By on June 19, 2014
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(Warning: NSFW due to language)

A customer at a Columbus, Ohio tire shop left his dash cam turned on while having his Porsche 996 Turbo aligned – and if the gratuitous display of his car being driven across the grass wasn’t enough, the employees have some choice words for the owner and his choice of vehicle.

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97 Comments on “Tire Shop Owner Treats Turbo Like Trash...”


  • avatar
    Kenmore

    Hey, that little f*ggot has his own jet airplane.
    That little f*ggot is a millionaire.

  • avatar
    mitchw

    And you’ve got your titties in a bunch over this, DK? You’re spending too much time with Baruth. Of course lots of proles hate Porsche owners. Especially when they’re cheap. (not you, Jack)

  • avatar
    Hillman

    So, are those cars that much harder to align then the standard car? Just trying to figure out the hate.

    • 0 avatar
      AKADriver

      Sort of. That Hunter machine takes the guesswork out of it, though. It’s just more labor because there are more settings. When the shop is asking a flat rate for alignments (and paying their employees a flat rate, in turn) they’d rather spend their time on the typical car where the only setting is front toe.

      I’ve run into this attitude before from shops when I’ve asked them about doing all the stuff the Hunter alignment and tire mounting machines they paid tens of thousands of dollars for can actually do. They just don’t want to put in the extra labor when 99% of the cars that roll in to their shops just need the most minimal work.

  • avatar
    klossfam

    Despite the minor mistreatment of the Cayenne, it shows money doesn’t buy smarts…Why would you take your Porsche to knuckleheads like these? If I can’t do work myself – like an alignment – I make sure I’m confident in who I take my vehicles to – and review the work so I can keep a decent list of competent repair shops.

  • avatar
    hiptech

    I can hear them now “20 years in the business never seen one of these before…”

    Could’ve been worse and fell off the lift… good thing the owner spared no expense and brought it to a Porsche dealer :P

    • 0 avatar
      KalapanaBlack

      Don`t you think the Porsche dealers, who charge outlandish prices to dentists with more money than brains for badge-engineered Volkswagens with poorly built plastic cooling systems and self-destructing 3.8l engines so they can over-compensate for their advancing age, are the real villains here? Seems to me Porsche`s pricing structure is more insulting than a few words…

      • 0 avatar
        hiptech

        FYI… my comments were meant as sarcasm.

        But the fact remains you should never bring a car for service to a place that doesn’t respect you, your car or worse – hasn’t the intelligence to work on it.

      • 0 avatar
        Ion

        If he wanted cheap labor and a lousy dealership experience then they should have bought a Kia.

        • 0 avatar
          Kenmore

          My personal experience with Kia service has been truly excellent.

          What was yours?

          • 0 avatar
            Ion

            Granted it’s been about 12 years but it starts with us going to pick up the car and the crank windows not working. Having the shop fix said windows when we should be driving the new car home. Then going to start the car and having the radio on blast.

            It ends with selling the car to scrap because it had no resale value and all the dealers in NYC suburbia keep going out of business. They keep going out of buisness to this day, Lash Kia in greenburgh/white plains closed a few months ago.

          • 0 avatar
            Bill Wade

            Same here. The local KIA store has been by far and away the best dealership experience on multiple occasions I’ve ever had.

            The Chevy store down the road would embarrass the Mafia with their tactics.

        • 0 avatar
          SC5door

          I’ve never had an issue with KIA service, and no the labor isn’t cheap either.

          I’ve also never had a Ford, GM, Chrysler or Honda dealer call after the service to see if I was satisfied or not.

          • 0 avatar
            Kenmore

            Truth. In the 6 years we had our oh-so-humble Rio5 the frequency of follow-up inquiries for every little thing from both the local dealer and from Kia corporate was almost oppressive.

            And corporate made the dealer do a free replacement of an O2 sensor that failed after the warranty on electronics was up but at only 20,200 miles.

          • 0 avatar
            omer333

            For my Civic and Crosstour, and my wife’s Ridgeline and CR-V, I’d get a call for feedback on the service department experience.

