By on August 6, 2013

ford_f150_supercab_fx4_yellow_2004 (1)

I was recently driving down a street in my neighborhood and I saw, parked on the street, like everything was completely normal, a late-model Ford F-150 painted bright yellow. Bright. Yellow.

Since I live in an embarrassingly upscale neighborhood, the kind of neighborhood where people hold functions in their backyards, I can only assume this was towed away immediately. But it got me thinking: Why would Ford make this color?

Here’s what I mean. We all know the most popular car colors are silver, white, and black. In fact, I personally own three vehicles, and they’re all painted silver, despite a long search that involved, in each case, guidelines that strictly included the parameter: I do not want silver. (Actually, this isn’t entirely true. For my Nissan Cube, the parameter was: I do not want a Nissan Cube.)

With that knowledge in mind, why would Ford intentionally make it more difficult for their dealers to sell a car by painting it bright yellow? Think about it. Pretend you’re Ford. You live in Michigan. The roads are awful. The only way you can make a left turn is by first making a right turn. The average home costs as much as a pack of Milk Duds. Are you in this mindset?

OK, so you’re Ford, which means you want to sell as many cars as possible, because you’re paying those union workers either way. Shouldn’t you paint every single vehicle silver, black, or white, under the theory that they’ll appeal to the greatest number of buyers?

The answer to this question is obvious: no, you shouldn’t. Undoubtedly, color distribution is a bell curve, just like most things in life. That means for every 50 people who walk into a dealer and say “Please give me silver!” there are at least a few stragglers who actually arrived at Chrysler dealers in 2003 and said: “Oh, I just have to have that PT Cruiser with the wood on the sides!” Interestingly, those people are still around today, and so are all of their cats.

Screen Shot 2013-08-06 at 1.09.20 PM

But this begs an entirely different question, which is: Why would someone want to subject themselves to a weird color? Now pretend you’re the guy who has the yellow F-150. You’re manly. You’re signs on the windshield that said: “BUY ONE, TAKE AS MANY TWO-DOOR FOCUSES AS YOU WANT!” and you chose … yellow.

You have to be pretty secure with yourself to make this decision. You have to be OK with the fact that women will talk about you behind your back and say things like: Oh, I really liked Jim, but he picked me up for our date in a yellow pickup truck! And then they will giggle and get their nails done because this, I have learned from the media, is what women do.

More importantly, you have to be pretty financially secure to choose a yellow pickup. Because when it comes time to sell, you’re going to be screwed. You’ll be up against a thousand other trucks on AutoTrader.com, all of which are white, or silver, or black, or some other color that will not repel women but rather will make women want to climb inside and announce: Let’s go back to my place. (This is how truck people think.) So you’ll have to price your truck way less than everyone else, and beg potential buyers just to come check it out. Right?

Wrong.

I recently did some searching on AutoTrader and discovered that mileage, model year, and trim level are really the only things that determine asking price. Color is a distant 90th place, right after things like cigarette lighter placement and whether the clock is set properly. And while I don’t have selling price data, I have to assume these dealers have some idea what they’re doing when they set these prices.

You’d think this article would end there, with me suggesting that everyone should go buy a car in whatever color they want, because I’ve spent eleven minutes researching the topic and there’s clearly no downside to owning a pink Honda Pilot.

But it doesn’t quite end there. That’s because there’s still one group of cars where color matters. I am referring, of course, to the fickle world of luxury automobiles, which includes a lot of high-end brands and, occasionally, Acura. These people care about color. These people won’t buy pink. Or green. Or yellow. Or basically any color except for various shades of bluish gray and silverish black and whitish beige, all of which have names like Desert Sea Silver Metallic that were invented by marketing staffers who have never actually seen the color in person.

Screen Shot 2013-08-06 at 1.10.22 PM

That’s proven if you check out used luxury car listings on AutoTrader. As an example, I’ll turn to the Range Rover, which was recently voted the finest car ever made in a poll that included everyone in my home office. This is approximately how 2006 Range Rover pricing works:

Black: $25,000
Silver: $25,000
White: $25,000
Red: Will consider trades for an Oldsmobile Alero

And so, ladies and gentlemen, it turns out that color does matter – but only if you’re looking for a luxury car. If you want a non-luxury model, go ahead and do whatever you want. Unless, of course, that involves a PT Cruiser with wood paneling. Those have a four cat minimum.

@DougDeMuro is the author of Plays With Cars and the operator of PlaysWithCars.com. He’s owned an E63 AMG wagon, road-tripped across the US in a Lotus without air conditioning, and posted a six-minute lap time on the Circuit de Monaco in a rented Ford Fiesta. One year after becoming Porsche Cars North America’s youngest manager, he quit to become a writer. His parents are very disappointed.

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240 Comments on “Is It OK To Choose A Weird Car Color?...”


  • avatar

    As the owner & driver (& special orderer of) a yellow Chevy Colorado pick up yes, its okay. But realize if you do it you can never cheat on your wife (or girlfriend) unless you like walking. Everyone sees you coming/going and they know its you.

    • 0 avatar

      That could work if you are an exhibitionst and actually want people to see you coming. Just sayin’.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      Everyone sees you coming/going and they know its you.

      If you want to be anonymous choose a fleet white W-body Impala. 50% of witnesses will swear they saw a 2002 – 2005 Honda Accord.

      • 0 avatar
        jpolicke

        Or get a silver Camry and they’ll swear you were never there.

        • 0 avatar
          Luke42

          Seriously.

          I bought a gray Sienna in December, and it took months of driving around in it before my friends noticed.

          Including one friend who, I kid you not, works in the Toyota service department where I had the prepurchase inspection done. And, yes, we did talk to him while the vehicle was there.

          It is the ultimate stealth vehicle. The F117 and F22 ain’t got nothin’ on it, because they look cool when they’re standing still. My van, not so much!

        • 0 avatar
          redav

          The most invisible vehicle I am aware of is a contractor white F-150, reasonably beat up, with various tools thrown in back.

    • 0 avatar
      KixStart

      For sure. And, if you have kids, you should invest in a strangely colored, relatively uncommon car for them to use during their high school years.

      Like a yellow Peugeot 504. Or an eggplant ’74 SuperBeetle. Of course, you may have to drive it around yourself for a year or two, so people get to understanding that it’s your family’s car. However, once the friends and neighbors are programmed, you’ll get reliable reports on where your teen has been.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        My uncle went out to an auction from the local John Deere dealer who was getting rid of some of his fleet vehicles. My cousin Christopher’s first car? 1989 Chevy Celebrity wagon with a John Deere NASCAR paint scheme. That kid didn’t get away with anything during his high school years.

        http://www.bleedinggreen.com/GG2001/gg-08-06-01_files/race_jd23car.jpg

        The kid must have learned to love the attention because his current vehicle is an Orange Colorado crew cab.

      • 0 avatar
        FuzzyPlushroom

        In hindsight, choosing a Swedish-flag blue Volvo 244 as my first car may not have been the *most* practical decision… but at least there was one similar car around, so I had plausible deniability.

        Then, of course, I had to go and buy a green 740 wagon (good so far) with mismatched wheels and a bumper cover which fell off (wait, hold on, stop there) and crunch in the front end so that it ended up with a maroon hood (oh, great).

        Having a beige car with a handful of pre-applied sports team and dog breed stickers feels sort of unnatural now, even if the car is a Saab.

        • 0 avatar
          FuzzyPlushroom

          Oh, and at one point, the green-and-maroon wagon had purple wheels.

          I regret nothing.

          • 0 avatar
            wagonsonly

            …But as I recall from prior posts, you’re in New Hampshire – land of Saabs, Volvos, Subarus, pickups and precious little else. “No, that wasn’t me, it was someone from Keene State/Franklin Pierce/downtown Manchester/Brattleboro” sounds completely believable for that area!

          • 0 avatar
            FuzzyPlushroom

            Damn… you actually got my corner of New Hampshire, too.

            That said, Keene State is arguably too liberal/concerned with the purchase of smokable plant material for cars, Brattleboro is solid Subaru country, and Rindge (home of Franklin Pierce Col… err, University) is a conservative town that happens to have a college in it… so it wasn’t /that/ anonymous, for better or worse.

  • avatar
    twotone

    Sure, if you don’t care about resale value or time to sell. It all depends upon the car. I would not buy a yellow BMW, but I would buy a yellow Lamborghini (or any color for that matter). Porsches came in some pretty ugly colors over the years — puke green, shit brown, slime yellow, etc.

    • 0 avatar
      healthy skeptic

      >> puke green, shit brown, slime yellow, etc.

      Wow, the marketing department really screwed up with those names.

