By on July 22, 2012

Remember the Daewoo Nubira? No? Did you know that there was a wagon version? Even though production of the Nubira stopped just ten years ago, this car has all but disappeared from our consciousness.
The only reason I noticed this Nubira wagon in a Colorado self-service yard last week was its relatively pristine, un-picked-over condition among a row of completely gutted imports. This row of cars had been out for a couple of months and is no doubt due to be crushed any day now. Even the Kia Sephia nearby had been picked clean, but hardly anybody wanted Nubira parts.
The only reason I’ve been aware of Daewoos in the junkyard at all is that the Faster Farms Plymouth Belvedere LeMons team has been harvesting junkyard Daewoo emblems, cutting off the “Dae” parts, and installing “WOO WOO” badges all over their car. For that reason, I think of a couple of disreputable-looking dudes in skanky chicken suits hooting “WOO WOO!” every time I see a junkyard Daewoo.
We see Daewoos on the street all the time nowadays, but they have Chevy Aveo and Sonic emblems. Like Isuzu, the Daewoo name never meant much on these shores.

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62 Comments on “Junkyard Find: 2000 Daewoo Nubira Station Wagon...”


  • avatar
    mccall52

    I’m under the impression there were some marketing deficiencies in regards to Daewoo. Case in point, the only time I saw any mention of one in a car mag back in the day, the picture showed the Lanos, Nubira, and Leganza on display in front of a college fraternity house, with a college guy playing salesman.

    • 0 avatar
      FJ60LandCruiser

      They were sold by some spotty college student “dealer network.”

      I remember the response by the car journos at the time was anywhere from thinking this is a brilliant idea, or an abject failure…

      • 0 avatar
        EchoChamberJDM

        I remember the ads in Automotive News, LA Times, Monster, etc. where Daewoo HQ offered to fly their “college salesmen” wannabee’s over to their Korean HQ for a full blown immersion into all things Daewoo. Wonder if we could find anyone who actually went on one of these trips?
        Its kinda scary that after the Pontiac Lemans debacle (the 80s made Daewoo made Korean built model, not the original GM built 70s model) Daewoo continued to pilfer their crap cars on US consumers who by this time wised up to buying an unknown car from an unknown Korean brand with spotty dealer and service network.

        That said, I see a trend in the latest Junkyard Find postings. Forgotten Asian Brands that start with a D…Daihatsu…..Daewoo…..time for another Datsun!

    • 0 avatar
      Joe McKinney

      The student dealer network concept sounds like a trendy marketing stunt right out of the late 1990′s Dot-Com Boom period. I am betting most of Daewoo’s U.S. sales were through traditional brick and mortar dealerships.

      Around 1999-2000 I recall seeing a Daewoo dealer in Columbas, GA. I drove by this dealership on several occasions. Most of their inventory appeared to be used cars and they were never very busy. It seems fitting that this dealer was located behind a dead shopping mall miles away from the city’s new car row.

      • 0 avatar
        EchoChamberJDM

        Joe – from my memory the student salesman project didn’t last long. Then again, neither did Daweoo dealers. I remember after they decided to pull out of the US market, their “new” cars showed up at several used car lots around the So Cal area. For about 1/3 off their original sticker. And Daewoo dealers started suing Daewoo HQ in Korea, as well as GM. Didn’t get very far….

  • avatar
    Volt 230

    A 2000 model, body in good shape in the junk yard already, I wonder how many miles on it? must have been catastrophic engine or tranny failure, I knew someone who owned a Leganza, tranny went kaputz at 70,000 miles, it cost so much to fix she tradede it away and lost a crap-load of money, no Daewoo-derived anything for me, thanks, I don’t care how much GM tries to hide the fact that it is a Daewoo.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      My sister had one of these, and the body was well put together and the interior was fairly well designed, but it was a mechanical disaster with shoddy parts that were hard to come by. They were simple enough that a backyard mechanic could keep them running, especially if he was creative enough to be able to modify more durable parts from other Japanese auto makers. I can’t help get the feeling that this car was kept garaged and only driven by a little old lady who drove it once a month to the drug store to get her prescriptions filled.

  • avatar
    acuraandy

    The local Napa Auto Parts in the town I grew up in had a fleet of Lanos for parts runners back in the early 2000s, they got them for something like $5-6k/each (a local new car dealer peddled Daewoo for a while, only to eventually have the entire inventory basically sit and rot).

