By on January 13, 2014

2015-Honda-Fit

Face it: Honda’s been the best in the business at building cars in the Fit’s segment since it was really the Civic’s segment. The new-for-2015 model won’t exactly inspire confidence in Toyota Yaris salespeople across America, either.

2015-Fit-Interior

The Fit now rolls on sixteens and sports LED tails in a nonchalant affirmation of B-Spec tuner culture. Though it is 1.6 inches shorter, unspecified increases in width and height lead to an additional 4.8 inches of rear legroom and nearly five extra cubic feet of cargo space. Total space with the rear seats folded is 52.7 cubic feet of space.

For the first time, you can get leather seats in a Fit. The arrival of Bluetooth and a significantly-sized infotainment screen will allow Honda to swipe back at the Fiesta.

The 1.5-liter four will twist out 130hp through a six-speed manual or CVT. Mileage is guesstimated at 41 highway, 33 city, 36 combined.

As long as ours don’t come from China, it will be hard to argue against the Fit in the mini-car market next year.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

66 Comments on “NAIAS 2014: Honda Fit All-New, Bigger Inside But Smaller (Well, Shorter) Outside...”


  • avatar
    Astigmatism

    Never understood the point of leather in this segment. There’s a thing called “happy cheap,” guys, and the Fit should be it.

    • 0 avatar
      musicalmcs8706

      Some people want a small car that is well equipped. And they didn’t say leather was standard for everyone.

    • 0 avatar
      imag

      Some people want an upscale small car. I know the B&B opinion is generally against those types of cars, but the success of Mini shows that they can be profitable.

      Besides, if a single platform can accommodate more buyers, why not extend the options? Econoboxes have very low margins, so options help cover the costs of the low-spec cars.

      • 0 avatar
        The Heisenberg Cartel

        I was just thinking the other day, I wonder who is responsible for the fact that basic cars can be optioned up so insanely high compared to 10 years ago. Is it Ford?

        Consider me one of those who doesn’t mind all of the options, btw.

        • 0 avatar
          imag

          My understanding is that the cost of delivering a complete vehicle platform is now very high relative to years past. The R&D costs are a much greater part of the overall vehicle costs than they used to be.

          That means that economy cars cost the manufacturers nearly as much to deliver as higher-spec vehicles, which means they make almost nothing on base model economy cars. Luxury options allow them to recoup more of the vehicle costs.

          Anyone with more of an inside understanding, feel free to jump in.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            The simple answer is that people demand the extra equipment.

            The things that used to be considered luxuries are now expected. The days of handcrank windows, a DIN-sized hole in the dash for the radio, and four-speed manuals are dead and gone.

          • 0 avatar
            mkirk

            Yet I have a 2013 with hand crank windows and a standard double DIN opening in the dash in which I installed the aftermarket stereo of my choosing. I do wonder how many cars still allow you to roll up your own windows though…The Versa and Frontier are the only ones I know of for sure.

        • 0 avatar
          TEXN3

          I’d say Mini ushered in the idea, at least for the US.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            If memory serves, the VW brand was at the forefront of offering soft-touch plastics and upmarket options in Europe, and it spread from there.

        • 0 avatar
          jimbobjoe

          I’ve heard the argument that government safety features are the reason.

          It’s difficult to make a basic car that you can make a reasonable profit on. It’s enormously difficult to do so when you have to include several thousand dollars worth of safety equipment.

          The automakers had no choice but to move the platforms upscale. But also keep in mind that the platforms are so expensive all on their own that the cost of the luxury features isn’t all that much comparatively. I can get a normal Chevy Cruze for $18k. For $5k more I can get a Chevy Cruze outfitted like a Lexus.

          *I also believe that it’s a good thing, and the safety features, while expensive, are worth it.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            Automakers have long used options in order to boost margins — almost without exception, the options carry a higher margin than the base car (which is one reason why they offer them as options.)

            This is more of a demand issue. We like to be coddled; we have less tolerance for inconvenience than before. The market for stripped basic cars no longer exists, and it would cost more money to build a simple car that gathers dust and doesn’t sell. It’s better business to just add the convenience and comfort features in the first place.

            Here’s a test: go rent a compact and midsize car from one of the major rental agencies, and note how it’s equipped. If it’s in a rental, then it’s probably the bare minimum of what an automaker can get away with it, and rentals are better equipped than they used to be.

    • 0 avatar
      Mandalorian

      I understand it in certain markets like India, where there is a relation between tax and vehicle size, people want the features, but they don’t want to take the tax hit for a bigger vehicle.

      That being said, I really don’t get it in the US either.

