By on April 24, 2012

So today The Tycho,  proprietor of Carnewschina and expert on Mao-era-revival cars, intercepts me at the show and says: “You did it all wrong! You talked about the H7, but showed the L7!”

“I beg your pardon?”

It turns out he was right as usual. In my piece on the Red Flag car, the wrong pictures were added to the wrong text. Corrected. As a make-good, here the ultimate L7/H7 pictorial.

This is the L7. Based on a Landcruiser chassis. And with the full frontal perspective, as demanded by Comrade Karesh.

For people who are more into bootie.

Rims with Mao-era inset.

This is the H7. This one truly based on a Toyota Crown.

From the side.

Even this car will save the planet – if a large enough battery is ever found. And a substation to go with it.

Revolutionary hood ornament.

 

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10 Comments on “2012 Beijing Auto Show: Capture The Real Red Flag...”


  • avatar

    I kinda like the L7′s retro front end. Reminds me of an old Ford Thunderbird I saw once.

    D

  • avatar
    Contrarian

    Is that a real extension cord or just an orange piece of rope?

  • avatar
    ranwhenparked

    The Chinese auto industry actually seems to have the luxury thing figured out. Between Red Flag and Roewe, they’re doing some pretty competitive higher end vehicles right now. A lot of their mainstream stuff is still pretty well junk, but they do seem to know how to put together a nice luxobarge.

  • avatar
    Richarbl

    Is it wrong to want one of those incredibly cool triple red flag badges?

  • avatar
    infinitime

    The H7 is little more than a rebadged Toyota Majesta, itself related to the Toyota Crown. Not a bad car, but hardly “indigenous” Chinese. In fact, many posters on Chinese-language forums ridicule the H7 as a wannabe Toyota, clearly not the image one wants for a premier Chinese vehicle.

    The L7 on the other hand, is based VERY loosely on a stretched Landcruiser platform. The engine is indigenous (I vaguely recall it being a 6L v12), and basically designed from the onset to be a premium vehicle. Equipped properly, it can be bulletproofed from the factory. Its true predecessor is the CA72 from 1958 (ignore the Audi and Lincoln clones which followed in the 80s and 90s):

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Hongqi_CA72_1959.jpg

    A rather classy car in its own right. The current model is meant to fill the role of a presidential vehicle, similar to the bullet-proof Caddy limos that US presidents ride around in…

  • avatar
    tekdemon

    I always wondered what it was platformed on…kinda surprised that it’s based on a stretched land cruiser platform but I guess if it’s meant to carry leaders the platform has to be a tough truck based one for armoring purposes.

    The L7 is way cooler than the H7 obviously.

  • avatar
    Joss

    L7′s front end has a hint of Farina – Peugeot 404ish… Nice hood ornament for those pesky pedestrians, though the organs may not be suitable for harvest.

  • avatar
    Amendment X

    Maybe I’ll be able to purchase a real, American-luxury-styled car when the Chinese finally enter the market here in the next 10-20 years. If Ford didn’t have their head up Europe’s ass (Kinetic design language abound), that H7 would have been a Lincoln 5 years ago.

    The American car companies are followers because they aspire to the traits of OTHERS (always mimicking European design, etc.). Grow some balls, Detroit. The Chinese are beating you at your own game.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    I can’t read “Hongqi” phonetically and not giggle. Yes, I’m immature.

  • avatar
    daveainchina

    About the hood ornament. I’m very happy that China doesn’t have Ralph Nader removing those design elements from vehicles here. you can still find vehicles with hood ornaments here, although not many as vehicles are basically global in nature now.

    Making our world soft bland and colorless for the god of safety makes too many things uninteresting, I’m not sure that we are in the end doing ourselves a favor.

    Time will tell, but I think we are losing something that maybe shouldn’t be lost.


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