      They could at least given them names like Shit Brown Metallic.

    • 0 avatar

      I would say that yellow for a Lambo is actually the norm – sort of like silver on an Audi!

    • 0 avatar
      JuniperBug

      I think that the old Porsches looked great in those colours, although a black 930 is close to rolling art, too.

      Whether it be colour or some other thing, I think that having a ride that tastefully stands out a little makes my world a better place. Whether it was my white ’92 Jetta 2 door in the early 2000s, my repainted blue, de-stickered TL1000S, my two-tone pearl white VFR VTEC with matching hard cases, or my slightly-lowered silver NB Miata on subdued aftermarket 15s, I’ve always had a ride that when people I knew saw it, they knew it was unmistakenly mine.

      I, for one, loved the idea of Jack’s lime-green Audi. Conversely, I’m not a fan at all of people’s cars who’ve got complicated, poorly-done paint schemes and random flotsam tacked on, to the point it looks like a rolling Easter egg.

    • 0 avatar
      rem83

      I have worked hard to try to find a yellow BMW 850ci, with little luck. I did locate one (a 6 speed no less!) a few years ago, but it was originally dark metallic green and still had some lingering accident damage. Not all BMWs look inappropriate in yellow.

  • avatar
    PlookStick

    I hope so, because I have two…

    One is a Wrangler in “Sienna Pearl” which is kind of a brownish dark red.

    The other is a Mustang in “Windveil Blue” which is like a silvery-blue.

  • avatar

    …and the reason trucks will always be available in weird colors is this: commercial fleet sales. The highway department buys hundreds of yellow trucks a year, if Ford can sell a few to losers with “Pussywagon” keychains (me again) that’s just gravy.

    • 0 avatar
      NoGoYo

      Where can I find a dealership that will sell me an Omaha Orange Silverado?

    • 0 avatar
      Windy

      Exactly right. Fleet sales dictate a lot of strange colors like school bus yellow and plumbing contractor red/brown.

      But I do wonder at the lack of choice that many makers seem to have settled on in recent years. In many lines for example the dark greens have vanished along with real choice in interior shades. Red for example is unseen for car inside trim in most lines these days. The other day I saw a knock out restomod 40s Packard that had a green leather interior and was painted in a beige that had a hint of light green in it …. It was stunning and the green cast to the beige was so subtle that you had to look twice to see it the dark green leather of the interior really set it off and made you look and see that light touch of green in the beige. There was also a very fine hand painted pin stripe in dark green that called attention to the lines of the car.

      With modern high tech robot painting lines that can change the paint between each car in the line of production the ability exists to provide from the manufacturer any color of car a buyer might want for cars that are ordered. Dealers will keep buying the “safe” shades for sale from stock of course. But as for offering a large choice for inside color; I do not see an easy way for that to happen in a volume make of car… And of course that limited choice of interior color will to some extent decide what will be on offer for the outside paint….

      Many years ago in the 60s, I knew a woman who worked in advertising… Every 3 years she would buy a Lincoln continental that was 2 years old her choice would be dictated by its inside fit out color and she would then have reprinted in a color she liked… It was different every time…. I wonder what she did when the iconic 60s Lincoln design ended. She picked some very interesting colors including one year a light purple that I never saw on any other car before or since.

      • 0 avatar
        brettc

        Chevy has a nice dark green metallic called Rainforest Green on the 2014 Cruze. Really nice colour in person (at least to me). My wife doesn’t like it. She says I like it because it reminds me of my ’85 Jetta. But green is just a rare colour now, and it’s unfortunate. VW used to have several green shades even in the 2000s but now you don’t get it for a choice. I applaud the companies that make crazy colours available, like the Habernero orange from Toyota and the pink that’s available on the Chevy Spark. It’s nice to have choices aside from gray scale, red, white and blue.

      • 0 avatar

        When the CLS class was first introduced, I fell in love with the British Racing Green model. Gorgeous car. Unfortunately, Mercedes lost their courage :( and now they have almost no color choice for the CLS at all :(.

        I have a tan (looks gold to me ) E320. I love the color because I can always find it easily in parking lots. I could never have a white or silver car since I would never be able to find it in the Aventura Mall parking lot :(.

        Fortunately, Tesla has a huge color choice for their Model S, probably because they make all their cars to order. Including British Racing Green.

        D

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          I saw a BRG Tesla Model S in person a few weeks ago in a wealthy suburb. It was just jaw-droppingly beautiful, and attracted a crowd of onlookers the entire time it was parked. The best color I’ve seen by far.

          • 0 avatar

            Thanks for the report, glad to hear it looked great, since it’s tough to tell from just a paint sample.

            I’ve seen five. Two were red, two were black and one was silver. So Mercedes’ color choices have held up well as being what the public wants. I’m looking forward to seeing more unusual color schemes in the future.

            Incidentally, I’ve seen three Fisker Karmas, two Volts and zero Leafs. I haven’t seen a Karma or a Volt in a month or so and in the last couple of weeks I’ve been seeing more Teslas. Looks like they are doing just fine here in South Florida, one of the world’s most exotic car friendly markets.

            D

      • 0 avatar
        olddavid

        I know it is considered de rigeur to piss and moan about the dealer body, but with profit margins flattened by the wide availability of invoice pricing, the days in stock could mean the difference between profit and loss. Many vehicles used to have “X” days free flooring, so in an ideal world, the car is gone before the inventory charge commences. Therefore, taking a chance on an odd color combo, or an unusual option package is not smart use of your vanishing dollars. Previously there were demo allowances (that was payment for cars your staff drove for you born after 1985), daily rental subsidies, etc. that you could use to order an unusual package and take a chance with it’s uniqueness. No more. I’m glad I’m out of the business now, as it no longer resembles the one our family started in 1958, and I continued in for 30 years. Your current transaction starts at invoice and attempts to go up, whereas before you would start at retail and work your way down. I cannot imagine an ethical single-line and point operation making a decent living today. Believe it or not, I blame the malaise in the dealer body on the vestiges of a management style with roots in the 1950’s called system sales. The “consultants” from a company called Hall-Dobbs Management came to our house when I was in primary school with a proposal to increase our profits and sales. My most vivid memory is of my angry Father, after “encouraging” them to leave, saying “I’ll quit the business before I’d operate like that”. By 1975, it wasn’t easy to find a large city “straight” sales house. The multiple salesmen, lost trade keys, back and forth with the sales manager and a separate finance office were all system “innovations”. I spent the last 15 years of my career trying to instill dignity and honesty as a “system” to reclaim the public trust. Imagine a salesman competent enough to handle your transaction from greeting to delivery – what a concept! I do not know what the dealer development guys are doing today, but judging by the comments given by people who read the blogs I do, they’re missing the target by a wide margin. With the public so gunshy and money still relatively tight, why not take a chance with your dealer body and initiate a new operating style throughout the company – at all dealerships? Maybe ordering a yellow truck will not be seen as such a radical idea. Possibly with a new sense of professionalism, Doug might go back to Porsche? Nah. You seem like you’re having too much fun.

        • 0 avatar
          Dimwit

          I think you should be writing some articles on here!

        • 0 avatar
          Domestic Hearse

          Old David,

          I second that thought. A few articles please. From a former dealer principal.

          You know what stands between driving that old car a while longer and getting a new one (for most people)? The dealer experience. It has become akin to getting a root canal at the dentist.

          How’d we get there? What was it like before? How do we fix it for both the consumer and the retailer? How do we restore cooperation between the OEM and dealer body, instead of the antagonism that exists today?

          Think – cars have never been better than they are today, yet the system of acquiring them in most instances is worse than ever, once your foot steps on the car lot. That’s a huge disconnect.

        • 0 avatar
          wstarvingteacher

          Old Lee thinks old David rocks.

          As an air conditioning contractor most of the people I fired were fired because of dishonesty. We used to do honesty and courtesy calls after we had been someplace. When servicemen were trying to sell things on the side or charge cash on the side, it normally showed up. As a retired sailor I decided that wasn’t how I wanted to live. Either cheating people or firing people.

          I became a starvingteacher because of this as much as anything. Still have a license and still (barely) do jobs for friends and family. The last call was because someone tried to sell a neighbor a little electronic thermostat (that didn’t exist) to tell the room thermostat to turn off. If that sounds like bs, you are very perceptive. I think I could stay busy if I advertised free second opinions. Instead, I am about to let the license lapse.

          Honesty has it’s place. That place should be everywhere. It isn’t.

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          +3 What a great perspective, would love to know more

        • 0 avatar
          56BelAire

          Great post ___David. I was in “the business” from about ’65 to ’81 and I concur 100%.