    It was with some irony when the store had to dump the cars when THEY couldn’t get parts for them anymore when they broke (frequently). lulz

  • avatar
    MrWhopee

    Oh look, a small, European style wagon. Unfortunately the European thing only extend to the styling, and only the back and sides at that. The front styling, as well as everything else about the car is Korean-cheap, the Korea that once looked down upon, and with good reason. Still, gotta say it looks mighty attractive from the back 3/4 angle as in the main picture.

  • avatar
    C170guy

    Check out the picture of the engine. Looks like the head gasket blew.
    Coolant tank hose has lots of crud in it too.

    The impression I got from these cars is that the original owners didn’t keep them long and they ended up in the note lots/buy here pay here places very quickly. Most of them appeared to be treated very poorly in the used market and looked to be suffering. I am talking mismatched tires with mismatched wheels, dents, peeling paint, running on 3 and puffing smoke. I haven’t seen a Daewoo branded Daewoo in two or three years now.
    This one has good paint.

  • avatar
    volksman

    I forgot all about these cars! I used to make fun of the commercials “It’s a whole new Dae.” Anyone else remember that?

    • 0 avatar
      Liger

      i remember a Daewoo commercial were a Ferrari and a Camry (or some other boring reliable Japanese car) drove into a double car garage, the door shut and out came a daewoo (presumably the daewoo was the output of their love)….

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    I dunno why, but I find it amusing that a banged up Beetle and a 2000 Daewood are next to one another in a junkyard.

    • 0 avatar
      Geekcarlover

      A nice comparison of “cheap”, economical cars. How to do it right, and how not to.

    • 0 avatar
      jpolicke

      The difference is that someone looking for a project car might take that Beetle home and restore it, and end up with a ride that, while still technologically dated, will provide reliable transportation while bringing a smile to those who see it and remember how popular they were “back in the day”.

      The Daewoo will be fondly remembered by no one, including the people who made it. It will go unlamented to the smelter, thence to be turned into less offensive and dangerous objects such as AK-47 barrels.

      • 0 avatar
        volksman

        Beetles have what I call “rebuild value” something like a Daewoo doesn’t.
        And I’m not just saying that because I’m biased ;)

      • 0 avatar
        Ryoku75

        At Geek: Basically a case of “Good Idea, Bad Idea”.

        As for why the Beetle would be saved but no the Daewood, well its easier to find VW parts and they’re far easier to fix the mechanicals of.

  • avatar
    Steven Lang

    Bought one at an impound auction for about $350. It was about $349.99 too much.

    The vehicle only had 41k and I tried mightily to find a replacement engine for it.

    No dice. Not even at the nearby salvage auctions that will go through 500 to 700 units a week. The only Daewoo Nubiras around at all had blown head gaskets or timing belts that had given up the ghost before the required maintenance interval.

    I believe even the Niedermeyers had trouble keeping one of these running.

    Now having said that, I did see a Nubira wagon yesterday afternoon. It looked like the buyer had found a way to rescue it from the junkyard. The paint was primer in a few sections, and the car looked like a sad third world remnant. But it did manage to cross the intersection without incident.

    I’ll be blunt with the TTAC folks. Kia was the $shittiest brand in America before Daewoo showed up. Most late 90′s Kias were pure garbage. Daewoo ended up filling the top of that landfill.

    • 0 avatar
      Dimwit

      >>I’ll be blunt with the TTAC folks. Kia was the $shittiest brand in America before they made the Daewoo. Most late 90′s Kias were pure garbage. Daewoo ended up filling the top of that landfill.<<

      I think that you're a little confused, Steven. KIA is a separate company to Daewoo. Both 2nd or maybe 3rd tier manufacturers. KIA is now owned by Hyundai which bought them from near bankruptcy because of their terrible quality control and they made huge improvements. GM bought Daewoo outright after basically overwhelming them with private label design work and assembly. Of course, GM hasn't hardly changed a thing.

      • 0 avatar
        Steven Lang

        Kia was an independent company that came to the US market in 1995.

        Daewoo began selling their vehicles in the US & Canada in 1999.

        Kia was the worst brand in America until Daewoo came to our shores.

        I realize both of them are two completely different companies. I’ll change the comment so it won’t be misunderstood..

    • 0 avatar
      Volts On Fire

      Speaking of the Niedermeyers, any word on how long that Leganza lasted? I somehow doubt it’s still going.

