By on June 15, 2012


You can read Jack Baruth’s extremely thorough track-test of the 2013 Mustang V8 here.

All right stop, collaborate and listen:
The Mustang’s back in a brand-new edition,
Recaros, grab a hold of me tightly -
Flow through the corners daily and nightly
“Will it ever stop?” Yo, I think so,
It’s got grabby pads and brakes by Brembo.
To the extreme: a drag car that can handle,
Light ‘em up, stage, then wax a chump like a candle.

Right, I think that got all the Vanilla Ice out of my system. Let’s drive this damn thing.

It’s brony week at TTAC and things are looking good for Ford with Back Jaruth Jack Baruth Beardy McShinyshirt calling the ‘Stang, “the best, most thoroughly realized product Ford makes.”

Oh, Ford makes this thing? Well that’s weird: why there aren’t any dang Ford badges on it? I’ve got a galloping steed up front, “5.0” on the flanks and a big ol’ GT belt-buckle out back so that the guy in the 3-series knows that at least he didn’t get smoked by a V6.

Welp, there ain’t no bow-ties on a ‘Vette neither. The Mustang is a brand all to itself, which is exactly why it has such a clear feeling of identity. This latest edition obviously has the blood of its sixties ancestors pounding in its veins, although I can’t say I’m in love with the tweaked front end. It looks like Moose thinking about something sad.

This car is American, inside and out. Frankly, I love it. The materials aren’t luxuriant – dear me, no – the pebbled dash is textured like the backside of a vulcanized rhinocerous and why does chrome-look plastic even exist? Why? Matte-black would do just fine.

The steering wheel is leather everywhere you don’t touch it and plastic at the 9- and 3- o’clock positions. And the retro-look speedometer is useless with metric markings, but serve me right for living in an igloo.

Ignore all that. The Recaro seats fit perfectly, the cabin is clean and simple and spartan and it feels really well put-together. You get the feeling that the person (well, robot, I suppose) that screwed all the plastic bits down watched the car go out the factory door with a satisfied nod. Made in America, and that’s a good thing.

I suppose I should mention something about the on-board infotainment entermation. The optional Shaker Pro system is incredibly loud and comes with an after-thought trunk-mounted subwoofer that looks like a metastasizing desktop PC. If you play Motörhead through it at high-volume, all vegans within a five-mile radius spontaneously combust. Fun!

But then, the glorious V8 soundtrack is about half the reason to buy a GT over the V6 in the first place; why cover it up? Save your money for an aftermarket exhaust. Or, just put the window down.

Overall, the inside of the Mustang’s a bit like a pair of jeans. Not useless skinny jeans nor saggy-crotched baggy jeans nor hyper-expensive ass-framing euro-denim. Just jeans. The kind you wear when you’re going to fix something or hammer nails into stuff. “Getting-shit-done” pants.

Yeah, that’s it. The inside of the Mustang feels like a place where you Get. Shit. Done.

This is the ranch, where I keep my four hundred and twenty horses. They’d like to run to 7500rpm. Too bad the fuel cut hauls on the bridle at 7K.

The Coyote loves to rev. Point that big nose down the on-ramp, stomp on the throttle and don’t forget to shift – there’s no top-end dead zone to remind you. 1-2 from a roll-out around town is giggle-inducing; 2-3-4, you shut up and pay attention.

As a sort of sauerkraut sorbet to whet my palate pre-Stang, I spent a few days behind the wheel of six-speed M3. Let me just put this out there: while the ‘Stang’s Chinese-sourced 6-speed may be inferior to the Boss Tremec option (deferring to the opinion of my colleagues here), it’s better than the Bimmer’s. And, dare I say it, I like the Mustang’s engine better too.
And then there’s the cornering…

Whoever designed the Mustang’s traction control was either a genius, or a red-neck, or a redneck genius. Mishandle the ‘Stang, yank at the wheel and stomp on the go-pedal and the back-end riverdances about like Michael Flatley, pulling back just before it falls right off the stage.

Sure you can disable it for the track, but on the street it’s less hand-slapping e-nanny and more Master P: shake dat ass – but watch yo’self! Stickier tires would not go amiss though.