          Back in the day I worked for a family run Buick dealer and we salesmen did the entire deal alone. From intro, to demo ride, to close, to finance qoute, to printing the contract, to getting the sold car from storage yard to prep, to aftersale, to delivery……the salesmanager would actually get pissed off if we asked him to TO a deal.

          Incidentally, still in business today, same family.

    • 0 avatar
      mkirk

      This. The Georgia D.O.T. buys a ton of yellow F-150s

    • 0 avatar
      Wraith

      Yeah, a yellow full-size pickup truck isn’t unusual to me, as there’s an ag-related company in the region that has/had all their trucks in bright yellow, not unlike the article pic. (Though these were 90s-era Silverados, mostly.)

      Maybe not a color I’d buy myself, but I could see people buying decommissioned fleet vehicles in less-common colors, either due to personal taste or getting them cheap.

    • 0 avatar

      Check out the RAM site you get an additional 5 or so colors going with a cab and chassis I’m guessing for fleet sales.

    • 0 avatar
      racebeer

      PW60 … if memory serves me right, the “Pussywagon” was a Dodge Ram.

  • avatar
    gmichaelj

    Ford painted the F-150 sport truck YELLOW because it LOOKED GOOD. I’m sure they had no problem selling them. Note the truck is two-tone.

    • 0 avatar
      epsilonkore

      AMEN. The yellow F-150 looks GREAT pulling that boat, or running along the beach. Would it look right on a hunting expedition in a dark green forest? Probably not. Does it look right in a neighborhood full of “lets all look alike and pat each other on the back for being exactly the same shade of grey”… probably not. Add to that the fact that if you have the guts to drive a yellow F-150 into a grey-borhood, you probably LOVE ruffling feathers.

      Different strokes for different folks. Its part of human expression, (even the kind we may not like) and it makes life worth living.

      • 0 avatar

        I disagree, you absolutely want that color on an expedition vehicle if you go forest. The whole point is to make it easier to find. As for the game, it’s either colorblind like deer, or needs walking to it anyway, like turkey.

        • 0 avatar
          360joules

          Pete, you are so right! I grew up with friends who learned the hard way not to drive a brown truck on a forest road in deer season.

        • 0 avatar
          PCP

          Especially if your hunting mate is Dick Cheney…

        • 0 avatar
          epsilonkore

          I agree with your logic, though my experience with local hunters does not reflect such practical notions. After catching multiple trespassers on my parents wooded property over the decades, I referenced what they drove in my example. Some were brown, tan, green or grey… there was one that was painted in a glossy perfect realtree camo. Perhaps it was painted that way to keep US from seeing them trespass, rather than a functional hunting benefit. The prey may be color blind, but I am not. I guess West TN is full of potential trespassing hunters since I rarely see brightly colored vehicles that are dedicated “hunting” vehicles. Either that, or they just have to scream “This is my Huntin’ vehicle… cant you tell?! It looks like the forest!”

      • 0 avatar
        69firebird

        Vivid yellow Mazda Protege5 here.No other color corners faster.It’s been tested.

        • 0 avatar
          56BelAire

          In the past week I’ve seen a new Beatle Convert and a Prowler….. both in bright yellow and both gorgeous.

          Incidently back in the mid-70s I worked at a Chrysler/Plymouth store and had a Yellow Cordoba with T-Tops and a Saddle Leather interior as a demo for 6 month…..sweet ride.

    • 0 avatar

      Haha. The anger. Actually, I don’t disagree.

  • avatar
    genuineleather

    Leasing a car is a perfect opportunity to get a nutso color; it doesn’t affect your payment, and it’s the manufacturer’s problem when you turn it in. Just saw a 750LI for sale in laguna seca blue.

    I like oddball colors, yellow among them: my first car was a butter-hued Mercedes W123.

    • 0 avatar

      So true. If I wanted a wild color, I would ONLY lease. When the automakers calculate lease rates, it’s all done by averages – so they know for every 20 black or silver cars that may be $50 ahead of their residual estimate, there will be 1 or 2 army green ones that will be $200 below.

  • avatar
    Bluliner

    If you’re making the payments, you can choose whatever color you’d like. That’s capitalism for ya. But if you’re planning to sell your car in a few years time, a unique color may make that difficult. Silver, beige, or the speckled black that looks like a bass boat when the paint is clean? That’s a bit boring in my view. Some don’t like to stick out and cause attention on themselves…some want that…others are oblivious.

    Anything is better than one of those “coexist” bumper stickers though.

    Me? I’ve owned yellow, orange, red, etc. cars in my past. Really need to check off “Key-Lime Green” off my bucket list sooner rather than later.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      REMAIN
      CALM
      **
      PAINT
      YOUR CAR
      SILVER

    • 0 avatar
      Freddy M

      I recently saw a car with one of those Coexist bumper stickers on it. But it also had one of those christian fish emblems that was modified with feet to be a darwin emblem. Kind of contradicting each other, aren’t they?

      My car history has been colourful as well. Of course, I have to reach into my family car history going back to when I was younger, but nonetheless it includes Blue, Maroon, Grey, Dark Blue, Maroon, Yellow, Black, Red, Lime Green. I just need white and plum to complete the list. Won’t touch silver even if it would cure me of cancer however.

    • 0 avatar
      carlisimo

      Did you not read the article?

  • avatar

    Money doesn’t buy happiness, but it does allow a person to be more of the person they really are.

    I’m certain many people hate the color choices and would prefer “their color” if possible to mix paints on their whim. It’s so funny watching Arab oil barrons buying and DEFACING Veyrons and Aventadors with gold plating/ chrome plating and ruining the interiors with ugly materials. All the money int he world and THEY THOUGHT it looked cool…

    • 0 avatar
      Ubermensch

      “Money doesn’t buy happiness, but it does allow a person to be more of the person they really are.”

      Ummmm, what?

      • 0 avatar

        Believe it or not I kind of agree. The more money have the more you can do whatever the hell you want and not worry what people think. With less money you are very much beholden to others and to conformity. Look at the weird crap celebrities wear/drive/do.

      • 0 avatar
        Nick_515

        I am confused too. I think BTSR meant to say: “Money allows a person to express, nay develop, their individuality.” This is interesting, because it contradicts Baruth’s piece on manufacturer and dealer conflagration in rendering silver the dominant color of German luxury (look up the series of his lime green A5). In BTSR’s case, poor suckers lack choice, not luxury buyers.

        But then he contradicts himself a second later by seemingly disapproving of Arab oil barons’ choices. Haven’t figured that one out yet.

        • 0 avatar

          Notice that most closeted gay celebrities “come out” as soon as they get rich and famous – but lived tortured lives before the cash.

          MONEY allows you to do whatever you want to do because just about everything has a price tag. However, “Happiness” is something you can’t buy.

          Steve Jobs had more money than I’ll ever see in my entire lifetime, but he’d trade every dime of it to be ME right now.

          Cause I’m alive.

          Same goes for Stephen Hawkings.

    • 0 avatar
      Silvy_nonsense

      Being who you are is all fine and good until I’ve got to look at some ugly mystic purple monstrosity parked in the driveway across the street from my house. If you buy a car in a weird color, that’s fine, but please park it in the garage.

      • 0 avatar
        epsilonkore

        I have a neighbor with a purple 240SX Nissan Silvia that pisses off a lot of neighbors with his loud aftermarket exhaust and its post apocalyptic battered appearance (looks like he drifted the back end into a concrete bridge). It hasnt seen wax/buff in years. If it was a pristine purple 240SX, with tasteful exhaust, I doubt he would have to park it in the garage to prevent the neighbors complaints. Moral of the story? You have an out of trend color on an otherwise desirable car? Better keep it quiet and immaculate!

        • 0 avatar
          mnm4ever

          So do you think the neighbors would like his car better if it was in exactly the same condition it is now, but painted a nice grey, silver, or beige???

  • avatar
    nine11c2

    I owned a 911 Carrera 2 in Eggplant. As in just darker than Barney. With a tan leather interior and Kinesis Supercup 3 piece wheels. Awesome car…did I take some abuse for the color? Yes. But haters be hating…

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    I think it all depends on the car, or even who you are and how you earned the money to buy the car. I’ve seen a couple of pink Hummer H2s with the “Mary Kay” sticker on the rear window, my first thought being, how much lipstick and eyeliner did that women sell to earn that pink Hummer? Perhaps having a pink Cadillac would inspire a hit song. A guy who distributes treated lumber might not want his pick-up in anything BUT yellow, but the guy that got the PT Cruiser with the wood paneling… well, let’s hope he got a good deal

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    I think the RX pictured is Millennium Silver Metallic. That’s what my GS is painted.