      • 0 avatar
        rpn453

        Some people prefer driving smaller vehicles. I suspect that there exists both larger and smaller vehicles than those that you drive, and owners within both groups who don’t understand your size preference either.

    • 0 avatar
      Demetri

      I’d actually like to see some premium non-leather options. I personally would never buy a car with leather trim, and unfortunately, almost every performance oriented car out there has at least a leather steering wheel, in fact, I’m not sure if there are any leather-less enthusiast cars out there. You used to be able to get the Miata with a urethane wheel, but they got rid of that a few years back.

      • 0 avatar
        rpn453

        Are leather steering wheels undesirable? I’ve never experienced any non-leather steering wheels that felt as good as those wrapped in decent leather. Even my lowly ’04 Mazda3 has a leather steering wheel. It feels great to me and shows no visible wear yet, aside from a minor surface scratch due to a sharp ring I wore for a short time.

        I chose not to pay the extra $1600 for leather seats and a sunroof though. Those options didn’t hold much value to me, so the significant cost made for an easy decision. I don’t consider leather to be a desirable option in a northern climate. I find heated seats unpleasant, and totally unnecessary if they’re made of fabric.

        • 0 avatar
          segfault

          Agreed. One of the things I disliked about my 2009 Altima was the urethane steering wheel. The interior was otherwise decent. The leather/leather-esque wheels feel nicer.

        • 0 avatar
          Demetri

          They wouldn’t be so ubiquitous if people didn’t like them; I just personally think leather sucks as a material and have a problem with how it’s created. I went with the urethane wheel on my Mazda3. I like that it’s a bit thinner than the leather version, and it’s still soft and has good tactile feel.

          Probably the sportiest thing you could buy without any leather trim is a CR-Z, or a Mazda3i, which is really saying something. Actually, this new Fit could be a contender in that area; the first drive impressions have been very positive.

          • 0 avatar
            npaladin2000

            You do know that underneath that leather is your urethane wheel, right? Just cut the leather off. There’s a reason it’s called a leather WRAPPED steering wheel.

        • 0 avatar
          mkirk

          Undesirable if you keep your car for a long time or buy old cars. As to leather seats, every old 80 series Land Cruiser I looked at with leather had cracked seats. The cloth in the 250,000 mile example I got was absolutely perfect. Not all cloth is created equal but I have had better luck with cloth except for my wives car where the cloth is stained from leaky sipper cups from when the kids were little which makes me miss Vinyl. There, I said it. Give me a car with MB-Tex vinyl dammit!!!

      • 0 avatar
        azulR

        On the sidetrack of non-leather options, I’m still driving my ’94 Miata with the urethane steering wheel just because all the plausible next-move-up options only come with leather wheels.

        As I understand it, at the low end of the market the leather is more likely to be plastic with finely shredded cow skin embedded in it than anything produced by Connolly. As such, its use is just the result of the manufacturers naturally and cynically taking advantage of the marketplace shorthand that “leather” is somehow a step up, and if adulterated plastic can be called leather, all the better for the profit margins.

        It’s perhaps not surprising that “sporty” models only come with leather steering wheels, but having Ford and GM outfit their supposedly eco-friendly models with leather seems counter-intuitive and sure to lose a few (though perhaps very few) sales.

        If I had the money I’d follow the example of a couple of people at work and be driving a Tesla. As I understand it these are, in the base models at least, leather-free.

        • 0 avatar
          rpn453

          “As I understand it, at the low end of the market the leather is more likely to be plastic with finely shredded cow skin embedded in it than anything produced by Connolly.”

          Regardless, it feels better to my hand than any leather-free steering wheels I’ve used.

          The one on the ex’s ’93 MX-6 is probably the best plastic wheel I can remember using. It’s more than acceptable.

          • 0 avatar

            My favorite steering wheel was a 2008 Corolla S – no buttons and perforated leather.

            As far as “plastic” steering wheels – Honda makes the best. My wife’s 2003 Civic LX still looks new. Non-fading and non-worn and it certainly hasn’t been babied. Doubt a leather steering wheel would last that long with no care.

            Wish the Civic/Accord EX at least had a leather-wrapped steering wheel.

        • 0 avatar
          mkirk

          The only “premium” steering wheel covering that belongs in a first gen Miata is the wood of a Nardi wheel. Had one in my 90 after the urethane disintegrated and loved it.

    • 0 avatar
      segfault

      Faux leather, as seen in many late model VW products and quite a few BMWs and Mercedes, would be perfectly acceptable, especially in this segment.

