By on January 3, 2012

After seeing the intensely early-1980s-Japan instrument cluster in this ’83 Cordia in a Northern California wrecking yard a few weeks back, it gnawed at me that I hadn’t brought the tools to pull the thing on the spot. I kept thinking about the amazing big-nosed climate-control humanoid diagram, and the even-better-than-the-280ZX-Turbo “bar graph” tachometer.
Finally, I broke down and called a member of the LeMons Mafia who lives near the junkyard in question: “Please go and grab that Cordia cluster for me!”
Shawn, who races the fast-but-fragile Bunny With a Pancake On Its Head VW Rabbit in West Coast LeMons events, did the parts pulling for my Junkyard Nightmare Build Quality Challenge: Speedometers piece last year, so I knew he was the right guy to yank and ship my much-dreamed-about Cordia cluster.
A couple days back, a big box shows up on my front porch. I’m really impressed by the component quality and workmanship on this unit; it’s obvious that Mitsubishi’s consumer-electronics experience helped them a lot here. The only clusters of this vintage I’ve seen that look more solidly built come out of W126 Benzes.
Yes, the rest of the Cordia fell apart in a hurry, but I’m sure Honda and Toyota engineers were a bit envious of the car’s instrument cluster.
Even though it has a digital speedometer, the Cordia still used an old-fashioned speedometer cable to provide the speed signal to the cluster’s brain, rather than a solid-state sender at the transmission. This allowed Mitsubishi to use a mechanical odometer and trip counter, in addition to avoidance of designing too many new electronic components.
With all the analog processing and whatever else goes on inside the Cordia cluster’s black box, Mitsubishi decided to punch these snazzy louvers in the cover over the nerve center.
Did the JDM version of this climate-control diagram feature such a big nose, or is that just for us gaijin?
From a user-interface standpoint, only the locations of the “door open” indicators on the car-shaped diagram make any sense; the designers apparently thought “let’s pack the little car picture with all the idiot lights, so they don’t clutter up the Big Nose Climate Control Man’s area.”
I try my best to avoid being a crazy car-parts hoarder, especially with pointless stuff like instrument clusters. I’ve already got this 1961 Citroën ID19 cluster, pulled from this car a few years back. I’ve got several silly junkyard-parts-based projects in the works, inspired by the happiness my Junkyard Boogaloo Boombox brings me in the garage. There’s the big box with 50 car clocks, and another box with several hundred “Fasten Seat Belt” warning lights, and yet another full of car horns. Someday, these ambitious projects will join the Junkyard Boogaloo…
As for the Cordia and ID19 clusters, my plan is to frame them and hang them on the wall of my office, wired up so that the lights and gauges function. The Citroën cluster will be pretty simple, with just a clock and some lights to wire up (I’ll leave the speedo at zero, since a motor to move the needle would make irritating noise), but the Cordia unit is going to be a greater challenge.
I’ve bought the Cordia factory shop manual on eBay, which will give me the wiring diagram for the dash harness. Armed with that information, I should be able to get all the idiot lights and— probably— the Big Nose Climate Control icons to work. What I’d really like to do is get the tach and speedo cycling through their paces, and for that I’d need to spoof their inputs using simple digital electronics. I’ve always wanted to mess around with the Arduino microcontroller, and now I have an excuse!

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

73 Comments on “When I Build My Spaceship, It Will Be Equipped With This Mitsubishi Cordia Instrument Cluster...”


  • avatar
    MrWhopee

    If you can put that digital cluster in your impala, that would really blow people’s minds off!

    You’re absolutely right, though. These things need to be rescued and safeguarded for future generations! How awful would it be if it’s just left to be crushed along with the car, and turned into worthless plastic shards! The car (or the metal that make up the car) at least would be recycled and reborn as Wuling vans and stuff.

  • avatar
    28-cars-later

    Murilee, you are awesome.

  • avatar
    redmondjp

    I’m glad that I’m not the only one with this disease . . . I kept a spare set of taillight housings for my long-gone 1971 LTD (that my dad bought new when I was 5, I still remember going to test-drive one in August and riding home in the one we ordered in November) that I plan on mounting on a board and equipping with 5W night-light bulbs.

    It will have to hang in the garage, now that I’m married . . . if I ever get around to actually making the thing!