  • avatar
    racer-esq.

    Does anyone have any experience with this stuff. I saw this in a pop-up ad and it seems like a good way to do a not suitable for resale color:

    https://www.dipyourcar.com/pages.php?pageid=48

    Apparently it just peels off when you are done with it.

  • avatar
    Flybrian

    As someone who acquires and retails late-model used cars for a living, let me tell you – color DOES matter and bullshit, off-the-wall, how-long-was-the-line-of-blow-this-guy-did-before-looking-at-the-brochure combinations DO sell if A) you buy the car cheap enough and B) it somewhat looks right in some fashion.

    Recent hits:
    2012 Mustang Premium coupe – originally blue, resprayed pearlescent PINK, but done professionally and thoroughly. Sold in 7 days for full retail.
    2005 Mustang Convertible – red/red leather (a rare 1-yr combo apparently)- sold in two week.
    2005 Colorado Ext Cab Z71 – Sunburst Orange 4×4. Purchased by a gentleman 250 miles away because of the color. On lot three weeks.

    Recent misses:
    2008 BMW 328i – low-miles, loaded, nav, etc. Montego Blue with Dakota Brown Leather. Obviously a special order color. Looked okay on Simulcast, terrible in person. Barely broke out after 4 months on the lot.

    So yeah.

    • 0 avatar
      healthy skeptic

      I was shopping for used 335i’s recently. I found a 2007 335i which had a lot of what I was looking for at a great price, but it was Montego Blue. That color looks good under a lot of lighting conditions, but it totally blows up under direct sunlight, to a sort of dazzling neon. I hate the boring monochromatic trend as well, but Montego Blue was a little much for me.

      In the end, I found a 2011 335i in Deep Sea Blue that cost nearly twice as much. Of course, it was four years younger, with half the mileage and more options that I cared about, but the funny thing is that color undoubtedly played a big role in my decision. Maybe I’m crazy…

      And as far as it goes, I love Deep Sea Blue. It’s not as crazy as Montego, but when I went to test drive it at the dealer, it stood out beautifully among all the black/white/grey/sliver Bimmers on the lot.

    • 0 avatar
      Nick_515

      I think that brown on blue combo will give me a headache just thinking about it. But then again, what interior do you get in a Montego Blue exterior?!? I am not fond of black interiors, unless it has silver trim in the case of the 3 series.

  • avatar
    crtfour

    My all time favorite automotive color is dark green. With my last 2 vehicles, I specifically looked for that color and ended up getting (I think) a better price because of the color. I’ve heard the phrase “no sale green” kicked around a bit.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      I actually owned a car painted dark green by the factory. It was a 1962 Mercedes 220, and I bought it in 1969, trading in a very thirsty ’62 Buick LeSabre that was light blue. It cost me $450 plus the Buick. The dealer was happy to be rid of the four-speed column shift, and get an automatic – ANY automatic – in trade.

  • avatar
    bumpy ii

    There is the obvious example of Baruth’s green Audi.

    I know someone who actually *factory-ordered* a Saturn Ion in that bizarre first-year-only gaudy yellowish green. My theory is that they were at least partially color-blind.

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      Yeah, the whole world told me that it was resale poison. Then I sold it with 39,000 miles on it for three grand below dealer invoice new AND THEY WERE FOREVER SILENCED*

      * by which I mean they all called me a liar

      • 0 avatar
        FractureCritical

        damnation! I wanted to be the first to rag on Jack’s pimp-green S5.
        *Ahem* Audi has quietly reinstated their Exclusive program a few months ago, so if you wanted to special order another one….

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          “Audi will do a car in any color on this page, for an extra 2500 pounds.”

          “That’s just a spectrum.”

          “Oh, sir would like his car in visible light, would he?”

          LOL

    • 0 avatar

      1gen Neon used to come in a similar color, that Chrysler called “Nitro-yellow Green”. There was a national club “NYG Neon”, a subdivision of Neon Enthusiasts.

      P.S. http://www.nygclub.com/

  • avatar
    ljwhitmire

    Live a little people! I bought a 2001 Solar Yellow IS300. It was quite the celebrity in our area
    for several years. It was like a 1 car parade. I have people come up to me and thank me for having the marbles to buy something other than black/grey/white/beige/etc.

    After that dies I went with a custom painted Metallic Burnt Orange IS350. I never have trouble finding my car!

    I’m sure it depends on what your tastes are and if you have any tastes at all. Don’t worry about resale value. Just buy the car that flicks your bic and be happy. I don’t think that people on their death beds ever wish they had purchased more beige in their lives.

  • avatar
    hans007

    i own an estoril blue 3 series.

    i have seen 1 other car in this color in los angeles in 8 months. maybe itll be slightly harder to sell, but somehow im doubting it. but at least while i own it itll look cool.

    i currently have actually had 2 loaner cars for a couple firmware issue, and one was plain black on black and the other one was something that looked like bronze with a puke beige interior. i’d have mine over those 2 ever single time.

  • avatar

    You forgot Gold for Rovers. Perfectly acceptable.

    But, my ex used to swear the world would be a happier place if everyone’s car was painted like the cars in Edward Scissorhands.

  • avatar
    Beerboy12

    So, the more wealthy amongst us, or at least those with better credit ratings (Temporarily or not) seem to have stronger reasons to remain “low key”. I guess that is because they wish to avoid the attention of criminals or they are criminals themselves and wish to avoid the attention of the cops.
    The less you have to hide, the more colorful you can be.
    My favorite color for a car is green.

  • avatar
    mnm4ever

    I hate silver cars. Also most shades of grey. White is ok, black is always good just because it looks good even though its hard to clean. But everyone buys silver or grey and its just so boring. I like cars that are unique… yellow, orange, red, bright blue (no not dark blue thats just like grey, a real blue).

    We own a yellow MR2, a silver CRV, a black GTI, a white Hyundai and a bright turquoise blue Civic. The Hyundai is the embarrassing car that belongs to my oldest daughter and she hates nice cars because she hates to keep them clean or worry about them at all so it doesn’t really count. I am constantly considering having the CRV painted red or blue or orange or yellow, or maybe flat black rhino liner and putting big tires on black wheels on it just for fun. Yellow is the perfect color for an MR2 and black is perfect for a GTI.

  • avatar
    redliner

    These loud colors exist for one reason only. So that the manufacturers can have a dramatic color for auto shows, advertisements and dealer demos during the first year or two. Then the color is promptly canceled and replaced with some shade of gray.

    • 0 avatar
      Japanese Buick

      Pretty much nailed it here. I saw so many cool colors of NC MX-5s on the road that I was surprised and disappointed by the slim selection available by the time I bought my 2012. I got the dark blue color and the dealer had to trade with another state to get that one.

  • avatar
    Quentin

    I simply don’t like most odd colors on most cars. 911 GT3 RS? Oh yes, give me baby blue! Volkswagen Golf? Eh, white will do. I prefer a wilder looking interior to a wilder color exterior. I loved the black/gray/red plaid in my white GTI. The new IS350 F sport in bright white with a red interior? Yes, please! My car history is pretty dull as far as exterior colors. 1993 Impreza – plum, 2001 Impreza 2.5RS – silver, 2005 Mini S – white, 2007 VW GTI – white, 2010 4Runner – white, 2012 Prius v… white. Given better used car availability, I’d have gotten my 2.5RS in white. I think most cars look best in white, I guess.

  • avatar
    kkop

    Dodge Challenger in ‘Header Orange’. Doesn’t get much more orange than that. Wife and I were taken aback when we first saw it on the lot; now we love it. Dodge has many wild (and sometimes temporary) colors: Hemi Orange, Plum Crazy Purple, etc.

    Also: easy to locate car in full parking lot. I will never own a boring color again.

    • 0 avatar
      Pinzgauer

      +1 on the Header Orange.

      I also love the Plum Crazy Challenger. I cant tell you how many White and Black Challenger R/T’s and SRT’s I saw for sale when I was shopping them. I cant imagine buying that car in a boring color, it just doesn’t fit.

    • 0 avatar
      hubcap

      Dodge has a great selection of colors. It’d be nice if other manufacturers offered more of a selection. How can you have two white, two black, three silver/grey yet no green, blue, or orange.

      Here’s a link to some colorful BMWs.

      http://www.autospies.com/news/Dream-Display-Of-BMWs-In-RARE-And-HOT-Colors-70120/

      Such a refreshing alternative to the rolling gulag of today’s roads. I’ll take an M3 please… in blue.

