By on January 30, 2014

2015 Volvo V60 T5 Sport Wagon Exterior

There was a time when wagons roamed the interstates, ferrying families from one National Lampoon vacation to another. With the rise of the crossover, those looking for the original “looks practical but handles like a sedan” mode of transport have few options, and most of them live in the luxury segment. Let’s count them before we go too far. We have the soon-to-be-cancelled Acura TSX, the last-generation Cadillac CTS , the Volkswagen Jetta, Mercedes-Benz E-Class, BMW 3-Series and the Toyota Prius V. Even if you expand things to include “off-road wagons”the list only grows by three (Audi Allroad, Subaru Outback and Volvo XC70.) Despite the shrinking market, Volvo’s brand has long been associated with practical wagons. It’s almost hard to believe it has been three full years since Volvo sold one in America. That’s about to change with the 2015 V60.

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Exterior

Back in 2010 Volvo was selling two wagons in America. The V50 was based on the compact S40 sedan and the V70 shared its underpinings with Volvo’s 5-series competitor the S80. Although the V70 is still sold in Europe and the V40 (the replacement for the V50) splashed down in 2013, Americans will have to settle for Volvo’s middle child, the V60 wagon. Based on Volvo’s S60 sedan, the V60 competes internationally with wagon variants of the 3-Series, C-Class, Audi A4 and many others. But this is America and Volvo’s only direct competitor is the BWM 328i xDrive wagon. More on that later.

Despite ditching the boxy form years ago, Volvo’s style remains the automotive Birkenstock to BMW’s Prada. The entire Volvo lineup in America (except for the XC90) received a 2014 face lift with a more aggressive grille and more creases in the hood. Volvo has finally tucked their radar cruise control module behind a plastic panel that blends into the grille rather than sticking out like a sore thumb. Out back we get bumper cover integrated exhausts, a large black surround on the rear glass that made me wish it was separately hinged, and a continuation of those oh-so-sexy Swedish hips. Volvo’s engineers kept the V60’s roofline fairly high at the rear, but even the Swedes have given in to modern “coupé” styling cues, most notably in the greenhouse shape. The raked rear glass looks sexier, but takes a toll on cargo space.

2015 Volvo V60 T5 Sport Wagon Interior-003

Interior

Birkenstocks are comfy. Prada? Hit and miss. (Or so I’m told.) And so it is with Volvo and BMW interiors. The S60 on which the V60 is based is now 5 years old.  Aside from massaging color and trim options, the only substantive changes to the interior since it was launched is Volvo’s LCD disco dash, a new steering wheel with shift paddles (optional) and a new gear shift knob. Despite its age, the Scandinavian chic cabin has what it takes to complete with BMW, especially now that the 3-Series has gone slightly down-market with more hard plastics in this generation. My only major gripe is the small 7-inch infotainment display that is clearly outclassed by BMW’s ginormous iDrive screen.

Despite lacking the range of motion that the competition affords, Volvo’s thrones continue to be the segment’s ergonomic benchmark. Volvo equips all V60 models headed to America with aggressively bolstered front seats and even more bolstering is available in a sport package.  If you’re a larger driver, you will find the sport seats confining and may even have issue with the standard seats as the bolstering seems to be designed for slim to average builds. Rear passengers are in for a mixed bag with less rear leg room than Acura’s TSX and quite a bit less than BMW’s 3-Series. Checking the numbers, the 2015 V60 actually slots in behind my old V70R, which wasn’t exactly spacious in the rear.

Wagons have long been about practicality and cargo capacity. The V60 scores points on the practicality front with a fold-flat front passenger seat and a standard 40/20/40 folding rear seat back. Volvo also tosses in a plethora of shopping bag holders, a built in cargo divider and additional cargo capacity below the load floor. Unfortunately the sexy profile cuts storage behind the rear seats to 43.8 cubic feet with the rear seats folded. The pursuit of fuel economy has meant the loss of a spare tire which may be a tough pill for road trippers to swallow. Volvo says buyers can option up some form of spare tire but details were sketchy.

2015 Drive-E Engine, 2.0L Engine, Picture Courtesy of Volvo

Drivetrain

The V60 lands at the same time as Volvo’s new engine family. If you want to know more about Volvo’s four cylinder future, check out our deep dive from a few days ago. Volvo’s engine lineup is getting a bit confusing as they transition to their new engine family resulting in two totally different “T5″ models. Front wheel drive T5 models use a new four-cylinder direct-injection engine good for 240 HP and 258 lb-ft while T5 AWD models get the venerable 2.5L 5-cylinder engine making 250 horsepower and 266 lb-ft of torque. This is the point where most companies would stop. Indeed, BMW is only offering the 3-Series with a 241 horsepower 2.0L turbo gas engine and a 180 horsepower diesel I4 in America. The TSX isn’t long for this world but is only available with the familiar 2.4L 4-cylider engine.

In an unexpected twist, Volvo confirmed that there  will be a third engine with two performance levels bound for America. The T6 AWD model will get a 3.0L twin-scroll turbo inline six cylinder engine cranking out 325 HP and 354 lb-ft. This engine takes the S60 sedan from 0-60 in 5.05 seconds and I expect the V60 to post similar numbers. If that isn’t enough, Volvo will go one step further and bring a 350 HP, 369 lb-ft Polestar tuned variant to America good for sub-5-second runs to Ikea.

The new 2.0L engine is mated exclusively to Aisin’s new 8-speed automatic transaxle, also found in the 2014 Lexus RX 350 F-Sport. The new cog swapper enables standard start/stop on the V60 along with a coasting mode (similar to ZF’s 8-speed) which essentially shifts into neutral when you let off the gas on a level road. Due to packaging constraints, 2.5 and 3.0 liter engines get an Aisin 6-speed automatic and standard Haldex AWD.

2015 Volvo V60 T5 Sport Wagon Exterior-012

Drive

The only V60 model Volvo had for us to play with was a front-wheel-drive T5 model with the new 2.0L turbo. Lacking the supercharger for low-end response (available in the S60), the T5 model felt very similar to BMW’s 2.0L N20 engine in the 3-Series with a hint of turbo lag to start and a broad power band. The German mill cranks out less torque, but is required to motivate less curb weight, so I suspect 0-60 times will be fairly similar. Because of the limited time I had behind the wheel we don’t have verified 0-60 numbers but Volvo says the V60 will do the sprint in 6.1 seconds, which is about 1.5 seconds faster than the TSX.

Despite the healthy torque numbers, the V60 presented relatively little torque steer. Volvo didn’t say what they had done to improve on things vs the last T5 FWD model I drove but they did say no suspension designs were changed. (This is a contrast to the S60 T6 FWD which had plenty of torque steer in first gear.) Volvo’s test fleet consisted of Sport Package models only, which are tuned toward the firmer side of the segment. The tuning is certainly firmer than BMW’s standard 3-Series suspension and on par with the Sport Line wagon.

