By on September 20, 2012

How similar is a man to his brother? Their parents flipped the chromosonal coin twenty-five thousand times with each. Perhaps they are entirely different, individuals in perfect reversal. Perhaps they are identical twins. But it’s rarely that simple. Imagine two brothers, similar and different. One is balanced, light, controlled; the other is brutish, temperamental, dramatic. One is well-liked everywhere he goes; the other is either despised or adored. Yet they are both capable of callous viciousness, careless love, arrogant intellect, base stupidity. It would be a rare woman who would want them both.

We’re obviously talking about the 2013 Boss 302 and Shelby GT500, right? As fate would have it, I happened to have the Shelby for a week. In the course of that week I drove it over a thousand miles on gnarled back roads and ruler-straight Midwestern freeways, took it to five different states, and hammered it to one hundred and sixty-eight miles per hour on the back straight of Virginia International Raceway. I would have loved to have compared it to the Camaro ZL1, but I’ll need to do a few more Sonic advertorials before I get GM loaner cars here in the States. Instead, I compared the big Shelby to the only car that its purchasers are likely to genuinely consider. Brother Boss, step forward.

I found Instagram fancier and former professional bluesman Bark M. relaxing with his son at his rather oversized Kentucky home. “You interested in checking out the Shelby?” I inquired, already knowing the answer. We rolled down Route 1958 near Winchester in tandem, two middle-aged guys laughing their heads off, cranking the music, nodding at the open-mouthed Fox Mustang and F-150 drivers rolling the other way. At any speed up to about a hundred miles per hour, the GT500 can smoke the rear tires on the roll, the force-fed 5.8-liter making instant and Herculean power. The Boss has a lighter nose and a lesser twist, but it snarls viciously through its side-bypass exhaust.

It’s interesting how different these two brothers are. There’s a twenty-thousand-dollar gap between Bark’s Recaros-and-Torsen Boss and my Performance-Pack-and-Track-Package Shelby, and it’s reflected in various little ways, from the Shelby’s leather trim to the no-frills stereo fitted in the 302. When we come to a halt, Bark immediately demands to look at the Shelby’s suspension. “Not adjustable,” he sneers.

“It is, with a button on the dashboard.” His expression is contemptuous.

“Hope one of those two settings is right, then.” Nor does the GT500 have the massive strut tower brace fitted to the Boss. This is probably because the 5.8-liter block is visibly taller and deeper. It looks squeezed into the engine compartment where the five-liter simply fits.


I know Ford’s M3-mauling ponycar pretty well, but Bark has no such Shelby experience. I toss him the keys and watch him disappear down a two-lane, back wheels spinning, the back of the car hanging almost into the ditch. He’s an autocrosser, I’m a road racer, but we’re both part of what NASA’s director of competition, John Lindsey, once called “the brotherhood of speed” in an email to me. Full disclosure: the occasion on the email was my putting a fellow “brother of speed” on a LifeFlight. Oh well.

Bark returns half an hour later. I’d spent the time helping his five-year-old son photograph bugs in the church garden. Bark’s son is quiet in his concentration, while mine is outgoing and easily distracted. I remember Bark being a lot like my son as a child; my mother says I was a lot like his son. Perhaps the gods have decided to make us raise each other.

And now we’ll turn this review over to Bark for a moment to get his impressions:

When first sitting in the GT500, everything seemed familiar. A couple of slight differences-I actually prefer the all alcantara steering wheel on the 302 as opposed to the half leather/half alcantara on the GT500. Seems like that would make the dreaded shuffle steering on an autocross course really challenging. The white shift knob on the GT500 sticks out a little too much for me-I prefer the 8 ball look of the knob on the 302.

Now, when it comes to driving-it’s really an either/or type of situation. If you want to go very, very fast in a straight line in a very, very composed fashion, the Shelby is the pick. The whine of the supercharger is constant, making a very smooth torque curve and a seamless, disturbingly quick jaunt to triple digits. Steering with the throttle is a dicey proposition. The Goodyears are a little grippier than the Pirellis on the Boss, but they aren’t as predictable.