    When I was growing up, I hung wheel covers on the walls of my room as decorations. They put Interstate 5 smack dab through the middle of my grandparents’ farm, and my grandfather collected all of the roadside wheel covers that he recovered and gave them to me. I had some really nice ones from the late 50s – early 60s, and about 20 years ago I sold them off at the Portland Swap Meet (I didn’t even know what some of them were for exactly until I sold them and the buyer informed me).

    I have a thing for high-end 1940s-50s refrigerator interiors as well – they had about as much chrome trim as the cars built during that same era! Too bad that most of today’s designs are so bland . . .

  • avatar

    “…only the locations of the “door open” indicators on the car-shaped diagram make any sense….”

    Oh, I don’t know. The oil, high beam, charge, and coolant lights are all at the front of the car, the seat belt light is in the passenger compartment, and the fuel light is near the back, all indicative of their actual locations. The fuel light is even on the correct side to match the filler location. Arguably the brake light is adequately associated with the location of the pedal, too. I’m not sure about the “light out” light, but the others seem sensibly (or at least justifiably) placed.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      Agreed. I had an ’83 Mustang with a similar car-icon full-o-lights but it was located below the dash near the shifter. It included a reset button to clear the “computer” after you fixed the situation that caused a light to come on (IE: filled up the gas tank).

      • 0 avatar

        I have one of these from an 80 Mustang in my garage right now, if anyone wants it. I pulled it while grabbing stuff for our Lemons Futura from the junk yard. I’d sell it for whatever I paid plus shipping, which is not much.

  • avatar
    Skink

    Tach to be adapted to function as Warp speedometer.

  • avatar
    jmo

    Pathetic – Subaru XT Turbo FTW

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R9qxLK6v7_k

    • 0 avatar

      The XT6 is one of those 80s Japanese cars I will own someday. Just the dash alone is enough!

    • 0 avatar
      dvp cars

      …….jmo……I sold these new, forgot how hi-tec they were…..great video, but, as I remember, the most bizarre feature of the dashboard was what happened when you hit the tilt wheel……the whole dash cluster tilted with it…..never failed to get a giggle out of your passenger. Those oddball XT’s had another claim to fame, the lowest aerodynamic drag co-efficient (.29 CD) of any production car, a figure rarely bettered 25 years later….virtually effortless 100mph cruising speed.

    • 0 avatar
      Sketch

      You beat me to it. I posted a video of one of these in the last digital dash thread.

      I lusted after one of these when I was a teenager. Couldn’t quite convince my parents to buy me one, though. They were afraid of the repair costs of anything turbocharged, the XT6′s were too expensive (this was around ’92 or 93), and the base 4 cylinder was ungodly slow. Even my suggestions that the turbo would be a nice safe car for a teenager, because it was the only one with a configurable speed alarm warning you could set on the dashboard, which would alert you if you went over a certain speed, fell on deaf ears… I ended up with a 4-cylinder Fiero instead, and the rest is history (5 Fieros later…)

      Years later I spotted one at a used car lot and drove it and was pretty disappointed at the power and handling. I still love the styling though. I lost all respect for Consumer Reports when they dissed the car because the flush-with-the-body covered door handles could pinch fingers.

      BTW, Murilee, I think the digital dash was only availble on the 4-cylinder Turbo. I’ve never seen an XT6 with the digital dash. EDIT: Wikipedia confirms, no digital dash on the XT6: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subaru_XT#Subaru_XT6_.281988.E2.80.931991.29

  • avatar
    Lemmiwinks

    I – Love – This – Instrument – Cluster

    I, too, have had the images of this thing rolling around in my head in the weeks since you first posted it, Murilee. Thanks very much for revisiting so I could have a closer look. This thing is just awesome. My dad used to have an old tiny Mitsu pickup of roughly the same vintage, and though its IP had the same graph-paper aesthetic, it lacked the other interesting bits.

  • avatar
    MR2turbo4evr

    Please post pictures/videos once you have the cluster working!

  • avatar
    GS650G

    This calls out for a talking voice, in Japanese, gently reminding you to buckle the seat belt, check the oil, and not bring shame on your ancestors by exceeding the 100KMH speed limit in Japan.

  • avatar

    Nah, original C4 Corvette cluster over the lot of them.