The V60 handled winding roads with composure thanks to wide 235/45R19 (part of the sport package) tires all the way around but the lighter and better balanced 328 wagon feels more nimble out on the road. Meanwhile the TSX and Audi Allroad feel less connected. Since the BMW is only available in America in AWD trim, a comparison to the T5 AWD and T6 AWD may be more appropriate, so check back when we can get our hands on one.

2015 Volvo V60 T5 Sport Wagon Exterior-006

No Volvo would be complete without new safety tech and the V60 spearheads several improvements to existing systems. Volvo’s blind spot system has moved from a camera based system to radar. The switch improves accuracy, allows it to operate better in fog and inclement weather and increases the range. There’s also a new self parking system to parallel park the V60, but we didn’t have an opportunity to test it. City Safety, Volvo’s autonomous braking system, now operates at up to 31 MPH and can now detect cyclists in addition to cars and pedestrians (optional packages apply). Volvo tells us that they expect the system to provide autonomous braking for large animals like moose in the next 1-2 years.

The V60 has been priced aggressively for 2015 starting at $35,300,  an $800 upsell over then S60 and $6,150 less than a base 3-series wagon. Adjusting for feature content, the base V60 is still $5,000 less. If bargain wagons with premium badges are your thing, the TSX is king at $31,985, but the delta shrinks to less than two grand when you adjust for the V60’s feature set. The $36,800 might be the more appropriate competitor for the AWD-only 3-wagon, but a more interesting match up is the $44,300 V60 T6 AWD. Configuring a 3 or the CTS wagon with the same equipment you find on the Volvo will set you back at least $2,000 more. In addition to the value factor, the Volvo brings 35% more power to the fight. The extra power and AWD go a long way in compensating for the better weight balance in the BMW or the Caddy. Since GM hasn’t refreshed their wagon yet, the 3.0 and 3.6 liter V6 engined are outclassed in every metric by the Swede. Option your V60 with every conceivable option and you end up at $54,480.

As a former Volvo wagon owner, I’m probably biased, but all the reasons I opted for a Swedish cargo hauler in 2006 apply to the V60. Aside from the fact that “value” strikes a fire in my loins, the Volvo is the clear performance option in this segment. Want more shove than the $44,300 Volvo? Pony up $64,900 for the CTS-V wagon or $102,370 for an E63 AMG wagon. I’ll reserve my final judgement until I can get my hands on one for a more thorough evaluation, but in the mean time the V60 is quite simply the best performance and value option in this phone booth sized segment.

 

 Volvo provided travel, lodging, meals, the vehicle, insurance and gas for this review

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181 Comments on “First Drive Review: 2015 Volvo V60 T5 Sport Wagon (With Video)...”


  • avatar
    IHateCars

    Nice car….but I still miss the V70R 6MT.

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    Wait so it’s only 43 cu ft “behind the rear seats with seats folded”? Or is that a typo? Correct me if I’m wrong but 43 cu ft is probably what the old wagons used to fit with the seats in place. Heck a Honda fit has more cargo space than that with seats folded. What’s the point of a wagon if it can’t haul some seriously bulky cargo?

    • 0 avatar
      caltemus

      My 1995 850 wagon has ~37 cu ft with the reat seats up

    • 0 avatar

      “What’s the point of a wagon if it can’t haul some seriously bulky cargo?”

      Well, it indisputably holds more than its sedan equivalent. And it arguably looks better.

      • 0 avatar
        NormSV650

        Especially when it looks like a Venza from the side. My Encore holds almost 20% more and much more if I fold the front passneger’s seat down.

        Nice to see Volvo moving away from the iron block engines. But that insturment center stack looks like some art designed tuner from Bang & Olfuson just floating there. That key in the igntiion just screams old school today, not luxury for luxury car prices.

        • 0 avatar
          PonchoIndian

          Your Encore has an iron block engine.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          By God Norm is right. the Encore has 18.8 cu ft behind the second row and the V60 has 15.2 cu ft. This is nothing but a hatchback pretending to be a wagon. Its not even a spacious hatchback. A compact CUV will have at least double the the storage space.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            15.2 is the only number I could find floating around online as well, I was hoping that this was a mistake and that’s it was the new S60’s trunk volume. I saw the 48.3 cu ft folded seat number being touted by volvo and all of the fluff articles, perhaps trying to avoid exposing the reality that this car is fantastically space inefficient.

            As attractive as those volvo ‘hips” look, that is wasted space relative to the car’s foot print. Newer volvos seem incredibly poorly packaged across the board. My gf’s old 2004 S60 had terrible leg room, the XC90 my family test drove seemed very tight after our old MPV.

            I find utilitarian designs such as the first gen scion xB to be very attractive for their form follows function looks. The Honda Fit is a packaging marvel, the 2015 model will only expand upon this strength.

          • 0 avatar

            From what I saw at NAIAS, cargo space in the V60 looks pathetic. XC60 and XC70 appear to have substantially more cargo room. http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2013/10/capsule-review-2013-volvo-xc70-t6-polestar-brown-wagon-edition/

            I find there’s little qualitative difference between the S60, XC60 and XC70 as far as driving goes. The usual “lower ride height, higher center of gravity” arguments against “crossovers” (which the XC60/70 barely count as) don’t hold water from what I’ve experienced.

            The V60 appears to be a lifestyle vehicle for empty nesters. It appears that if you want to haul, the XC vehicles are the ones to go with. But I’ll reserve judgement until I drive one.

          • 0 avatar
            fredtal

            I thought it “looked” pretty roomy with the back seats folded. Then, I’m coming from an A3.

          • 0 avatar
            Wheatridger

            That’s the “trunk” space of a Golf!

          • 0 avatar
            fredtal

            I want to add something to this space discussion. In my case I look at the trunk space of many sedans and they are pretty good. The problem is the trunk lid limits putting bulkier items in. So the few wagons about there and hatchs solve that issue. Also it makes loading things like bags of cement a lot easier.

  • avatar
    krhodes1

    Can you actually see out the back of it? That was my major complaint with my ’08 Saab 9-3SC, and this looks to have the same sort of tiny windows and high tailgate window back there.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      That was a very pretty car. You never see them.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        It really was a great car. Especially since I only paid $23,900 for it brand spanking new after all the GM discounts and rebates. $13K off in round numbers. Mine was the brochure color combo of white on parchment, really a great looking car. The 2.0T Ecotec was a gem, especially paired with the 6spd stick. 85% as good as my BMW for 1/2 the price.

        But hard to see out the back of! Genuinely needed parking sensors.

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      I’ve heard the more compact C30 was hard to see out of so I have no doubt that a bigger, similarly styled model would be just as hard if not more.

  • avatar
    TrailerTrash

    rear seat room? Seems like there is almost no room for anybody if the driver is over 5ft 9!
    This would be a major not buy for me. The rear passenger comfort puts it near the size of the previous 3 series.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      I’ve been in the current S60, whose rear-seat room reflected the car’s size classification…something of a compact-midsized tweener. I can’t imagine that this V60 is appreciably worse, and it looked to me like the seats were all the way back or further back than they’d normally be.