The Boss does everything a little more slowly than the Shelby, but it’s more exciting. The transmission isn’t as smooth, but that seems to make each shift a little more thrilling. The rear end is predictable and willing to dance in comparison to the Shelby. It’s the more “raw” of the two cars-you get a lot more feedback from the Boss, and it seems more amenable to having a two-way discussion.

Surprisingly, the Shelby seems to be more refined in its delivery of power. I wonder if that has something to do with the target audience of the cars? The Shelby seems like it would be quite at home being piloted by a lead-footed man in his fifties, while the Boss seems more like the Gen X car.

I don’t disagree with his conclusions, although I prefer the Tremec transmission in the Shelby. I have a suspicion that it will last longer. In fairness, I’ve never had a missed shift with either on-track. In concession to my loathsome taste in food, Bark agrees to eat at McDonald’s with me despite the likely effect on his P90X workouts. We spend half an hour answering questions about the cars, and then it’s time for me to head to VIR.


My partner in crime, the infamous Vodka McBigBra, has always wanted to see the “Natural Bridge” in Kentucky, so I plot a 350-mile route down the mountain two-lanes and we set off. The two-mile hike to the top of the rather unique rock formation is a bit tiring, but amazingly enough in this liability-conscious era we are permitted to walk along the top. An attractive, predictably-tattooed couple is attempting to take a self-shot with the girl’s iPhone. “Let me take the photo for you,” I offer.

“Nope,” she replies, “we’re trying to do this the reverse way. For once,” she snarls at the boy, and I can’t repress the chuckle.

“My advice,” I tell him, “is to cancel your XBox Live account.” Youth is wasted on the young.

As Kentucky Route 80 enters Hazard County, (yes! that Hazard County!) it becomes a wide two-lane with long stretches up the mountains and lumbering trucks dragging clumps of frustrated cars in their wake. I squeeze the steering wheel three times as I always do in the pace lap. Time to grab third and light the fire beneath this intercontinental ballistic Mustang. Across the dotted line and there’s one car gone already, then twothreefour — there’s a shape coming my way — fivesix – I can now clearly identify the oncoming car as a Camry — seveneight — yes, it’s a black-grilled SE — ninetentruck! I step off the throttle as we pass the Freightliner’s cab and the Shelby sonic-boom rattles his doorhandle. The Camry doesn’t even bother to honk. He’d been prepared to be angry but the GT500 eats traffic like a B-58 Hustler on the afterburners and I’d never really been in his way.

We do it again. And again. And again. Finally, as we blast up what looks like a six percent grade, someone takes offense. He’s at the head of the line in a boosted Cummins diesel Ram and I see his vertical cab pipes blast a twin Mount St. Helens of smoke as he spots the Shelby coming in the mirror. He’s full-throttle, leaping from the car behind like a drag racer. I know from experience that some of these tuned-up trucks can be deceptively fast. Some of them run in the elevens, and we still have three or four cars to get past. He catches my eye in the mirror and smiles. I smile too. The programmable “SVT” light on the dashboard flashes, and while I still have his eye I reach down… Fourth! There’s a mild squeak — my God, I just chirped fourth — and I step off the throttle as we blast by.

Boom bap, bitch.

I look in the rear view. The man in the Cummins has his hand out the window and is showing me a finger. Not the finger. His thumb, straight up. Fairly beaten, firmly impressed. How could he not be? This is probably the most powerful American production car in history. It isn’t a toy, as we will see in Part Two. It requires respect and a gentle hand. Still, it isn’t a Hemi Dart or anything like that. It cruises windows-up at 72mph on the freeway, delivers twenty miles per gallon, chills the cabin, plays Sade’s “Love Deluxe” with appropriate fidelity, doesn’t cook the luggage in the mail-slot trunk, rides acceptably on bad pavement, looks spectacular, costs less than a loaded German mid-size sedan, will be sought-after in the used market as long as there’s a gallon of gasoline to be had anywhere. It reaches for the road ahead with incandescent aggression and remains stable long after the fenceposts have blurred into invisibility.

Of course, it will all fall apart at the racetrack. Or will it?

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67 Comments on “Life With Shelby Part One: A Thousand Street Miles And A Meeting Of The Siblings...”


  • avatar
    doctorv8

    I thought “that” Hazard county was spelled with two Z’s?