    A large collection of digital instrument panel photos:

    http://www.doubleyoudigital.nl/~cars_digital%20dashboards.php

    Some of the Italian and French ones are the most insane.

  • avatar
    70Cougar

    Might I suggest adding a talking Nissan instrument cluster to your collection. “Your lights are on.” “Someone stole your battery, I say we go get the mother #$%^&er.”

  • avatar
    obbop

    The Omaha-based used parts emporium had an entire semi-trailer with multiple wood-built shelves to hold the extensive stock of “foreign” instrument clusters.

    We sold and shipped them across the USA for around $45-$75 depending upon rarity.

    Quickly pulled when entire car dismantled and selected components saved (depending upon demand, number in stock, etc).

    Our computer-based sales/inventory/etc system allowed for easy perusal of part-type, etc in demand.

    I included mileage shown, etc. for each component to ease sales parson’s job.

    Since various trim levels of cars COULD have differing instrument clusters that was something to consider.

    Interchange for instrument clusters existed but MANY gaps due to varied output by manufacturers of the info needed to create interchanges.

    Often needed to play the “match-up game” sending part numbers, written descriptions, etc. to other yards or walk-in customers seeking an instrument cluster.

    I enjoyed the first-hired era when I roamed the yard with print-outs of existing inventory to add subtract computer-based dat with the yard’s realities.

    Added and deleted to data base to match reality of stock on hand with inventory.

    Sales people loved me for increasing their productivity and greatly reducing their need to waste time with the “Let me go check on that part” due to MANY inaccuracies past laziness and slovenly errors created in the inventory.

    Too bad the greedy owners were unwilling to share the wealth.

    Such is life.

  • avatar
    skor

    If I get a chance, I’ll post a pic of the digital dash in my old Ford Probe. Even more Atari-tastic than that Mitsubishi.

  • avatar
    Crabspirits

    Hang on the wall? Wat?
    This thing needs to be in your van.

    • 0 avatar
      cfclark

      +1000. Would have been perfect for the Impala.

      “I try my best to avoid being a crazy car-parts hoarder, especially with pointless stuff like instrument clusters…”

      Who are you kidding? ;)

    • 0 avatar

      Actually, I’m seriously considering putting the Citroën cluster in the van. It’s about the right size and the correct vintage. I really like the factory cluster in the A100, though.

  • avatar
    JCraig

    Great to see people sharing my obsession with instrument clusters. This one is truly gold.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Why do I hear Harrison Ford’s voice-over for “Blade Runner” every time I see these Japanese digital instruments?

  • avatar
    stuart

    I’m guessing the METRIC light means that the speedometer is displaying km/h? Only in the USA would a “METRIC” lamp exist, and as a warning lamp, natch.

    stuart

    • 0 avatar

      That’s a button, not a light. I assume it switches the speedo display between miles and kilometers. I doubt that it changes the mechanical odometer numbers, though an all-gear means of doing so would be extremely cool.

      • 0 avatar
        stuart

        If the METRIC object is a button, then is the visually-similar CHECK object also a button? What happens if you press the CHECK button? Does the cluster perform a diagnostic self-test?

        If the cluster can self-diagnose itself, that’s… well, some kind of awesome. :-)

        Does the cluster make any interesting sounds to match its awesome appearance?

        stuart

      • 0 avatar

        I’m guessing the CHECK button just tests the light bulbs, but who can say? Once I get the shop manual, I’ll know more.

  • avatar
    carguy

    The “Star Wars” dash of 80s cars were awesome nuggets of futuristic tackiness. Someone should really dedicate a museum to them before they rot away.

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    “Even though it has a digital speedometer, the Cordia still used an old-fashioned speedometer cable to provide the speed signal to the cluster’s brain, rather than a solid-state sender at the transmission. This allowed Mitsubishi to use a mechanical odometer and trip counter, in addition to avoidance of designing too many new electronic components.”

    That’s one possibility. The more likely reason is that, by running a mechanical speedometer drive cable to the cluster, the factory could simply choose, at the moment of production, whether a particular car would get a mechanical or digital cluster.

