By on April 2, 2013

Last week, I wrote an article entitled “Don’t Invest In These Investment Cars.” I expected the usual: at least one commenter would ask why I didn’t include a Panther derivative (which happened), my parents would ask when I was going to get a real job (which also happened), and life would otherwise continue along normally.

But that didn’t happen. Instead, I received a phone call from everyone I’ve ever met asking how I dared to include the Buick Grand National on such a list. (“They’re like $30k! And they used to be like nine! Are you an idiot?!”) So this week, I’m going to play it a little safer and instead write a piece on good investment cars. Feel free to provide your feedback, as long as it doesn’t include the words “Crown Victoria.”

DISCLAIMER: Do not actually attempt to use cars as an investment. You have a better chance of getting into the NBA as a white guy from French Lick, Indiana.

Without further ado, here are my nominations.

Acura Integra Type-R

Acura sold about 3,800 Integra Type-R units here in 1997, 1998, 2000 and 2001. (Presumably, they skipped 1999 to annoy people who wrote about them later.) Of those, 2,700 were stolen, stripped of any important parts, and stashed in a warehouse in North Jersey. And about 1,000 more were lowered by people who think modifications add value.

That means just 100 clean examples are left for people who a) appreciate the Type-R brand, and b) park in a locked garage.

Audi Quattro

The original Audi Quattro is a rally legend that probably won lots of races when driven by people from Sweden. Today, you can be just like them by purchasing a used street version, which seems reasonably priced until you bring it to a mechanic. Best just to buy one and treat it as garage art, watching the values soar around you.

E30 BMW M3

It’s actually impossible to create a list like this and not include the E30 M3, so here it is: I’ve done it. This is what we know: the E30 M3 is a seminal car for BMW enthusiasts everywhere. Like later M cars, it included a lighter curb weight, more power, subtle modifications and, apparently, no turn signals.

As I’ve said before, the only downside to buying one is that you have to deal with the kind of people who are selling them. Really, it’s stunning just how many of these are “the best example in the world.”

Ferrari F355 Berlinetta

I called out the 308 and 328 in my last article. This time, I wanted to include a Ferrari whose value will increase. As a result, I did not pick the 348.

Instead, I’ve chosen the F355 Berlinetta, which is annoyingly uncommon. Seriously, check AutoTrader: of the four zillion listings sure to pop up, three point nine zillion are for Spiders, aka convertibles, which no one wants. A few are open-roof GTS models, and about six are Berlinettas (good!) which have F1 transmissions (very, very bad). Finding a well-sorted F355 Berlinetta with three pedals is as almost difficult as finding a desirable Chevrolet SSR.

1993 Land Rover Defender 110 (NA Spec)

From 1994 to 1997, Land Rover sold a lot of Defender 90s to people who wanted to cruise along the beach after a nice hard day of watching their investment account. But an even rarer version came stateside in 1993: the Defender 110.

Only 500 “NA Spec” Defender 110 units came to the States, each equipped exactly the same: white, four-door, rust. Because of that last one, most were subject to five-figure restorations undertaken solely by people who live in Nantucket. These days, they can go for $60,000 or more, which is lots of money for a truck that leaks water on its occupants even when it isn’t raining.

1993-1995 Mazda RX-7

Anyone with even the slightest automotive knowledge is aware the RX-7 has reliability issues. Seriously, this is like the second day of car guy school, right after you learn the names of all the GM brands and before you cultivate a love of diesel-powered station wagons.

Because of its troubles, many RX-7s have been the victims of sloppy engine swaps. Still others have been “stanced” by the kind of people who find green wheels attractive. That means pristine examples will start increasing in value, if only because they’re among the most beautiful cars of all time.

Mercedes 500E

If you think the Panamera was the first four-door Porsche, you’re solely mistaken. It’s just the ugliest. Behold, the Mercedes 500E, which was built in extremely limited numbers by Porsche at a time when they desperately needed help keeping the gates open.

That help came from Mercedes-Benz, Porsche’s neighbors in Stuttgart, who asked Porsche to build the car. The resulting 500E was subtle, handsome and high-class. Clearly, it had no influence on the Panamera.

Old SUVs

Although I don’t see most SUVs climbing in value (sorry, International Scout owners), two models clearly stand out. The famous “FJ40” Toyota Land Cruiser will go up, simply because the wealthy cannot be seen cruising private beaches in a mediocre vehicle. And the original Ford Bronco will gain in value, marking the first time in the Bronco’s 31-year history it will ever be known for anything besides leading the LAPD on a tedious car chase.

Porsche 911

This should be obvious, especially with the recent (and mostly inexplicable) rise in values for 1960s and 1970s 911 models. But I’m calling out three in particular that I think will steadily go up in the next few years.

The 930 is, to me, the most obvious. For you normal people, that’s the 911 Turbo sold from the late ‘70s to the late ‘80s. There’s absolutely no reason the values for these haven’t taken off yet, except maybe for the fact that not enough have been exported by Europeans looking for a good deal. Give it time.

The 993’s values are also clearly trending upwards. That’s the 911 sold from 1995 to 1998, which makes it the last car for annoying purists who will only buy air-cooled. The 993 will always be revered by enthusiasts for this fact, and for the speed at which it kills bugs.

My “out on a limb” 911 pick is the 996 GT3, which was sold in 2004 and 2005. Not only is it a track monster, but it’s way too cheap – especially as purists start hanging on for dear life now that they’ve killed the 991 GT3 by making it faster.

1993-1998 Toyota Supra Turbo

Values of the “MkIV” Toyota Supra are only going to go up, which is annoying since they’ve already been going up ever since Vin Diesel lived his life a quarter-mile at a time. These days, a clean example with reasonable mileage can pull $50,000 or beyond, which is approximately the same money private sellers ask for Land Cruisers from a similar era.

So there you have it, folks: my picks for cars we’ll see at Barrett-Jackson in 20 years selling for multiples of their current value. Of course, that’s meaningless, since many cars at Barrett-Jackson today sell for multiples of their current value.

How wrong am I? Who’s going to call me out for not including any American cars? How many people will mention the GMC Typhoon? I’m eager to find out. Just stop calling me about the Grand National.

Doug DeMuro operates PlaysWithCars.com. He’s owned an E63 AMG wagon, road-tripped across the US in a Lotus without air conditioning, and posted a six-minute lap time on the Circuit de Monaco in a rented Ford Fiesta. One year after becoming Porsche Cars North America’s youngest manager, he quit to become a writer. His parents are very disappointed.

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169 Comments on “Definitely Invest In These Investment Cars...”