    • 0 avatar
      Dr. Kenneth Noisewater

      No room for an LS1?

  • avatar
    el scotto

    Now if it had came with a diesel and a 6 speed……

  • avatar
    Volts On Fire

    The Nubira’s proud legacy lives on today in the Cruze, Sonic, and even the 2013 Malibu.

    TTAC’ers should print copies of these photos, and show them to owners of the above. “Congrats, dumba$$. You do realize that you bought one of these, right?”

    • 0 avatar
      el scotto

      Has their quality improved at all? I mean when your baseline is horrid about anything is an improvement.

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      I’d do it if I had a printer, its amazing how almost every Aveo that I see has rusty brakes all around.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      “The Nubira’s proud legacy lives on today in the Cruze, Sonic, and even the 2013 Malibu.”

      Another great reason to avoid the re-maligned 2013 Malibu. Such a shame.

      • 0 avatar
        el scotto

        FWIW the the 2012 Malibu is a JD Power award recipient. 2012 Cruze and Sonic three gold dots or medallions or whatever they’re called. Snark as needed.

      • 0 avatar
        Volts On Fire

        I don’t think it’s worth very much, and here’s why. The North American launch of the Cruze has been riddled with problems, from leaking trunks to blown transmissions to (my favorite, naturally) catching fire after their owners have the unmitigated gall to get their oil changed.

        In fact, N/A customers seem to have had far more problems with their Cruzes than all other regions combined, despite the fact we were one of the last markets to see the car. That may be a sign the UAW hacks in Lordstown are still up to their old tricks, even if Daewoo may have improved ever-so-slightly. Union workers should also probably receive the lion’s share of blame for all of those Sonics released from the plant without brake pads.

        The 2013 Malibu promises to be inferior to the car it’s replacing in almost all categories.

      • 0 avatar
        el scotto

        Volts On Fire There are UAW/CAW workers on this site; I’m petty sure they don’t like being called “hacks”. Where did your obvious GM hate come from? Inquiring minds would like to know.

      • 0 avatar
        Volts On Fire

        If they don’t want to be called hacks*, they should find more respectable professions.

        I have my reasons to hate GM, not the least of which are the company’s horrible quality record and unwillingness/inability to improve its products to compete on even ground with the Japanese and Europeans.

        The events of 2008 convinced me the company should have been killed when we had the chance.

        *”Hacks” is literally the least offensive term I could think of.

      • 0 avatar
        el scotto

        Volts On Fire Fair enough on your reasons to dislike GM, I respect that. In the end, I think the bailouts were the worst of a bad situation because I don’t think other manufacturers would have picked up the slack from GM/Chrysler folding. Yeah that baby was ugly. Now the ugly details of the bailout and the political ramifications we’d need a few pitchers to come to an agreement. I could be wrong, but I believe all the UAW plants are closed shops. Want a line job? You have to join the union, it’s a closed shop.
        I used to be an union iron worker in the Midwest. Traditional apprentice, journeyman, master route to include on-going education and hours worked. It also paid very well. When I got laid off every winter, I’d go to work inspecting auto parts. It was horrid job with high turnover. I was welcomed back every year even though they new I’d quit come springtime. Once I got into the plant I saw all sorts of jobs being done by union and non-union workers. Except for the assembly line. The assembly line was only manned by UAW personnel.

      • 0 avatar
        Dr. Kenneth Noisewater

        So Bush (and Obama) bail out banks that engaged in fraud to the tune of nearly a trillion dollars, so that shareholders and bondholders in those banks get to slough off their losses onto the taxpayer, while the fools and felons who committed the crimes and stupidities get to not only keep their jobs but continue to receive large bonuses, and they get to continue doing the same stuff they had been doing with impunity. That’s OK? Every time a bank “settles” for a financial penalty, they just chalk that up as the cost of doing business, and keep right on going with the same scams and BS they did before.

        http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2012/07/big-banks-are-criminal-enterprises.html

        Frankly, the GM/Chrysler bailouts in comparison are chump change, and anyone stupid enough to have held onto those companies’ paper in the _decade_ before the crash deserve what they got as much as any smug dotcom daytrading “investor”. In terms of the degree of social damage, I would compare the automaker bailouts vs bank bailouts as I would compare shoplifting to the assassination of a Federal judge.