  • avatar
    Feds

    No nose-based racism on Mitsu’s part. I can confirm that all of Mitsubishi’s instrument cluster people looked like that, all the way up through the middle/late ’90′s, as evidenced here:

    http://www.exblog.jp/blog_logo.asp?slt=1&imgsrc=201005/15/02/c0151002_23541680.jpg

    (Stolen from the instructions for my first Delica project:

    http://translate.google.com/translate?sl=ja&tl=en&js=n&prev=_t&hl=en&ie=UTF-8&layout=2&eotf=1&u=http%3A%2F%2Ffusionsbx.exblog.jp%2F14387209%2F )

  • avatar
    mad_science

    I hope some day there will be a museum with your name on it.

    BTW, when do we get part 20?

  • avatar
    GS650G

    The instrument cluster and dash is the most important thing to me when buying a car. You have to look at it everytime you drive.
    I chose my XG350 over a Panther because it had a nicer dash and overall nicer instrument panel.

  • avatar
    Broo

    As a kid I really liked KITT’s “high tech” electronic displays. My Celica Supra has the digital dash, I think fondly of my youth when I fire it up. :) Such electronics are quite common in many applicances nowadays, but back then, it was impressive.

  • avatar
    skor

    Found the picture of my first gen Probe with the digital dash and trip computer. All the buttons were illuminated in that car. At night I felt like an F-4 pilot. I really miss it.

    http://mysite.verizon.net/vze3j6z2/sitebuildercontent/sitebuilderpictures/PDB.JPG

  • avatar
    carbiz

    Wow, thanks for the pics. It’s easy to forget how the future looked 30 years ago!
    I remember driving a ’84(I believe) 300Z: it’s dash was a dizzying array of digital readouts and blinking lights. (It also had a vibrating seat/subwoofer with dials on the console!) The digital compass was so cool that I darned near drove the thing into a pillar watching it spin around.
    The ‘Vettes of the day were very Buck Rogers, too.

    • 0 avatar
      Sketch

      The RPM gauge shaped like the engine’s torque curve with the “available power” bar graph underneath (depending on how hard you pressed the throttle) was pretty nifty.

  • avatar

    Snort! You call that an instrument cluster?
    Now this is an instrument cluster:

    • 0 avatar
      skor

      Nice, I didn’t know that Wurlitzer did dashboards.

    • 0 avatar
      silverkris

      Is that a late 1950s Imperial or other Chrysler? I’m guessing it’s got those pushbutton transmission controls

      • 0 avatar

        Definitely a Mopar. The file name says Imperial, but looking over the shots from the Eyes On Design show that I took and matching up colors, it’s ’61 DeSoto.

        More pics here:
        http://www.carsindepth.com/?p=2708

        One of the cars had a RCA Hiway HiFi. I was at a Mopar show later in the year and one of those cars also had a record player. Apparently Chrysler dealers sold records for the players and the owner of the car at that show was very proud of having collected 43 of the 44 records Chrysler released.

      • 0 avatar
        dvdlgh

        I remember my Aunt from Milwaukee having one like this. The rear window seemed as big as our living room picture window! I don’t remember if she had AC, or if was available. I do recall it being so dang hot in the summer sun. It was definitely a Mopar brand.

    • 0 avatar
      ciddyguy

      Ronnie,

      That also looks very similar to the 60-61 Dodge Darts and that was my thought but not the base Seneca, but the top flight Pioneer.

      Now those are wonderful dashes for their day.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    1989 to 1992 Ford Probe digital dashboard.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L3gavTXH4F0

    It had a weird “feature,” that if you were in MPH, and you got to 85 MPH, the speedometer would just blink 85 MPH over and over again. However if you went to Metric, it would show the actual speed KPH. There was a button on the center stack that allowed you to toggle from Metric to English, and scroll through and do feature setup on the DIC in the lower left corner. It also had a maintenance alert based only on miles.

    • 0 avatar
      skor

      Yup. 161kph = 100mph. It also had another interesting little anomaly, the sixth odo digit would only show a 1. I drove that car over 200K miles. After the odo got to 199,999.9, it rolled over to 100,000.0 I was like, WTF? Why did they do that? The system scanner showed all kinds of useful info: Door ajar, decklid ajar, headlamp out, tail lamp out, low fuel, low coolant, low washer fluid and some other stuff I can’t remember now. My car had most of the options that were available including a flip-up sun roof. Of course Ford decontented the car for the second gen and killed it off entirely soon after that. Oh well, I guess there was a lot more profit in converting pickups into SUV’s.