    • 0 avatar
      nrd515

      I wanted my Challenger in Detonator Yellow, but the only one in 200+ miles was at a dealer my guy wouldn’t trade with, because of BS that they pulled when doing a trade ( like not accepting the car traded for totally bogus reasons), my next choice was TorRed, but the ones that color all had sunroofs, so I passed, and took Hemi Orange. I’ve had a couple of silver cars and I got tired of them in about a year. Red never gets old, nor does yellow (A potent yellow, not the yellow that Chrysler put on the 300 a few years ago), or a Hemi or Header Orange, or the Petty Blue color. I like Header Orange, I see a Challenger that color a few times a week.

      No more boring colors for me either.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Please choose color. My old F150 may be “Arizona Desert Beige” but it shares driveway space with a 2005 “Orange Fusion Metallic” Pontiac Vibe and an “Aged Burgundy” 1967 Mustang. Choose color people!

    My local Dodge dealer had a crayon box of Darts lined up on the state highway. I really admired him for that. It was like a psychedelic ROYGBIV.

    • 0 avatar
      jpolicke

      I think Ford actually called it Vintage Burgundy. Only recall this because I had a grandfather who got a ’63 Country Squire (and he always had Squires) in that color. Don’t ask me how I remember this trivia.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        I just looked it up. You’re right. (no plans to paint it now, I’m enjoying the patina.)

        • 0 avatar
          jpolicke

          My dad also has a ’69 Galaxie in that color. After that time, the color dropped off the face of the earth. Too bad, because it looked rich all waxed up, especially with a black vinyl roof.

          • 0 avatar
            Lorenzo

            I suspect the problems GM had with similar color shades in the 1960s may have turned people off the grape hues. The GM paints faded badly, and a lawsuit, if I remember correctly, failed to hold GM accountable. Anybody else remember something like that?

  • avatar
    cpthaddock

    Let’s not forget folks who perceive a restricted color spectrum (formerly color blind). I have a friend with an Integra that is metallic Barney in color and to him, it looks silver grey.

    If we were all “mainstream” it would be a very boring world. We’d never get to wonder what kind of nutbag it takes to drive a banana yellow Hummer, or what makes some hairy gorilla wear leather chaps and a thong to their local Target on Saturday morning.

    • 0 avatar
      Summicron

      If I ever see the new Avalon in “summer metallic rain” it will test my inner Scrooge.

      One thing about weird colors: there are people like my wife who don’t care about car-aesthetics but hugely desire something easy to find in a parking lot full of identically shaped and sized blobs.

      Sorry, cpthaddock, clicked wrong box.

      • 0 avatar
        cpthaddock

        No worries :)

        In the days when Hertz used to hide the remote for the Taurus in with the spare wheel, the oddly colored examples were highly sought after among road warriors tired of playing “which is my Taurus” in parking lots.

  • avatar
    Brian E

    To me the really weird colors are in the commercial carpet / dirty bathroom tile / fresh bodily fluids spectrum. Those shades seem to be distressingly popular amongst Toyota owners and lately amongst luxury car makes searching for new varieties of off-silver to sell to the color-allergic crowd. My own car is a particularly fetching shade of non-metallic red. I would happily consider a car in yellow, orange, green, bright blue, purple, or any other color. Life is short. Don’t drive bland.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    I once owned a Goldwood yellow 1964 Chevy Impala SS convertible – avatar over on Curbside Classic.com. So did my wife years before I met her!

    My question of the day would have to be: Why NOT order a weird color?

    One issue though – the yellows most often available aren’t near as classy as that GM Goldwood – yes, Wifey and I always look. The yellows used on cars now either looked washed out or looks like a school bus. In fact, 10 years ago, Ford offered a yellow called “School Bus Yellow” YUCK.

    My 2012 Impala? Yes, it’s Ashen Gray… Admittedly it does look superb in that color, especially with the pinstripe and the emblem & name on the lower front doors. Only one in town like it.

  • avatar
    lon888

    Honda tried for 2 years to market “euro yellow” – a horrible gold/yellow/orange something or another color. It was a major flop – guess who brought back that terrible mess – Ford! Ack!

  • avatar
    bball40dtw

    Hey, my house costs at least as much as a family size bag of Twizlers. I do live in a nicer suburb of Detroit though.

  • avatar
    David Walton

    Doug,

    You have egregiously overlooked/forgotten the most beautiful car/color combination of all time.

    Maritime Blau 964 RS

  • avatar
    gslippy

    When I bought my former 05 xB, I came very close to getting the Release Series 2.0, which was Solar Yellow. Instead, I got Camoflage (deep green), and I’m glad I did.

    As a Leaf driver, one color I won’t have is that weak ‘EV blue’ offered by Nissan, GM, Ford, and Toyota, especially with the 12-inch-high ‘ZERO EMISSION’ banner on the doors. It just screams ‘science project’.

    On the other hand, our beater 01 Elantra is silver, just like a billion others of its kind – it’s the perfect getaway vehicle. I won’t have silver again.

    • 0 avatar
      eggsalad

      That’s funny! Two Camo xB drivers posting in a row??

      • 0 avatar
        sco

        The Release Series of Xbs featured a different unusual color each year: burnt orange, yellow, lime green, color changing torched penny, etc. They were all very unique and all looked great. Of course you’re out on a limb owning an Xb to begin with so I always thought the wild colors were a great idea. 2006 torched penny was my favorite

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    Color me crazy (HA!) but I like cars that are painted in actual colors, rather than shades of gray. My first car was a ’74 Chevy painted Medium Metallic Green. My current car is an ’05 Scion xB painted Camo (Olive green metallic).

    I really want to replace my car with a Mazda CX-5, but I won’t. Why? I insist on a clutch in my cars. If you want a CX-5 with a clutch, you can pick from 3 (non) colors: Black, Silver, or Gray. A minivan with a clutch won’t have much resale value either way, so why won’t Mazda allow me to pick the more interesting colors from the CX-5 Touring??

  • avatar
    71 MKIV

    I had a 76 SAAB 99 5 door that came from the factory in “international safety green”. Something just short of frog barf or a hangover after a 3 day binge.
    Everybody knew when I was home. It was easy to find in a parking lot. I sold it to the junque yard at 221000 miles cuz I didn’t feel like putting a clutch in it.

  • avatar
    hf_auto

    We just bought a purple ’95 Ranger (manual, no AC, no power anything) for hardware store and dump trips. Thank god someone bought that thing in purple, because we got a great deal on it.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      I have a two tone silver and purple ’98 Ram 1500. My dad bought it new from a dealership that did all the concrete for. When he originalled poured their new curbs and sidewalks he made an offer on it. Eight months after they turned his offer down, the truck was still on the lot. He offered them $4000 less than his original offer, and we still have it for work puposes.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        Like this?…

        http://i188.photobucket.com/albums/z256/jimbob1955_2007/bad%20day/purple_1998_dodge_1500_4x4_quad_cab_4900_ferndale_21404559_zpsdfbef1e3.jpg

        …looks good on the Ram

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        Similar. I have a regular cab. But I agree it looks good on the Ram. Mine also has more dents and scratches. Filling the bed with broken up concrete takes a toll.

  • avatar
    krhodes1

    Some cars look great in strong, unusual colors – FIAT 500 being the king of this – they look great in yellow, or the mint green, or pretty much any of their color pallet choices. Some colors are just plain ugly – I don’t think turquoise looks good on anything built since the 50’s.

    I have a special order BMW wagon in Tasman Green with Chestnut leather. It’s a medium-dark gray/green color. To me it looks green, but to many people it looks gray. Chestnut is a red/brown like a reddish baseball glove or a basketball. I get constant compliments on the combination.

    Sadly, FIAT limits the Abarth to Black, White, Gray, and Red, so mine is metallic black. I would have preferred yellow or some other cool color, but I am not a fan of red.

  • avatar
    Silvy_nonsense

    “Oh, I really liked Jim, but he picked me up for our date in a yellow pickup truck!”

    For every man who likes yellow trucks, there’s a good woman who likes the same. I say get what you want and collect people around you who are like minded. Denying yourself while trying to please others usually doesn’t work out well.

    A cheap Mazda 2 will get you from A to B just fine. Buying anything more expensive involves ego fulfillment, rationalization and baloney justifications. There’s nothing wrong with any of that. As long as you’re buying something that involves a bit of irrational justification, don’t go half way. Get the color you want.

    • 0 avatar
      FuzzyPlushroom

      Funny you mention the Mazda2… it comes in Oh God What Is That Green. A friend just leased one and was seriously jonesing for the green, but the only ones on the lot were black… at least she insisted on a manual transmission.

    • 0 avatar
      Freddy M

      Amen.