    Great writeup, and color choice on the Shelby, for that matter! ;-)

  • avatar
    RideHeight

    This post convinces me that I’m a communist in a cathedral here at TTAC.

    Can anyone recommend another car/truck site that approaches TTAC’s knowledge level but caters to those like me who never drive faster than 50 unless lives are at stake?

    I’m after a place that lionizes and extolls everything TTAC’ers think is boring. Safety, build quality, durability and nothing that would interest an 18-35 male.

    Thanks for any help.

    • 0 avatar
      kvndoom

      The Camry forums are THAT way. —>

      ;)

    • 0 avatar
      alex_rashev

      Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority home page comes to mind.

      I find boring car reviews to be pretty damn objective, informative, and reasonable here – what’s the problem?…

    • 0 avatar
      Prado

      Priuschat.com Car geeks of a different kind.

    • 0 avatar
      Speed Spaniel

      “This post convinces me that I’m a communist in a cathedral here at TTAC.”

      I disagree. I think a true car enthusiast can appreciate the merits of a Toyota Corolla and a Shelby GT500.

      I’m with you though. These cars represent the near pinnacle of performance and cars with that much power should go fast and make a lot of smoke. Yeehaw, ride ‘em cowboy! For me, it’s a pass. Now there’s my week old ’12 Mazda MX-5 Miata with 400 miles. The mechanical specs aren’t that special and are actually unremarkable – but getting behind that wheel and that near perfect 50/50 balance is a magical experience. It makes me think cars like these Fords, “why bother?”

      Sorry I can’t recommend any other web sites. I’d stick with this one though. They know what they’re talking about (enough for me to try and ultimately acquire a Miata) and I don’t think you’ll find better. They do write about the occassional “mainstream” car however…..

      • 0 avatar
        kvndoom

        Yeah this is the place to be. In my time reading, I have certainly seen more “appliance” reviews than performance car reviews. I think it’s a good mix. Hell, we’ve just had the Accord and Fusion reviews in back-to-back weeks.

        Although I thought the site was for a while slipping into TTAGT86, it recovered.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Sounds like Volvo of old… for the record some of us are also very interested in build quality and durability. I would much rather pick my poison and be able to hang onto it for a decade if I chose too, than lease new fangled depreciating assets in a bi-annual basis.

      This may be a bit Lutzian, but there’s also something to be said about ‘real cars’ vs ‘appliances’… on average most TTAC’ers oppose automobile appliances.

    • 0 avatar
      el scotto

      So you’re the guy doing 30mph merging into the Interstate :). (That’s whole separate rant for me and NOT directed at you). Most of us have some highway driving in our commute or drive on one at some time. Usual speed limits are 55 to 65.

    • 0 avatar
      George B

      Maybe a website dedicated to maximizing fuel economy like CleanMPG is what you want. http://www.cleanmpg.com/ Engineering involves tradeoffs so squeezing the maximum performance out of a car, either speed or fuel efficiency, is likely to affect durability.

      I enjoy reading Jack’s perspective on cars and appreciate having the real option of buying a Mustang. An interesting car I can afford! I’m frugal and not likely to buy more than a GT, but these higher trim versions show what is possible.

    • 0 avatar
      Caboose

      Perhaps Sir would be interested in a review by Monsieur Karesh?

    • 0 avatar
      nrd515

      If my dad was alive, he would shake his head at your never going past 50 and mutter something like, “Oh man, what is wrong with this guy? He’s killing me!” I on the other hand wouldn’t be nearly as nice.

      Why won’t you go over 50? How fast do you go on the freeway? If you don’t do the speed limit, minimum, you shouldn’t even be on the freeway, you’re a road hazard, and I’m kind of shocked you haven’t been squashed like a bug by some hothead or a semi driver that’s on autopilot after driving way too long.

    • 0 avatar
      Robstar

      How about motorcyclistonline.com? You can pick up a used litrebike, go 50 in first gear, don’t even need to shift, should get 50′ish mpg!
      slash-tongue-in-cheek

  • avatar
    True_Blue

    Love the obscure B-58 Hustler reference! Money being no object, I’d still have a hard time choosing between these two.

  • avatar
    Viquitor

    Great post. I always saw the Shelby as a over-the-top beast, almost a bully and too much for a non-IRS car; whereas the Boss was a much more focused machine, like a “Mustang GT3″ of some sort.