            I did not get the same from Ford when I had my Mustang.

            I’m debating to take my Dart to one of the local dealers for service (mine was bought in San Jose), go to Jiffy Lube, or do it myself.

        • 0 avatar
          wolfman3k5

          The work may be lousy at most KIA dealership – shops, but it sure as hell ain’t cheap. Speaking from experience… Oh, and they don’t like complaints either.

  • avatar
    KalapanaBlack

    Edit: this is in response to Hillman.

    They are. Nearly all German cars (including BMW-developed Minis) require expensive proprietary tools and absurd procedures (80 kg of weight in exactly the center of the vehicle, you do your own conversion) to align. To say nothing of the complex, over-thought yet under-built suspension systems with 20 control arms and their many attendent bushings that must be perfect for a good alignment. And they are never in perfect shape. But hey, they give great road feel when new!

    I`m more upset about the pristine grass, but it doesn`t seem to have been a `hooning` moment, more of a shortcut to keep from getting rear-ended on that high-traffic road. What`s so bad about this? Many people really are jack wagons in a customer service setting…

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      “more of a shortcut to keep from getting rear-ended on that high-traffic road.”

      That was similar to (although more generous than) what I was thinking. The guy was too lazy and irritated to wait for traffic to clear, so he cut across the lawn.

    • 0 avatar
      Hillman

      Thanks. I was wondering about the comment regarding the dealership price and saying no to customers. Not that I am making excuses for the unprofessionalism of the workers.

  • avatar
    Da Coyote

    Can’t comment seriously on mechanicals of German autos, but as a very experienced EE, I’d give ALL of their electrical engineers a big fat F. Really,it takes talent and devotion to be that bad.

    • 0 avatar
      KalapanaBlack

      The mechanicals are just as bad. Spend 5 minutes researching coolant crossover pipes in BMW 4.8l V8s, coolant systems in the Cayenne, and anything relating to the first-gen Mercedes M-Class. Or go talk to a VW service dept. Or ask Jack Baruth about Porsche 996 engines and Porsche`s customer service relating to them.

    • 0 avatar
      wumpus

      As a rookie EE I worked on some industrial equipment made by AEG (own by Mercedes Benz). After a couple of years I would only use the term “German engineering” for swearing.

      - Rumor had it that the most critical element (the part that pulled each letter individually into the sorting machine) was wildly better than any American design. I still didn’t trust the mechanical side (although I could see what was wrong with the electronics, but didn’t have the knowledge of mechanical design).

  • avatar
    DrGastro997

    I would never take my Porsche to a tire shop for alignment or anything else. But then again, a Cayenne isn’t a true Porsche…

    • 0 avatar
      sitting@home

      It says it was a 996, not a Cayenne. Either way it’s probably the furthest off-road a Porsche has ever got.

      I’m guessing the tire shop has a fixed price alignment and a fixed payout to mechanics for their work. Hence the guy saying “I woulda told the owner to f*ck off”, because they’re each losing money on the job. If my customers had a web cam recording what I said about them then they’d never bring work back to me .. fortunately they only see the final product and not the anguish I sometimes have to go through to get the work done.

  • avatar
    Ion

    Unless the dealer farmed out his car to the tire shop he has nothing to complain about. You want to buy an expensive car and be cheap about repairing it then you should expect the low paid tire shop or quick lube guys to be unhappy about working on it. Hell your lucky if they have the right tools to work on your car. I’ve seen more than my fair share of canister filters opened with band wrenches in a pinch, lugs stripped, skid plates improperly secured etc.

  • avatar
    Rich in Fla

    That mechanic may have a great lawsuit. In most states it is illegal to record people without consent. The video portion is not a problem, but the audio may cause the Porsche owner some legal or civil hassles. Even worse that he posted it for the world to listen to.

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      >> That mechanic may have a great lawsuit
      It’s possible that it’s legal. There are legal ways of doing it. If you’re going to post something like that, you should have an attorney review the circumstances to see if it was done in a lawful manner first.