  • avatar
    Type57SC

    It’s frustrating how many of these I’ve owned or seriously considered. Damn. I often really miss the Integra type-R most of all, becase it really wouldn’t have been expensive to keep it.

    • 0 avatar
      MZ3AUTOXR

      A note on the Type R – the 100 left that haven’t been stolen or modified are probably being autocrossed in SCCA D-Stock where they are the car to have.

  • avatar
    MeaCulpa

    500E is a good choice, so many have been molested in attempts to transform it into an E500.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      I’ve seen the 500E around over the years and I wasn’t aware of its unique history. At this point its like any other Benz of similar vintage, somewhat durable but bring your checkbook.

      • 0 avatar
        MeaCulpa

        the W124 was probably the last propper mercedes, before all this AMG nonsense and stupid sedan-coupe-offroader-station wagon-crossovers.

        • 0 avatar
          golden2husky

          I agree. I looked closely at the build quality of several of the M-B products at the car show and was very disappointed in the fit and material choices of the interiors. Maybe the underlying structure makes up for it but on the surface I’d have to say the models I looked at were a farce compared to what a Benz used to be. Then again, factored for inflation they cost a lot less. So M-B did what others did – cut quality to move more units…all at the expense of the granite reputation.

  • avatar
    Autopassion

    No Acura NSX?

  • avatar
    ldl20

    Values of the “MkIV” Toyota Supra are only going to go up, which is annoying since they’ve already been going up ever since Vin Diesel lived his life a quarter-mile at a time.

    Doug: There is a fine line between being sarcastic/witty/clever and just sounding like you’re trying too hard, but in my opinion, you’re doing a nice job of staying in the former camp. In case you’re wondering, someone like P.J. O’ Rourke, recently of C&D, is in the latter camp. He’s basically unreadable. Keep up the good work!

    Oh, no complaints with the list, though I would add the X-11 Citation, just for its incredibly stupid, vertical radio.

    • 0 avatar
      MeaCulpa

      O’Rourke Is living on his old laurels and has been for the last couple of decades, his take on “the wealth of nations” was/is horrible.

    • 0 avatar
      Cubista

      \\Values of the “MkIV” Toyota Supra are only going to go up, which is annoying since they’ve already been going up ever since Vin Diesel lived his life a quarter-mile at a time.//

      Vin Diesel actually lived his life a quarter-mile at a time in the same model RX-7 you also have included in this list…the Supra was Paul Walker’s ride.

  • avatar
    jco

    my friend had his chicken yellow Type R stolen from his locked fortified garage, which had no windows. where it sat under a cover. thieves can smell Type Rs, I think.

    and I have always wanted a 993. C2, white. I feel like it will be cheaper to have a 997, unfortunately.

  • avatar
    jkross22

    Surprised there’s no 840i listed here.

  • avatar
    GarbageMotorsCo.

    No S-2000? Or NSX?

    • 0 avatar
      Reino

      I vote for the NSX as well. You will not find these in decent condition below $30k. As for the S2000, unfortunately I think it suffers from high production numbers and is still very common.

      I’d like to throw in the 1997 LT4 F-bodies (‘Firehawk’, ‘SS’). Their prices seem to be immune to the eternal depreciation of their LT1 cousins, due to their rarity and esteem among the F-body crowd. They have yet to see four digit prices yet, and if kept in good condition with low miles, they should stay that way and possibly go up in value.

      • 0 avatar
        gessvt

        Not to mention the LT4 Corvettes. Lately the Grand Sports are selling for more than similar mileage C4 ZR-1s. As for Firehawks, the 1992 is the one to have.

        • 0 avatar
          danio3834

          The real money is in the LT5 cars. Although expensive to acquire now, they’ll hold their value which will increase incrementally over time.

          While the LT4 cars won’t fare badly, the LT5 is that much more special.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Agreed, but this line from Wikipedia is going to forever put me off on one.

            The LT5 however wasn’t an evolutionary dead end. Despite being discontinued, a new class of premium V8s for Cadillac and eventually Oldsmobile, the dual overhead cam V8 Northstar and its derivatives, drew heavily from the LT5′s design and lessons learned from its production.

            LT5 is related to Northstar *shudders*.

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            @28, you have nothing to fear. The LT5 is in no way related to the Northstar in construction other than the fact that it has 32 valves and 4 cams. They seem to be pretty durable.

            The worst thing about owning one would be sourcing parts should you ever need any of the top end bits.

        • 0 avatar
          mnm4ever

          I have had my eye on a C4 ZR1. The last cpl model years are still very pricey, they are a bit more powerful and less were produced so the speculators are already on them. But right now a very nice early 375hp ZR1 can be had for under $20k, and I bet those extra 25hp are not hard to uncork. And unlike most other C4s, most ZR1s were babied and pampered by their owners.

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            “And unlike most other C4s, most ZR1s were babied and pampered by their owners.”

            Possibly as a whole. There was one Friday night at the drag strip where a pair of C4 ZR1s showed up and hot lapped side by side laying down many 12 second passes. Then they drove them home. Still, I’m not sure they were much worse for wear.

            Not a bad deal at under 20k with a generation newer performance.

          • 0 avatar
            mnm4ever

            Oh yes you will see a few that got used hard and put up wet, but far more were kept as “investments” that have not panned out and the owners need the cash.

            For ultimate performance, the C5 Z06 is still the bargain king, from what I have seen you can buy those for around the same price as an equivalent C4 ZR1, and get much better performance and a generally nicer driver. but I really dislike the C5 look, and I like the C4, I guess because I grew up in the 80s.

    • 0 avatar
      chrishs2000

      Now that the S2000 can be afforded by most 18 year olds, it’s only a matter of time before 98% of them are either snap oversteered into a ditch or have an EBay turbo kit installed on them. Give it 10 or 15 years for the values to start climbing quickly, once people get nostalgia for them and realize there are exactly 7 stock examples left.

      • 0 avatar
        mnm4ever

        You know, I actually do not see too many S2Ks that have been bastardized, even when modified they tend to be tasteful, or at least functional. I agree a stock one will always be worth more and is more desirable to me… if I had one I wouldn’t change one thing on the car, nothing. But at least the second wave of owners seems to respect the car more than typical used Honda buyers. They are also quite expensive these days as was pointed out in the previous article.

      • 0 avatar
        JMII

        I can almost claim the same thing for my ’03 350Z Touring. However despite the number that are wrecked or riced-out daily they are still zillions of well kept, clean, OEM versions to chose from. Same goes for many of the “golden” 80s/90s Japanese sports cars mentioned in the earlier Generation Why article.