      Around the Toronto area in my experience, I see quite a few Mazda2s. And every second car seems to be the green colour. Those owners have obviously chosen to fulfill their wants.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      “A cheap Mazda 2 will get you from A to B just fine. Buying anything more expensive involves ego fulfillment, rationalization and baloney justifications…”

      You can live in a one room house, but…

  • avatar
    drtwofish

    I submit that M cars – particularly e36’s, 46’s, & Roadsters – look by far the best in crazy colors. Techno Violet, Dakar Yellow, Estoril Blue (my favorite by far), Imola Red, Laguna Seca Blue, even Phoenix Yellow all look amazing.

    Which is exactly how I ended up with Cosmos Black. Hmm.

    • 0 avatar
      Charlie84

      I have an Alpine White E36 M3. For whatever reason, I wish to hell that it was Techno Violet. I didn’t care for Techno Violet back in the day, but now I can’t get enough for it.

      Estoril Blue is the definitive E36 M3 color.

      • 0 avatar
        drtwofish

        Yup. My dad has a Techno, and my stepmom a Dakar, so I was really hoping to get Estoril to round out the trio! Ah well. Alpine looks damn good cleaned up, though.

  • avatar
    meefer

    I own a navy blue car with big bird yellow wheels. I have been fist bumped (and exploded) by an LAX skycap. I have had 5 minute conversations with gas station attendants. I have had club valets in Newport who regularly move Ferraris and Lambos remember me after two months between visits. No regrets. If any manufacturer is coming out with a car in tennis ball yellow, I sincerely hope you make it a convertible.

    • 0 avatar
      Freddy M

      Kudos to you.

      Up the street where I work there’s a navy blue Dodge Caravan with bright green steely wheels.

      And across the street there’s a black FR-S with red painted rims. We call that one wagon wheels because… well that’s what it looks like.

      My coworkers and I always deride how hideous we feel those cars look. But as long as the owners love their rides day in and day out, that’s all cool. I’d just balk at being offered a ride in it.

  • avatar
    Charlie84

    I had a plaid-pattern vinyl wrap applied to the roof (exterior) of my VW. What does this say about me?

  • avatar
    FractureCritical

    I once owned a bright red 1985 S-10 blazer. Like so glaringly bright that you couldn’t look at it in direct sunlight. It had zero options except 4×4. it didn’t even have a carpet, much less power anything or A/C. I loved that truck. There is an authority of purpose on the road when you’re driving a screaming red car that’s worth slightly less than the gas in its tank. When you put your blinker on, people move.

  • avatar
    walleyeman57

    My daughter’s friend and teammate at University of Michigan (motto-the most expensive state school in the state)came from WA state. Her parents decided she needed a new car so they purchased one for her-by phone-from an Ann Arbor Ford dealership. They told her they got it in her “school colors” which are maize and blue. When she went to pick it up the salesman told the parents that her Escape was parked right in front all by itself. She looked all over the front lot and did not see any in “Michigan” blue. Turns out they picked the maize (yellow). She found it. I’m not sure if it had a blue interior. Drove it for 2 years and now has a black Jeep.

    For some, I guess the hideous yellow has some meaning. Just don’t drive it in Columbus, OH.

    • 0 avatar
      Cubista

      GO BLUE (wear Maize)…I was going to make the additional point that yellow is also a good color for the sports nut (The Stillers fan from Picksburgh or the Broonz fan from Bahst’n who doesn’t want a black vehicle, the Michigan fan who can’t find the right shade of navy blue, etc)…good call.

  • avatar
    Wraith

    There are also some “weird” colors that catch on with a particular model or brand, for example: Chrysler/Plymouth Voyagers in purple.

    • 0 avatar
      Ion

      My dads voyager started out a maroon and kind of got sun bleached into a purple. So I wouldn’t say purple caught on so much as cheap paint happenstance.

    • 0 avatar
      gslippy

      We had a 96 Grand Voyager in that color. Initially we didn’t like it (got a good deal), but it grew on us. With the tinted windows it actually cleaned up very well.

      Plymouth’s color was nicer than the Dodge, IMO, and Plymouth called it Dark Rosewood.

  • avatar
    Ion

    Black,silver, and white are not colors. I dont expect everyone to run out and buy a car in “gotta have it green” like me, but come on a blue or red here and there won’t kill you.

  • avatar
    ajla

    “I want to purchase a Land Rover, but I am concerned about resale value.”

    -Most naïve person in the world

  • avatar
    racer193

    If you have a red 06 RR I have a very nice low mileage 05 alero coupe in SILVER of course. Only 120k km with the entertaining 2.2 five speed. Its clean no rips or tears never smoked in and not yet hooned or beat on in any way, Ill take a red Range Rover. Seriously I got this car two weeks ago for nothing, and while it doesnt always start the first try it does always start (I think somthing is wrong with the ecm) the next try. While I do not know as of yet what I am doing with it I will make up my mind soon and It will probably be a whole bunch of road legal shinanagans happening with this car. If I didnt have to start from so far away maybe I would join you on your roadtrip and see which is more fun,a free not yet tired 4 cylinder alero or a expensive cts-v. Nah just joking you have to resell that car and try to make some of your money back.
    aka William Robinson

    • 0 avatar

      Haha. I wonder how far the Alero would make it!!

      • 0 avatar
        racer193

        I was kinda shocked the original owner got rid of it. But he only did so because he lost his liscence for ever. It dos’nt smoke tick or bang, has new struts all around and new brakes all around even has four artic alpin winter tires for extra summertime grip!¡!. I do have a chinese garrett gt28 tubro sitting around that may make its shoddy quality known to the alero.

  • avatar
    99GT4.6

    When I went to buy my car I said I did not want silver. Nonetheless I ended up with a silver one after finding a sweet deal on Kijiji. It’s a really boring colour but it does blend in well.

    • 0 avatar
      Russycle

      When I bought my Mini I swore it would not be white. Oops. I guess the racing stripes kind of make up for the color, or lack thereof. And our Kiwi Green Element too.

      • 0 avatar
        Japanese Buick

        Surprised it took this long to see a mention of Mini. They seem to offer the biggest variety of color choices of all the mainstream makes. I was THIS close to a blue Mini convertible with a denim roof before I bought my MX-5

  • avatar
    Hummer

    I’ve asked a Hummer dealer who buys yellows, he’s told me it takes a special person, very different not necessarily in a bad way.

    The H1 could be ordered in any color, looking at a sales chart I saw one sold in “international harvester red”

  • avatar
    caretnik

    I had an Imola Yellow Audi. Did not plan on buying that, was looking for a gray one, but once I saw it in the showroom, I was sold. Sold it to a friend when I moved 5 years ago, and I still think I should get one in the same color again some day. It was a lot of fun, and rainy days weren’t as rainy in that car. My current dark-colored wagon gets much less attention from police though. Exactly zero attention :)

  • avatar
    Synchromesh

    I think color does matter. Back in 2004 I was looking at a 2002 Honda Civic Si in that awful yellowish hue called European Gold. It was cheap for a 2 year old car (about $10K) because of that color. I couldn’t bring myself to buy it. Every time I saw it, I threw up in my mouth a little. I think I’ve seen another 2 in same color over the years and I hope that’s all of the ’02 Sis they sold in New England in that color.

  • avatar
    Nostrathomas

    I find it a little sad that “yellow” is now considered a weird color. I think that F150 in the photo looks fantastic. Plus it reminds me of Pamela Anderson in her glory years.

    Personally, I love the whacky colors (as long as they aren’t one of those diarrhea offshoots, or anything with “pearl” in it). Older cars definitely seem to look better with crazier colors (how I love my old 911 in unique colors), but even if its new, I need to get at least a red. One of the things I love the most about my Cayman is how the Guards Red just pops in a sea of boring old silver.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    The yellows and orange of large fleet orders differ greatly from the original yellow or orange choices, unless there was a cancelled order, after the paint booth. Then you may have a collector’s item.

    My last truck buys have all been red for the sake of safely, at least in my mind. I realize red autos are involved in just as many accidents, statically as a percentage, but the cars most invisible to my eyes, at a quick glance, are beige and gray/graphite, depending on background.

  • avatar
    SC5door

    KIA dealers were having a very hard time keeping Alien Green Souls in stock for quite some time. When we looked the nearest + model with UVO was 1,000 miles away. We ended up with Moss that was shipped from Missouri a week prior as that dealer was selling them as fast as they could get them. (They sold 4 that day including ours)

  • avatar
    canddmeyer

    My neighbor has a Ford Ranger the same yellow color as the truck pictured. It’s beautiful, and the paint looks great with zero fade. Myself, I like the lesser known colors. With most everything being black, white, charcoal grey, silver, or red, bring me some color.

