By on April 19, 2012

Some 200,000 EVs are already on the road in China, says Reuters. Teslas they ain’t.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

5 Comments on “VOTD: EVs Selling Like Crazy In China. (Wait Until You See Them.)...”


  • avatar
    OldandSlow

    Another bottom-up Chinese innovation that lacks official government approval would be electric bicycles and scooters. There are probably millions of them on in use.

  • avatar
    mdensch

    These look like Neighborhood Electric Vehicles, an idea that never took off in this country. We had a dealer set up shop in a nearby town several years ago and he successfully petitioned local governments all over the state to adopt ordinances that would permit operation on city streets.

    Their top speed was governed at 25mph, though a simple software update could kick that up to about 35, making them a little more competitive with other vehicles on the streets. Range was about 20 miles or so, adequate (barely) for a grocery-getter or for a short work commute.

    They were tiny, light, uncomfortable and expensive for what you got, which wasn’t much. I drove one, a ZENN, a fairly attractive little car but a total penalty box to drive.

    ZENN no longer makes cars and the dealer long since has closed his doors.

  • avatar
    L'avventura

    This sounds similar in concept to what GM and Segway had in mind for China in Project P.U.M.A, which evolved into the Chevy EN-V for the Shanghai Expo:

    http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2011/07/did-gm-greenlight-the-en-v/

    Which are slow-moving electric vehicles for urban usage. Granted, these EVs being sold in China seem to be more for rural usage than urban, but the EN-V seems to fit the bill.

    The Renault seem to have a similar thought process to bring the Twizy EV to the UK:

    http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2012/03/you-wont-need-a-license-to-drive-this-renaut/

    The bigger question is if GM can make these cars cheap enough. The EVs described in the video cost $5k and use lead-acid batteries. GM’s will most definitely use a more modern Li-ion battery that would surely add costs. And may be out of price range of the rural Chinese farmer which those EVs are being sold to, since a few hundred dollars seem to be the decisive factor why they choose the EV over the gasoline model.

    Either way, interesting video.

  • avatar
    cmoibenlepro

    more:
    200,000 produced
    500 sold
    199,500 in storage.


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Subscribe without commenting

Recent Comments

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Authors

  • Brendan McAleer, Canada
  • Marcelo De Vasconcellos, Brazil
  • Matthias Gasnier, Australia
  • J & J Sutherland, Canada
  • Tycho de Feyter, China
  • W. Christian 'Mental' Ward, Abu Dhabi
  • Mark Stevenson, Canada
  • Faisal Ali Khan, India