    • 0 avatar
      hybridkiller

      I’m not an attorney, but I’m pretty sure the recording has to be done where the person being recorded has “a reasonable expectation of privacy” for it to be illegal. I’m not sure an auto repair shop would meet that standard. As to a civil suit, plaintiff needs to show he was damaged in some way or suffered some loss – and I just don’t see it. This video is mild compared to some of the stuff we’ve probably all seen, and it’s unlikely to damage the shop’s business, even if widely viewed.

      I see no evidence of the car being abused or the alignment not being done properly (to the extent that this shop is qualified to do it at all). The shortcut across the grass looked pretty smooth, and lots of competent, conscientious pros bitch, complain, and use rough language.

      When I clicked on the video I was expecting to see some really heinous behavior – this is nothing.

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        “…lots of competent, conscientious pros bitch, complain, and use rough language.”

        Yup. They go to school for that: the School of Hard Knocks, or Navy Operations and Maintenance. When I see a mechanic with an anchor, Harley-Davidson, or girl-wearing-a-military-cap tattoo on his forearm, I know my car is in good hands.

  • avatar
    kmoney

    This is definitely non-professional, but not really that bad. The driving across the lawn is a kinda ridiculous — but the shop somewhat asks for it with its odd layout that makes you turn onto two public streets to bring vehicles from the front to the back door.

    As for the conversations between the two guys. I bet you would get the same at 30-40% of shops out there. Over the years I’ve overheard tons of techs at dealers, independents and, quick tuneup/lube places speaking exactly the same way and having exactly the same attitude. There are a lot of good techs out there, but there are probably just as many who just ended up there and go through their days full of hate and vitriol for whatever comes in the door.

    • 0 avatar
      MBella

      You are right. You would have a very hard time finding a place where the techs aren’t constantly complaining about something.

      • 0 avatar
        Charliej

        When I owned and ran a repair shop, any tech who was a pain in the ass was gone. I don’t care how good a tech someone is, if they are a lot of trouble, I didn’t want them. There are enough good techs who are also good people, that I never had to go without techs. Life is too short to put up with assholes. By the way, when I retired, I offered to give the business to the employees. They declined, they said that I had to work too hard to keep it all together. I helped them get on with other shops and sold everything. Some people are just not cut out to be self employed.

        • 0 avatar
          MBella

          It also sounds like you gave them very little reason to complain. Something that isn’t common with today’s auto shop / dealership owners who are oblivious to reality.

  • avatar
    brianyates

    Regardless of which type or make of car the shop will be working on, at the end of the day that owner is paying their wages. What a bunch of tossers.

    • 0 avatar
      redmondjp

      A good friend has been a mechanic for the past 20 years and has worked for a dozen or so shops (plus had his own). Tis the norm, rather than the exception, that the worker bees are underpaid.

      You get what you pay for – most shops aren’t willing to pay enough to get the real professionals, leading to what we see here.

      Let the customer beware.

  • avatar
    koshchei

    Don’t care.

  • avatar
    redliner

    The techs do not feel they are being adequately compensated for the amount of work involved. They are a little unprofessional, but nothing that would keep me awake at night even if I was the owner. Talk is cheap. Grass grows back. No biggie.

    Want to pay cheap labor to work on your complicated car? Well, this is what you can realistically expect.

    Did they damage the car? No
    Did they perform the work as requested? Yes
    Great, so stop whining.

    • 0 avatar
      burgersandbeer

      This is all I saw as well. I felt worse for the grass than the car. That lawn is probably flatter than some of the roads that everyone drives over daily, so I think the car will be fine.

      I didn’t see anything personal against the customer either, just one disgruntled tech that thought the job was too much of a pita for what they charge for it. In addition, at least one employee in the video didn’t necessarily agree with the driver: “We should tell the customer no? What, are we not capable of aligning this thing?”

  • avatar
    ajla

    So for the folks defending these guys, what is the proper price level to not get trashed by mechanics?