This car had the glass roof, high-mounted weight which should theoretically affect the handling like a lead cycling helmet. That and the soft-ish suspension might have track-addicts hunting down the Boss instead – or heading for the aftermarket. As a street car though, you’ll be having too much fun to care.

There’s a caveat. For all the talk of muscle-car-turned-sports-car, the Mustang is a big machine. With an upright seating position and long front-end, it’s like being in a canoe (albeit a canoe with twin Mercury outboards) compared to the “sit-in” kayak hip-pivot feel of something like a MX-5. Not disconcerting, but something to get used to if you’re stepping out of anything lighter than 3000 pounds.

And then there’s the fuel economy which is not… good. If you’ve got a commute, and you’re on the fence about the V6, be aware that you won’t get any pleasant surprises from the V8.

But I pay for my own gas when I’m evaluating a car, and I begrudged the V8 not a single drop. Sure it did a pretty thorough job of processing petrochemicals into noise and shimmy, but I expected it to.

There are basically just two kinds of cars in the world. There are those that you climb into after a long day’s labour and suddenly you find yourself half-way home on autopilot, living out the Talking Head’s “Once in a Lifetime”.

Then there are those cars that straighten out the workday slouch and quicken your step as you walk towards them in the empty parkade. You’ve put in extra hours to make the bigger payment and the nine-to-fivers are already gone for the day.

Rush hour has tailed out, the roads are quiet and you pause before you crank the starter to mute the radio and drop both windows. The Coyote barks, hollow echoes bouncing off the concrete. Dinner’s in the fridge, kids already in bed – no need to drive straight home.

Yo. Word to your mother.

Ford Canada provided the car tested and insurance.

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59 Comments on “Off-track Excursion – 2013 Ford Mustang GT Take Two...”


  • avatar
    Robstar

    The more I read about the GT the more I want the extra 150 ponies that my STi doesn’t have….Then I think modding might be cheaper, although I do need something reliable as a daily driver so not sure if I should go that way or not.

    • 0 avatar
      TEXN3

      It’s not the power you’ll want, it’s the sound. It’s absolutely beautiful even at low speeds and taking it easy. It mellows you out and you don’t seem to want more. I love Subarus but you won’t get the same feeling driving one, even modded to the hilt.

      It’s like drinking good bourbon vs a vodka/red bull drink. Just sit back and savor the experience.

      • 0 avatar
        patman

        My poor old ’96 GT might be making 240 or 250 HP and should get stomped by a new V6, let alone a GT or Boss, six ways to Sunday but the sound of that V8 (and not having had a payment in forever) makes me smile every morning and afternoon when I climb in it. Rolling along in 4th gear at 1200 RPMs and then easing down on the throttle to surge forward a bit or winding it out to 6 grand at full throttle – glorious! I sometimes go for a couple of weeks with the radio turned off and just the music of the engine to entertain me on my commute.

        You can rationalize a V6 all you want – lighter weight, better mileage, cheaper insurance – but the differences aren’t all that much in the real world and you want that V8 rumble. You may think you don’t need it but you do.

      • 0 avatar
        duffman13

        @patman

        I say the same thing when I get in my S2k.

        Is there faster and better stuff than it now? absolutely. But I probably get the same feeling watching the revs scream to 9k on my AP1 that you get from your V8 burble.

        And nothing in this world can touch that emotion. It’s why we’re on this website.

      • 0 avatar
        mnm4ever

        +100 — You guys absolutely nailed it. Doesn’t matter what you choose to drive, its that emotion, that connection, that feeling you get from it.

        Camry drivers just dont get it.

    • 0 avatar
      Brendan McAleer

      Going Stage II is worth it. Going Stage IV is not. You wouldn’t actually see much of an increase in fuel consumption if your tune is done right, and the enormous amount of torque and improved turbo response that’s just sitting there on any F-I Subaru project is worth the initial price of admission. Just be careful of bearings and #3 cylinder fuelling – find a respected tuner and take their advice.

      Big turbo is completely unnecessary for the street – you lose the point-to-point sweetness of the car.

      • 0 avatar
        Lug nut

        patman
        My 96 GT still puts a smile on my face every time I get on it. Sometimes I visit the Ford store and drool over the newer Stangs, but I’m never disatisfied with my old car. Well. The sqeaks and rattles wear me slick.