    • 0 avatar

      At a recent autoshow, I did the “sit behind myself” test and I could comfortably fit my 6’2″ (albeit somewhat slight) frame behind myself in the V60, and rear cargo space didn’t seem as small as I thought it would. I did a similar test for the 3-series wagon and it was also fine (slightly better space wise), but the V60 was a nicer place to be and the seats were more comfortable.

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        Even with the Volvo’s empty switch bezels (like the missing navigation switch on the center console), it doesn’t do nearly as good a job of reminding you about unselected options as the Volvo does. The base, non-Comfort 3-Series seats are cheap and flat-looking that they won’t fool anyone. And that small color screen in lesser 3-Series’ is also bad-looking…

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    Beautiful. I actually think this looks better than the 3-Series wagon, especially in that color. And since I’ve got no experience with the IKEA-optimized Volvos of yore, I have no real bias toward them or their upright styling…so to me, this hits the nail on the head. My one complaint, again, is that this Volvo does not have standard projection-beam headlamps, but then neither do to the 3-Series, A4 or C-Class.

  • avatar
    morbo

    I’d qualify the Toyota Venza and Ford Flex as wagons too, even if the feds don’t.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      I don’t understand how the Venza *isn’t* a wagon. Everybody claims it competes with the Murano and Edge, and maybe it does…but it’s a wagon.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      The Flex and MKT have basically the same ground clearance as the Taurus and MKS (5.9″ to 5.1″). They are wagons, regardless of label.

      • 0 avatar
        morbo

        All the black car services using Fox bodied Town cars around DC metro are getting retired. Initially I saw a lot Suburbans, Expeditions, and an occasional E-Klasse or 300C as replacements. lately a LOT of MKTs with the ‘Town Car’ wording along the side passenger door.

        Someone at Ford finally realized the Town Car has some brand value. Unsure how the aristocracy of DC like the replacements though.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          I wouldn’t call it finally realizing it, the MK-T-TC was always the trim level for livery service, and was designed as soon as the Town Car went away.

          • 0 avatar
            TMA1

            This is correct. The reason you’re seeing them now is because the livery services have been hanging onto their old Panther Town Cars as long as they can.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          They are certainly comfortable. I would take riding around in the back of an MKT over a Town Car anyday. Its just SO much better back there.

          I still think Lincoln needs to make the MKT look more like the Explorer or Range Rover, and bring back the Aviator name. The looks are polarizing, and take away from Lincoln’s most competitive product in a segment.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Fox bodied Town Cars, Morbo? Panther :)

  • avatar
    MAGICGTI

    Alex, overall a nice review but a few bits of misinformation. The test car has the Sport Package, which includes the Sport Seats (they aren’t standard as mentioned), 19″ Bor wheels, and lowered chassis (Sport suspension). This unlocks the Beechwood interior color, which is beautiful.

    The new Drive-E 2.0T is the way to go the in 60-cluster, the performance is better than the beloved outgoing inline-5 and the real-world MPG is spectacular for what the car is. It’s right on par with the BMW 328i, which is a nice feat.

    As to the comments on cargo room, no it’s not a box but that comes with the territory along with the 328xiT and the Allroad. If you want a Volvo box they will gladly sell you an XC70.

    • 0 avatar
      Alex L. Dykes

      If you look at the interior section of the review I didn’t say the Sport seats were standard, I said the standard seats were aggressively bolstered (which they are) and you can optionally get even more bolstering if you desire.

      The problem with the “there is the XC70″ is that the XC70 is a taller off-road oriented wagon-trying-to-be-a-crossover. Since Volvo doesn’t sell the V70 here, the V60 is the only pure wagon on offer.

      • 0 avatar
        CH1

        One other correction, City Safety is Volvo’s low speed forward collision mitigation/avoidance system, standard on all models except the XC90. The system with pedestrian and cyclist detection is the optional collision warning with full auto brake (CWAB) which operates essentially at all speeds and is packaged with ACC, lane keeping aid, etc.

      • 0 avatar
        MAGICGTI

        Alex, I was watching the video. I’m not sure how else to interpret the comment. Another minor point with the video is the optional boosters are integrated into the seat cushion, not seatback. We’re just splitting hairs at this point.

        It sounded like I was criticizing you but my comment was aimed more at the general public who haven’t been in a Volvo made in the last ten years but still shoot from the hip.

  • avatar
    PonchoIndian

    So where is all the bitching about the size of the “fail” the rear seat room has because “everything should be able to fit 6+ footers in the rear seat in this segment”?

    Are the party poopers going to complain about the rear seat like they do the ATS and Regal?

    Volvo has done some nice styling lately. This is the first time I’ve started to look at Volvo’s and think they are starting to look pretty sharp.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      In this car, someone 6 foot or under can sit behind me. In the ATS or Regal, only those with no legs could do that.

      Disclaimer: If I did not have a child, I would lease an ATS. The lease deals are great.

      • 0 avatar
        PonchoIndian

        The Regal is listed as 37″ of rear leg room, the Volvo is 34…

        I’m not NormSV so I’m not going on a tangent, just interested in pointing out double standards.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          Every manufacturer measures legroom differently. Ford has a habit of moving their seats all over the place to get measurements. I find that I actually have to sit in the car to figure out what works for me. Regardless of measurements, the ATS has TERRIBLE rear leg room. I will say I am more comfortable in the front seat of a Regal than the V60. I feel it has more front seat kneeroom.

        • 0 avatar
          davefromcalgary

          Hey PI and bball,

          Could this be an issue of interior packaging making the interior dimensions less relevant? Thick padding, hip points, etc?

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Part of it. Part is also because of how measurements are taken. Its also how the backs of seats are sculpted. Some have more knee room than others.

          • 0 avatar
            redav

            It’s much more complicated than a simple “legroom” measurement. For example, if there is foot space below the front seats, you can rest your legs lower (and support your thighs on the seat cushion which makes the rear seat feel much more spacious & comfortable.

    • 0 avatar
      cdotson

      PonchoIndian,

      In reality, if a 6+ footer cannot sit behind the front seats with reasonable comfort you won’t have a snowball’s chance of installing a rear-facing child safety seat. Hauling appropriately ensconced kiddos is squarely within the purview of this vehicle class. I was just discussing this very issue with a coworker earlier in the week and he drives an E39 wagon and he cannot fit his son’s carseat behind an occupied front seat.

      • 0 avatar
        PonchoIndian

        That’s when the other people come in and say “well you should be driving a minivan if you have kids” blah..

        Lets face it, is it really the kind of car aimed at new families that need to put a child seat in the back? Not really the demographic the company is looking for in this part of the market.

        This is aimed at DINKS, SINKS or empty nesters that feel they want something nicer than their Impreza wagon and don’t typically put people in the back seat for long periods of time.

        • 0 avatar
          sproc

          Amen. With the one-in-a-blue-moon nephew exception, my cars will never see a child seat, and rear seat passengers are only a little less rare. However, I can’t stand CUV/SUVs, don’t care about off roading, want something fast and tossible, but also want the ability to haul small to medium cargo internally.