    • 0 avatar
      dwright

      If you’re a douchelord, there is no price to make people like you.

    • 0 avatar
      Dan

      It’s not a price thing. It’s a culture thing. Show up in a $50,000 diesel Super Duty and blue collar people will generally default to treating you just fine.

      Conversely, Porsche driving yuppies will give you every bit as much respect as the guys in this tire shop just showed this douchebag.

    • 0 avatar

      Back when I worked in shops there was always a few guys who bitched no matter what. That and talking trash tends to be part of the shop experience in most smaller places. I would say just act nice at the shop and don’t worry about what they say behind your back.

    • 0 avatar
      hybridkiller

      “So for the folks defending these guys, what is the proper price level to not get trashed by mechanics?”

      The guys in the video are selling auto maintenance and repair. If you wanna buy some respect I’m pretty sure you’ll need to shop elsewhere.

  • avatar
    hotdog453

    That shop is in a fairly shitty part of Columbus. There’s way too many good, independent shops, let alone a massive amount of German-specialized shops in Cbus, to take a car you really care about to a place like that.

    Not defending the shop at all, but it’s nothing too overly shocking IMHO.

    • 0 avatar
      GiddyHitch

      Ah, so one of Jack’s PCA buddies has an axe to grind? Makes sense now because I was expecting something a lot more heinous than what I actually watched.

    • 0 avatar
      wolfman3k5

      Columbus isn’t all bad (not by far), and I understand the shop’s POV as well. IMHO if they didn’t want to do it, they should have either refused the job or charged accordingly.

  • avatar
    Xeranar

    The moral equations are coming out hard and fast in the comments. They drove it across a perfectly flat piece of lawn and then complained about the social standing of the owner. It was unprofessional and anecdotal. Seems like the owner is more upset that somebody didn’t treat his vehicle with the social standing he expected and nothing more. I would feel for them if they intentionally tried to break his property but it amounted to at most a bit of juvenile behavior.

  • avatar

    From the title of this post, I was expecting donuts in the lawn.

    I see nothing anyone wouldn’t see when observing the ‘behind the scenes’ of any business that has to deal with John Q. Public – quick lube, dealer service bay, restaurant, department store, etc.

    So, no harm, no foul. I don’t see what’s unusual, upsetting, or even mildly interesting about this.

    My dealership shares property with a German Auto Repair shop and about 50% of the clientele are decent folk. The other 50% are exactly what you’d expect from someone who paid too much for a maintenance-intensive lifestyle accessory that was painfully out of date three years after it debuted.

  • avatar
    Spartan

    When you drive a Porsche and you take your car to get serviced, you have to pick the lesser of two evils. You can listen to a guy who’s incredibly jealous of your success at an independent shop or you can listen to the mechanics at the Porsche dealer laugh at you for paying out the nose for simple automotive work.

    Your choice.

  • avatar
    jacob_coulter

    I agree that it’s not that big a deal, but what a fantastic attitude. I’d fire the guy just because I wouldn’t want my workers exposed to such a toxic personality every day.

    I can’t imagine why he’s his age and still making $12 an hour at a tire shop.

    Usually the people they put on the alignments are bottom of the barrel in terms of skills or are just starting out. It’s work a teenager without any training could master in a few hours with modern alignment machines. I can’t tell you how many times I have had to bring a car back because the alignment was done so poorly, the car would change lanes as soon as you’d let go of the steering wheel. I’ll gladly pay more for one done right the first time.

    Maybe the guy should have brought his Porsche into a dealership, but it’s really no that outrageous, it’s a $40k car. I’m sure they work on newer trucks all the time that are worth more. If the shop said they could handle it, I can’t really fault the car owner.

    • 0 avatar
      Xeranar

      Mildly off topic, you have had such a bad alignment that your vehicle was pulling out of the lane in a quick fashion? I think the worst that I had was the Crown Vic had some slight listing to the left after I hit a pothole and I took it in and they straightened it out. I imagine you’re exaggerating slightly, but what kind of hellhole are you going to that can’t keep your car atleast 90% straight in the lane?