    I like the metallic gold tones, but I’d settle for some light green metallic tones too.

  • avatar
    Athos Nobile

    “Is It OK To Choose A Weird Car Color?”

    I’ll play Captain Obvious here. Simple answer is yes, why not.

    “Why would someone want to subject themselves to a weird color?”

    You are asking the wrong question. When I see people on the street with green, purple or magenta tinted hair, the above doesn’t make any sense to me.

    I like that truck in the picture above. I also like yellow VE Commodores, and have been the subject of jokes in the office for that, (and my Saab).

    I’ve seen some cars in the street with stunning colors: VEs painted in purple and FG Falcons XR6 in a dark metallic purple or candy orange. All OEM and all great looking.

    Contrary to what your mates in ze-German OEMs think, cars can be painted in other colors different that grey, silver or black. I personally hate grey.

    I’ll ask you: Is it OK to like a Dodge Caliber? The answer is yes (I don’t like it, just in case). Is it OK to like its cousins? Yes, I actually like the Patriot.

    Ah, sell the Cube and get a pink Micra.

  • avatar
    Hobie-wan

    Boring color cars are stocked because they are ‘safe’ and it sucks. My current and last car were black. I wish they weren’t because I roast in the summer, but the cars were manual transmission and otherwise agreeable with me so that was more important. Two cars ago I had bright yellow and it was great. People were more likely to avoid running into me and it was easy to find my car in a huge parking lot.

    I loved the aqua, metal flake green, and metal flake orange vehicles my parents had growing up too. My grandmother had an orange Vega too.

  • avatar
    velvet fog

    I’m waiting for 70’s jet boat metalflake colors to come back. Then I’ll get my SL sprayed big metal flake green.

    • 0 avatar
      Zackman

      Your screen name, “Velvet Fog”… You must be a Mel Torme fan. So am I to a point, and his son James Torme is following in his footsteps, but his voice is kind of flat.

      Oh – beware of anything colored green – at one time, a large percentage of all cars stranded on the side of the road happened to be green!

      We owned a green car, a 1993 Dodge Spirit – it was a piece of junk.

      Red is my favorite car color of all time.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    @Doug–My first car was a 73 Chevelle Deluxe Sedan that was light yellow with a green interior. It had been a Baroid Drilling Mud Co. car I bought for $1,400 on a used car lot in 1975 when I was a Senior at Baylor. Baylor’s colors are green and gold so it was school colors. I have never seen a car with those color combinations. Great running car with a 350 V8. Maybe it is in a junk yard somewhere and Murilee could track it down and take pictures of it unless it has been crushed long ago. It got lots of attention and it was one of the best running cars I ever had.

  • avatar
    xantia10000

    Why choose one crazy color when you can have four… all on one car! Remember the Golf Harlequin? Doug, you reminded us about it before.
    http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2013/03/volkswagen-golf-harlequin-vws-strangest-idea/

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      Four colors is too much. My aunt liked Fords, and her ’56 Fairlane used the spear on the sides as natural break points, along with the roof. She had black below the spear, pink above and on the hood and trunk, and a yellow roof. She never lost it in a parking lot.

  • avatar
    noreaster

    Obvs, yes. Not only is it okay, but you’re a wuss if you don’t get the color you want. And color is good in itself. It’s so depressing, sometimes, to look out over a parking lot and see so little color variation. New England has the most monochrome fleet of any place I’ve ever lived.

    I love color. I doubt I’ll ever buy another Ford, but I’ve seen one with the prettiest creamy yellow. I can’t find that color on the Ford website tho. “Ginger Ale” isn’t it. Maybe it was discontinued, which would be a shame. And when I was shopping for my Phaeton, I found one in an eggplant purple. Gorgeous, but unfortunately way too expensive, and I never found another one. Mine, sadly, is just black.

  • avatar
    jbltg

    Could not agree more. You may be surprised to know that it is at least as boring for car colors here in supposedly hip and daring Los Angeles. We can be slogging through traffic or any parking lot in a complete daze just observing the sea of black, white and variants on gray/silver. Dreadful. What is life for?
    On the other hand, there are rays of hope. On my block many days there sits a new Corolla in an amazing burnt orange metallic(?) that is a joy to look at and would enhance virtually any vehicle. My Miata would look much better in that paint.
    All fugly practical cars such as Prius, Yaris etc etc would be much more attractive in cheerful paint schemes for no meaningful added cost. We have next door the Scion FR-S or whatever that silly roadster is called, in freeking dark gray already! BO-ring!!!!!!
    There are all manner of Minis in interesting colors and combos that help break the monotony, not to mention a good number of Prius C in bright orange Habanero.
    There are glimmers of hope in the dreadful auto paint landscape.
    I don’t buy the argument that it is not economically feasible to offer many colors across your car line. Just look at any of the Japanese domestic automaker sites. They offer a staggering array.
    We are all being unfairly shortchanged. Hell, it’s just paint!

  • avatar
    manu06

    I bought my wife a brand new 1993 Honda del sol in Samba Green. 167k later we still have people wanting
    to buy it. Great color on an ok car.

  • avatar
    deanst

    I hope to be brave enough one day to buy a Fahrenheit orange gti……..complete with plaid seats.

    • 0 avatar
      Cubista

      Fahrenheit was only available for a single model year for the GTI. The only interior trim available was leather, so the interlagos would be a non-starter. Sorry…FWIW, your vision is an admirable one.

  • avatar
    James2

    It depends. When I had my Probe GT it just looked fantastic in white (of course I’m biased).

    My 07 Mazda 6 is painted in Dark Cherry Mica (think dark red wine) and it stands out in a sea of bland, white/silver/gray sedans.

    In my condo someone just bought/leased/stole? an orange Dodge Dart and if it wasn’t for the color no one would notice the car. I can’t help but look at the car thanks to that color.

    BTW, that yellow F-150 looks fantastic.

  • avatar
    jim brewer

    I would have chosen a yellow F-150 had it been available to me. In fact, I’d say the drab colors available for Ford are a fault.

  • avatar
    CowDriver

    I too am bored by the endless sea of black, white, silver and gray cars on the road today. When I buy my next car, a bright exciting color will be high on my must-have list.

    My Volvo wagon may have started out as boring white, but before long it gained large black cow (Holstein) spots. I know that I could never commit a crime, as the police would be waiting in my driveway when I got home. But I enjoy being somewhat eccentric — the car even has a horn which goes “Moooooooo”.

  • avatar

    I had a 2006 Ranger in that exact shade of yellow – I think the official color name was “screaming yellow metallic”. According to the window sticker, it was a limited edition color.

    I bought it as a leftover, and it was pretty much the only one around that was equipped the way I wanted – a 4wd extended cab without too many extraneous features. Everything else was either loaded or stripped.

    Pros: it was easy to find in parking lots. Cons: i got pulled over a lot in it.

    I traded it in to Carmax, so no word on the resale value. I did get random compliments from people when I owned it. It didn’t help me with the ladies, but I ended up trading it in for a black Pathfinder and that hasn’t helped either.

  • avatar
    Burger Boy

    47 cars in so far and I’ve never, and won’t ever, own silver or white. Life is too short to be that boring. I’m enjoying my Tangerine Scream Focus ST and the women love it, ( he says shooting holes in the writer’s theory).

    • 0 avatar
      MightyOne

      Fellow Tangerine Scream ST owner here… I have had nothing but good comments about the color. Initially, I figured it just made sense to get the signature color for the ST. I mean, if you’re going to buy a prestige model, why would you want it to be easy to mistake for a base model?

      Then it just became about not being boring. Especially in New England, it’s rare to see any sort of bright colors on cars. Blue is considered a daring choice around here. I myself owned two black cars and a gray sedan previously. It’s just so gloomy to walk out into a parking lot.

      Now I consider it my personal responsibility to add color to the world. I walk out of work and my car is the brightest thing in the lot. It’s awesome to have that waiting for you at the end of a crappy day. I’ll never own a black/gray/silver/white car again if I can help it.

  • avatar
    Compaq Deskpro

    Surprisingly, every last Subaru Crosstrek I have seen is that nacho orange color seen in the press releases. As stated before, the color of the concept or press car is always a “in your dreams” and “dealer poison” shade. Maybe by shipping an inordinate number of ornage Crosstreks they stand out from the un-jacked Imprezas, and grab buyer’s attention.

    Ford is currently good with the colors of their cars. I’ve seen several new Lincolns and Fords with this really odd ginger ale green, and new Escapes and Fusions in strange shades of green and baby blue far outnumber the black and silver and white ones (in my experience).

