By on June 11, 2014

02 - 1966 Ford Taunus Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinLast week, I left the Return of the LeMonites 24 Hours of LeMons and went straight to Sweden for a car-freak field trip with Dr. G.D. Yo-Man. Surströmming, runestones, black metal, and, of course, junkyards full of weird (to Americans) European cars. Bloms Bilskrot, located in Söråker, boasts what must be thousands of cars from the 1940s through the 1990s, and the inventory extends well into dense forest where decades-old trees grow through engine compartments and plants grow on mulch on car roofs. Today’s Junkyard Find was located in the less wooded part of Blom’s, so I didn’t have to climb over any fallen trees in order to photograph it.


The P3 Taunus was built for the 1960 through 1964 model years, and it was designed by Uwe Bahnsen, the man who penned such cars as the Ford Capri and the Merkur Scorpio. It was a bit weird-looking, but you couldn’t mistake it for anything else.
19 - 1966 Ford Taunus Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinThis one has the kind of rust you see in the American Upper Midwest and probably wouldn’t be worth restoring, but the trim, glass, and interior are in pretty good shape.
01 - 1966 Ford Taunus Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinThere’s a bit of a family resemblance to the early Ford Falcon here.
03 - 1966 Ford Taunus Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinNo Falcon ever got a face like this, though.
13 - 1966 Ford Taunus Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinEngines in these cars were pushrod four-cylinder units with displacements ranging from 1498cc to 1757cc. I have no idea which one this is, but I’ll bet some of you Europeans can ID it.
18 - 1966 Ford Taunus Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinI thought about pulling this clock for my collection, but the odds of finding a 50-year-old mechanical car clock— even a German one— in functioning condition are about the same as finding a rust-free Datsun B210 parked outdoors in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula.
11 - 1966 Ford Taunus Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinWe’ll continue my Scandinavian junkyard adventures (which started last fall with some Reykjavik yards) in future installments of this series.

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49 Comments on “Junkyard Find: 1963 Ford Taunus 17M...”


  • avatar
    J.Emerson

    A neat little car, but I still prefer the lines of the American Falcon

  • avatar
    danio3834

    I can only imagine how anemic a 1.5L made in 1963 would be, even in a car that light. 0-60 in never?

    • 0 avatar
      Zykotec

      You’d be surprised. The engines ranged from 54 hp to a ‘wild’ 75 hp (net hp, so not much less than the least powerful Falcon 6) , The car didn’t weight that much less than Falcon, considering it was more or less exactly the same size (only slightly narrower and a bit taller), but with better interior space, the more efficient engines and manual transmission made them perform close to a straight 6 falcon with an auto, while getting 25++ mpg.
      And with the next gen in 1965 you got the ‘massive’ 90 hp 2.0 v6 which wasn’t slow at all.

    • 0 avatar
      cwallace

      I think this motor gave way to the 1.5 and 1.7 V4 that Ford made, which actually has some life to it. Saab bought these from Ford when it was time to move beyond their 2-stroke Shrike motors.

      • 0 avatar
        Zykotec

        True, and the V6 was derived from it (most of the extra ‘life’ was the inherent low end torque in a v-engine though). In it’s last update the v6 followed the Mustang through 2012 before prodution ended if I recall right.

        • 0 avatar
          TR4

          “the inherent low end torque in a v-engine”
          This sounds like BS. Can you explain why a V engine would have different torque characteristics from any other configuration?

          • 0 avatar
            Zykotec

            I am not going to claim it’s not BS, because I’m not an engineer. But either because the v configuration spreads the force on the shorter and lighter crankshaft more evenly during each rotation, or because the to engine banks are inherently unbalanced, you at least get an extra ‘feeling’ of torque compared to most inline engines. There could be other differences (bore, stroke or compression)between the engines creating this feeling, but most v-engines feel stronger, and less rev-happy than comparable inline engines.

        • 0 avatar
          cwallace

          If you are right, that’s one long-lived engine design. I’m sure there are plenty of other engines that have soldiered on for even longer.

          I see a Saab 9000 and a 900 Turbo in the background of these pictures, so maybe some older “Fast, Roomy, Handsome- And Built With Aircraft Quality” Saab iron will come up in the next installment…

          • 0 avatar
            Zykotec

            Tbh, it was updated and refreshed so many times that only part of the block and bolt pattern for the bellhousing was left in it’s last iteration, but from the 1962 Mustang I prototype (as a V4) trought to the 2010 Mustang ( I fact-checked myself) is a reasonably long run for an engine that was more or less outdated by 1985 :P

    • 0 avatar
      Vega

      Weight was only 2,200lb. With the 55hp engine it accelerated to 60 in 25-30 sec. Compared to early 60s Volkswagens that was very competitive.

