars on principle
    5. No Hemi? No sale (OK, that’s just BTSR)
    4. I had so many reliability problems with my mini and Dart – no more British cars for me
    3. I can’t even spell Lagona properly
    2. I am waiting for my autonomous Google car
    1. Brown? Yes RWD? Yes MT? Yes Station Wagon? NOOOOOO

    • 0 avatar

      Post of the day

    • 0 avatar

      +1000

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @VoGo – funny.

        Actually I disagree with #10.

        An ugly Aston Martin is as exclusive as they come.

        This is grounds for the CIA to use Predator Drones in India.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      Get it right, people:

      1) Rear wheel drive (or light AWD system, sending no more than 18% of power to front wheels)

      2) Diesel (turbocharging a diesel, unlike a petrol motor, is not only fine, but the only way to fly)

      3) Manual transmission with hydraulic foot operated clutch & 5 or 6 speed gear lever

      4) Durable yet supple whale peni foreskin leather interior trim

      5) Mocha and/or dark’caramel brown exterior paint option

      6) 0-60 time of less than 7.5 seconds/top speed of 150 mph @ 48mpg

      7) Starting MSRP of $12,998 with fully equipped model maxing out @ $16,339, including destination

      8) Factory standard bumper-to-bumper warranty that is 12 years/120,000 miles

      9) Only station wagon or true hatchback configuration

      10) Actual center console mounted, non-electronic hand brake

    • 0 avatar
      VenomV12

      Ha ha, good one.

  • avatar

    >>>One reason that bespoke cars are so popular in the region is that they are a rare chance for individuals to express themselves in a society that enforces conformity in most other areas of life.

    I take it by “middle east,” they don’t mean Israel. And that’s just fine with me.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      Wonder if the author has ever been to the Middle East (realistically, the Gulf States) Compared to the US, and particularly Europe, conformity isn’t nearly as “enforced.” Social customs amongst the .01% of the popularions who could care one iota about bespoke cars may be different.

      More likely, the reason why bespoke cars make sense there, is LACK OF the kind of ENFORCEMENT that causes western cars to all CONFORM to a very narrow set of standards. Plus, the pragmatic fact that there is really no mass manufacturing efficiency gains to be had for the production numbers likely for $1mill+ cars.

  • avatar
    dkleinh

    In the 1980s I lived next to Newport Beach (New Porsche Beach), CA and I remember seeing an ad in a local magazine from an Aston Martin dealer for the 1980s Lagonda: Aston Martin – for the man who demands perfection – and has the means to pay for it.

  • avatar
    Christian Gulliksen

    I could be wrong, but wasn’t the wedge-shaped Lagonda designed, initially, as a one-off for a Middle Eastern customer and then put into production?

    I happen to love the design. The first one I saw in person was parked at the Newport Beach cinema where we were seeing Breakin’ — I would’ve skipped the picture and stared at the car for two hours given the opportunity.

    • 0 avatar
      raresleeper

      Why… oh why… must anybody mention that triangular/wedge shaped behemoth?

      I guarantee that if you eat an excessively large meal then look at images of the Lagonda, then you will likely lose your lunch.

      That thing takes the term “horrendous” to new heights.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        Opinions are like @ssholes – everyone has one, and they usually stink. I happen to love the original Lagonda (well technically it was something like the third iteration of 4dr by Aston Martin using that name), and I rather like this one too. It could be nothing else BUT a Lagonda. Fabulous. As will the cost be, I am sure.

        • 0 avatar
          Siorus

          I like the original Lagonda as well.

          I’d buy one, buy a white linen suit and drive around listening to Whitesnake and Def Leppard, but that’s just me.

  • avatar

    If you want an Aston Martin Lagonda, you must meet three requirements

    1. Get an invite from Aston Martin
    2. Live in the Middle East
    3. Have no taste

  • avatar
    hgrunt

    All I have are questions!

    Will the Dubai police force spec one out for promotional purposes?
    Will there be a similar program for the Chinese market, which prizes exclusivity and long wheelbase sedans?
    Does the decision to target middle eastern markets have much to do with middle eastern companies having financial stake in the company?

    The intrigue!

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    It looks like a stretched and widened Ford Fusion. The new Crown Vic?

    • 0 avatar

      Front may be but from C-pillar back it looks like MKZ, also stretched. Influenced by Ford design for sure but Aston Martin was owned by Ford not so long ago. But still I would rather copy BMW, Mercedes or Hyundai than Ford. But wait, it looks like Hyundai too.

  • avatar
    wolfman3k5

    The first Lagonda was such a hit, especially the electronics related issues, never mind piss poor reliability and lacking build quality that Aston Martin thinks that they will dump this on less suspecting customers. For some reason I see troubles for this car as well. Maybe not related to the electronics inside of it, but being a very limited production car it will have its fair share of mechanical issues. Aston Martin stuck in a gear anyone?

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      @wolfman3k5

      Do you seriously think that anyone who is genuinely in the market for a car that will probably be the best part of $1M gives one single thought to how reliable it may or may not be? Seriously? This will be some billionaires 12th car, and if it doesn’t start some assistant’s assistant will deal with it and the man himself will drive something else that day while Aston Martin comes and gets it and fixes it. I suspect those who get an invitation to buy one will do so JUST BECAUSE they actually got an invitation to buy one, so just having one at all makes a HUGE statement.

      Reliability is for the little people like us. The buyers of cars like these are literally above caring.

  • avatar
    3Deuce27

    What The Hell is a Logona?

  • avatar
    PriusV16

    Looks very elegant and Aston Martin-ish, IMHO. Yeah, it’s a four-door saloon, just like some Hyundais and Mazdas etc., but it certainly is distinctive enough.

    The only question is: Why would I want to have this if I already own a Rapide?

    And I’m also pretty sure that a regular customer from Europe who pounds on the table and demands his own Lagonda won’t be sent away just like that.

  • avatar
    Joss

    Arab 500 Gucci.

    Spawned from a menage of Aston, the Brit royals & a Saudi prince.

  • avatar
    James2

    At least it doesn’t look like the Rapide, which looks like a DBS, which looks like a DB9, which looks like a Vantage, which looks like…

  • avatar
    petezeiss

    OK, how many others ran to Google image the pointy-snoot Lagonda?

    Damn, now every time I re-watch a Poirot and Hastings says Lagonda I’ll imagine that taffy pull of a car.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    I generally am not moved by British car design, but looking closely at the side profile, doesn’t the side glass and C pillar and even the trunk slope look suspiciously like the last generation Malibu?

    Go figure, the British have been copying American design for many years, not that I’m against that, just saying!


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