      • 0 avatar
        Volts On Fire

        Our society needs banks. Customers proved beyond a shadow of a doubt in the years leading up to 2008 that the majority of them could do without GM. We’ve never needed Chrysler.

        It’s not perfect, and no doubt entities like Bank of America, Chase and Wells Fargo should have suffered a lot more than they did. But they are institutions we need.

        It’s time to start determining what we need as a country to survive, and what should be led to the cliff’s edge and pushed over without regret or remorse. We do NOT need GM, and we sure as sh!t don’t need the UAW. In the long run, what’s left of American manufacturing would be far better off without both.

      • 0 avatar
        SC5door

        Yea lets just close down GM and Chrysler, all those employees including the engineering staff (AKA Hacks) should find another “respectable” profession.

        BTW the fires from changing the oil on the Cruze is a DESIGN ISSUE. It has nothing to do with assembly of the car.

  • avatar
    jpolicke

    Daewoo. What an extraordinary fountain of excrement, bouncing from one failure to the next. I’m still undecided as to which was the worst car ever- Daewoo or Yugo. I’m inclined to go with Daewoo because the Yugo was just one model that apparently ran well enough in its home country, but was incapable of surviving with US-required emission equipment, US-market-demanded A/C, and US highway speeds. Daewoo produced an entire lineup of disasters allegedly designed for modern US drivers.

    I had the misfortune to buy an ’88 Lemans. I was working for a Pontiac-Buick-GMC dealer and was able to get one for near cost (not that there was a lot of dealer markup anyway), and had read that the car was based on a popular Opel. What the car actually was, was a pile of trash stuffed into an Opel-shaped container.

    How true to form for GM, after having been burned by this failure, to go and buy the whole rotten operation outright after Daewoo had been driven into bankruptcy as a direct result of horrible product quality. What could go wrong with this plan?

    No matter how many good reviews the Chevy Cruze gets, the fact that the car originated at Daewoo is the overriding reason I would never consider owning or advising someone to consider owning a one, or any of GM’s other small cars.

  • avatar
    Joss

    Wow Wiki says brief stint in Russia as the Doninfest Orion.. and gawd – engineered in the UK. Hoped by 97 it would too late for any BL ghosts.

    Daewoo is a brand name GM needs to fade away.

  • avatar
    Rental Man

    Better half informed me today that in her native Lithuanian language Nubira means “falling”. Perfect description.

  • avatar
    jbeale53

    I had a friend that bought a Nubira station wagon years ago; might have been around that time frame. He was so excited, got it for so cheap, brand new with leather, etc. Of course, it was a total piece of crap and he had to give it up a few years later.

  • avatar
    willbodine

    “Unpickedover”? No surprise there. How many of these extremely rare wagons were ever sold here to begin with? 200?

    • 0 avatar
      mr_muttonchops

      Honestly how many Daewoos were sold, period? I’ve maybe only seen one Daewoo on the road, ever, and it was also a Nubira. I’ve seen more Gremlins on the road than that.

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    I have strong hopes for the more modern Daewoo. Honestly, I’m waiting for the reviews of the Daewoo/Chevy Spark.

  • avatar
    hgrunt

    A friend of a friend of mine got suckered into paying far too much for a ‘woo in 02 or so. After he got in a fairly minor accident, where his headlamp was damaged, he reported it to his insurance company who instantly totalled and handed him a check simply because no parts were available.

  • avatar
    Felis Concolor

    There are many cars with an air of anonymity about them – but until I read this entry today, I had no idea the Nubira existed, much less a wagon variant. It was too easy to guess at cylinder head and gasket woes from photo 12 in the spread before reading confirmation below.

  • avatar
    ravenchris

    1998, I was looking for a small base wagon and I saw adds for the Nubira. The price for a base Ford and a loaded Nubira including leather were pretty close.

  • avatar
    Volt 230

    I guess that H/K must have hired the top of the engineering class from Korean Universities and Daewoo got the Mc Donald school dropouts.

  • avatar
    burnbomber

    AKA Chevrolet Lacetti, the Top Gear “star in a reasonably priced car”. Seen one in many episodes

    • 0 avatar
      MRF 95 T-Bird

      AKA The Daewoo based Suzuki Forenza here in the states. There was even a wagon version. Just yesterday I saw a late 00′s 4 dr in front of a used car dealer. It was marked $6999. Way over priced for such a eh vehicle. Another reason why Suzuki is treading water in the US market.