      The Ford P3 (nicknamed ‘bathtub’ in Germany) was seen as an emancipation of Ford Germany, given previous post-war Fords were generally just shrunken copies of US models, which were considered to baroque for European tastes.

      Btw. top speed was 85 mph (after a few minutes presumably).

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        I’m sure it was acceptable in it’s day for what it was. I have driven a late 50′s Beetle and even with it’s slightly modified engine, was painfully slow. How jaded we’ve become when 10 second 0-60 times are considered unacceptably slow.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Is this where the Taurus name came from twenty years later?

    Also, speaking of Fords:
    This morning I saw a 2000ish F-150, and on the same label as the F-150 emblem on the back (underneath) in red was “7700.” I have never seen this before – any Ford truck people know?

    • 0 avatar
      autojim

      Yep. For the ’97 model year, Ford moved the F150 and F250LD onto a new platform, but kept making the old platform (what the PowerStroke guys call the “Old Body Style” or “OBS”, referring to the ’80-’97 body) for the F250HD, F350, and F-SuperDuty.

      This confused the everloving fuck out of the marketplace: TWO different F250s?

      So shortly after the ’99 F250/F350/F450/F550 SuperDuty debuted in ’98, they quietly switched the F250LD (easily identified by its 7-lug wheels) badging to “F150 7700″ referring to the 7700 lb GVWR it had. It was never a particularly big seller in the States (though it did relatively well in the Mexican market), and as the SuperDuty sales took off, it was quietly dropped.

    • 0 avatar
      davefromcalgary

      “After the introduction of the Super Duty version of the F-Series in 1998 as a 1999 model, the light-duty version of the F-250 was discontinued; the heavy-duty suspension continued on as the “7700″ package for the 2000-2003 F-150 (noted on the tailgate emblem)”

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ford_F-Series_tenth_generation

    • 0 avatar
      bertolini

      It means it was a heavy duty F150. On the tenth generation trucks Ford introduced the Super Duty 250/350 in 1999 and a lighter duty F250 based on the 1997 F150. Eventually the lighter duty F250 was renamed the F150 7700 as in capacity is <7700lbs. Think of it a "heavy half" ton pickup sharing many componants with an F150 and a Super Duty.

      Biggest clue as to whether a truck is a conventional F150 or a 7700…..seven (yes 7) lug wheels.

      • 0 avatar
        greaseyknight

        They also used the 7 lug wheels and axles under some Econolines, for what reason I have no idea. Some google searching shows that the 7 lugs came on trucks as new as 2012.

    • 0 avatar
      Vega

      Taunus was a traditional name for cars from Ford Germany. It is the name of a mountain range near Frankfurt. Ford Germany used the Taunus name from 1939-1982.

      Its origin stems from pre-war politics, car companies wanted to appeal to the German government (and consumers) by giving their cars german names. Other examples include the Ford Eifel (another mountain range), Opel Blitz etc.

    • 0 avatar
      Johnster

      Um, no. But many people are confused by the similarity of the names.

      “Taurus” is a latin word meaning “bull,” as in the astrological sign, “Taurus,” the sign of the bull.

      “Taunus” is a mountain range located in Germany, north of Frankfurt. Besides lending its name to the line of German Fords, it is known for having a lot of natural hot springs and, according to Wikipedia, for being something of a resort area that was once popular with European aristocracy.

      While various English Fords were officially imported and sold through select American Ford dealers from immediately after World War II up through 1970, German Ford Taunus models were officially imported and sold through select Mercury-Edsel-Lincoln (MEL) dealers for the 1958 model year through about 1963 or so.

      There was the earlier Ford P2 Taunus model that was sold from 1958 through 1960 and which looked like a miniature 1955 or 1956 full-sized American Ford and then the later P3 model. Supposedly most of them were the 17M model with the larger 1.7 liter 4-cylinder engine, but there were also some of the 15M model with a 1.5 liter 4-cylinder engine.

      Ford also imported a handful of the Ford P4 Taunus 12M which was a completely different car based on the Ford Cardinal project. The P4 Taunus 12M was a smaller car with front-wheel drive and a 1.2 liter version of the Ford V-4 engine.

      These Ford Taunus cars didn’t sell all that well, Lincoln-mercury dealers weren’t particularly interested in selling them and they had the “Comet” to sell to people who wanted a small car.

  • avatar
    raresleeper

    The upgrade to 14″ steelies from 13″ steelies signifies that this was CLEARLY…

    …a ’63 Taunus SHO.

    By the way, is that a “three on the tree”?

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    My tailor is an older Egyptian gentleman who goes on and on about when he had his Ford Taunus. I had to look it up because I had never heard of it, its nice to see another one in the flesh so to speak (well what’s left of it).