          I hate Subaru Fisher Price-like interiors, and this is a pretty sharp looking car. Only wish I could cross shop a T6 and an S4 Avant.

      • 0 avatar
        Sam P

        I don’t have much practical experience with the E39 BMW but my cousin and her husband fit a rear facing child seat + 4 month old son in their VW Golf 5-door. Both of them are able to sit up front as they normally would and I know for a fact they’ve been on a 3 plus hour drive to visit the family over the holidays with the child seat in place.

        It’s interesting than an E39 wouldn’t have enough space for a rear facing child seat, while a Golf would. My cousin and her husband are 5’5 and 5’10 respectively, so pretty average in height. I don’t think their car seat is anything exotic either.

        • 0 avatar
          PonchoIndian

          Sam P,

          A lot of people bring up the child seat thing, what they don’t say is that child seats themselves vary greatly in the amount of space they take up. You can get a rear facing child’s seat in the back of a Camaro and Mustang, as long as you purchase the one that fits…

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          The Golf actually does a good job with car seats. The packaging is excellent and seats aren’t humungus. A stroller takes up the entire hatch, or more, but its doable. The previous gens of 3 series were worse than the Golf for car seats and such.

        • 0 avatar
          30-mile fetch

          I have a Golf Estate (Sportwagen) and it sees rear-facing carseat duty. There’s a fair amount of room in that backseat, but the infant carseat was touching my seatback. The rear-facing convertible car seat starts significantly impinging on my driving position.

          Carseats are huge. I can sit behind myself in that car and have inches of knee space. Install the carseat, suddenly it feels like a subcompact.

      • 0 avatar
        burgersandbeer

        Your coworker must have long legs. I’m just over 6′ and I can quite comfortably sit behind myself in an E39.

        I don’t have kids so someone help me out – how did people get by just 10 years ago when cars on average where noticeably smaller? I have the impression you have to buy at least a midsize sedan (most current versions of which I consider massive) to even have a chance at fitting the rear-facing child seat. Is this rear-facing seat a recent development? An E39 is no limo, but it is hard to imagine the backseat being insufficient for kids.

      • 0 avatar
        mypoint02

        I have an E39 wagon. We have an infant carrier (Chicco Keyfit 30) on the passenger side and it just barely fits. You have to move the seat 2/3 of the way forward. Fortunately, my wife is short and it doesn’t bother her. There’s no way in hell it would fit behind my seat (I’m 6’2″). Pretty sure it would fit OK in the center position though. It’s going to be interesting when we go to a rear facing convertible seat soon. Not sure how that’s going to work. I’ve sat in the back seat before and it’s comfortable. Just doesn’t seem to do well with the car seats. I have no idea how people get them in Civics and Corollas…

      • 0 avatar
        MattPete

        Having recently gone through this myself (disclaimer: I’m 5’8), a person should not need to replace a perfectly good sedan with a minivan just so that you can put in a rear facing child seat.

        In my e46, there is no way that I could place the rear-facing child seat behind the driver and still be able to fit in the car, so I put it on the passenger side (which meant no one over 5’8 could comfortably sit in the front passenger seat). Likewise, our Mazda 5 had the same problem, and I was unable to drive my wife’s Mazda5 because she had mounted the child seat on the driver’s side (she’s only 5’4, so she had no problem fitting in front).

    • 0 avatar
      TrailerTrash

      well…not just to complain, but the rear seat is extremely important for our family. We travel long distances and my wife spends the entire trip there along with our puppies. The room and comfort needs to be equal to the task.
      Right now she has been spoiled by the MKS rear seats…like the ultra soft leather as well as the luxury couch like seat.
      I can’t force her into a penalty box JUST because I am trying to go wagon.
      And eventually I will find one that allows me to make the switch. This new engine has me thinking I have an opportunity again.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        MKT. Its a MKS wagon with an eight inch longer wheelbase. It also has better seats, optional captain’s chairs, and an optional fridge.

        • 0 avatar
          Kyree S. Williams

          That’s true, but if Trailer is trying to get into a sportwagon, or at least a *decent-looking* wagon, the MKT is not going to work.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Well then Flex. The Ecoboost Flex won’t handle like the smaller sport wagons, but it will be nicer on long trips.

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            I really disliked the Flex’s front fascia before the 2013 facelift. Now it looks lovely…

          • 0 avatar
            TrailerTrash

            exactly…if I wanted just another overweighted MKS…and a car to move caskets aroound…I would get the MKT.
            I was looking to go even sportier than the MKS and have always lusted for wagons…
            The 3 series pissed me off with the start/start madness and then the run flats.
            I am sorry to see these also have run flats…

            But to tell the truth..MAYBE the next gen CX60 with the newer motor will be OK…

      • 0 avatar
        Chicago Dude

        When you do those trips, is there any person in the front passenger seat?

        These Volvo wagons have the flat-folding front passenger seat. The seatback folds down and you position the seat all the way forward so the head rest is under the glovebox (this is what keeps it folded flat). It creates a ton of room for the rear passenger and provides a flat spot for a foot rest or to just hold all the gear you would have thrown on the seat. The only downside is that you lose access to the passenger foot well.

        Again, this is only useful if you have no passenger in the front passenger seat, but you make it sound like you do not. Go give it a try with the seat folded down – it’s a lot like a limo for that passenger. Really nice.

        • 0 avatar
          TrailerTrash

          actually…one way yes…and no to FL. My son comes home from college back to MO.
          I will say I was impressed with the RDX and will keep looking as this is no rush.
          I think there will be a great fun bunch of new vhicles coming out the next year.
          The new Edge and Lincoln. The Volvos. Hell…lots of cool things coming.

          Not to mention I still pray to the Car Gods that Mazda will let me drive the Mazda6 diesel wagon…still an awesome looking car/wagon

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    The leather looks cheap, the plastics look hard, and the interior is unrelentingly grey. And dated. As usual, Volvo stacks up well with the competition when you’re at base model level, but check some option boxes and you’d be better off in something with real prestige and a better AWD system.

    I do like the color and styling!

    But that’s not enough to save it. The CTS wagon is about 88% cooler. The BMW wagon has 45% more prestige. The Allroad has a much better interior. None of the competition has Chinese roots.

    And since about 2007, I’ve always had a feeling like someone is sitting in a board room at Volvo HQ writing in the file called “When to Leave America.”

    • 0 avatar
      LesM

      Volvo’s really got to work on their sad and boring interiors. Sure, it’s a bit cheaper than the competition, but at what price? They are still charging serious coin, and no one could possibly feel good about themselves after buying that grey disaster.

    • 0 avatar
      MAGICGTI

      CoreyDL, why don’t you hop off the computer and check one out in real life? You could easily make a valid point about the style of the interior, or the odd pictrgram of the climate control, but by saying the leather looks cheap completely discounts any point you make. I’ve been in them all working in the car business and I will gladly say the leather looks and feels expensive, smells like leather, and more importantly will wear like iron compared to most Japanese and American car leather.

      What’s wrong with the AWD system? Haldex isn’t a real AWD? What planet are we on?