        For investment worthy material you need something that was produced in very limited numbers. I think a Solstice Coupe might be the ticket. Only 1,266 were made according to Wikipedia. I saw one advertised that claimed to be 1-in-5 combination of colors and options. More excellent info here: http://www.solsticeforum.com/forum/f114/comprehensive-solstice-coupe-production-numbers-data-61972/#post933199

        Similar to collectable muscle cars, the car must be a low production run with some unique options combinations. For example when speaking about ’03 Zs like mine a Brickyard Red model with navigation and the orange leather would be the rarest combo based on my research. Based on how much VIN#001 sold for:
        http://www.barrett-jackson.com/application/onlinesubmission/lotdetails.aspx?ln=417&aid=443&pop=0 its not a great investment. Personally I’d rather just drive the thing!

    • 0 avatar
      duffman13

      As a multiple S2000 owner, I’d say that S2000 prices bottomed out about a year or 2 ago. The depreciation won’t be to what they were new, but I firmly believe that even being DDed, a car bought in the last year will be able to be turned for what it was bought for given a mileage increase of about 10k/year to a reasonable number.

      My insurance paid out almost $3k more than I paid or my AP1 when I wrecked it. I used that to buy a newer AP2, which will eventually get relegated to weekend/track-car status. That’s the problem with S2000s, is that many of them become that weekend warrior, necessitating a proper rollbar, and thereby stripping out parts of the OE rear plastic trim to fit it, reducing the number of truly mint examples.

  • avatar
    mnm4ever

    I had no money for an old Porsche 911, Integra Type R, RX7, or E30 M3 when they were pretty cheap, now that the prices are going up I will probably never get one. If I knew I could have gotten it cheaper before it loses it’s appeal to me at higher prices, just the way my cheapskate brain thinks!

  • avatar
    grzydj

    A Toyota Tacoma would still beat most of these at resale value. Seriously.

    • 0 avatar
      espressoBMW

      I would tend to agree with the Tacoma. Pick-ups in general are getting a pretty good return on investment when compared to nearly any other common car or SUV.

    • 0 avatar
      MeaCulpa

      Not a short wheelbase sport quattro. But those are not easy to find.

      • 0 avatar
        grzydj

        Tacoma’s are everywhere, but still command a hefty price for having the privilege of driving one. You’re almost better off buying a brand new one.

        • 0 avatar
          gearhead77

          The local Mitsubishi dealer had an 09 X Runner on the lot. Those must be rather rare, it’s the only one I’ve ever seen. Didn’t even know it was an X Runner until I looke that the dealers wesbsite.

          About the only Tacoma I’d go with besides a base model without the PreRunner nonsense or the “no-name” truck known as the HiLux everywhere else.

          • 0 avatar
            mnm4ever

            My buddy has an X-Runner, he took it to the autocross and did VERY well, he was beating many cars that should have done much better. Its fun for a truck…

    • 0 avatar
      mnm4ever

      Everyone continues to confuse resale value with an INCREASE in value.

    • 0 avatar
      Vega

      Good 993s are now going for above 50% of new. No Tacoma’s gonna beat that.

    • 0 avatar
      markholli

      Tacomas dwell in a magical realm where the word “depreciation” has no meaning. My friend has a 2003 4-door 4×4 that he bought 3 years ago with 115k for $12,500. It now has 145k, and I guarantee he could list it today for $13,000 and sell it within a week.

      Just today I was browsing car ads and saw a 2005 4×4 quad cab long bed with almost 200k with an asking price of $18,000!

  • avatar
    DeeDub

    The little devil on my shoulder keeps telling me that now is the time to buy the Z3 M Coupe I’ve lusted for 15 years. “Bottom of the depreciation curve!”, he keeps saying.

  • avatar
    gessvt

    Excellent choices all.

    If I had the extra cash, I would not hesitate to invest in a Renault 5 Turbo or any other Group B homologation special.

  • avatar
    imag

    The F355′s selling price will go up, but owning it will still cost tremendous sums of money. That kind of music doesn’t come cheap.

    • 0 avatar
      vaujot

      I have owned my 993 for four and a half years now and it has some serious appreciation to do before I break even on the maintenance costs. But the ride has been a lot of fun.

  • avatar
    chrishs2000

    Some guy near me had a ’97 ITR with 48k miles on craigslist for $10.5k. Bone stock. It looked like a real ad. I’m not sure if it was a scammer or if he just had no idea what he had.

  • avatar
    Johnny Bouncewell

    I’d invest my money on the Boston Celtics not winning the finals unless they get another French Licker.

  • avatar
    greaseyknight

    I can’t help but thinking that in the long term the 5th and 6th gen Civic coupe’s are going to be valuable, sorta like the 32 Ford 3 window is today. Bazillions made made back in the day, but most go used up or beat to death.

  • avatar
    mvoss

    On the list, I’d throw in an MB 190 E Evo II (but may already be a little old for the list), but great list!

  • avatar
    WaftableTorque

    Any Gemballa Porsche with “storage space” added that hasn’t been inspected by Customs agents.

  • avatar
    vaujot

    One white guy from French Lick actually made it to the NBA so for that town’s population, the statistics don’t look too bad.

  • avatar
    gearhead77

    “Only 500 “NA Spec” Defender 110 units came to the States, each equipped exactly the same: white, four-door, rust”

    I actually LOL’D at that last part.

    Great list. Finding any Integra that hasn’t been Fast and Furioused or eaten by the tin worm near me is not impossible. I was surprised when Auto Trader turned up 4 within 25 miles of Pittsburgh and shocked that none have a muffler by Folgers, giant CF wing and/or ill fitting body kit/hood. Or a DC skate shoes logo. One is actually a rather nice red 95 GS-R at 107k for $5000. Wouldn’t mind it actually. Parents had a 92 Integra LS at one point. Besides the automatic belts and automatic transmission, it was a good car, except it was really loud. Road noise was absolutely insane.

    I’d love any of the cars listed here, even the Defender. Alas, I might never get a chance, especially if Mr. Demuro’s predictions hold true.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Ah, a fellow yinzer I see.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        For those of us “from away” as we Mainers say, could someone explain what the heck a “yinzer” is? I’ve been to Pittsburg once, seemed like a nice place but I was working at CMU.

        • 0 avatar
          gearhead77

          Like most places, Pittsburgher’s seem to have their own dialect. “Pittsburghese” (Google it) is “spoken” by my 60+ y/o parents and older Pittsburghers in general. The closest thing is the Southern “Y’all”

          “What are y’all doing?”

          in Pittsburgh is:

          “What are yinz doing?”