  • avatar
    Glen.H

    Weren’t these basically rebodied J-cars? And they were mostly POS when they came out in the early ’80s!

  • avatar
    punkybrewstershubby aka Troy D.

    A true “throwaway car” in every sense of the word.

    We had a Daewoo dealer here in town. It closed and became a satellite store for our local Cadillac dealer and now it is gone as well.

    You still see the occasional ‘Woo sporting around town, but they look just like their old Suzuki brethern, ratted out and struggling to make the next mile in one piece.

  • avatar
    dwight

    This isn’t a junkyard find. I think that you need to define what is a true junkyard find. This is just junk — junk the moment it came off the assembly line.

  • avatar
    ciddyguy

    There is a guy who drives a red Lanos hatchback near where I live (Seattle). I often see the car parked, though not in the same spot always so it obviously gets driven. I think I may have seen it being driven too a few times, but mostly it’s parked.

    Otherwise,I don’t see these too often these days.

  • avatar
    Pastor Glenn

    The wife and I bought a “new” (used) Nubira sedan in ’03, for 1/2 retail – with 25 miles on it. We knew we were taking a chance. In fact, ours was a good little car – as long as you knew the ABSOLUTE REQUIREMENT of changing the cam belt before 72,000 miles and simply looked after it like the machine it was.

    It’s my understanding that “nubira” means “It’ll get you there” in the Korean language. In other words, it was intended as a modern day Model A – basic transportation. Which it was. Despite having front power windows, it had cranks in the rear doors (like a mid 1990′s Neon), and it had AM/FM stereo – with cassette. The dashboard plastic was ‘rental car grade’ – for eastern Europe. You know, like a 1990′s (overpriced) Volkswagen.

    Before anyone ‘disses’ the ‘cheap nasty Daewoo engine’ it should be noted that Daewoo bought these engines pre-engineered by General Motors of Australia, and the engines were built by GM Holden in Australia. The automatic transmission is ZF – yep, the supplier to BMW. Oddly enough the more reliable 1.6 engine in the smaller car (the descendent of which is sold as a Chevrolet Aveo to this day), was a Daewoo design.

    The one problem we had (other than a power window motor, replaced under warrantee) was the OPEL derived suspension bushings which failed (replaced under warrantee). Yep; underneath, the engineering is GENERAL MOTORS OPEL of GERMANY – it’s for all intents and purposes based on the late 1980′s early 1990′s Opel FWD cars which were one size smaller than the global J-cars (I think they were sold as Astra, at least in England by Vauxhall).

    Yep; GM bought Daewoo up for two cents on the dollar – they strung along the bankers in South Korea until they wore them down. In fact, they got a company which builds pretty good bodies – I recall reading something in a British car magazine about how GM realized that Daewoo were building bodies better than GM could with better tolerances (at the time of the corporate purchase of Daewoo).

    What did GM get for two cents on the dollar? An engineering center from which most of their global small and even medium cars are now sourced – outsourcing many of the engineering jobs from higher cost nations such as Germany and the USA.

    Sad isn’t it?

    Oh by the way – despite GM’s promises (lies), GM immediately pulled the rug from Daewoo USA when it bought Daewoo – and refused to even send spare parts (illegally) and refused to supply new cars. Once the courts got involved, and looked at laws mandating spare parts being available by Federal law, GM relented – but of course, by this time the desired bankruptcy of Daewoo USA was accomplished.

    Take heed and take warning, PSA. You’re sleeping with a company which will give you a social disease and then dump you when you’ve outlived your make-up.

  • avatar
    Advance_92

    Daewoo’s launch into the car business after building a few cars for GM turned out to be a scam as big as any bank perpetrated, and brought down the company. Yet you couldn’t say their cars were much worse than anything coming from Hyundai or Kia at the time. Cheaping out on the dealer and service network in the US didn’t help, but it let the fraudsters in Korea keep more money.

    Given that, I don’t see all the blind hate for the infrastructure that GM bought for next to nothing that helped lower costs and get instant expansion opportunities in Asia and for that matter Korea, where everyone seems to be gushing about quality improvements. Everything else I hear are stories that can be applied to any late 90s Korean car, blind GM hate and the usual political claptrap.

    That said I drove a rented Nubira all over the Scottish highlands in 2000 and it wasn’t very good. Mainly because the brakes were warped and the fluid full of air pockets.