      As to the CTS wagon, sit in both and drive them and come back with your opinion. I like the outgoing CTS but unless you’ve been living under a rock the new 2015 CTS is out and it’s larger car than its predecessor.

      BMW has more prestige and has its own merits but is significantly more expensive and has standard AWD. You can get a diesel which rocks. The Allroad has a nice interior but this isn’t 1999 where Audi interiors are awesome and everything else pales in comparison.

      As to leaving America, I can assure you that Volvo Cars NA has a newfound fire under their rears to come back in sales. There have been SERIOUS missteps in product focus in the past several years but the divorce from Ford was unceremonious. If we had a new XC90 by now like we should have and bothered to federalize the V40/XC40 we’d be rolling.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        So where do you work at Volvo?

        And you can’t say that my comment about cheap looking leather discounts any point I make, then say the leather looks expensive.

        I’m not going to go drive the V or the CTS because I’m not in the market for a wagon, and frankly neither of those cars are nice enough for me to consider.

        • 0 avatar
          MAGICGTI

          In the dealership ranks but left BMW, was previously at MB. For the record I will own anything and currently drive a 2011 328xi Touring manual and love it.

          As far as financial interest, I doubt my calling you out on a niche enthusiast forum is going to stir up sales. I’d never expect you to buy a Volvo but at least be transparent and admit you’ve never been in the new Volvos.

          I’ll say negative things too. It’s small, it’s $2800 more than the S60 with no additional equipment, the AWD is mated only to the legacy 2.5 inline-5 and 3.0T inline-6 with 6-speed automatic Aisins so the fuel economy doesn’t approach the 2.0T Drive-E. It would have been optimal for them to make AWD with the new engine/trans but they’ve got bigger plans than that. We’ll see how the future of electrification of rear wheels is for AWD but it makes me nervous for the brand.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            So it’s in your best personal and financial interest to say only positive things about Volvo. You may be biased.

          • 0 avatar
            tremorcontrol

            lol – I think someone must have run over CoreyDL’s dog with a Volvo or something (canine detection didn’t work I guess…). I’m pretty amazed at the negativity he has toward a car he’s never driven or even sat in.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I think the company calling itself Volvo cars speaks for itself.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            They tried to run over the dog, they
            FWD torque steered around it.

        • 0 avatar
          MB_star

          “frankly neither of those cars are nice enough for me to consider”, coming from the guy who has a G35/7 as an avatar. Lol.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Hey, you’re 100% incorrect. Good job.

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            Looks more like the M35/45 to me…

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            Isn’t it some sort of ancient pre-beak Acura?

          • 0 avatar
            MB_star

            Looks all the same in avatar size, call it whatever you want. The only descent Infiniti is the Q50 right now. But as a brand if Volvo or Cadillac are nice enough, shouldn’t Infiniti be also in that class? Through Acura in as well. Also if you live or go through more established/high income neighborhoods a Volvo is a common sight, Infiniti not really, those are common in the “other” neighborhoods.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            1) Established and high income are not the same.
            2) Decent
            3) Throw
            4) Can’t take you seriously now. Guess I’ll go back to my “other” neighborhood as I descent through town.

          • 0 avatar
            pb35

            I had an Infiniti and a Volvo in my garage at the same time back in 2012. The XC90 Sport interior blows my former G35x away with its paper-thin carpets and console made out of a recycled chalk board. I still have the Volvo and the leather is holding up great in its 7th year. The steering wheel and shift knob are soft and feel expensive.

            I traded the G for a Dodge. The Dodge is a nicer place to spend my commute IMO. My wife/kids are trashing the Volvo and it still looks good.

    • 0 avatar
      fredtal

      That center stack is not to my taste. The seats are the best I’ve ever sat in. I don’t remember a lot of hard plastics and generally thought the interior is well laid out. Volvo is kind of in a funny spot it’s not as luxurious or prestigious as some other cars, then I’ve found it to be several thousand less than those. Besides it has it’s own style that appeals to some of us, Chinese owners or not.

    • 0 avatar

      Yeah, I have to side with the others here and wonder if you’ve ever actually been in one of these. In addition to being comfortable, Volvo has always been known for using very nice quality leather. The plastics are actually quite good as well. I sat in a 3-series wagon and then almost immediately a V60 at the autoshow and the Volvo actually felt more premium by comparison. What’s more, have you actually sat in a last-gen CTS? The interiors were nothing to write home about (design was fine, quality left quite a lot to be desired), and the same for the TSX. As Alex clearly stated, in the materials department the V60 is more than competitive in this market.

      The comments about “real” AWD and “real” prestige seem a little rich coming from an Infiniti owner (I really like Infinitis, but lets be real here). By all accounts BMW’s AWD system is token, and meant solely to get the power to the ground more capably than actually make it a good winter vehicle. I don’t think Cadillac’s is any better.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Wonder no longer – I haven’t. But I’ve researched used Volvos extensively, and considered an S80 for a time. But their interiors just don’t age well. Including that fancy pants awesome leather. I have no doubt they’re comfortable as all get out, everyone says so. I can’t get over the colors of their more recent interiors – grey.

        I don’t like FWD-biased Haldex AWD. I like RWD-biased AWD systems. They’re better.

        But you don’t think Infiniti is considered a class above Volvo (and really Cadillac for that matter), alright. My car isn’t Haldex, and it’s not FWD-based. It’s not all grey on the inside, it has real wood, real leather, and overall a much nicer interior than this. And it’s 6MY older than this.

        • 0 avatar
          PonchoIndian

          I don’t like FWD-biased Haldex AWD. I like RWD-biased AWD systems. They’re better.

          Better because?

          They’re less efficient, is that better?

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Driving dynamics.

          • 0 avatar
            PonchoIndian

            on a track car sure, a street car, not a chance for the intended use of 99% of the public

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I’m still not clear on the voodoo for a transverse engine/transaxel having the ability to transmit power to the rear wheels. Its an overly complex system with I imagine more points of failure.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            So if driving dynamics don’t matter to 99% of people, let’s make all cars FWD with Haldex optional. We can all have a 93 Sixty-Special.

          • 0 avatar
            PonchoIndian

            “So if driving dynamics don’t matter to 99% of people, let’s make all cars FWD with Haldex optional. We can all have a 93 Sixty-Special.”

            Driving dynamics has a hell of a lot more to it than drive wheels alone. If you are truly concerned with dynamics you aren’t looking at an AWD car in the first place.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            “We can all have a 93 Sixty-Special.”

            Where is the waiting list I can sign up on?

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Hey there’s a REALLY nice black/black FWD 91 Fleetwood on Ebay, 70K miles for $3k BIN!

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Link?

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=181313196896&fromMakeTrack=true&ssPageName=VIP:watchlink:top:en

            OMG and it’s in PA just like you are!

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            OMG indeed its gorgeous and the right color. Rear is sagging though, prob needs air ride replaced, also needs pads.

            I asked the seller to post pictures of the transmission fluid color.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I wasn’t thinking these had air springs. I can’t tell it’s sagging! The fender cover throws me off.