  • avatar
    kmoney

    Had a 2000 suburban LT in two-tone burgundy and gold. Never saw another one in person (I think there were 1200 made; I cant even find one on Google images). I used to always get friends phoning me and asking “what are you up to, you just drove by me,” or asking how _____ was the previous night as they saw it parked out front. Kinda got weird.

    I was scared I would get pounded when it came time to resell it, but I sold it for essentially the same price as the traditional coloured trucks, didn’t even take that long. I think the weird colour thing is a double edged sword, as if you find someone who likes the colour they are pretty much guaranteed to buy it if they find it.

    Side rant – weird interior colours. Every Craigslist add I see for Audi S5’s says it has the “rare” red interior. Every one I have seen on CL save for one has had a red interior, and it’s not particularly attractive/desirable over black.

  • avatar
    mnm4ever

    I am amazed at the number of comments this post has generated… congratulations Doug!! And everyone is so passionate about their preferences, wild colors, safe colors, non-colors, interior colors, two tones, etc. One thing for sure, I am glad we have choices, since clearly everyone has their favorites.

    I like bright colors and black interiors, but I can appreciate a stealthy silver grey too, and I drive a black car with dark grey wheels so what do I know?!? But I think you guys are wrong to assume a bright color hurts resale value. When I was car shopping the “cool” blue, red, orange, and yellow cars all were priced higher and sold faster. Maybe in strictly “luxury” cars you would be right, but any car with remotely sporty pretenses attracts people like me who like standout colors. More people do choose silvers and greys, but I think that’s just because it is a “safe” choice, almost a non-choice. But the fact that much fewer cars are sold in brighter hues makes them that much more rare on the used market, so it all evens out in the end.

  • avatar
    chicagoland

    I miss the plethora of car colors seen before the 90’s ended. People want ‘what everyone else’ has.

    However, in housing, interior paints in many colors are in style now. Look at houses for sale and lots of green, dark yellow, or red walls. Home improvement shows will have lots of color added into rooms.

    Only with kitchen appliances, are home owners being conformist, with “I want Stainless Steel” heard all the time.

  • avatar
    ndlaw95

    Regarding Range Rovers, I looked to trade in my maroon 2010 a few months ago. I think the color is quite nice. However, after a lot of back-and-forth, after it had become clear the dealer wouldn’t move any more (with no deal as a result), he told me he could have given me $5,000 more if it were white or black.

  • avatar
    racebeer

    I’ve never been shy about colors. My first car was a Flame Red Opel Kadett Rallye. Next came a Chrome Yellow Manta Rallye (yes … I had a weakness for Opels….). I got off the German bandwagon and bought a French Blue Fiat X1/9. Fast forward and I now drive a Bright Red ’01 T/A convertible. HOWEVER … the wife has a Silver Buick Rainier, so I guess we do fall into the normal classification here. The ’63 Dodge Polara is the original Ivory color, and I wouldn’t dare mess with that!!

    • 0 avatar
      Zackman

      “Next came a Chrome Yellow Manta Rallye…”

      I’m jealous as I used to want one in that very color!

      • 0 avatar
        racebeer

        Yep … Chrome Yellow with the black hood, black vinyl top, and white interior. That car was pretty quick for the day, and the handling was superb. You should have bought one!!! The skinny 13 inch wheels did give way to a set of American Racing mags (4-spoke, BTW) and BFG B60x13 T/A Radials. Also added Koni shocks and larger swaybars. Those additions made this little pony car handle even better!!

  • avatar
    Cubista

    First, yellow isn’t exactly a “weird” color…any number of manufacturers have released cars in various hues of it, usually in limited editions…like the Camaro in “Transformers” trim or the Dodge Charger Super Bee in “Detonator Yellow”. The LS-engined Pontiac GTO/Holden Monaro Coupe was available in a wicked cool yeloow, also. Subaru had a WRX from the Bugeye generation available in yellow, Hyundai had a Genesis Coupe 3.8 available in yellow from their first generation, and Corvettes, Ferraris, and Lamborghini all have had histories of using it as well. Those are just what I can remember over the last decade off he top of myhead…I’m sure there are others.

    I would argue that yellow is actually a GOOD choice for pick-up trucks/utes, especially those that are being used as they were intended. It’s high visability, which is what you want on a job site.

    Now, the trend lately toward various shades of green…that’s definitely a “die is cast/crossing the Rubicon” decision when you sign to buy a car in that color. Yellow is not black or silver, but it is at least passable as a “performance”-oriented paint choice. But green…man, that color SCREAMS “trendy” at the time of purchase and it coveted by a select few. Even the Nissan Cube isn’t offered in a shade of green after the second model year in this market.

  • avatar
    55_wrench

    Both of our daily drivers are white. But it wasn’t always that way.

    Right out of high school,low on discretionary money, I built up a ’65 Corvair Monza coupe, only paid 35 bucks for a beige shell with a nice interior. I painted it Panther Pink. Okay, it was the disco era, lots of padded vinyl tops in the day, so I put padded white vinyl in the rear taillight area after hacking big holes for the ’67 Camaro tail lights. Interior was black vinyl-covered hard surfaces with white seats and door panels.

    Not exactly a stealth machine, but it was so far out there that I had to behave myself to keep from getting traffic tickets. And I needed that.

    The car served me well for almost 4 years, took me to Texas and Canada on road trips, and never once got keyed or otherwise got any sign of disapproval.

    If you want an unusual color, go for it. One of my current favorites is Scion’s Army Rock Metallic.

  • avatar
    adame24

    I owned a 2001 BMW Z3 coupe in Dakar Yellow with red leather interior. I really liked the combination. I loved the red leather interior and would get that interior again over black or tan. It got a little more attention than I would have liked but any Z3 coupe will stand out anyway. I would not have bought a 3 series in that color but thought it worked well on the Z3 coupe.
    The yellow color did make selling the car more difficult but I found a buyer for it. The car stood out so much that my brother spotted it in Yonkers a year after I sold it. I live an hour north of Yonkers and the kid that bought it lived in Brooklyn so chances of seeing it were pretty slim.
    When I had it for sale some of the guys on bimmerforums were making fun of it calling it a ronald mcdonald car but I chalk it up to insecurities about…

  • avatar
    nine11c2

    Just saw a orange Cadillac looked like it was done with that can stuff. Wish I could upload a pic..

  • avatar
    jim brewer

    Yellow, you know, in the United States signifies ‘cheap’ That’s why you see so little of it in any context. The Euros don’t have that association.

    Realistically, like most people, I don’t have the opportunity to be too picky about color–besides, as so many have pointed out, there isn’t really that much to choose from.

    I don’t buy all this stuff that the most common colors are the most practical–I had a BMW in that nearly ubiquitous asphalt gray color. The thing was practically invisible to a lot of drivers.

  • avatar
    nrd515

    I had a bright yellow and black Power Wagon for 4 years and none of the women I dated seemed to hate it. Actually, some of them really liked the color, but thought the truck itself was just silly. Silly isn’t what I called it, I called it a POS.

  • avatar
    henkdevries

    I will buy every green or pink Lamborghini with Russian number plates if and only if it has genuine bullet holes. Preferably from an AK.

  • avatar
    duffman13

    We’ve owned our fair share of cars over the past 10 years, and only 2-3 were appliance colors, which I’m rather proud of.

    96 Nissan Altima – White, but it looked good and was my first car so I didn’t care
    02 Nissan Xterra – Alpine Green
    96 Audi A4 – Emerald Green
    04 Acura RSX – Arctic Blue Pearl
    00 Honda Civic – Milano red
    00 Honda S2000 – Silverstone, but at least it wasn’t Sebring silver, which is hideous
    10 Mazda 3 hatch – Celestial Blue Mica
    04 Honda S2000 – Suzuka Blue
    92 Isuzu Rodeo – 2-tone gunmetal with some rust and dings, I don’t care it’s a beater

    I was really leaning towards yellow for the S2000, but the wife vetoed it, saying it was too garish to have a car that came in banana. So I guess some colors are still off limits.

    My mom’s car growing up was a Country Squire that she lovingly referred to as “Baby Shit Brown”

  • avatar
    pb35

    I want a Plum Crazy Charger so badly…mine is Pitch Black and I regret my color choice.

    No more black cars, ever!

  • avatar
    matschke48

    I agree with most everyone else on this subject. I am sick of the gray/silver/black/white and all shades in between. I said i would never own a gray car and by some circumstances out of my control I ended up buying a charcoal gray F150. Nice truck except for the color. Totally regret it.

    My vehicle of choice: in 2005 and 2006, Ford made the Amarillo edition of the F250 in Blazing Yellow. Look it up. These rock. Amarillo is Spanish for yellow in case you didn’t know.


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