          No one knows why. It’s like a contraction for “you ones” or something like that. No one said it is good grammar.

          Pittsburghese is also “spoken” by lower class folks,although I have friends who, like me, were born and raised in the suburbs, who talk like this.

          You wouldn’t have found much at CMU. Had you ventured into “Carik” (Carrick) “Sliberty” (East Liberty) you would have found more. You have a nice day n’nat (and that)

        • 0 avatar
          nine68

          “From away” or “flatlanders,” take your pick.

          I, too, laughed at the Defender description. I poked around one in my local Land Rover indie shop, and was astonished at the enormous gaps between the windshield and soft top. The truck was in mint condition, yet I can’t fathom those willing to drop big bucks for it.

          I’ll stick with my trusty (yes, trusty) ’02 P38. (Furiously knocking on wood.)

    • 0 avatar
      gslippy

      Another yinzer here, although my wife has trained most of it out of me. :)

      In this list, the -R is the only one I’d cross the street for.

      • 0 avatar
        gearhead77

        A Pittsburgher yes. Yinzer, never! Now for the rest of my family and extended family…

      • 0 avatar
        Syke

        Wimps. The true hardcore come from Johnstown.

        • 0 avatar
          AFX

          “Wimps. The true hardcore come from Johnstown.”

          Johnstown’s just a microcosm of Pittsburgh, only with Thunder In The Valley thrown in for good measure. Same former steel mills, same bombed out roads, Yinzer women in their late 40 with the same bangs and hairspray hairdo they had in highschool in the 80′s, guys walking around in camo jackets and ballcaps with beards or the Glenn Frey circa 1970 look, and rusted out pickups and tweakers with beaters. Even though I’m a guy, Johnstown makes me want to throw on a mumu, put my hair up in curlers, grab a bucket of chicken, and sit around all day “watchin’ ma stories” while I collect welfare, WIC, and child support in my Section 8 housing in the projects.

          The only good thing to come out of Johnstown is the Hanson Brothers from Slapshot, and they were ficticious.

  • avatar
    Monty

    I think there will be a few Detroit vehicles that will be worthy as collectors in a few years or decades.

    The Typhoon, Solstice/Sky twins, Cobalt SS – all due to a combination of small production and low survival numbers. In another 5 years, how many Cobalt SS cars will not have been beat to death?

    Think about it.

    • 0 avatar
      gearhead77

      I would add the Saturn Ion Redline to that. Bascially the Cobalt SS with Saturn funkiness. Even less of those than Cobalt SS?

      • 0 avatar
        mnm4ever

        Solstice/Sky yes. Cobalt SS or Ion Redline? Doubtful, they never attracted much of a following outside of the poorer end of the Fast and Furious crowd regardless of the performance. I see those going the way of the Beretta GTZ or Dodge Daytona or Omni GLH… sure someone might want one but even really perfect ones are cheap.

  • avatar
    DavidB

    No pre-1992 Jeep Grand Wagoneer? Really?

  • avatar

    Dad had a 93 RX-7 in black. The guy he sold it to crashed it on the test drive (minor, but expensive sheetmetal damage). Sad days, but it was headed into the old/pre-classic dead zone where cars are just dated and expensive.

    I simultaneously love and hate that clean classic 4x4s are getting collector-y. It’s nice to see them not just cut up and used and trail monsters, but it also means they’re getting rarer and more expensive.

    Also, you’re clearly an America-hating elitist communist for not including every RWD GM performance car from the last 10 years.

  • avatar
    Lorenzo

    I met a guy who claimed he bought one of the first-year AMC Pacers with all the options and put it in storage. He said he’s going to take it out of storage and put it in concours condition in 2025 when fifty years are up and get 100 times the original price. The way inflation is going, he might get it.

  • avatar
    Steve-O

    I was thinking the 1984-86 Mustang SVO would be a good candidate. High tech for the time that turned out to be a harbinger of things to come. Better handling (adjustible Konis) and braking (4 discs) than the 5.0 GT was icing on the cake. Good examples are still sub-$10k. I see some potential upside…

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      What’s an SVO? I get a lot of curious question by people young and old that have never see one before. They probably have, but weren’t paying attention.

      The SVO is a great alternative to the E30 M3 for less cash. I’m almost certain the M3 was a response to the SVO, but I’m probably mistaken.

      Anyways, it’s nice that the prices of SVOs are so stagnant and haven’t taken off, considering how scarce they are now. What’s keeping their prices down is also the reason their prices will never really skyrocket. People have to know something exists before it can ever be in high demand and therefor command a high price. It is a car I can enjoy on the odd weekend and walk away and get another if it gets totaled.

      • 0 avatar
        Vega

        I’m pretty sure no one in Munich’s M department even knew what an SVO was. The world doesn’t really revolve around the US when it comes to performance cars. The M3 was made as a homologation special for European Touring car racing.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          I figured I might be wrong however, the US is the M-series’ biggest market and I’m sure BMW of America is has been quite aware of what hits the streets here. BMW eventually put a design studio in southern California, the unofficial Meca of BMWs.

          • 0 avatar
            MeaCulpa

            The M3 had everything to do with mercedes and nothing to do with ford.

          • 0 avatar
            CJinSD

            The M3 was a group A homologation special. BMW could make changes to the production car provided they built 5,000 cars with those changes. As is sometimes the case with such cars, it caught on and they sold so many that they build subsequent ‘M3s’ that were just high performance versions of the 3 series, but the first ones were road legal racing cars. As Mea Culpa said, the most important place for the group A cars to race was German Touring car, where the conceptually-similar Mercedes 190E2.3-16 was its closest competitor. There was a Ford in the picture, but it was the Sierra Cosworth, no real relation to a Mustang SVO.

          • 0 avatar
            Vega

            There WAS a Mustang in DTM, but it had a V8 and usually made up the rear of the field
            Turbos were not allowed.

      • 0 avatar
        Steve-O

        I think one of the reasons the SVO prices have been stagnant is because the engine doesn’t get the respect from the majority of the Mustang fan-base. Never mind that the turbo 4 produced the same horsepower as the V8, handled better, braked better, looked better (in my opinion!)and was more fuel efficient — most Pony Car people don’t care unless it has a V8.

        Full disclosure: I have an SVO. ;)

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          The 2.3 turbo and stroker 2.5s have found there way into T-bucket roadsters, sandrails and 9 second Mustangs. These are no Pinto engines and good for 700 plus HP. That’s of course with massive turbos and O-ring’d heads etc. But they have all forged internals and high-nickel blocks.

        • 0 avatar
          raph

          It also helped that the GT was cheaper than the SVO and in most ‘murican minds, a V8 is a premium engine offering.