            You just rarely see them in black/black in non-ruined ghettofied state, with a near-pristine interior. And a fair price.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I’m fairly certain Fleetwood was offered with air ride either standard or as an option. Ninety Eight was and Park Avenue may have been, although I’ve never seen a Deville of this vintage with air ride. Transmission fluid color will be telling, if it was dealer serviced in the last ten years the fluid should not be black. if its black the transmission becomes a point of contention.

          • 0 avatar
            PonchoIndian

            Nice Fleetwood. Like you said, rare to see them not beat to hell.

            They all had rear pneumatic struts, none of them had air springs.

            Most of the time the compressor solenoid gets sticky and stops working, or the level sensor fails. Both easy and cheap fixes.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          You also have the kick ass model of Infiniti, this model is based on the near compact S60 sedan. Granted the S80 isn’t in the same league as your M either, but it might be in one of a lesser model Infiniti. Brand to brand, all of these cars are sort of relative.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Why thank you ;).

            You also brought up one of my favorite things to mention about the Volvo brand. They continually misstep and put up a less equipped/smaller item but call the competition the larger/better equipped “size up” from the German and Japanese competitors.

            They want to put the S80 against the 5 and E, when it really is only relevant to the MKS and RL.

            They pitch their FWD/AWD items against RWD or AWD standard stuff from the competition. They’re always aiming too high.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            You’re quite welcome.

            Volvo does tend to to that, always a day late and a model short.

        • 0 avatar

          Again CoreyDL, I don`t know where you’ve gotten your info. For a long time, Volvo has been one of the most progressive in terms of available interior colours. Orange leather, brown leather, tan, beige, a mixture of calming natural colours generally. Volvo did brown leather before it was cool.

          If your fundamental issue with Volvo is FWD, that’s an entirely different issue that has nothing to do with much that you’ve mentioned so far.

          • 0 avatar
            kingofgix

            Funny reading all these comments. I sat in one a couple of days ago and it was by far the nicest interior I have ever been in. Loved the look and feel, and the seats are fantastic. Blows away my friends S4 and any BMW I have ever been in. And I really like the center console design. Very cool and simple to use. I am returning tomorrow for a test drive. It’s an exciting car for Volvo IMO.

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      While I agree on your interior comments (they remind me of a late 90’s Ford), other readers should know that you’re saying “looks”, theres a fine difference between commenting on appearance and outright saying “The interiors cheap and nasty!”.

      I will give them this though, with todays cars its nice to see a clean interior without a huge screen crying out for my attention. I hate the generic steering wheel though, and the mishaped box around the screen.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        That’s right, I am saying looks. It looks very underwhelming. And from a quality standpoint, their leathers don’t hold up well. Just look at a 4 year old S80, or similar vintage XC70, etc.

        • 0 avatar
          Ryoku75

          The closest thing I can go off of is my mothers Ford 500, but it has cloth seats that’ve held up fine. At the same time theres a LOUD clunk from the cars interior vents when the cars turned on or off.

          My 240s been fine though, apart from a few plastic bits like the door pockets.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            What’s the deal with her 500, compressor issue? Does she leave the fan on when she shuts the car off? I know that can lead to a surge in cars without adequately modern climate control.

            I have no problem with the 500/Montego/Taurus/Sable of those vintages, except the CVT part. The interiors aren’t brilliant, but they were mass market and never purported as luxury.

        • 0 avatar
          Ryoku75

          Beats me, the poor cars pretty neglected though, its rarely serviced. I’m surprised that it still works.

          The interior was nice initially, now theres crums, trash, stains, but at least she keeps the house clean.

    • 0 avatar
      Sam P

      An Infiniti owner is complaining about a cheap feeling interior. There’s irony here somewhere.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Which model have you felt? And I’ve clearly stated I mean looks already.

        • 0 avatar
          Sam P

          I test drove a CPO G37xS not too long ago.

          Great engine, decent slushbox, handles pretty well, interior is maybe Honda Accord level. Plastics feel cheap.

          With the VQ oil consumption issues I decided to pass and keep my 330i which is a known quantity. Seems like some of the 3.7 liter cars are starting to show this issue.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Well I’m glad I don’t have that engine if that’s true, but I had not heard of that issue.

            I agree the G interior isn’t up to par. It shows through that it’s inherently a Nissan underneath.

            That’s why in my opinion it’s usually better when buying from a premium Japanese marque to get the model which has no standard marque equivalent (at least not in the USA).

      • 0 avatar
        MB_star

        Lol, agree. Friend had the first gen FX about 8 years ago while I had the XC90 and stepping inside one from the other was night and day. The XC felt like a tank compared to the FX with its cheap sounding doors and even worse fake sounding exhaust, not to mention the interior. Not saying the XC was all that great either, but much better then the FX. The only thing the FX had was its exterior looks, but that wore off quickly.

    • 0 avatar
      chiefmonkey

      Maybe I’m crazy but I think the interior is best in class. Solid surfaces, amazing seats…based on a bare bones S60 T5 rental. Where I find BMW Audi and the others are increasingly cutting corners Volvo offers up an interior that looks premium in even the lowest trim level. In my opinion the only thing these cars DON’T have is the tight handling of the BMW…but the handling was hardly clumsy. Just more family sedan-ish.

      • 0 avatar
        MAGICGTI

        Please chiefmonkey, you are only allowed to comment on Volvos if you’ve never sat in one or driven the car ;)

        They don’t handle like the BMWs do, certainly. You did test the standard Touring suspension which is very comfortable but not terribly sporty. Also before 2014 they had 215/50-17 Primacys on 17×7 alloys, the tires being LRR and affectionately referred to as Prius tires. 2014 brought wider tires on 17×8 Pandora alloys in Premier and up trims.

      • 0 avatar
        MAGICGTI

        Please chiefmonkey, you are only allowed to comment on Volvos if you’ve never sat in one or driven the car ;)

        They don’t handle like the BMWs do, certainly. You did test the standard Touring suspension which is very comfortable but not terribly sporty. Also before 2014 they had 215/50-17 Primacys on 17×7 alloyes, the tires being LRR and affectionately referred to as Prius tires. 2014 brought wider tires on 17×8 Pandora alloys in Premier and up trims.

        • 0 avatar
          chiefmonkey

          I try to keep an open mind and the S60 was a genuine surprise. For a 2013 with 40 thousand rental abuse miles on it it felt tight as a bolt (or whatever the correct expression is), no noises or vibrations whatsoever. As for this V60…I’d say it looks nice. I suppose the big concern now is production shifting to China…a legit concern I guess. I don’t know the whole story there.
          As long as we’re talking about Volvos, the C30 r-design was a beautiful vehicle and I think it is a complete shame it didn’t sell more units.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Have driven multiple current-generation S60s. Can confirm that both the leather and the plastics are of quite high quality. Certainly better than an E90 (I haven’t driven a F30). Seats are also some of the most comfortable I can recall. Would seriously consider a S60 Polestar if I were in the market for a new car.