      • 0 avatar
        patman

        @Lug nut

        More exhaust or more radio will fix that right up.

        Mine doesn’t have any squeaks and rattles… until my wife or some other passenger gets in the car and then I hear squeaks, rattles, groans and clunks I’ve never heard before. Also, every bump, pothole and other road imperfection are suddenly 10 times bigger.

        The new ones are outstanding and better in most ways than mine but they’re not a big monthly new car payment better to me. The Boss 302 does make me consider selling plasma from time to time though.

        @duffman13

        Yeah, that’s what it’s all about. It’s a visceral experience that is much more than just numbers. If you start chasing just numbers you’ll never be satisfied.

  • avatar
    mbaruth

    Nicely written. The Mustang is dominating the pages of TTAC lately…and that’s a good thing.

  • avatar
    Spartan

    Love the Mustang GT. I’ve had a lot of seat time behind a friend’s 2011 Mustang GT and my only gripe with it is how heavy it feels. After driving a V6 with the 3.7L, as crazy as it sounds, I thought the V6 felt like a better car.

    • 0 avatar

      I agree and disagree with you. I have a two month old GT 2013 vert and my wife has a 2010 V6 vert. Yes, a dual stang household. She is not a fan of riding my pony, she says its a brute. I WILL drive her V6, twice a week I have to commute 300 miles Driving a much enforced 50mph for most of the journey on lightly travelled straight as a die country roads takes away all the fun of driving. Better to drive the less thirsty boulevard cruiser V6 for that commute. However if I stick to driving around my home town of Charleston, SC, I am all about the V8. Turning on the ignition brings the first smile, then the exhaust (I have a Roush and its pure music) will bring the second smile. Lastly that telltale dual exhaust will have no one messing with you, you get respect.

  • avatar
    Educator(of teachers)Dan

    ‘Merica – fu** YEAH!

    One of Americas honest cars. “Owning a Mustang at some point in my life” should be on everyone’s list.

  • avatar
    redav

    Haha, bronies.

    (I wonder if there’s a Fluttershy edition?)

  • avatar
    craigotron

    I would like, once again, to thank the TTAC overlords for validating my purchase last week.

    Should a guy like me learn to track a Mustang GT like this a bit? How does a guy like me even do that?

    • 0 avatar
      autojim

      Click the link on Beardy McShinyshirt’s article on track testing the 2013 in the story above, and there’s a link to Track Daze.

      Depending on where you are in the country, there are a variety of options for doing HPDEs — where you’ll learn how to drive better.

      If you want to get your feet wet for cheap, head on over to http://www.scca.com, find the “region locator”, and find your local SCCA region — then get to one of their autocrosses (“Solo” in SCCA-speak). You’ll find the regulars are usually friendly and helpful to newbies, and even if you decide it’s not for you after a few events, you should pick up some skills that will a) apply when you DO go to an HPDE or open track event, and b) likely save your bacon on the street at some point.

      • 0 avatar
        craigotron

        Thanks! I actually live in Metro DC so it looks like Track Daze isn’t an unreasonable drive. I’m very much a n00b “long time listener/first time caller” with the whole car that actually performs thing. I have a lot to learn but am enjoying it.

      • 0 avatar
        duffman13

        This. It was autocross that taught me if the rear starts to step out on FWD, add power liberally.

        It really did save my bacon one day when I was younger and getting on an onramp in the wet turning in while trailbraking (before I knew what trailbraking was and that I do it habitually). Rear end started stepping out, and I put the loud pedal down and it pushed enough weight backwards to keep the front and rear wheel in their appropriate places.

      • 0 avatar
        mbaruth

        Washington DC has a very strong regional Solo Program, and you’ll see one of the best Mustang autocrossers evAr there.

    • 0 avatar
      replica

      Word.

      Mustang crew checking in.

      • 0 avatar
        craigotron

        I love your avatar. I actually named by Grabber Blue GT “Mega Man”. I was sick and stuck inside for a while recently and did the whole “lets beat all the Mega Man games in order” thing. Forgot how hard and rage inducing #1 is.