    But after reading this post I have a newfound respect towards the GT500. I still think the Boss is the one to have, though.

  • avatar
    TonyJZX

    if it was porsche it’d be the GT3 vs. the Porsche Turbo S

    many people would take the GT3 and call it a day

  • avatar
    vagvoba

    Jack, didn’t you find something more fashionable to wear that morning? Something more reminiscent of your signature ’80s disco style?

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      Ha! Maybe I should list what I’m wearing, the way they do in Esquire.

      Shirt: Extended Bell Curve (http://shirt.woot.com/offers/the-extended-bell-curve)

      Shorts: Betabrand Mountain Print (http://www.betabrand.com/black-printed-mountain-shorts.html)

      Shoes: Allen-Edmonds Tivoli (out of production in 2006, sadly; my brother and I bought six pairs each the day they discontinued them and I’m down to two unworn pairs)

      Belt: Allen-Edmonds Center Seam in Chili. Shoes don’t match the belt, that’s how you know it’s Sunday!

  • avatar
    philadlj

    Terrific write-up. Also good to hear about real-live drivers of tuned trucks who aren’t jerks. I know they’re out there somewhere, but probably not many in the city.

  • avatar
    Dimwit

    Can’t wait for Part II!

    If it’s not the Tremec, then what’s in the Boss?

  • avatar
    tjh8402

    Jack, you referenced an F104 Starfighter in a previous post, and now a B-58 Hustler. You love your J79 powered planes don’t ya?

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      I was an Airman First Class in the Civil Air Patrol at the tender age of eleven. Nominally, the CAP starts at twelve but since I was already in the eighth grade when I turned 11 they let me in.

  • avatar
    86SN2001

    The ZL1 is the best of both worlds. Faster than the silly “BOSS” and it out handles and is far less expensive than the “go fast in a straight line” GT500.

    And the best part? The ZL1 does not look like a lowly V6 Camaro.

    • 0 avatar
      el scotto

      Got any performance facts on the ZL1? Chevy’s website states MSRP from $54,350. http://www.chevrolet.com/camaro-zl1-sports-car.html.
      Ford website shows $54,200 MSRP for a Shelby GT 500. http://www.ford.com/cars/mustang/models/?searchid=61240949|2322889469|29974640.
      Can you teach me the math where something that lists for more than it’s competitor is far less expensive than the same competitor?

      • 0 avatar
        Dimwit

        Heavily discounted because the sales suck?

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        Looking at a Road & Track comparison test, the ZL1 comes with all performance features standard while the GT500 has ‘optional’ $3,500 locking differential and adjustable shocks, $3,000 transmission, oil, and differential coolers, and $1,600 seats. Good luck getting one without a differential, shocks, a cooling system, or seats. You might be able to find one without a sunroof($1,995), maybe. The as-tested prices were about $7,500 apart, and I strongly suspect that reflects the window stickers on all of them.

      • 0 avatar
        LBJs Love Child

        Of course, saying a few grand on the ZL-1 means coming in second in almost every performance category. When it comes to competing against the GT500, you might as well get the “lowly V6 Camaro” and save even more.

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        Depends on what you want. The ZL1 was fastest around a road course, faster in every segment except the longest straight away, and that is without needing $7,500 in performance options that the losing Mustang had.

      • 0 avatar
        racer-esq.

        “You might be able to find one without a sunroof($1,995), maybe.”

        I forgot about the fixed glass roof, for a moment I thought that Ford finally offered a real sunroof on the Mustang.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        GM’s Magnetic Ride (shocks) is the home run that made all the difference in the ZL1. Otherwise it would’ve been just an over powered and overweight SS that the Mustang GT embarrassed.

        The aftermarket and other OEMs should take note. I think it was Ferrari that was looking to use the technology or already is.

      • 0 avatar
        el scotto

        CJ thanks, it’s an Apples to Oranges caparison; you have to drop 7k more on the Ford to get the same options as ZL1.

      • 0 avatar
        raph

        @ CJinSD – the GT500 comes standard with Fords “Trak-Lok” diff, the 3.5k “Track Pack” replaces that with a Torsen.