      • 0 avatar
        Kenmore

        YOU have/had a resource wasting, Gaia-harming, imperialist victory-disease-America pampering, conservative Koch-tool bourgeoisie middle-class early-Alzheimer darling, archaic V-8 RWD choice of Vietnam vets vulgar enough to do modestly well in life, metallic scion of the fascist eugenicist Henry Ford’s war-profiting global scourge of a pioneer multinational parasite…Crown Vic?!

        I would never have guessed you to be an Augustinian.

        • 0 avatar
          Xeranar

          I first drove a 1988 Ford LTD Crown Victoria.
          Second a 1997 Ford Crown Victoria (the car I drove the majority of my early years)
          Third a 2000 Mercury Grand Marquis.
          Finally a 2008 Scion xB.

          I’ve driven a plethora of friends cars and rentals between then and now, including a Lotus Espirit, a Civic Type-R with a blower that made north of 300, a Chevy Cavalier, and the list goes on.

          I’m going to refrain from making a moral argument on the validity of the choices my parent’s made and my enjoyment of the Panther platform. But for sure, I enjoy being selfish once in a while, it doesn’t make me a hypocrite, I actually advocate for people to drive whatever car suits them, but I also advocate for stringent laws to make them more efficient.

          Also the mod V8 was hilarious fun to drive when gas was cheap, I used to illegally race with it because it was decently fast with the mustang parts the original owners had put into it. It still didn’t have more than 250 or so, but it was decently quick in 2000-2003. Drunk driver swerved across three lanes and took me out. I still miss that giant boat.

          • 0 avatar
            Kenmore

            Grant me environmental responsibility and moral consistency, but not yet.

            ‘Cause I’ll forgive myself anyway. And I am not a hypocrite, merely nuanced.

            Oh, and you can drive anything you want as long as I can help take it away.

            We good?

          • 0 avatar
            Xeranar

            Well Kenmore, what you said is an obtuse response to my statement. I’m fairly sure the difference between a LEV vs. PZEV vehicle is minimal and driving a car that got a combined MPG somewhere in the high-teens when the average which in 2000 was fairly average, maybe just slightly below average doesn’t really make me some sort of horrid polluter. But sure, if it gets you off, Ken, believe what you will.

            The difference between driving what you wish that is available on the market and advocating for more stringent fuel economy so that the market moves in the fuel efficient direction aren’t exactly a fantastical authoritarian fantasy land you and some of the others insist I live in.

            Then again, what is there to say when you want to try and troll my arguments as unreasonable strawmen? :)

    • 0 avatar
      hybridkiller

      “I can’t imagine why he’s his age and still making $12 an hour at a tire shop.”

      Has it occurred to you that maybe the reason that (older) guy is there is for precisely this kind of situation? You’d be the first one screaming if they handed the Porsche to a teenager.

      Also, not everyone can be a brilliant, successful executive or entrepreneur such as yourself.

      Elitist much?

  • avatar
    CapVandal

    If the alignment was done correctly — or maybe they just checked it and didn’t touch it if it was ok (a great deal, considering the risk of the procedure causing other problems — even if it is only 5%), then where’s the beef?

    Probably got the best deal in town on the tires.

    Anyone ever wonder what doctors say about patients behind their backs?

    • 0 avatar
      schmitt trigger

      An acquaintance of mine who is an anesthesiologist, tells me of the jokes and the comments that occur during surgery. Think of MASH.

      Having said that, if a crisis develops or the surgery is a complicated one, everything becomes serious business and the jokes immediately stop.

    • 0 avatar
      vvk

      These are not doctors. Are not paid like doctors. Are not educated and trained like doctors. These are skilled blue collar workers. Angry blue collar workers. Not angry at the customer, angry at the guy/girl behind the counter in the office who is too timid to refuse the job because it should cost several times what they charge. I think the language is entirely appropriate!