      • 0 avatar
        replica

        1 is probably the hardest. I coast through 2 and 3. It’s all about the sweet music.

      • 0 avatar
        craigotron

        Not sure if I can RE: to the RE:. “It’s all about the music”. Are you familiar with the Minibosses? I actually did video work for them in a galaxy far far away and they make a compelling case for 8-Bit music as hard rock. The Mega Man 2 tracks aren’t to be missed. http://minibosses.bandcamp.com/

  • avatar
    rmwill

    Love my 2013 Race Red 5.0 vert. 7K miles since mid March.

  • avatar
    iNeon

    Please, no more Mustangs.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    Great, great review on a car that I’m ho-hum about. The entire ponymuscle car genre is tired and cliche for me; it’s not Ford or Mustang specific.

    I’d rather be a scalpel wielding surgeon than a chainsaw wielding axe murderer.

    But Mystika’s lyrics should be etched into neon on the back of any Track Pack Boss, though (it really would be fitting):

    Shake ya ass, but watch yourself
    Shake ya ass, show me what you workin’ with

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    “I can’t say I’m in love with the tweaked front end. It looks like Moose thinking about something sad.”

    Best line of the whole review.

  • avatar
    86SN2001

    “calling the ‘Stang, “the best, most thoroughly realized product Ford makes.””

    Jack should moonlight as a stand up comedian. That was damn funny.

    I’d never buy a Mustang GT because it looks exactly like a V6. And the GT500 or whatever it’s called…looks just like the V6.

    Ford really forgot to think that one through. All versions of the Mustang look like the ones you will find at a Hertz place and the one the secretary drives.

    And why does a muscle car have to be so boring. The exterior is basically the same tired shape that was rehashed for 2005 and the interior could very well be out of a Camry.

    The infatuation with this car is so undeserved. Ford really had no focus when they reskinned the car for 2010 and 2013. Same boring snooze mobile.

    • 0 avatar
      mbaruth

      The general public disagrees with you. An SBY Boss 302 will snap heads on every street and parking lot in America. Or so I’ve heard.

      • 0 avatar
        carguy

        +1 – I sometimes see one on my way to work and I can never help but look (and listen). The new 302 is probably the most brilliant Mustang ever.

      • 0 avatar
        rmwill

        I have a hard time buying fuel without having to answer a dozen questions about the car. It attracts more attention than my old Series 1 E-type did to back in the 80′s. I think most people assume all Mustangs are V8′s anyway.

      • 0 avatar
        slance66

        I sure as hell notice them. Love the Bullit version by the way, guy in town has one I see now and then. Does it have the visceral impact of the 427 Cobra I saw last week…no. But really, what does? A Boss or Shelby especially stand out, much more so than any modern Corvette, and far beyond any modern Camaro or Challenger. It’s much more noticeable, whether seen or heard, than an M3. It just commands attention.

        Buy one? Only if I had a lot more disposable cash and a third garage. I don’t think it works as my every-day car. I’d be willing to downgrade my day to day ride to fit one in the budget though. Gas wise, might even come out ahead.

    • 0 avatar
      replica

      They’re all very different. The GT has a different front bumper and a few other things. The Premium V6 and GT share a lot. I think it’s great that you can get “similar” cars but with just different size engines, like the good old days. Can you give me an example of a line of cars that are the “same” car that don’t look similar? Civic DX and Civic SI look similar to everyone else. Same with Camaros. Same with Subarus.

      The body changed quite a bit from 05 and 2011. The most notable are the huge curves in the body starting at the rear doors, rising over the rear wheel well. It’s a fantastic curve. It’s even noticeable when looking in the side mirrors. The wheel wells are smoothed into the body, whereas on the 05′s they were a clear design curve. The reason Mustangs are probably “boring” looking is because the original Mustang shape has been in use for oh…about 50 years.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      If you can’t tell the difference between a GT and a V6, you’ll also see zero difference between an M3 and base 3-series. I love that they blend in with all the V6s, if you’re not paying attention. Or a cop.

      Now if you don’t see any difference in the GT500, you’re really not paying attention in class.