        One thing everybody forgets about the 580hp Camaro, it gets slapped with the GG tax while the 662hp GT500 doesn’t.

        But as alot of people are pointing out, my big peeve with the current GT500 is the lack of standard equipment compared to the ZL1 – Ford should have included the “Performance Pack” & “Track Pack” as standard equipment with the Recaros, Infotainment, and Glass Roof being the only added cost options to check off.

        The GT500 would have been a screaming deal if Ford would have priced it within a coupla grand of the ZL1 but as it stands the ZL1 is the better deal of the two despite the GG tax and 580 hp.

        Still were I in the market and had the bucks, I’d get the GT500.

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        Sales suck? Can’t speak about the Stang, but I have been investigating ZL-1′s and they carry a $5K ADM ripoff slapped right on top of sticker. Gotta love the profiteering s-bags at the stealership.

        The car mags have, in general, been giving the nod to the super Camaro over the Mustang…

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        http://www.thesmokingtire.com/2012/chris-harris-on-cars-2013-mustang-gt500-vs-2012-camaro-zl1/

        I enjoyed Chris Harris’ review of the two cars in NYC and around Monticello Motorsport Park. The proper response to ADM is to not pay it, even if not buying at all is involved. Have a little patience and MSRP will be all the money in the world for pretty much any car.

    • 0 avatar
      racer-esq.

      “And the best part? The ZL1 does not look like a lowly V6 Camaro.”

      Yes it does. To add insult to injury the steel rims on the base Camaro look cooler than any of the optional rims. Any Mustang or Camaro is based on, and looks like, a $20K car (which I argue makes the $20K versions a great deal). If you want to get a unique car in this price class you need to get a Corvette or Cayman/Boxster.

    • 0 avatar
      mbaruth

      You’re right-it looks WORSE than a V6. Ridiculous spoiler, available in sexy colors like maroon…ugh. Terrible.

      • 0 avatar
        01 ZX3

        The GT500 actually posted faster lap times in just about every comparo. The only downside is you would need to make/buy brake cooling ducts if you wanted to track the car for more than 3 laps.

    • 0 avatar
      86SN2001

      I love the fanboys trying to explain how the GT500 is a better car.

      The fact is, after you spend $7,000 more for the Mustang, you still have a car that will be out handled by the Camaro and will cook it’s brakes within the first lap of a track.

      The current GT500 follows Ford’s standard m.o. of making headlines with fancy numbers (worlds most powerful production V8 or some other drivel), but then being a complete let down on execution. The egoboost V6 is the same way. Ford plastered all sorts of lies about it, and in the end, it never lived up to the hype.

      • 0 avatar

        “I love the fanboys trying to explain how the GT500 is a better car.”

        They are mad their 660 HP “supercar” got out-handled, out-braked and outrun by the heavier, less powerful ZL1. Most car mags have already concluded the ZL1 to be a more superior car in every dept except straight line drag races. The ZL1 was consistent and cut a line across the track the GT can only dream of. The GT was good only in the first few laps. Handling and brakes took a hike after a few laps. The ZL1 looks the part too. Badassery wrapped around 580 monster hp. I couldn’t tell apart a GT 500 from the 5.0L. The ZL1 has a better interior, better equipped and has more sophisticated technology. Most importantly it is track ready.

        With that said, this isn’t an apples to apples comparison. Shouldn’t a Shelby Mustang go against a Hennessey ZL1 or a Hennessey CTS-V? A 1226 HP CTS will absolutely destroy the GT500.

        http://jalopnik.com/5940718/heres-the-1226-hp-cadillac-thats-challenging-bugatti

        This is great for fans and buyers alike. Chevy and Ford have always had a live and let live relationship when it came to muscle cars while the respective fans have been at each others throats for ever. The GT500 and ZL1 have shown that things have changed. Now this is WAR!!

        Ford fans must also be b-hurt that Chevy has two cars, the Z06 and ZR1 faster than their fastest car. How about the fact that every non mainstream European or American supercar maker uses the GM LS engine? How many supercars, superboats and hotrods use a ford engine? Zero!

        GM needs to stop messing around with Ford and drop the 7.0L 427ci Z06 motor in the Camaro, use the same TVS2300 blower on it like the ZR1 and watch the 800hp monster kill everything on the street.