          Anyways all this Mustang talk reminds me of my favorite Integra Type R story. IIRC it was Sports Car magazine that ran a Mustang GT/Integra Type R shootout. The Integra Type R was supposed to embarrass the Mustang GT plenty in the shootout since it was both race bred and possessed of superior Japanese engineering (true on both counts I suppose, the Type R was a really nice car – especially that sweet little under square four Honda gave it). Unfortunately the track picked for the shootout favored the Mustang’s higher power V8 and didn’t have enough kinks or turns to keep the V8 reigned in and allow the better handling Type R to strut its stuff.

          The author admitted as much at the end of the article after the Mustang soundly beat the Type R.

          I never read any follow up comments published later on but I really wished the internet community had been accessible as it is today, to meander over to any number of Acura/Honda boards would have been epic reading indeed.

      • 0 avatar
        AFX

        “What’s an SVO? I get a lot of curious question by people young and old that have never see one before.”

        Just tell them it’s a special edition Mustang with a Pinto motor that has a hairdryer attached to it.

        • 0 avatar
          joeveto3

          I’ve always had a thing for the SVO. I still remember when it came out, and reading about it in all the car mags. It was just cool. The front end styling and the rear wing really looked European Cool for the time.

          If I remember correctly, the style and powertrain really set the stage for Merkur and the Thunderbird turbo.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            All the Euro snob car mags went nuts for the SVO and that’s what caught my attention. They hated Mustangs up till then. “…Goes Like a Scalded Cat!” I was 16 in ’84, but got to drive one at 19. Yeah, I was more than impressed. The power about doubles at full boost with the loudest turbo I’d ever heard.

          • 0 avatar
            mnm4ever

            I was 16 in ’86 and a friend of a friend had an SVO that was modded to the hilt, it was one of the fastest cars around, had a body kit, monochrome paint, all the 80s trends were represented. His dad had money and was into cars and bought it for the kid, who promptly lost his license. I had just gotten my license and this guy wanted someone to cruise around with who would drive his car, and I knew how to drive a stick. Talk about your dream jobs! I seriously barely new the guy, but became fast friends with him. He liked to have me drive him down to the beach, drop him off where he would hang out at the pier, and I could drive his car all night as long as I put gas in it. I would race other guys, do burnouts, pick up girls, that was a FUN few months. Came to an end when I backed it into a high curb and screwed up the exhaust and the body kit, he was a little ticked off and then soon after that got his license back. I think that car is why I love Mustangs.

            But no… no way BMW gave a rat’s butt about the SVO when they designed the M3.

  • avatar

    The last R7 is not just a great looking car (and the personal favorite of designer Tom Matano, who also did the first Miata), it’s also a wonderfully balanced sports car. I remember reviews comparing its cornering and handling to the Lotus Elan, which is high praise indeed.

    Finding one that’s still stock might be a problem but the last gen R7 is only going to appreciate in value in the long term.

  • avatar
    DGA

    Hmmm…I think the list is missing that turbo Buick deal from the 80s…

  • avatar
    seth1065

    No MR 2 ‘s I think they belong on the list

    • 0 avatar
      racer-esq.

      Shhh

    • 0 avatar
      mnm4ever

      I am keeping and restoring my MR2 Spyder, but more because we love it and can’t afford a Lotus Elise instead. But if it goes up in value, all the better!

      • 0 avatar
        jco

        just find a 2ZZ-GE, which was the same motor used in the Elise, and swap it in. why did Toyota not sell that combination..

        • 0 avatar
          mnm4ever

          Oh believe me, I have looked into it… for around $2500 I can get a 2ZZ with 6-speed, or I can get a custom built engine and trans for $6k or so from Monkey Wrench Racing with my choice of cams, final drive ratios, etc. If my engine ever goes I will consider it.

          But the Spyder is still 200 lbs heavier and not nearly as stiff as an Elise, even with chassis bracing. The suspension is not as good either. I doubt I will spend that much on it, the base car is actually quite fun and capable. The 1ZZ with a few cheaper upgrades is still a fun engine and bulletproof, but I would like a 6-sp to make it a bit more highway friendly.

          Toyota didn’t produce it with the 2ZZ because it was too fast for the US. Even with the 1ZZ it can get pretty loose in the rain and at highway speeds you feel a lot of lift in the nose. I am not sure I want it to have too much more power.

          • 0 avatar
            joeveto3

            Clean Spyders are still easy to find, and IMHO, fantastic cars. I think they are saved by their whiff of chick car. If we had another space in the garage, I’d grab one in a heartbeat.

  • avatar
    racer-esq.

    These are all already cult cars, so continued demand is likely, but I don’t see most of them doing more than keeping up with inflation. With the exception of the Audi. The Quattro is a significant part of Audi’s transformation from a weird VW subsidiary to a brand that arguably outshines BMW and Mercedes.

    I would bet on a first generation Insight with stick over an Integra Type-R.

    The final generation of rear engine VW vans/campers is going for stupid money. Hell, even Eurovans are, but they are an example of something I would short if that was possible.

    For what a Defender 110 or 90 costs, even grey market, you might as well go all the way and get a Unimog Doka.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    If things keep going the way they are with cars I can’t see any car rising in value due to pure nostalgia, these days people of Gen y often have to seek excuses to own a car through modifications, exclusivity or they own an old land yacht and completely despise driving.

    But then again I flunked “car guy school” when “diesel wagon appreciation day” showed up.

  • avatar
    Alexdi

    Given a choice between an RX7 with the original turbo rotary and a swapped LS V8, I’ll take the latter a hundred times over. The swap makes the car. It sounds wicked, goes like stink, and has more reliability with 200K than the original mill did off the showroom floor. The trick is making someone else eat the labor cost of the conversion.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    Was that BMW E30 the first car to have projector headlamps?

    And the Mercedes-Benz E63 AMG just might be one of those cars that soars in value, especially the current one…

    • 0 avatar
      joeveto3

      Those aren’t projectors but actually just old school sealed halogens.

      There was a time in the mid to late seventies, into the 80′s, when those dual round headlights just sort of signified a European car. I remember being six and first seeing them on an Audi Fox and thinking they were really cool.

      • 0 avatar
        redmondjp

        Au contraire, mon ami!

        They are indeed protectors – my roommate had a 1988 M3, and I changed one of his cracked headlights for him – it was my first time to ever see such a lamp assembly and boy was I ever impressed.