  • avatar
    MrGreenMan

    The shop guys were right that they shouldn’t have taken the job if it was considerably harder than the average alignment for a fixed fee because it’s an exotic. Usually, if they specialize, a shop will proudly proclaim it takes those kinds of cars, or you should assume they’re only competent at the most common cars in your market.

    I agree with the many above that have said – OK, so a little damage to the grass, no obvious damage to the car, a little petulant, a little juvenile, but they were going to align it, anyway. Otherwise, guys talk like that, so sorry they treated it like a car and job instead of a lifetime achievement and a privilege; sounds like they had a problem previously with a Maserati.

    I wonder what the missing segments of the video recorded them saying.

    Edit: I notice from the version embedded on YouTube that there’s a small speedometer in the lower left. It suggests that the max speed was 23 kph, so under 15 mph at the top speed. It seems to make a lot more noise than you would expect from a car at 15 mph, but one wouldn’t expect 15mph to be in anything but first gear. This doesn’t seem like a severe thrashing.

  • avatar
    jim brewer

    I’m with you Mr. Greenman. This is exactly what I would expect them to say when no one is around and it doesn’t bother me one whit.

  • avatar
    Carlson Fan

    If you listen to the tech, he says we should just tell the customer “no”. I’m sure he understands they don’t have the expertise/experience to align a car like this and lose money when they do. Which is why he comments that the dealer gets $300 for the same work they are probably charging $80 for.

    The tire business is competitive and I suspect there is not a lot of money to be made on the sale of the actual tires so things like an alignment is where they make their money. But if they spend 2 to 3 times as long doing the alignment as they should what’s the point? Hence the comment about the Maserati.

    They were unprofessional, but I can see their point. The owner should decline this business or charge accordingly.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      I was wondering the same thing. Maybe the technicians are concerned they can’t do the job right – at least not right for this customer – and don’t want repeat visits to fix this alignment later for free.

      I’ve had two cars whose alignments were perfect, but they turned out to be very sensitive to tires. My current Leaf is one of them, and my former VW Passat was the other. After measuring the circumference of my tires, I’ve discovered that they’ve varied by 1/4 inch when properly inflated, and brand new. Placing the larger tires on the right side cured the ‘alignment’ problem, and greatly extended the tire life.

      Just imagine the special challenges of exotic tires on this exotic car, whose owner will inevitably blame the alignment shop if his car doesn’t drive true afterward.

      • 0 avatar
        burgersandbeer

        Radial pull is another way tires can cause cars to not track straight, even with a perfect alignment.

        If you visit a shop for new tires and an alignment and the car doesn’t track straight after, I think it’s reasonable to verify the alignment first, even if the tires could be the cause.

    • 0 avatar
      Hillman

      The problem is the owner of the car found out what they said. I see their point but it makes the shop look really bad when the mechanics are saying they should not be doing the work. These PR blunders are really aggregating because they are easy to avoid. Don’t say stuff that can burn you when there is a camera right there or on social media.

  • avatar
    OneAlpha

    I didn’t hear anything all that bad.

    I’ve been a professional auto mechanic at three separate companies, and if anything, this was pretty mild talk.

    The mechanics didn’t insult the guy or call him names, they just commented on how they were losing money on the job and they weren’t happy.

    Besides, customers can do some pretty fucking thoughtless things that earn them the enmity of the mechanics.

    About ten years ago, I had the privilege of installing a new exhaust on a Chevy pickup in February after a bad snowstorm, and the damn bed was full to the rails with snow.

    Which gradually melted inside the heated confines of the garage bay, showering me with icy glacial runoff for an hour. Ever install a catback while dressed up like the Gorton’s Fisherman?

    The guy could’ve had the common courtesy to shovel out that bed before he brought his truck in.

    At my other job, we had this one dumb son-of-a-bitch who wanted two rear tires on his van full of scrap steel and chunks of concrete. The rear end was riding the bump stops, and this was a Ford E350.

    I don’t know how he was even able to get it moving under its own power, because NONE of our lifts, including the big drive-on alignment rack, would pick it up.