      • 0 avatar
        Shawnski

        The GT500 motor is simply superior design to the LS. If you do not get that, I pity you fool!

      • 0 avatar
        raph

        “Ford fans must also be b-hurt that Chevy has two cars, the Z06 and ZR1 faster than their fastest car.”
        And you pay how much for the Z06 and ZR1? The local GM dealer doesn’t have a Z06 that stickers less than 80k, let alone the ZR1. Besides Corvette and Viper have the domestic sports car market locked up tight – Ford would be doen right stupid to enter the catagory (vette covering the low and high end, viper covering the high end) – would be nice to the the Ford GT return though ;)

        “How about the fact that every non mainstream European or American supercar maker uses the GM LS engine? How many supercars, superboats and hotrods use a ford engine? Zero!”

        Try Koenigsegg, they sourced the 32v MOD V8 orginially and based the in house engine on it. Or the Panoz cars

        Sigh… the LS is a good engine but its becoming about as trite as a Hemi (which btw one ol’ big honk’n 426 hemi fell victim to my puny 5.4 the other day)

  • avatar
    Nick

    Price is no object, well, I’d have to go with the Shelby. I mean, I can’t see myself getting tired of saying ’662 horsepower’.

  • avatar
    racer-esq.

    We all know the real winner is the V6 Mustang.

  • avatar
    el scotto

    As much as I like both, visibility sucks in both of them. That’s important when there’s a flashing light bar behind you.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    As Kentucky Route 80 enters Hazard County, (yes! that Hazard County!) it becomes a wide two-lane with long stretches up the mountains and lumbering trucks dragging clumps of frustrated cars in their wake.

    Enos! This is your superior officer RosCOOOOOOOOO P. Coltrane!

  • avatar
    akitadog

    Dear God! There’s two of you!

  • avatar
    rpn453

    Love it. Nothing wakes up a highway drive better than passing trains of vehicles in one shot on mountain roads. I don’t have that kind of power and I don’t cruise much over the speed limit on highways these days, so my double-digit vehicle count passes at well over double the speed of the “train” typically only still occur on icy/snowy days. On studded tires, of course.

    The herd may think we’re insane, but if they’re going to tailgate each other to the point that it’s impractical to pass only one at a time, then it’s the only logical solution!

    I don’t think I’d want 650 hp though. Seems like it would get me in trouble.

  • avatar
    AoLetsGo

    Nice write-up, great cars but I would never buy one. In my town ever Ford engineer and middle manager has one and their 16 year old daughter has the GT convertible, and next year they will have a newer better one and the year after that and on and on. But I can take solace that my muscle can run them down and blow by em on the road bike on Hines Drive or on the mountain bike trail.

  • avatar
    MMH

    Something something something Mustangs. GODS, what an opening. Put me in the mind of a man in black fleeing across the desert.

  • avatar
    doug-g

    Still pale and after I took the time to tell you how to get a good tan a while back. Pale is how you should look after you’ve used the Shelby as a getaway car in a failed bank robbery and served your time. Your brother is pale, too. Not listening must be in your genes. I’ll read the post now – which you could have written using a lap top and wifi while laying by a pool, BTW.

  • avatar
    craigotron

    That tower brace? Available for about $180 from Ford Racing and any of the many aftermarket guys. I went with the Boss one specifically; went on my GT in 10 minutes and 5 of that was trying to locate the lost nut in the Bermuda triangle of my engine bay. Went with the “drive fast and hit the brakes shake it loose” approach after the magnet turned up nothing. The Mustang aftermarket… I had no idea. They seem to be able to accommodate every great/awful idea an owner can come up with for any era.

  • avatar
    Dave M.

    Your brother’s cooler, if only because he’s not wearing a belt with his shorts. Dad.

  • avatar
    mikey

    @Mark MacInnis…No way… a big guy like Jack would look like a slob if he didn’t tuck his tee in.

    BTW…I own a V6 Mustang, and recently bought a 428 hp Camaro. I love the Camaro,but frankly, it scares the c–p out’a me.

    Next time I’m in the US I’m going to look up the Jack Baruth school of drivig

  • avatar
    mikey

    @Loser….Thanks, Silver grey..no stripes.


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