By on June 5, 2013

Renault-Logan-Hatch

When Renault entered the Indian market a few years back, it had little experience. Thus the French automaker tied up with local automobile giant Mahindra. The first product to be launched was the Logan, priced a bit optimistically. The product didn’t sell, and Renault decided to part ways, giving Mahindra the rights to sell the Logan as its own product. Mahindra went solo with the Logan, re-badged it as the Verito and made some changes. The Logan started to sell better under the Mahindra umbrella.

Soon, competition started to get intense. A new segment of cars emerged, better known as sub 4-meter compact sedans. These vehicles measure less than 4-meters in length and are powered by engines which are less than 1.5-liter in capacity for diesel or less than 1.2-liter in capacity for gasoline. If the above criteria are met, the cars will be slapped with half the excise duty (12% against 24%), resulting in massive savings. Maruti Suzuki came up with the Swift sedan while Honda came up with the Brio sedan, both of which duck under 4-meters in length.

The Logan aka the Verito measured above 4-meters in length. In order to get excise benefits, Mahindra has made tweaks to the rear of the vehicle, bringing it under 4-meters. The result is the Verito Vibe, which gets a trunk with hinges (like sedans) and the rear windshield doesn’t open with the hatch door like it does in hatchbacks. The vertically stacked tail lights are quite old-fashioned, but the price is lower than the regular Verito due to the savings in duties (around $12000). The vehicle is powered by a 1.5-liter diesel engine producing 65 BHP and 160 Nm. Do you think the Verito Vibe looks appealing?

Logan-Interiors-India

Verito-Vibe-Boot

Logan-Two-Box

Faisal Ali Khan is the editor of MotorBeam.com, a website covering the automobile industry of India.a

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10 Comments on “Mahindra Chops Off Renault Logan’s Trunk...”


  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Vertical tail lights are old fashioned unless it’s a Volvo! I wish Indian manufacturers would come up with some more lux looking badges and emblems.

    Other note – the volume of the tail lamps is entirely too much against the flat rear window.

  • avatar
    gslippy

    “chops off”, not “chops of”

  • avatar
    wstarvingteacher

    It looks good till you open the trunk. This needs to be a hatchback. I fail to see a real advantage the way it is built but I can see a couple drawbacks. Actually one drawback (the rear window) that introduces a couple disadvantages. A hatchback is very functional this does not appear to be.

  • avatar
    FuzzyPlushroom

    So it looks like a hatchback and works like a sedan, like a Buick/Olds Aeroback or a classic Mini. Worst of both worlds, isn’t it?

  • avatar
    FPF422

    For the Indian market, it’s the perfect car… very sturdy… the roads are really bad as are, with our standards, the Indian drivers… They don’t need an up-to-date design… but a reliable, sturdy small and economical people mover and this will do it perfectly

  • avatar
    jakechaffeymain321

    good. for convenience and comfortably for seating

    http://www.thewash.net.au/

  • avatar
    MrWhopee

    The trunk opening reminds me of old Morris/Austins of the 1960s. These are good for ducking the Indian taxes only. Elsewhere people would immediately ask why the glass area did not open too. But why not just stick the Sandero’s (Logan Hatchback) hatch in there, instead of completely engineer this new opening? Unfortunately the Sandero itself is more than 4 meters long (by a few centimeters) otherwise they could’ve just sell those.

  • avatar
    Athos Nobile

    The boot opening is a bit awkward, but overall it doesn’t look too bad.

    Can they add a proper hatch there? Is it allowed in the regs?


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