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        I would hardly say Ford decontented the second generation Probe over the first. Digital dash aside, which was fading in popularity, the second generation Probe far outclassed and outperformed the first gen by a landslide…

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        Yup, I had the LX with every option but the automatic, including the sunroof. Red and red. I’ve always said the ’89 was the best mainly because they didn’t come with the motorized seatbelts.

        I put 186K miles on mine in 4-1/2 years, alternator, radiator (my fault, ignored a bad thermostat too long), and the trip computer display (under warranty). Got mine in August of ’88. I would park it and a crowd would gather, there was nothing on the road like it. I’d come out of stores and my side windows would be all smeared up with hand prints from people looking inside.

        I agree with you that the Gen II Probe was a step backwards, except for the 24V V6 engine in the GT. By 1995 Ford was phoning it in and the ’96 and ’97 models were utterly decontented and out classed by the competition.

        The Mazda 2.2L 12V four under the hood in both naturally aspirated and turbo form were under rated from a HP/torque stand point, and both bowed at the altar of torque, I do say that loosely about the base engine, which made the Probe an 11 second car. The engines are very tunable, I had mine tweaked up to a 9 second car, which was on par with a same year Acura Integra (not the top model).

        Consider it one of the best cars I ever owned; would love to find a loved one that was forgotten about in a garage.

      • 0 avatar
        skor

        @golden2husky, You could get a lot more interesting options in the first gen: speed sensitive steering(back in 1989 no less), adjustable suspension, digital dash. I liked the glass flip up sunroof on the first gen better than the metal sliding thing on the second gen.

        Both the engines on the second gen were more refined. The 24V Mazda sourced V6 was a little gem, but the first gen turbo 4 was the quickest. Having driving the first gen turbo, I can say it definitely was interesting. So much torque steer under full acceleration you could change lanes using nothing but the throttle.

      • 0 avatar
        skor

        @APaGttH,

        People use to write on my car. A few times wiseguys would write “Anal” in front of the Probe name plate. That’s what you get for living in Jersey.

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        By outclassed, I mean the 5 spd Probe GT. Yes, some of those kinda cool things were not included in the second gen, but from a handling point of view the GT was a gem. I still have mine – a 17 year old, 71K heated garage queen in uncrashed, unmolested condition save the aftermarket rear swaybar. I’m likely to sell it this spring for a something new…

    • 0 avatar

      If you’re going to embed videos and risk incurring Bertel’s wrath, remember to keep them less than 500 pixels wide. Otherwise the formatting on the page gets messed up.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        I just put the link, Word Press embedded the entire player, I did nothing but include a URL to YouTube (not the embedded codelet you can get). I don’t have enough hours in the day. You should change your WordPress settings.

    • 0 avatar
      dvdlgh

      Since the Probe was essentially a Mazda MX-6 I think the dash may have came from Mazda. I had a 1985 626 LX Touring Sedan with a digital dash. It had a button to switch it to metric readout if desired.

  • avatar
    GS650G

    My 93 Sable had the digital dash. I loved it. The low fuel warning would start beeping at 50 miles left. When you got to 25 it would beep more often and at 10 it would really wail. A cry for food if there ever was one.
    My speedo went to 120 MPH (found that out one night) and 200 KMH Metric (also tested that night) and it would flip all the numbers to Celsius, KM to empty, L/KM, etc.
    the Tach could be turned off if need be.
    It had a system monitor that would announce light bulbs were out, doors ajar, etc. Once at a red light it showed a signal bulb went out, a brake light bulb had died and I saw it immediately.
    Unlike the Taurus, Probe and others it was monochromatic, no colored lenses anywhere.
    It’s the one thing about that car I actually miss.

    • 0 avatar
      skor

      I don’t see why all new cars aren’t made with “glass cockpits” You could select any “skin” you wanted. Want analog? Fine. Want digital? OK. What to mix and match? Can do. Change colors? No problem. Developers could come up with all kinds of new dash board apps.

      I also think all new cars should come with a heads up display.

      • 0 avatar
        Patrickj

        Since they’ve all been electronic clusters for a decade, the electronic display changeable in software may be cheaper to make. But it may make it hard to sell unique replacement parts for each car.

      • 0 avatar
        GS650G

        The new mustang lets you select any color you want for dash lights. Literally. You can blend your own dash lights

      • 0 avatar
        geozinger

        @skor: Yes, I loved HUDs. I drove three Pontiacs with them, incredibly useful for night time driving for me.