  • avatar
    philadlj

    Wow, only 500 Defender 110s came to the states? I’ve seen one in Baltimore! One of my classmates was driven to school in one of these every morning. I wonder if the kid knew how rare that truck was…

  • avatar
    Tim_Turbo

    I dated a girl who had an Integra Type-R….funny thing is she liked driving my MX-3 more, for some reason….I think it might have been because I had put a much nicer stereo in my car. I was always glad to trade for the day, that car was just a blast to drive. Probably should have bought it from her or maybe worked out a trade…..

  • avatar
    jed592

    1997-1998 Nissan 240sx.

    • 0 avatar
      mnm4ever

      Oh good one! And I had one… a 1998, they only imported about 1200 that year and they are rare. Mine was completely stock and in excellent condition too, but it was an automatic with 105k and bad rings. I had a hard time deciding to sell it, but I had to decide if I was to keep it I needed to put the money into it to fix it and keep it and I had too many projects at the time. I ended up selling it for $7k to a guy who swore he was going to restore it and not destroy it. I still was sorry to see it go, I really think I am going to regret that one someday.

      The problem with the 240 is that it isn’t that great when stock. It needed a whole new suspension, a manual conversion, and more power. They take very well to mods, but you can spend a lot of money on them too.

      • 0 avatar
        Tim_Turbo

        Well here you go…of course up here it’s probably got some rust issues going on.

        http://maine.craigslist.org/cto/3706189175.html

        For fun I go on craigslist and type in “rare” just to see what people think as rare. I agree on this one.

        • 0 avatar
          Steve65

          It’s fun seeing what they think is “lightly ” modified, too.

          (ad text pasted to preserve for posterity:
          Looking into selling my lightly modded 1997 deep fuchsia kouki.

          Vehicle for Sale
          Year: 199
          Make: Nissan
          Model: 240SX
          Trim: SE
          Engine: ka24
          Transmission: automatic(have full 5 speed swap except master, slave, and lines)
          Color: deep fuchsia/purple (one of the rarest kouki colors)
          Mileage: 187,000
          Price: $ 6,000 or best offer
          Location: Westbrook, Maine
          Phone #: 207-one22-34five6
          —————-
          Mods: megan track series coilovers, q45 front brakes(3000 miles), 350z wheels, front tension rods, RUCAS, toe, traction (not sure the brand on the suspension arms), stock vlsd(came with open), fiberglass oem style fornt lip(ziptied but looks alright)
          Rust: front drivers side wheel well has a small spot other than that its very clean
          Mechanical Condition: car runs perfect, no weird engine noises and tranny shifts smooth. Engine light is on due to rear O2 sensor($60 part) and knock sensor(i have a new one, just needs to be installed)
          Body/Interior Condition: interior is a 9/10, exterior: clear coat is peeling a little bit on the hood and roof but only noticeable up close )

  • avatar
    ronbo56

    The Defender 110 NAS is a great choice, since even the much more common 90s from ’95 and ’97 are holding their value. Very expensive, though.

    The 355 is also a good choice. It’s better looking than the 348 and less common than the 360, and is supposed to be pretty reliable, too. But if your price point includes a six figure Defender, you might want to consider a ’72 365GTC/4. Stunning in every color but especially cool in black (which makes the “clown lips” disappear), great exhaust note, more drivable than the Daytona and a fraction of its cost.

  • avatar
    Crabspirits

    I have a lot of problems with your list.

    The M3, Rx7, and Supra shouldn’t be here for the same reasons the GN isn’t here. These cars have hit their ceiling. The M3 in particular is in the stratosphere.

    The Audi Quattro? Nobody remembers this car. Somebody I know has a nice one in his shop, and commented that it’s performance unremarkable, and not much fun to drive either.

    The 500E will be just another car.

    The SUV’s are a maybe, but the Bronco might already be in the GN club. I don’t recall ever seeing one on the street, but there is a garage near me that has 2 minty ones inside. They never come out, and I assume that’s what all of them do.

    Here are my pics:
    -K car.
    Yes, K car. Here’s your penny stock of a car. You can get a really nice American version of the Trabant for less than $1000. These cars were once everywhere, and will rapidly disappear soon. Laugh all you want. Some day, these most generic of cars will gain a following.

    -1973-87 C/K trucks.
    All of these are sitting in fields across the country, waiting to be restored on the cheap. Gen X retirees will want them back. They are already showing up in country music videos as THE truck to have.

    -1962-64 Chevy Impala 2 door.
    The star of so many 90′s rap videos, the Impala is still the dream car of many who grew up listening to Dr. Dre. Non SS 2 doors are an insane value these days. These are super easy and cheap to restore thanks to the extensive aftermarket providing reproduction parts.

    • 0 avatar

      Hmm. The E30 M3 will not rise, the 500E is just another car, but the K-Car is going to gain a following. I would submit this comment is among the more unexpected.

      • 0 avatar
        Kevin Jaeger

        A very polite way of putting it. But then he does create those wonderful little fictional stories set in the last moments of those cars’ lives just before they end up as Murilee’s junkyard find.

        Perhaps this is an alternate universe type piece of fiction?

      • 0 avatar
        gearhead77

        In theory I agree with crabspirits. This article and the others are all about speculation. A plain K car today in good shape with low miles might be $2500 and that’s probably high. Someone MIGHT want to pay $5000 for it in 10 years and so on. A Mark Cross T&C convertible? Maybe double those numbers. MAYBE!

        Think of all the stuff that crosses the Mecum block and others. For every 40k+ 57 Chevy Bel Air with the 283, there’s a 57 150 with the six and three on the tree for high teens to low 20′s. These cars were considered junk mostly by 1970, even by the people who had them as first wheels.

        Although, as a tail end Gen X’er, I don’t think we’ll see the values climb for cars of my youth like the Boomers. Not that I’d put one away with the hopes of hitting the jackpot.

        No one remembers the Quattro here because it wasn’t popular here and I forgot about the “specialness” of the 500E, as I’m sure many others did too.

        • 0 avatar
          Kevin Jaeger

          Agreed, we are just speculating on what future wealthy people will be willing to collect. Maybe limited edition Suburbans, Cavaliers or the earliest Hyundais for all we know. We’re talking about a demographic we aren’t part of.

          I’m just finding it hard to see people suddenly deciding they just have to have one of the last remaining K-cars. I may be wrong.

          • 0 avatar
            joeveto3

            You could argue just about any car in excellent condition will be worth something more than original msrp (or whatever today’s acquisition cost is) 30 years from now. But there are, shall we say, carrying costs that are incurred every year you own one of these. It doesn’t matter what it is, but the more exotic, the exponentially higher the cost.