    We had to get out two six-ton floor jacks and lift it manually, one side at a time. It never occurred to him to unload the pig before he brought it in.

    This Porsche guy got off easy.

    What do you want to bet that he demanded the job for free when he saw the footage of the mechanics not blowing sunshine up his ass?

  • avatar
    AJ

    The guy does have a point that they should have refused the job. Still, mechanics scare me which I try and do as much as I can myself.

  • avatar
    MisterNoisy

    Having a hard time figuring out what the kerfuffle is about. 15 mph over a flat lawn isn’t going to harm anything but the grass, and even that is debatable.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Other than the low speed crossing of nicely groom grass on a flat surface on what has been dry conditions – meh – I don’t see anything really here.

    The dude went to Bubba and Floyd with the strains of Sweet Home Alabama to do an alignment job on a car that Bubba and Floyd are smart enough to figure out the dude is just cutting corners.

    Meh. The fail car carrier jump was a far more entertaining video. There is a reason I don’t have a Porsche in my garage anymore – and it isn’t because I can’t afford to buy one. As others have noted – the insanely expensive maintenance and fragile nature of the beast is why.

    I wish they would make something 944 grade again (that ain’t the Boxster)

  • avatar
    16b

    You can see the tire tracks in the grass on the satellite picture (and street view). The shortcut seems to be standard operating procedure.
    https://www.google.com/maps/@39.9670357,-83.0956845,96m/data=!3m1!1e3

    Living in Columbus, I have had the unfortunate displeasure of driving through that part of town many times. The thing somebody else said about the grass likely being smoother than the pavement is accurate.

    As for the rest of the video… meh. I was waiting for it to fall off the lift or something.

  • avatar
    rudiger

    Here’s some more detailed info (including what appears to be a posting by the owner of the Porsche):

    http://www.porscheboost.com/content.php?4950-Watch-employees-at-Grismer-Tire-and-Auto-Service-in-Columbus-Ohio-drive-a-customer-s-Porsche-996-Turbo-on-the-grass-and-say-that-the-customer-should-fuck-off

    The owner claims he complained to the tire shop several times after he got his car back and watched the video. Eventually, the tire shop refunded his money for the alignment.

    The bottom line?

    1. The owner got a free alignment because the shop mechanics, although they did no damage and performed the requested work, were recorded not being the most respectful of the customer or his vehicle because they evidently felt it was a level/type of vehicle they shouldn’t (or didn’t want to) be working on.

    2. You can damn well bet that the mechanics will be looking for dash cameras on any cars they’re working on in the future (especially high-dollar performance cars) and keep their mouths’ shut when they see one. In fact, it wouldn’t be surprising if the place simply stopped taking in those types of vehicles, altogether.

    • 0 avatar
      CJinSD

      The mechanic read this guy correctly from the start. He was a cheap bastard trying not to pay the value of the work done on his car. On top of that, he is an open wound. Looking at the comments on porscheboost paints a really ugly picture of the sort of people that like Porsches these days.

  • avatar
    MattPete

    Seriously? This was posted as an article? This is a non-event (other than making TTAC look amateur for posting this).

  • avatar
    Signal11

    What a whiny little bitch.

    The owner who posted the video, not the mechanics. Bitch and moan is what mechanics and techs do.

    Posting up YouTube video of typical blue collar shop bitching because you weren’t accorded the respect you’re due as a Porsche owner makes YOU the douchebag.

  • avatar
    Stumpaster

    First I watched the video and thought that the bold guy is merely lamenting that they should not be doing such a difficult car for their flat rate alignment. Or he is concerned that the owner is gonna come back and nag or some like that. When I brought my 2002 to a Harley dude with Vw junk yard near Cambridge OH, and asked to rebuild the engine with my BMW sourced kit, he had the same reaction. Not his forte, not really interested. I had to convince him and provide torque numbers for the bolts, and he did a great job. But until a BMW mechanic later adjusted something else, the engine was not running right. That was totally understandable.