    • 0 avatar
      kuponoodles

      Short people that want to drive a smaller car, would still like some creature comfort… and yes, leather seats aren’t a luxury item anymore.

      what I want to know, is why,for majority of cars, the ventilated seats are only found his the very highest trim, where as heated seats can be had at a lower trim?

    • 0 avatar
      thornmark

      I believe most non high end car leather is plastic-coated. So you’re really sitting on plastic.
      http://303products.com/media/pdfs/automotiveleather_edited.pdf

      Cloth is a superior material, not burning hot in the summer sun or freezing cold in the winter chill. Cloth grips, leather, not so much.

  • avatar
    Volt 230

    Supposedly to give it a “premium” feel, they should know it takes more than just some cow hide to make it so!

  • avatar
    CompWizrd

    I have a ’10 Fit Sport that finishes its lease in a few months, so I won’t be able to go directly into a ’15.

    I’m wondering how much they will decontent it for Canada.. quite a few features in the previous generation were removed.

    • 0 avatar
      juicy sushi

      The option packages were also awful. Made the car much more expensive than it should have been to get the features necessary.

      I had to go with a Note as the new Fit wasn’t on market yet either (and I needed the fuel economy advantage over the current Fit). Otherwise, I would have gone directly to that new Fit.

  • avatar
    ajla

    “through a six-speed manual”

    Finally! Strike up the band.

  • avatar
    ant

    yeah, the seats in the current fit sucsballzzz. how bout an arm rest? they manage to splurge on that luxury item?

    What I’d like to see in a fit is an si version with: hydraulic steering, old school throttle cable, wishbones, and mor powah, either a 1.8, or a 2L. And oh yeah, good seats, and radio.

    holy a pillars in that photo.

    • 0 avatar
      imag

      Aren’t the A pillars required to have airbags now? Even if not, I am sure high scoring on the crash tests requires those beefy pillars to prevent passenger cell intrusion on a car with a minimal hood.

    • 0 avatar
      calgarytek

      A fit with double wishbones, an arm rest, 1.8 to 2.0 L DOHC VTEC, hydraulic steering/throttle would be full of win. Win, win, win.

      I just slapped some Rallyworks mudflaps on my 2000 EK. It actually looks aight…

      Dream ride would be a 98/99 Civic Aerodeck VTi. That would turn heads (up close) in North America. Not sure if that’s a B or an F series engine. If it’s an F series, OMG…

  • avatar
    crm114

    If Honda can build high-quality cars in the US, why not China? Does China have the UAW?

  • avatar
    zeus01

    Is that a sunroof I see? The beefier lower grille will go a long way toward protecting from road debris. The six-speed manual is long over due, but I think I’ll miss those cup holders at the upper left and right instrument panel locations on my ’09 that they seem to have deleted on the ’15. Leather is over-rated. I’d rather see more sound-deadening insulation and more substantial and durable carpeting.

  • avatar
    Demetri

    Even though it looks like they cleaned up a few of the ugly parts of the JDM version, I’m still disappointed with the the new looks. North America is supposed to be getting the sedan version (Honda City) this time around, and that looks a little nicer, but I’ll wait and see what the new Mazda2 is like. And what’s up with this trend of having black plastic side mirror stalks? Shouldn’t those be body color? The new Mazdas are like that too.

  • avatar

    I thought Bluetooth was available. I have a 2013 Fit that has it, anyhow (but not a touchscreen). Maybe Derek meant standard Bluetooth on stripper models.

  • avatar
    makabe

    FYI, that’s 5 cubic feet *less* cargo space in the 2015 model, not more. Time to change your headline. Still, looks like a nice update. Not sure I’d buy a first year model from a first year plant. I’m looking forward to seeing the real world MPG on the 6 spd M/T and if it has rear discs.

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    Toyota N.A. has clearly given up on the B-class hatchback market. The Yaris (aside from the bodystyle and name) is hardly removed from the 2000 Toyota Echo. Aside from rental fleets, I rarely see one on the road.

    This new Fit is gobs better than the Yaris – as is every other car in the segment.

  • avatar
    mike978

    The new Yaris should be much better than the current one seeing that Mazda is engineering it for Toyota.

    The Fit is a good car, but the Sonic spanks it in sales.

    • 0 avatar

      I don’t know why, but Sonic felt like junk to me… I didn’t make far-fetching conclusions from it though. It’s great if it works for so many people. But I liked Spark better than Sonic. Not even sure why GM even needed both of them, but then they also sold Impala and Malibu together for years.

  • avatar
    Flybrian

    Standard cruise control? No wheel covers on base cars? Am

  • avatar
    cargogh

    I never care about squeaking, cold or hot leather anyway, but I’m happy about shorter, lighter, and the 6 speed.