            How many times do you see a recently restored gem offered up at auction that sells for less than what it cost to restore? Constantly? The rule more than the exception?

            Insurance
            Paint jobs
            Mechanical issues
            A mouse sneaks in and makes herself a home with the wiring

            As Doug said, you have a better shot at the NBA…

          • 0 avatar
            Crabspirits

            My theory on the K-car is thus.

            The shape of the Reliant and Aries K’s are SO remarkably generic, it’s almost beautiful. Ask a 5 year old to draw “a car”, and he will draw you an Aries coupe. From a styling standpoint, it’s timeless. Then you have them in films, Ferris Bueller, Planes Trains and Automobiles, etc.

            The unusually roomy interior with a bench seat (“what’s that?”) will make it a kinda fun to drive car in the future.

            Hell, I bet I could make a ton of money RIGHT NOW, by buying them and shipping them to Japan. They already love Astro and Dodge vans, old cop cars, and Bubble Caprice Wagons.

            The Mark Cross and T&C verts should climb in value for sure. The wood paneled T&C’s are the 80′s equivalent to the 50′s “fin era”. (Yes, I’m aware the wood was a throwback, but when done in the 80′s, it was unapologetically garish.)

            Remember, this is an INVESTMENT. Going all in on an M3 at an already insane price point, and hoping to find somebody who cares about cars in the future isn’t very wise. A better option would be to buy a Lemons-race-clogging standard E30 if you want to see gains. Remember, this latest generation doesn’t even like cars. You don’t want to go blowing your wad on some Typhoon.

          • 0 avatar
            Crabspirits

            We already have an editor trying to find the last of the 1st gen Taurii in a specific trim that isn’t beat to hell. It’s actually pretty rare.

            Add 1st gen Taurus/Sable to my list.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            @joeveto3

            I agree for the most part. Probably the best bet for keeping ahead of inflation is one of the popular but not too spendy British roadsters. Buy the absolute best one you can afford for 1/2 what someone else spent on it, and you will never lose money on it if you use it sparingly. And once they have been put together properly, they are reliable.

            I have a nice ’74 Spitfire that I have owned for 18 years. I figure over the past decade it has cost me just about $200/yr to maintain, insure, and register. I drive it about 1000 miles a year. Might be $250 this year, time for a tuneup. Cheap fun.

          • 0 avatar
            Athos Nobile

            So your theory for the K-car is that it will become the Falcon/240/Dart of the future frugal people?

          • 0 avatar
            gearhead77

            There is a small segment that collects “nerd cars”. The Plymouth Horizon/Dodge Omni twins, Chevette, Pacer and I don’t know what else fall into this group.

            Even as a small niche, there are probably people in that group that will pay $5000 now for a showroom car that wasn’t that much new.

            The purpose of investment,as we all know, is to buy low and sell high. Buying a decent $2500 car now and selling it for $5000, if you can get away with minor repairs, is a pretty good ROI for a pretty bad investment vehicle. Renting storage would certainly destroy value, as would insurance, fuel, registration if you keep it road legal.

          • 0 avatar
            Joe McKinney

            Regarding the Nerd Cars, I like minivans and think it would be neat to assemble a collection of older minivans from the mid-1980′s to early 1990′s. The problem here is that these vans are getting scarce and finding nice originals examples could be difficult.

            While many people owned these, no one has bothered saving them. In the future it will be fun to see an early Chrysler Minivan or GM Dustbuster at a car show much like seeing an old station wagon at a car show today.

    • 0 avatar
      Athos Nobile

      I am with you on the 73-87 C/Ks (I love those, specially the early ones), but I’ll add the 88-98 ones to your list. Give them a couple of years.

      I check BAT daily, and seeing the prices there I think the traditional Saab 99/900 turbo should be on the list.

      On the classic SUV front, I am with the camp that thinks the SJ will increase in value. I can see (hopefully) classic Range Rovers there too.

      Down here I see the FG Falcon XR8 raising in value as it is pretty solid ATM in the used car market.

      Skyline GT-Rs, R32; R33; R34. Regular GT and GT-whatever will increasingly convert into Skycrap as they become P-platter fodder.

      VT Commodores will also soar in price.

      Once downsized engines take a real hold on the market, almost anything V8 will soar. But we’ll have to wait 10-15 years for that.

      Why the hachi-roku didn’t get a mention?, or the Porsche 964 (pre-993 911)?

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        Is the 964 going to appreciate? People already want the 993s, as they were the final and best of the 911s. I think there is potential for the 3.2 Carrera to appreciate as well, as it was the last of the torsion bar cars, last with the classic looks, reasonably light, and had the best engine of the various torsion bar cars. I’m not as familiar with exploding airboxes on 3.2s as I am with SCs anyway. The 964 comes off as the awkward middle child between the graceful 911s and the accomplished 993s. I’m saying that even though the most fun of my rear engined Porsche experiences came in one of two 964s that I drove about 20 years ago. The RS America was cool, even though I was never a fan of the whale tail. I think they’re already worth typically crazy collectible Porsche money though. They were a rare moment when Porsche actually added value to a special edition, instead of just price. Looking back, the other time they did that was in creating the 356 Speedster, which was meant to be an entry level car and turned out to be the best weekend racer of the line. Anyway, the RSA is already at least red chip, and the rest of the 964s are probably going to appreciate as fast as the 996s.

  • avatar
    vaujot

    After some consideration, I disagree with the 993 and the Ferrari 355.
    In order to be a good investment, cars have to be underappreciated, relatively cheap to keep running and rare. 993 fails all three criteria and a Ferrari 355 the first two. Owning old Ferraris is really for people who are either professional mechanics looking for a hobby car or who can afford to own new Ferraris.
    If I was an investor, my money would be on the BMW Z3 Coupe, the Porsche 968 and Alfasud Sprint. None of them will rise to the stratosphere but I suspect, if you keep them long enough, you may do well.
    [Note: I am in Europe so the US perspective might be somewhat different.]

    • 0 avatar
      mbardeen

      I’m right there with you on the 968… I’ve got one myself. Fairly unknown, end of the line (i.e. the most evolved) of the 4-cyl front engine Porsches, but a good handler with enough engine.

      I bought 1 of only 3 968s imported to Chile, and it’s the only cab. Chile prohibits used car imports in general, so I hope to recoup my money for the purchase and restoration some point in the future.

      • 0 avatar
        nine68

        I, too, hope 968s hold their value (I’ve owned four), but I don’t think they’ll ever be considered “classic” Porsches. It’s still a great car to drive, parts are relatively easy to find (many shared with the 944), and they’re cheap enough to make an attractive track car, although, depending on modifications, they may don’t neatly fit into existing amateur racing classes.