    • 0 avatar
      rudiger

      The similiarity between the lowliest, base, strippo Mustang and a GT500 costing nearly three times as much is intentional. Ford has been doing it ever since the first Mustang rolled off the line in ’64. The reason is it sells more of the low-lines to the poor bastards who can’t afford the hotrods, but will buy the cheapos when they look like the hotrods costing much more.

      And Ford has been quite good at keeping the level of similiarity and difference between all Mustangs just right.

    • 0 avatar
      BigDuke6

      Time to crawl back into your cave……….

    • 0 avatar
      drw1926

      “…and the interior could very well be out of a Camry.”

      Ummmm…no.

    • 0 avatar
      Lumbergh21

      You have got to be trolling. I was driving on a highway last week (60 mph speed limit but with occassional stop lights), alongside a black California Special Mustang. When we stopped at a set of lights, two girls in some nondescript Japanese snooze mobile pulled alongside the Mustang. They seemed to notice it as they would say something to each other then crane their heads around to get another look before say something again, look, etc. To me that is getting noticed. I can’t say that I have ever seen that reaction to a BMW, Mercedes, Lexus, etc.

      By the way if you can’t tell the difference between a GT500 and a V6 Mustang, you really need glasses, or you really aren’t looking. They aren’t even that close in appearance.

  • avatar
    PenguinBoy

    “If you play Motörhead through it at high-volume, all vegans within a five-mile radius spontaneously combust. Fun!”

    That gets my vote for “internet quote of the day”!

    Great review, thank you!!

  • avatar
    duffman13

    “Overall, the inside of the Mustang’s a bit like a pair of jeans. Not useless skinny jeans nor saggy-crotched baggy jeans nor hyper-expensive ass-framing euro-denim. Just jeans. The kind you wear when you’re going to fix something or hammer nails into stuff. “Getting-shit-done” pants.

    Yeah, that’s it. The inside of the Mustang feels like a place where you Get. Shit. Done.”

    Thanks for that. it’s writing like this that keeps me coming back to this site for all my car obsessing needs. Well done.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    Good point about the car’s honesty. It’s like “hey man. if you want soft touch plastics buy a ****ing 200 HP Audi. If you want to drive a car you will remember, keep your pasty ass put”

    The awful packaging + needless girth still upset my sensibilities, but maybe I could overlook all that with a drive. I was definitely enamored by the 1st GT500 at the 2010 NYIAS… maybe one day…

  • avatar
    bludragon

    Will you guys please stop writing about the 400+ hp mustangs now? I’m in serious danger of dumping my carefully budgeted Civic Si commute-and-track-car in favor of one of these even though the sensible part of my brain tells me that doing so will mean I have to settle for driving the streets at 1/10th for the next 5 years before my wallet recovers enough to fund tracking it.

  • avatar
    tjh8402

    Ignore iNeon. I need a video of Jack’s track day so we can hear that Coyote Howl. I test drove one of these and gave it serious consideration. Just really didn’t want the payment. Every once in a while (when I see one), I feel a little bit of regret. That being said, I can relate a lot to Alex’s description of the drive home from work. It’s hard to put a price on always having a smile on your face when you’re driving. You may not like where you’re going or where you’re coming from, but you know you’re gonna enjoy the journey. The sign the you’ve really made the right choice is, upon reaching your driveway, you realize you haven’t had enough yet and you go around the block one more time just for the fun of it.

  • avatar
    multicam

    I agree with every word of this review. I can relate to the description of walking to your car after a long day’s work excited just to start it up. I have a ’12 V6 with aftermarket cold air intake and exhaust (Airaid and Borla) and though it doesn’t sound quite like a V8 I still appreciate every wonderful note that comes out of those well-endowed pipes. The burble and pop as the revs wind down is addicting. I can’t sufficiently put it into words but there’s nothing quite like the satisfaction of driving something that I made my own with a few hours under the hood and on the local Air Force base’s lift ($5.50 an hour to lift the car up- totally worth it!).

  • avatar
    Buckshot

    What is this? http://www.ford.com? fordfanboy.com? redneckheaven.com? Sponsored by Ford? Delete this crap and go back to TTAC roots.

    “This car is American, inside and out” ??? Recaro seats and Brembo brakes.