  • avatar

    I was looking at a 2014 Honda Civic EX but this is looking to be be a bit better…

    - Updated Engine
    - More practical cargo space
    - Same tech and leather
    - Cheaper

    Wonder if the rear wheels are now Disk brakes as that was my only negative on the previous model (besides the road noise)

    • 0 avatar
      CompWizrd

      I don’t know if the drum brakes are a negative for me or not. I have 67k km on my ’10 Fit Sport, and my front brakes are maybe 3/5th of the way through the pad on my tire swap last month. Didn’t check the backs myself(pain in the arse to get them off), but my mechanic said they were fine last year.

      As a comparison note, my ’96 Trans Am needed new brakes every year or so… 20,000 km was incredible for me.

      My ’97 Neon needed new brakes every 6-8 months, at less mileage.

      I’m certainly not being nicer to the brakes on the Fit, my driving is almost 100% city, vs the almost 100% highway on the Neon, and more non-stop and go city the T/A had.

      If i remember right, the JDM version had discs all around, and had similar stopping distances as the drum versions, it was limited by the tires(which I did replace awhile ago)

    • 0 avatar
      Demetri

      It still has drums on the rear. There has been talk about an RS turbocharged model; I’m sure that will have rear disc if it comes to fruition.

  • avatar
    motormouth

    Front looks too much like a Nissan Note, with the headlight/radiator grille design. Other than that, I’m sure it’s a well-engineered car. And why not offer leather and other ‘luxury’ items? If it’s an option, you only have to pay if you want it.

  • avatar
    dwight

    If they finally gave it decent legroom and comfortable seats, then I found my next car.

  • avatar
    TrailerTrash

    I know this will sound stupid…but I would love to have cloth seats in my luxury cars!
    Ya…call me an idiot. but I am so sick of the leather being hard or cracking. I have wonderful soft cloth material on expensive livingroom couch and chairs. Never sticky like my leather seats.
    Why can they not produce a fantastic soft and durable cloth material like is on home couches for cars?
    I know…nobody would buy them…it would all be a consumer drive to look wealthy. Nothing to do with practicality of comfort.

  • avatar
    woodywrkng

    If you live in Japan you can buy a larger Fit called the Shuttle, as a hybrid if you wish. A friend of mine has one and seems to like it a lot. http://www.batfa.com/newcar-honda_fit_shuttle_hybrid.htm

  • avatar
    brettc

    Looks like a Civic wagon, which isn’t a horrible thing considering how the Fit looked in the previous generation (ugly). I prefer this design much more.

    As for leather, some people do want that in small cars. I personally wouldn’t pay for it unless it came with something else that I had to have, but look at how many optioned up Titanium Focii and Fiestas there are on the road. So I think leather Fits will sell to someone.

    In a bit of irony, VW recently announced the “Jetta TDI value edition”. A Jetta sedan with a diesel engine, manual or automatic, 16″ steel wheels with wheel covers, no sunroof and a cloth interior. Supposed to be on sale in March from what I understand. The TDI enthusiasts/freaks have been asking for a strippo TDI for years now, and VW is finally offering it while Honda moves the fit up in trim options.

  • avatar
    nine11c2

    “For the first time, you can get leather seats in a Fit”..

    not true..there is a Fit right here with leather…

  • avatar
    tedward

    I loved my old Fit. The only complaints I had related to front seat leg room and a bit too high of a seating position. 4.6 inches is a ton to add to the back, hopefully they extended back the driver seat seat tracks as well. Well, the interior was tacky also, that has to be said in the interest of fairness.

    It was fun to rev and easy to toss around, with just the right amount of rear wiggle under hard braking and a willingness to lift throttle oversteer when asked. I also loved the pedal placement, small, top hinged pedals that still managed to be perfect for heel/toeing. It is also, I think, the most technologically primitive car you can buy basically. No direct injection, no independent rear suspension, no rear disc brakes, no trick ignition strategies, no stability control (mine was the last year w/out), overall it’s stupid simple and fun.

  • avatar
    Dave M.

    Power, heated seats and a sunroof. Only luxuries I need….

  • avatar

    Honda truly does make very good cloth seats and urethane steering wheels. Just saying.


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Subscribe without commenting

Recent Comments

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Authors

  • Brendan McAleer, Canada
  • Marcelo De Vasconcellos, Brazil
  • Matthias Gasnier, Australia
  • Tycho de Feyter, China
  • W. Christian 'Mental' Ward, Abu Dhabi
  • Mark Stevenson, Canada
  • Faisal Ali Khan, India