    • 0 avatar
      MB_star

      I wonder what the average income is for Volvo vs Infiniti drivers, and by the car you drive who takes you seriously?

      Also yes going through town not throw?

      Anyways what I find amusing is your bashing of these premium/sub-premium brands (Volvo and Caddy) as not good enough yet your own car is just as equally mediocre. I don’t see how Infiniti is better than either.

      And if you do go to more ESTABLISHED neighborhoods (by that I mean financially also) you will rarely find a Infiniti yet Volvos would be more common.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        You don’t even realize when I’m mocking your incredibly poor grammar. But you go on and repeat yourself. It’s helping.

        • 0 avatar
          MB_star

          Keep driving your Infiniti and maybe one day you too will graduate to the big leagues. I see you have nothing more to say that relate to the points I have made, instead you point out a grammatical error. I guess you have nothing more to say, go off and troll elsewhere.

          Maybe I’ll THROW you a bone someday.

          • 0 avatar
            zspy

            Sigh…I don’t understand the obsession with badge status – a nice car is a nice car. Anyone who is willing to judge someone else’s financial status on the basis of the car they choose to drive is too superficial to take on an unbiased view of the automotive industry.

            Granted, Volvo and Infiniti both know how to make a good car. Who cares if you can’t find an Infiniti in an “established” neighborhood. I drive through plenty of neighborhoods with houses far over $1mil and many of those homes have civic hybrids, sonatas, and even kia sorentos sitting in front. Not everyone making “big bucks” cares about driving an expensive car.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            His arguments don’t have much of a basis, and he called me a troll of all things – which makes it even more clear that he has no idea what he says. Just let him be, he’ll go away sooner or later.

          • 0 avatar
            darkwing

            The idea of using the Volvo — historically, the car of the aspiring adjunct professor — to rank average incomes involves so many conflations it makes my head hurt.

            Not that I have any problems with this particular Volvo, mind you; but I do have problems with mindless status signaling.

  • avatar
    Atum

    The V60, TSX SportWagon, and other wagons based on compact sedans bother me; they don’t increase the cramped passenger volume or raise the low ride height at all! All they do is add on a ridiculous amount of cargo space, causing some huge tail that flips around every time you maneuver.

    The V60 looks cool though, especially in that color and with a Georgia plate. :)

    • 0 avatar
      MAGICGTI

      Atum, Volvo has an XC60 to sell you. Don’t worry, the RDX/XC60/X3/etc. all handily outsell them and have great amounts cargo room and a higher seating position.

      A huge tail that flips around? It’s not a jointed bus, it’s 100 lbs or so of metal and glass in the rear. It actually improves weight distribution if you’re into, you know, driving.

      • 0 avatar
        Atum

        Yeah, but the problem is, my parents own a 2012 RAV4 Limited and a 2008 Rogue SL, and being 6’3″ with parents who are also tall, the backseats are tight. My mom almost bought a Venza, but because of the price, we had to go with a RAV4. The only time my parents haven’t owned a five passenger SUV since my 1999 birth was the 2003 Mazda MPV LX my mom had and the Grand Caravan they had for the first year of my life, but I don’t remember the latter. I’m excluding my sister’s Ranger since that only seats three.

        Compact crossovers are boring to me, since I’ve lived with them my whole life. That’s why vehicles like the Venza and the Prius v are fascinating. The low ride heights are only detrimental to my parents; MY big gripe is the lack of passenger space in luxury wagons, such as the one being reviewed here.

      • 0 avatar
        Ryoku75

        “It actually improves weight distribution if you’re into, you know, driving.”

        It also lowers acceleration and gas mileage, if you’re into, you know, driving.

        • 0 avatar
          MAGICGTI

          I think the quoted 0-60 in 6.1 is plenty quick, I doubt the S60 is much faster. The cD for the S60 is .28 and the V60 is .29 so again, not much difference.

          You’re right though, for a race car the sedan is better than a wagon, as TWR proved with the 850 in BTCC in the mid-90s.

          • 0 avatar
            Ryoku75

            What about city mpg? Thats where the extra weight takes its toll.

            Interesting that the sedans more aerodynamic though, with past Volvos the boxy wagons usually were slightly more aerodynamic.

            But, if you knew anything about Volvos racing history you’d correct me with the success of their coupes in rallying and Touring car racing.

      • 0 avatar
        LesM

        The only real benefit of “perfect 50/50″ weight distribution is that you run similar tire pressures and spring rates front/rear.

        What benefits driving feel is mass centralization, and you don’t get that by hanging a 100lb weight off the rear bumper.

        Lots of people confuse the two.

    • 0 avatar

      “Huge tail that flips around”.

      Atum, you need to actually drive a car before you can make statements like these.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    I for one don’t care for the styling, its a deformed mix of AMC Eagle and Mazda 6. If Kia, Scion, Ford, and Nissan can get away with boxy cars/cuvs I see no reason why Volvo can’t, its like they’re ashamed of their past image despite its success for its time.

    A pretentious coupe-look and fake exausts on a Volvo? Really? Another car that throws away space for style?

    Yes I know its a wagon and should appreciate it just for that, but I don’t, because its also a Volvo that doesn’t have the nerve to admit it.

    I’m not worried about the “Made in China” stickers, I’m just sick of Volvo trying to be a 2-bit Audi competitor.

  • avatar
    tankinbeans

    I’m curious if the connection with the Chinese, Geely, has resulted in any difference in build quality or reliability? I haven’t really paid much attention to Volvo and don’t know.

    Is it more a case of Chinese money, with Swedish engineering/manufacturing?

    I’m not trying to say anything bad about the Chinese, but am honestly curious and since I have no way to get direct access I have to ask around to the people who might be able to answer the question.

    • 0 avatar
      MAGICGTI

      As of now it’s Swedish engineering/manufacturing (well, European) but that will shift more to Swedish engineering/Chinese manufacturing for China market and then likely beyond. We’ll see how that plays out.

      Regarding service,the cars are holding up much better than the Ford years. Especially stuff like front-end work, the new cars just don’t wear that stuff out. The interiors are wearing very well too.

      There are a few gotchas on the new cars, most notable a windshield seal that can visibly fail and leak, destroying modules. Ugh.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Dear Volvo,

    I want to like you, I really do, and if I expected any car brand to look at the misgivings of other brands and say “we can do it better” its you. However you make the same mistakes as everyone else. Thick C-pillar? Check. Wheels too big? Check. Laughable cargo room? Check. Not owner serviceable? Check. Stupidity of losing a spare tire? Check. Really you can’t fit a 14in doughnut underneath or some such? C’mon guys. I’d call this another Saabaru because you basically built the previous gen Subaru Outback with a FWD only option, except I believe the Subbie came with a spare. If you really want to grow you have to be DIFFERENT than everyone else, not the same with a Swedish twist.

    Sincerely,
    Common Sense

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Same sausage, different spices.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Exactly. Why you Volvo over trendier brands?