  • avatar
    jerseydevil

    I’m still not sure about this. A friend of mine had a few old years old GT convertable, I drive it occasionally. Understand that my regular drive is a ’95 Golf with a few mods. I found the stang heavy and weird to steer, powerful but complient, easy to drive. And yes, the sound track is awesome. I do not like the shaker stereo, it is loud but lacks any tonal quality or finesse, like a cheap boom box at an outdoor picnic. Mostly, however, i found it difficult to have fun in on regular streets. My old VW is a blast to drive at quite legal speeds, the mustang, not so much. An occasional rush away from the stoplight, big deal. On back twisties I DEFINITELY prefer my VW. So I guess I dont get it. Truthfully, I’d rather be seen in the stang, its cooler than my beat up MK3. I would buy this car as a very cool cruiser, but to have fun in, no.

  • avatar
    majeskyb

    “There are basically just two kinds of cars in the world. There are those that you climb into after a long day’s labour and suddenly you find yourself half-way home on autopilot, living out the Talking Head’s “Once in a Lifetime”.

    Then there are those cars that straighten out the workday slouch and quicken your step as you walk towards them in the empty parkade. You’ve put in extra hours to make the bigger payment and the nine-to-fivers are already gone for the day.

    Rush hour has tailed out, the roads are quiet and you pause before you crank the starter to mute the radio and drop both windows. The Coyote barks, hollow echoes bouncing off the concrete. Dinner’s in the fridge, kids already in bed – no need to drive straight home.”

    You hit the nail on the head! I have driven my ’00 Trans Am as a daily driver for the past six years, and have just retired her due to picking up a Lightning (my first Ford), that one might call, “highly modified, yet street-able”. I hope you don’t mind me borrowing the above lines as my signature on different forums. It’s just so perfect.

  • avatar
    Caboose

    I would love a Mustang but need a sedan. I keep waiting for Ford to drop a Coyote into a full-size, rear-drive sedan. (The Taurus is not a full-size sedan.) A new LTD.

    But I really wanted to Comment to echo the positive comments on the writing.

    Getting-shit-done pants.
    Spontaneously combusting vegans.
    And Sad Moose (which I desperately hope becomes a meme).

    Just really good writing of the kind that Bertel has wet dreams about when he thinks he feels witty. Oh, so witty.
    -That was a joke, by the way. I said it ironically, so I think I’m safe.

  • avatar
    dolorean

    “Oh, Ford makes this thing? Well that’s weird: why there aren’t any dang Ford badges on it? I’ve got a galloping steed up front, “5.0” on the flanks and a big ol’ GT belt-buckle out back so that the guy in the 3-series knows that at least he didn’t get smoked by a V6.”

    As a Mustang fanatic and owner of a ’95 Hardtop Convertible Cobra, I can tell you that Ford historically since ’94, perhaps to shrug off the Fox body, debadges “Ford” from the Mustang. My ’95 has it in one place, on the trunk lid. Running horse on the front, cobra on the steering wheel, Mustang stenciled on the twin-eyebrow, and Mustang on rear bumper (COBRA not on the back til ’96)

    The Mustang IS its own brand as is the Corvette. Badges, it dont need no stinkin’ Ford badges.

  • avatar
    gonflyn

    I think Fords done a great job with the 5.0, gets my vote for the best American sports car but………………………..” The 6 speed in the Mustang is better than the M3′s?……………………………………………..

    What!?!?!………….WHAT?!?!?!?!!! ……are you effin high?!?? I SAID ARE YOU EFFIN’ HIGH MAN!?!?!?!
    Isnt this the chinese made tranny that has the recall for shifting defects? Or have they addressed it
    for ’13? I drove a 2012 and i was appalled by the clunkiness of it, several times it simply would not go into the next gear, second or third i cant remember, under hard acceleration. I still love this car and would buy one in a minute if i knew this problem was sorted, but it was a huge turnoff for me, a reminder of American quality, or lack thereof rearing its ugly head once again. So close Mustang, so close!!!!!! Cmon! You can do it!!!!

    Anyway. What? WHAT?!?!? ARE YOU YOU EFFIN’ HIGH!?!?!?!

    Please make me look like a fool and tell me they’ve fixed it.

    Otherwise , nice review on a potentially great car.


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