By on December 12, 2012

Even though some blogs were reporting engineering breakthroughs regarding the Jaguar C-X75’s innovative powertrain, Jaguar has confirmed that the car is dead.

Speaking to Autocar, Jaguar boss Adrian Hallmark said

“We feel we could make the car work, but looking at the global austerity measures in place now, it seems the wrong time to launch an £800,000 to £1 million supercar,” said Hallmark. “This is backed up by other products from us that people are screaming out for.” 

Five prototypes are near completion, and three of the cars will be auctioned off to members of the public. Two will be kept by Jaguar, one for its museum collection and other as a running demonstrator.

While the concept C-X75 used a turbine powertrain along with four electric motors, the production car was set to use a turbocharged and supercharged 1.6L 4-cylinder and a hybrid powertrain for a combined 888 horsepower and 590 lb-ft of torque, with a 60 mile all-electric range.

Hallmark also said that the hybrid system, small displacement engine technology and aerodynamic work would be carried over to Jaguar’s future models.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

32 Comments on “Jaguar C-X75 Dead...”


  • avatar
    raph

    Good, another super car spared the indignity of FOTM powertrains.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    It was a dumb idea to begin with. And it looks like an IRobot Roomba. I do hope this spawns a diesel hybrid powertrain though. That would work pretty well in an XJ.

  • avatar
    Easton

    Seems like more of an insult to people to waste so much money developing are car only to cancel it so late in its development than to offer an expensive super car.

    • 0 avatar
      Greg Locock

      No, by the time you have built 5 protos you have only spent a small fraction of the total required to get into production. they’ve probably spent 10 or 20 mill so far, the whole project would be at least 200 and probably 500 million.

      You get very used to seeing projects abandoned. Worst I saw was a big 3 car one year from launch that was delayed by 2 years and then eventually cancelled. So they’d have paid for most of the tooling and homologation costs by then.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    It would have been fun to own a car that was a new Jaguar platform, with a new power train, and a new hybrid system.

    new technology + Jaguar + British = ________

    • 0 avatar
      NMGOM

      = ____________ (Disaster?)

    • 0 avatar
      Robert Gordon

      So disk brakes were a disaster were they? Interesting historical perspective you have! An what of,multiplexing, autonomous cruise control, vehicle to infrastructure – all complete duffers too?

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Bit of a difference between disc brakes and hybrid electric/turbine technology. The disc brakes were just an improvement over drum brakes. The turbine isn’t an improvement over an existing turbine, it’s all new.

      • 0 avatar
        Robert Gordon

        My profoundest apologies, for I was unable to infer that obvious qualification from the initial ‘new technology + British + Jaguar =’ remark.

        Forgive me also for applying the analogy – Disk brakes are clearly just a minor detail development of drum brakes. I was labouring under the delusion that a hybrid system when distilled to essentials is just a different way to make the car go, like a disk brake is a new concept in making the car stop.

        The group that now constitutes JLR also have absolutely no experience in gas turbines, and the plant that now makes Range Rovers wasn’t where the worlds first gas turbine car was made.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Subtle. You’re good at sarcasm. Maybe we can learn the difference between disk and disc next.

        By your “analogy,” a horse made a car go, as well as a steam engine. So those are the same as a hybrid turbine as well. (And by the by, a hybrid electric turbine has very little to do with a Rover-sourced gas turbine car from 60+ years ago.

      • 0 avatar
        Robert Gordon

        “Subtle. You’re good at sarcasm. Maybe we can learn the difference between disk and disc next.”

        That the best you got? Sort of like a boxer flailing on the way to the canvas. You made a glib statement about Jaguar and new technology with a bit of a national insult thrown in for good measure and I responded with a knock-out example that completely disproved your theory. Take it on the chin.

      • 0 avatar
        TW4

        Until you can disprove Jaguars of the 1970s and 1980s, you have not made a convincing argument.

      • 0 avatar
        el scotto

        Another of many Brits who waves the Union Jack and sputters but we made it here first! Yes, but rarely developed or perfected on that noble isle. Another one of many Brits who keeps a stiff upper lip and refuses to say anything about British Leyland’s debacles. However they can’t wait to pounce on and try to pummel silly those loud, rude, fat colonialists working for Ford who came to British car companies and introduced silly things like modern production techniques and quality control. Really old bean; cars should be made in a group of sheds, finances should be how many fivers are in the cigar box, and they’re quality because they’re bespoke. Deming? Isn’t he some Scottish chap? The Yanks cocked it all up, I’m going for a pint.

      • 0 avatar
        Robert Gordon

        “Until you can disprove Jaguars of the 1970s and 1980s, you have not made a convincing argument.”

        Disprove Jaguars? Not exactly sure how you disprove something in the existential!

        Facetiousness aside, I presume you are referring to Jaguar’s less than stellar build standards of that era. Whilst that is undeniably true (having said that I had a 1973 E type and a 1985 Sovereign, both of which were lovely), it is also a completely different proposition from the one that started this string of responses.