    • 0 avatar
      skor

      I’m not surprised. Taking into consideration the time and place, the Taunus was probably a good car. Such attitudes are common in the US as well. Today the 55-57 Chevy is iconic, but if I gave you one the exact way it rolled off an assembly line in 1957, you’d probably hate it.

  • avatar
    7402

    Is that a Volvo Duett on the right?

  • avatar
    -Nate

    When I lived in Guatemala City in 1976 I worked on a German Taunus that had a V4 engine and the radiator behind the engine , in the cowl .

    I thought it junk (it was really beat up) but the shop I worked in , told me it was considered a good car .

    -Nate

    • 0 avatar
      raresleeper

      Good for Guatemalan Standards :)

      • 0 avatar
        -Nate

        ” Good for Guatemalan Standards :) ”

        If only you knew ~ you had to live there to understand , things were pretty grim .

        I lived in Zona 6 , on the edge of the Capitol and rode the # 11 bus to work often (my ’37 EL KnuckleHead Harely was a gas hog) and often had to get out and help push start the Bedford Diesel powered bus that rattled and chugged , didn’t have any battery at all in it , none of them did , they push started them every morning with an old flat fendered Jeep , occasionally the driver was sloppy on the clutch and stalled them out .

        Oddly it was fun times but the vehicles & roads were bad , _very_ bad indeed , I was the ” Go To Guy ” in my Barrio to get lights , wipers , horns and so on , back to working , not any of the ” garages ” seemed to be able to manage those simple things .

        -Nate

    • 0 avatar
      Zykotec

      Probably a fwd Taunus 12m or 15m. The radiator doubled as a heat echanger for the interior heater. So, if the engine got hot, you had to turn up the heat inside. My dads first car was a 1964 12m . Terrible design if you had to go up a long hill on a hot summer day.

  • avatar
    bunkie

    I remember seeing these on the streets of Stockholm and Copenhagen back in the ’60s. That face was incredibly memorable.

  • avatar
    skor

    It does resemble the US Falcon of 60-63, but it seems that Ford was also influenced by the Taunus when they penned the 66-69 US version of the Falcon.

  • avatar
    Garak

    One of those early Taunuses was Ford’s first FWD car – a mostly forgotten machine, as they dumped FWD entirely for about 10 years after it. Contemporary reviews claimed the front suspension went out of alignment all the time, possibly due to the incredibly bad road conditions of the day.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    The front reminds me of a 1960 Ford Galaxy.

  • avatar
    Windy

    In reference to your collection of car clocks why not develop ( as a “it’s too cold to be outside working on my van project today”) as a winter hobby; the ability to repair these interesting bits of 20th century tech. That way you would not have passed up so many neet dashboard clocks over the years and your collection by now would be filling your spare bedroom!

  • avatar
    Frank Galvin

    My father in law, an American ex-pat, lives in Vienna. In 2012, he bought a nicely restored ’64 Taunus which he nicknamed “The Bathtub.” NIce red and black combo. He says it drives great, just not so well going up hills at speed. Can’t seem to attach the pics.

  • avatar
    Wheeljack

    I’m going to guess that engine is the ubiquitous Ford OHV “Kent” engine, offered in the U.S. in Cortinas, very early Capris, Pintos and the Fiesta. Not to mention various lotus products (often with a twin-cam head), Caterham Super 7′s, Formula Ford racers and Bobcat skid-steers to name a few. This one looks like the earlier (1959-1966) version with the non-crossflow head, and most likely a 3-main bearing crankshaft.

    Impossible to say what displacement it is though – it was offered in a 996 cc, 1198 cc, 1339 cc and a 5-main bearing version with either 1297 cc or 1498 cc.

    1967 brought a redesign to a crossflow head, which is the version most americans are familiar with. The 5-main bearing engines are nearly indestructible with their really robust bottom ends, solid lifters, a rocker shaft arrangement with cast rocker arms. The only weakness on the emissions smoggled 1.6L Fiesta version is a tendency to crack the cylinder head in between the #2 & #3 exhaust valves, but the heads were improved to correct the issue.

  • avatar
    threeer

    Before my father moved on (rather permanently) to Opel Rekords, we briefly had a Taunus. I was too young to remember much about it, but recall that my dad was pretty happy when he bought his first Rekord. Funny when you talk to people about it and they keep trying to correct you by saying “don’t you mean your dad’s Taurus?” Um, not in 1970…

  • avatar
    OzSRV

    Similar styling later used on the ’64-’70 Corsair in the UK. I like it, stands out in a good way I think.

  • avatar
    beetlebug

    Wow. I live in Sweden now and would love to visit there. Take me along next time. :)


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