  • avatar
    Times58

    When I read this post, I didn’t know whether to laugh or cry! The Nubira was a tempestuous attempt by Daewoo, to cobble together a car from a multitude of different parts! I should know, as I am a former corporate employee of Daewoo Motor America! In the late 1990′s, I had recently finished college with a degree in Marketing and International Studies. I had accepted a sales job with an up and coming computer hardware and software company, which I loathed! I had always been a car person, and I became of Daewoo’s presence in my hometown in the Northeast. You see, Daewoo corporate had purchased real estate several years before setting up their distribution network in multiple locations in the United States. Daewoo felt that college towns would be the most receptive to their new line of affordable cars, that were somewhat left of center. Where did this leave me? I had relocated to a fast growing area in the Southwest, that was not only near a University, but also around the corner from the area known as “Little Silicon Valley”. Daewoo had decided to pull out all of the stops, and built the first (and as it turned out) only exclusive factory showroom, right down the street from me. I had to be a part of it! It was the most interesting and comical adventure that I had ever experienced. Our home base was our corporate HQ in COMPTON, CA. (For those of you in the know regarding the city of angels, as well as the orange curtain, the idea of a Korean enterprise setting up shop in this neck of the woods in the 1990′s was considered to be an interesting choice, at best!) We worked out of a motel room for nearly 6 months, before our showroom was completed. (Little did we know at the time that the construction delays were due to the fact that corporate neglected to pay the contractors.) So, how do you sell an unknown brand of cars, without a showroom, certificate of occupancy, or advertising? You sell door to door, just like what many car salespeople do in Southeast Asia. I created a marketing plan to go to every Korean owned business that I could find, and spread the gospel of Daewoo! (I spent a lot of time in fish markets, grocery stores, and any other business that did not throw me out.) After a full day of canvassing, I would drive over to the construction site, and sit in the dirt lot in front of the dealership, as it was being built. With a card table, some brochures, and several bottles of water, I would wait for people to take pity on me, and stop to ask questions about the exciting new line of Daewoo cars. When our store finally opened, about 10 of the 40 or so people who stopped to see me, actually bought a car from me (some actually bought two of them!) I also had the opportunity to do the Daewoo campus sales program, although, it had varied greatly from the original plan of selling directly from college campus sites. (Note to our friends back in Pupyong, do not hire pre-law students to sell cars from campus, without paying them for their duties! It can get ugly in a hurry.) My absolute first car sale, at Daewoo, was my favorite car story of all time. I had convinced my dental hygenist to take a chance or a new Nubira. Her ’87 Sentra was on it last legs, and she was finally getting a steady paycheck. After a vigorous test drive one hot June afternoon, she was ready for a shiny new 1999 Nubira 4 door. The only trouble was, our showroom wasn’t finished, and we were still working of our make-shift office motel room. I brought her back to the motel, only to find the the motel room was locked. It had turned out that the management were having a meeting, and could not be disturbed. Where could I go? As it had tuned out, I had befriended “Judy the massage lady”, who maintained a (hopefully) legitimate massage service which she ran out of the motel room below us. She said that she was free for the afternoon, and that I could use her table as a desk! I obliged. Consequently, the first car sale that I ever did, not only for the dealership, but for myself, was drafted on a massage table at a motel room, with a casio calculator, no computer, and a handwritten contract for a shiny new Daewoo Nubira.

    • 0 avatar
      EchoChamberJDM

      Times58 – Great story. Singlehandedly you must have been responsible for half of all Daewoo sales in 2000! Dae certainly Woo’d you into selling some cars!

  • avatar
    Alfasaab99

    “Even though production of the Nubira stopped just ten years ago, this car has all but disappeared from our consciousness.” And the streets!

  • avatar
    stereorobb

    Haha the daewoo! The entire brand was a complete and epic fail here in the states. The one that sticks out most in my mind was the Lexus GS300 bootleg daewoo leganza. Pretty little sedans that looked like a period GS packed with all kinds of gizmos for a fraction of the price. A friend of mines mom bought one right off the showroom floor, within a year the paint was oxidizing, engine was burning oil, and the interior was falling apart. The car blew the head gasket at something stupid like 50k miles and that was the end of that. They sold a buttload of these things here in Florida and well, during the summer of 2000 they were everyware. By the summer of 2002 they had already disappeared.


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