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          I got nothing for you. You know of my love for Lincoln, and I feel the same way about that brand.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I genuinely like the Lincoln brand as well and for reasons you gave in the past the MkFlex sounds like a better product than the Ford Flex. The problem with both brands is they are trying to squeeze their product offerings into a generic cookie cutter package and completely ignore their history. If everyone else sells what you sell (for less) then why you over them?

            Heritage? You’ve ignored it for too long. Price? The competition can deliver the same product cheaper. Branding? What does Volvo or Lincoln mean anymore, does anyone outside of long time fans even give a hoot?

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            They mean nothing to most people.

            Both brands became worse for the betterment of the Ford and Jaguar brands. Lincoln and Volvo could never be better than Jaguar in the PAG, and Volvo became a Ford platform source.

    • 0 avatar
      MAGICGTI

      28, it’s the market unfortunately. You can get a donut spare underneath the cargo floor. 17″ wheels are standard so do not despair.

      Volvo could have split from the luxury game and spit out VW-like cars but without cheap labor it’s not going to work.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        That’s good to know a spare is available as Alex evidently was not provided with this information.

        “Volvo could have split from the luxury game and spit out VW-like cars”

        They would be bankrupt in 12-24 months if this were the case. What Volvo could do with the resources it has is attempt to better differentiate itself. Volvo was always known for its family haulers, why not become the desired brand for those and over-engineer your product accordingly? Safety is there, why not add size, comfort, and increased gadgets aimed at growing children. Just a thought as being Swedish and ostensibly quirky only gets you so far.

        • 0 avatar
          Ryoku75

          If you look at films, media, music, our love for the retro, you can see that we don’t live in very adventurous times. Volvo’s simply going with the flow.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Excellent point Ryoku. However between unsustainable debt, a phantom economic recovery, the potential of peak oil, and a Japanese nuclear disaster of epic proportions MSM refuses to discuss, s*it could get real very quickly.

        • 0 avatar
          Ryoku75

          Thats if the media covers it, where I live we’ve had thefts, vanishing kids, entire parking lots vandalized (broken windows, scratches), not a word shows up in the news.

          I do wholeheartedly agree with your premise on Volvo carving a niche for itself, but people today loose interest in cars too quick unless if you’re competing with company A, going hippy green, or going retro.
          Look at Codas electric cars which actually did a better job preserving their batteries in extreme climates vs the Nissan Leaf, plus Codas looked better if generic.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      A Swedish twist backed with Chinese money and a 5 year-old interior. The kids that were freshmen in high school when this interior was new are in college now.

      And still too expensive.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Alex I have a suggestion. In addition to your rear seat legroom tests, and your live human trunk size test, I propose a car seat test (at least on models directly aimed a hauling children).

  • avatar
    kenzter

    Did Volvo bring you to Palm Springs?

  • avatar
    Sjalabais

    Within short time, I see this wagon featured in every other Hollywood movie. It will roll up the wagon market.

    Or not.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      You noticed that too? It’s like EVERY semi-affluent family in a Hollywood movie has a Volvo wagon. Unreal!

      • 0 avatar
        Sjalabais

        That seems to have been the case for a very long time. 70s and, especially, 80s movies are awash with 240’s. And how better to represent today’s liberal middle class than with a XC70 or some kind of Subaru?

  • avatar
    philadlj

    I reckon many an 850/960/V70/V90 wagon owner has moved on to a whole new alphabet: RX/GX/LX, Q3/5/7, RDX/MDX, GLK/ML/GL, X1/3/5, SRX, Enclave, etc. etc.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    I’m iffy on Volvo’s long term prospects, and this car doesn’t make me feel any better.

  • avatar
    Stumpaster

    Look, a wagon is bought for utility. If this wagon has less rear space than the TSX, which I have, it’s a non-starter. TSX rear space is barely acceptable. My 40 lbs kid in child seat demands that we move the front seat so that his feet dangle in comfort. I already have some regrets about the rear space. So this Volvo is gonna have mediocre sales and everyone will be pondering why oh why. Because of this.

    • 0 avatar
      PonchoIndian

      No one buys wagons anymore anyway, so sales will never be great regardless of rear seat room. They didn’t aim this at a growing family.

    • 0 avatar
      MAGICGTI

      Their sales target is 4,000 units annually in the US. Not exactly a big target and, from what we’ve seen at the retail level, highly pessimistic.

      There is pent-up demand but we’ve sold nine in two weeks, which is ROLLING for Volvo in a traditionally slow January. Consumer feedback has been positive.

      The V60 has sold a few XC60s from people coming to see it, drive it, then want more space or higher seating position.

      Stumpaster, I would welcome more utility but I buy Euro wagons for the utility vs. the sedan counterpart. Dynamics and fuel economy of a sedan, better looking than a sedan, and much more useful. It’s more than just square cubes, the opening is larger and you can fit odd and bulky items that won’t work in a sedan.

  • avatar
    onyxtape

    Does Volvo give a Euro delivery discount like BMW? Or is it just free plane tickets to Stockholm and hotel?

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      If you were going to buy one anyway this equates to a free European trip, I can’t see this happening.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      They do give you a discount, but it is not as big as BMW gives. Looks to be ~$800 on a base V60, but it looks like they discount the options too, so it would add up. They DO give you two round-trip tickets and a hotel night though – that is worth about $2000, depending on when you want to go.

      BMW just discounts the car, the rest is on you. Works for me, I travel for a living so I have FF miles and hotel points to burn. When I picked up my BMW it cost me $80 to travel Boston-Munich in first class. Plus a gazillion FF miles of course.

  • avatar

    I love wagons. They really do just make more sense than other types of vehicles. This Volvo is gorgeous and aggressive looking.

  • avatar
    MLS

    Say what you will about Volvo’s prospects for long-term success, but their vehicles are pretty damned good looking. Which is to say, they’re nothing at all like Birkenstock sandals. That comparison is best saved for Subaru’s hideously crunchy wagon lineup.

  • avatar
    romanjetfighter

    Dear Volvo,

    Get rid of those reflector headlamps and have HID or projector lamps. It made the XC90 look way more modern, and I’m sure it’ll make this car look like a 2015 model instead of 2013.

    • 0 avatar
      MAGICGTI

      I agree, the active-bending HID lights are a standalone option at $900. Disappointed the launch cars weren’t equipped with them as they look and work wonderfully.

  • avatar
    ijbrekke

    I saw one of these at the LA auto show this year and loved it. But then I saw the price tag…

    This car could be great if I could cross-shop it against, say, a GTI. Sadly, it’s just too expensive for what it is.

    • 0 avatar
      MAGICGTI

      The GTI would be great if I could cross-shop it against a Sonic LT, but that makes as much sense as a V60 being the same price as a GTI. Why can’t it be priced less than its main competitor, the 328xiT?

  • avatar
    daver277

    All that money and it’s only got 2 pedals.
    Volvo has totally lost sight of it’s roots.

  • avatar
    CRConrad

    Alex writes: “The S60 on which the V60 is based is now 5 years old.”

    Yeah, well, the V60 itself is about five years old too — it’s only crossing the Atlantic now.


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