    And then here, I read that Porsche fanboi site article and comments. All I can say, what a bunch of runny nosed dbags they are. Wheels damaged by driving over the grass? How frigging stupid can you be? Obviously the owner of a 100k car thought it was a good idea to bring it to so e random shop to save a C note. His choice. So yeah, I did feel bad for the grass, being so close to the turbos and all. As to those who cry for this Porsche being abused, get a hankie, wipe your nose and get a frigging life.

  • avatar
    Ron B.

    I about the same age as the guy in the alignment shop and the language is about right too… sometimes customers can be certifiable but i understand the owner of this car was actually only annoyed that the alignment wasn’t carried out,(the hood wasn’t lifted so the strut mounts can be adjusted ).He got a refund and has been a customer of this shop for a long time. All in all, a very stormy teacup. This is what happens when alignment shops really cock it up;
    http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/queensland/dead-porsche-testers-were-safe-drivers-20100301-pcgp.html

  • avatar
    troyohchatter

    Something missing in all of this is the disclaimer with most of these flat rate jobs; “Some vehicles may incur an additional cost.”

    That’s the part I don’t get. Why did Grismer not look up the M/Hs required to do this properly and quote it accordingly?

    Then again, this is the same outfit that told me I had a bad wheel bearing on my Ford Ranger. When I told him to throw it back up on the lift and show me, umm, the talk changed.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Well, seems we have some shop workers who are having a bad day, but then again, what to make of the d-bag Porsche owner who actually keeps his CAR under surveillance, so he can document the bad attitude of the people who serviced his baby?

    Twenty bucks says he used this to get a better deal on the service bill.

  • avatar
    vvk

    I think the Derek’s comments to the video completely misinterpret what the mechanic is saying. I really don’t see how it is relevant that he is driving across the grass, since it seems to be smooth without curbs, etc. Also, the mechanic is not angry with the choice of the vehicle or with the customer. In fact, it sounds like they got the car from a body shop. The mechanic is angry with the front desk clerk who is too timid to refuse the job. While not as nightmarish as on the old torsion bar 911s, the alignment on the 996 is not what $50-60 typically buys you at a tire shop. Typical low cost alignment consists of adjusting front toe setting on generic front wheel drive cars that DO NOT call for anything else to be adjusted. Unlike a 911, which requires careful preparation, height measurements, corner weighting and multiple adjustments to toe, castor and camber, front and back. And if they screw it up, the car ends up in a ditch. Because of sensitive suspension geometry, rear engine weight distribution and the matter in which a car like this is typically driven.

    I think the mechanic is absolutely right to be pissed. I think he is also absolutely right in saying that the job should have been refused.

  • avatar
    cartunez

    Not sure in what universe the customer becomes a villain because he was trying to save a few bucks. The bottom-line is when I give you money for a job I have a reasonable expectation to you doing your best. The video simply shows that people tend not to treat your property as well as they should.

  • avatar
    windnsea00

    Maybe living in LA I am a bit numb to this but is driving a 911 that big of a deal? You do not have to be uber rich to own one by any means. -997 driver

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    1. YouTubing this clip will point out the quality of this place’s service.
    2. Don’t go back–ever.
    3. Advise your friends not to go there–ever.
    4. Let their bad work be their advertisement.

    When I run into something like this, I make sure everybody I know learns about it. On the other hand, I’m quite happy with letting my ‘enemies’ go there any time they want. Karma, you know?

  • avatar
    Domestic Hearse

    The clip is now removed, so I can’t watch it or comment on the technicians’ behavior.

    But in most tire shops, they’ll upsell the alignment at the time of the tire sale, offering some sort of wear and cupping warranty. So I’m sure the salesman made a $1000 tire sale then offered the Porsche owner the alignment/warranty package (which is mostly pure profit for the tire shop). The owner took the deal, now the shop has to do the alignment. And do an alignment check and adjustment every time the car is back for service.

    Blame shop’s tire sale/alignment upsell practices, not the car owner.


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