        Well-maintained convertibles are numerous and a joy to drive. They still look good, too, aging much better than other cars of the early ’90s.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    General rule of thumb when it comes to investment vehicles: http://02varvara.files.wordpress.com/2011/04/01-how-about-no-bear.jpg?w=800

    I’ll soon own a 1967 Mustang convertible “rescuing” it from my father who doesn’t feel that he has the time or the energy anymore. I’m not buying it as some kind of investment, I’m buying it to drive it. Resale and the money I put into it be damned.

    • 0 avatar
      mikey

      @PrincipleDan…..Very cool car dude. I do like your attitude. Drive for yourself. Its already a very disireable car. The next owner? May have a different view. Who cares?

      Enjoy you car!

  • avatar
    Compaq Deskpro

    96 Caprice LT1 police cars

    Rare because most have been turned into taxis, Impala SS clones, or donks.

    Super fast Corvette motor!

    Alright I’ll stop.

  • avatar
    BeyondBelief

    Doug, you specifically call out the International Scout as receiving no love from you but the Bronco of the same era does? Curious.

    Though, having seen the shenanigans that occur at BJ auctions, I wouldn’t be surprised to see IT cornbinders up on the stage going for big money.

    I was surprised to see 240z-260z-280z didn’t make the cut. Or Series 1 E-type Jags.

    • 0 avatar
      AFX

      “Doug, you specifically call out the International Scout as receiving no love from you but the Bronco of the same era does? Curious.”

      Baja Bronco…..and roll cage with a sprint car wing mounted on top of it, nuff said.

    • 0 avatar

      This is an interesting question. Personally, I think people do and will continue to find the Bronco more fashionable. The Scout seems to have a bit more of a grunge following.

      Series I E-Types seem too obvious – almost like Pagoda SLs. And, of course, cornbinders.

  • avatar
    Darrencardinal1

    Someone else may have already mentioned these, but how about the first gen NA Miatas?

    Jay Leno, among others, has mentioned these as a collectable.

    A true classic and a legendary sportscar. And they are still pretty affordable.

    They are the first and somehow the most “pure” of the Miatas. The pop-up headlights are adorable.

  • avatar
    Wheeljack

    I would add the 2005-2006 Jeep Wrangler Rubicon Unlimited to the list of 4x4s that will go up. They only built around 12,500 of them and a lot of them have been beaten to death off road or modified to excess. They will become the Scrambler of that series of Jeeps.

  • avatar
    AFX

    How about a CRX-Si ?.

    It’s almost impossible to find an original one that isn’t rusted, riced out, or primer and flat black. Any CRX search on the internet will bring back the words “engine swap”, “cold air intake/fartcan exhaust”, “JDM”.

  • avatar
    Darrencardinal1

    I second the CRX Si. I always liked these.

    Someone at work has one. It’s rough but it runs, and could be fixed up. And does not appear to have been lowered, have a fartcan, etc.

    We will never see one like that again.

  • avatar
    Morea

    With the return of Alfa to the US expect the older cars like Duettos and Bertone coupés to move up in value.

  • avatar
    korvetkeith

    Old cars I want. Don’t buy them!

    560 SEC
    C4 ZR1
    850
    K5 blazer
    Ferrari 550
    Panoz AIV roadster

    Cars I kinda want:
    Notchback 5.0
    Aston Martin
    Callaway twin turbo vette
    993
    CL 65 amg
    512 TR

    Basically anything sunjay has.

  • avatar
    MMH

    Mostly totally unrelated question: why are
    - most cars referred to by a model and year, while
    - some special cars referred to by particular monikers with asterisks like “MKVII” and FJ40″ while
    - BMW-philes can use some obscure letter/number combination that might be a model and year or might be the weight of oil Valvoline put in my car during the last visit there?

    • 0 avatar

      The worst part about it is that “E” originally stood for Entwicklung, the German word for “Development.” But as the “E” numbers gained cult status, BMW decided to capitalize on the marketing and gave the cars cool numbers. That’s why all the new one end in zero – E60, E90, etc.

      When they hit the end of E, they went to F, which now makes absolutely no sense.

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        I was a BMW nut for over twenty years and yet I didn’t know the origins of the E! Thanks, I am now a bigger repository of useless BMW trivia. I’ll roll that bit of information out if they ever start making worthy cars again.

      • 0 avatar
        MeaCulpa

        Like the first cars using the “F” codes: the F01, F02 F03 and F04 all ending with a zero… “Oh Snap!” Says the F07, F11, F12, F13, F25, F32 and F34. Put simply they ran out of E:s and started on the F:s as every project is assigned a code, even the stillborn ones.

        • 0 avatar

          That’s precisely my point. If “E” actually stood for Entwicklung, as it did at the beginning, then hitting E99 should’ve just turned to E100. But now that it’s a marketing opportunity, it bizarrely went to F.

          Then again, we shouldn’t be surprised, as this is a car company that believes it’s appropriate to name a trim level “sDrive35is.”

  • avatar
    moawdtsi

    I think the EVO8,9′s will be sought after some day. They are in the whole fast and furious realm, expensive in the day and now they are all ragged out and modded to heck. Also the SRT-4. I don’t see these cars around at all anymore. All were highly modded, many were wrecked.

  • avatar
    markholli

    “And about 1,000 more were lowered by people who think modifications add value.”

    I’m glad you brought this up, Doug. I wish this point could somehow be driven deep into the minds of auto enthusiasts everywhere: your car is worth more bone-stock.

    I laugh every time I see a listing for a car or truck that is several thousand more than others of the same make and model. Invariably the seller’s description contains a list of modifications and the cost of each, thus arriving at the inflated price. Then usually something like “this price is wayyy low, considering how much I’ve put into the car.”

  • avatar
    BeyondBelief

    Nobody has mentioned the awesomeness that is the Celebrity Eurosport.

    I kid.

  • avatar
    old fart

    Wow sounds like a car and driver article, as American cars aren’t worthy of mention.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      Those of us “in the know” are keeping quiet about the real American collectible gems. Keep this under your hat, but one of the gems is the first year 1964 Rambler American. It’s like the Audi 100 BEFORE there even WAS an Audi 100. In fact, there are rumors Audi copied the American.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    I’d like to nominate the original SC400. I think it’s at the bottom of depreciation now at ~20 years old, and pristine examples of the last-ish personal Japanese luxury coupe will be valuable. Plus many have been modded/changed by those with poor taste and a thin wallet, making them more rare.

    Black on black, gold emblems please.

    Also, possibly the MKVIII.


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