        +1 on the idea about skins on newer IPs. I’ve said before, with LEDs, we should be able to configure the information anyway we can comprehend. The OBD-II collects it all anyway, we should be able to see it all if we were so inclined.

  • avatar

    And how could we not ignore Chrysler’s contribution to the soundtrack of the ’80s:

    A Door Is Ajar

    It’s interesting to compare Japan Inc.’s Ginza-by-night digital displays with those of Chrysler.

    • 0 avatar
      GS650G

      My TSX announces seat belts are not connected and a few other things. Of course the GPS provides auditory stimulation as well.

    • 0 avatar
      skor

      I’m proud to say that I’ve never owned a talking car. I do not want any kind of machine talking to me. Lets hope that fad is long dead. That car interior looks like it was a prop in Woody Allen’s movie, Sleeper…a comic book concept of what the future would look like.

    • 0 avatar
      golden2husky

      And for those who owned one of these in their family with the Mitsubishi silent shaft, when the shaft killed the drive to the oil pump, you got to hear “Your engine oil pressure is low. Immediate attention is required”. Also, if you removed the door switch on the driver’s door, the car would go through it’s entire list of messages…

    • 0 avatar
      windswords

      Ronnie,

      My first new car, a 1986 Chrysler Laser XE (not to be confused with the Mitsubishi based Plymouth Laser of the early 90′s) had a digital dash and the talking man. What is interesting is that instead of saying “A door is ajar” (which door?), it would say “Please close your driver (or passenger) door”. I guess it could be specific because the Laser was a 2 door unlike the New Yorker. Chrysler electronics hired a professional announcer and sampled his voice at a high rate so that it would not sound robotic. I always wondered why they did not use a woman’s voice or provide it as an option. I had a switch in the glove box that could turn the voice alert off if I didn’t want to hear it. One neat feature was if something serious happened (like engine temp climbing) the system would interrupt the radio/cassette player, the voice would say your “Your engine temperature is above normal. Immediate attention is required”, and then the stereo would come back on. My dash was well laid out and very easy to read. If the oil or temp was out of normal operating range the digital indicator would turn red instead of the normal yellow/green.

  • avatar
    Educator(of teachers)Dan

    Wonder if it would be possible to swap one of the ‘Vette digital clusters out for the Mitsu one. I’ve heard the Vette clusters tend to be a little fragile.

    • 0 avatar
      windswords

      I had 1990 LeBaron convertible. The digi dash went black on me (in 2006). I went to a salvage yard and pulled one from another convertible that had been sitting there for months if not years with no convertible top in the hot FL sun and rain and winter temps that would dip into the 20′s or 30′s on occasion. I put in my car and it lit up right away.

    • 0 avatar
      redmondjp

      Yes Dan,
      The early C4 digital clusters were very static sensitive. I worked at Delco Electronics in Kokomo, IN where the clusters were made – some of the clusters got zapped in transit and arrived in Bowling Green already dead! You can spend the better part of $1K to get one repaired as well.

  • avatar
    texan01

    My 86 Pontiac 6000-STE had the full digital dash… my friends called it darth vader’s bathroom

    I liked it, even though the driver information center could drive a man to drink if a brake light was out. if flashed the bulb location and beeped….every frecking time!

    had the 199.999 mile odometer as well, I did watch it roll to 100,000. I even found out what happens when you exceed the 199 rating on the speedo, it just dropped the bottom segment on the 1 (flipped it to metric while having it run well into redline at 128mph.

  • avatar
    Advo

    Lots of love and excitement for those old digital dashes here. I bet that posters don’t find the same passion for current Honda digital dashes for some reason.

    All those pics of the digital dashes is just wild. It’s like forget about readability and ergonomic functionality. We want gadgets and all those steering wheel buttons.


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Subscribe without commenting

Recent Comments

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Authors

  • Brendan McAleer, Canada
  • Marcelo De Vasconcellos, Brazil
  • Matthias Gasnier, Australia
  • J & J Sutherland, Canada
  • Tycho de Feyter, China
  • W. Christian 'Mental' Ward, Abu Dhabi
  • Mark Stevenson, Canada
  • Faisal Ali Khan, India