        That was “new technology + Jaguar + British = {disaster}”, which of course implies that Jaguar is somehow incapable of implementing new technology. The + British is at best tautological (since Jaguar is ostensibly at least, a British company) and at worst prejudicial since it could also be construed to mean those working at Jaguar but not from Wales, Scotland or England were exempt.

        But anyway I digress, Jaguars have always been somewhat technologically conservative. On the occasions where they have been avant garde, such as the aforementioned disk brakes, independent rear suspension, aerodynamics and more latterly pioneering multiplexing buses, and Autonomous Cruise Control – this has been executed very well.

        In other words their problems with build reliable vehicles in the 70’s and 80’s were not due to new technologies, but for other reasons, primarily related to lack of funds and poor management.

        I suggest that given the track record of the current management there is no institutional or expertise impediment to a well funded Jaguar implementing advanced technology successfully. That there is some inherent inability is precisely what is being stated, and with that i take issue.

  • avatar
    BigMeats

    “other products from us that people are screaming out for.”

    One of us is delusional.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Exactly. What products would those be? A new XK since that one’s old? A new XF since that’s old? A new XJ since it’s new but nobody’s buying?

      • 0 avatar
        Maymar

        Given the relative success of the Evoque,(at least compared to the rest of the Land Rover brand), I could see the merit in a proper 3-Series fighting Jag. Use the Evoque’s I4 and AWD, and similar styling to the XF/XJ, and the B&B might hate it, but they’ll lease a pretty healthy number of them.

  • avatar
    Pan

    Ah, disc brakes. Didn’t Imperial offer full contact Kelsey Hayes disc brakes in 1951?

    • 0 avatar
      el scotto

      FWIW: The product innovations continued into the boom years of the 1960s when Kelsey-Hayes was a pioneer in the development of disc brake systems. Kelsey-Hayes disc brake systems beat out the competition and became standard equipment on Lincoln Continentals and Thunderbirds, and by the time the 1970s rolled around, 85 percent of U.S. cars came with Kelsey-Hayes disc brakes. Kelsey-Hayes replaced Bendix as the number one brake supplier to Ford. http://www.fundinguniverse.com/company-histories/kelsey-hayes-group-of-companies-history/ I had the honor to meet John Kelsey SR. He was really neat, a combination of old school charm/politeness, genius, and a raconteur about the “old days”.

    • 0 avatar
      el scotto

      8 Passenger and limo Imperials did. http://www.imperialclub.com/Yr/1951/Brochure/Back.jpg

    • 0 avatar
      Robert Gordon

      “Ah, disc brakes. Didn’t Imperial offer full contact Kelsey Hayes disc brakes in 1951?”

      No.

      http://www.curbsideclassic.com/blog/1950-chrysler-crown-imperial-four-wheel-disc-brakes-standard-but-not-like-modern-discs/

      • 0 avatar
        el scotto

        Your link cites a TTAC article about a 1950 Imperial. Mine cites a Chrysler 1951 Imperial sales brochure. I humbly think my source is more authoritative.

      • 0 avatar
        Robert Gordon

        There is a difference between authorative and informative. The sales brochure says virtually nothing save for a reference to a “Chrysler Hydraulic Self Energizing, self adjusting disc brakes”

        Where in the text does it support the assertion that they were Kelsey Hayes? They were Ausco-Lambert contrivances that to all intents and purposes were clutch assemblies acting in reverse. They were nothing like what we know as disc brakes.

  • avatar
    ExPatBrit

    Probably couldn’t source enough supplies of Lucas “magic smoke”.

  • avatar
    ICARFAN

    I see quite a few 70’s and 80’s Jags running around and those six cylinder motors sound remarkably like a small block Chevy.

    • 0 avatar
      MRF 95 T-Bird

      Actually they could be. Many 70′s and 80′s Jags have had small block Chevy engine swaps. There are a few companies that offer conversion kits and installation. Fairly inexpensive as well especially when you can find a decent XJ or XJS for a reasonable price. The Jag six is a legendary motor but the small block Chevy is far more reliable. Now if someone could only do something about those Lucas electrics…

  • avatar
    vanwestcoaster

    Okay, technicals are a bit of a challenge…but a round of applause for the designers – that’s one sexy ride.

  • avatar
    Pan

    Disc Brakes continued::
    When they finally started to become standard equipment, in the late 1950’s ( generally on front wheels only because of hand brake issues ), were the first disc brakes only on British cars, and Girling by brand, made under licence from Bendix?


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Subscribe without commenting

Recent Comments

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributing Writers

  • Jack Baruth, United States
  • Brendan McAleer, Canada
  • Marcelo De Vasconcellos, Brazil
  • Vojta Dobes, Czech Republic
  • Matthias Gasnier, Australia
  • W. Christian 'Mental' Ward, Abu Dhabi
  • Mark Stevenson, Canada
  • Cameron Aubernon, United States
  • J Emerson, United States