By on October 10, 2011

The author’s expectations play a large but rarely disclosed role in any auto review. Expect a car to be awful, and it turns out to be adequate? Then the review might even seem positive. On the other hand, if reviewers buy into the hype surrounding an upcoming model, and it turns out to be only pretty good, then the reviews can turn ugly. No one wants to be sold a bill of goods. I approached the Hyundai Veloster with different expectations than most of the automotive press.

Why? I never bought the hype gushing forth from Hyundai. I knew the Veloster would have the same 138-horsepower direct-injected 1.6-liter engine as the new Accent, but saddled with more curb weight (2,430-2,588 vs. 2,584-2,740 pounds). I also knew that Hyundai had yet to master the art of suspension tuning. (I’m also not buying the hype surrounding the Cadillac ATS and Scion FR-S until I have a chance to drive them.)

We already knew what the Veloster would look like. It’s a distinctive shape, made even more so by having two doors on the passenger side (the rear one “hidden”) but only one on the driver side. (I personally prefer the side with the rear door. You?) Fully loaded cars get the most attractive wheels complete with color-keyed inserts. On public streets the Veloster looks even wilder than it did at the auto shows, especially from the rear. People on the street recognized something new, and asked about the Veloster more than any other press car I’ve had. If Hyundai’s hype hadn’t persuaded journalists to expect an outstanding driving experience, this exotic shape would have.

The interior I wished for in the Accent? It’s here in the Veloster, complete with Cayennesque grab handles (that actually feel more solid here than in the Porsche), sportier upholstery, and available red/black color scheme. The designers were permitted to get a little more crazy in the sport coupe, but not to the detriment of ergonomics or good taste. The instruments are conventionally located and arranged while the center stack controls are easy to reach and operate. A seven-inch display and A/V inputs are standard, while a household-type power outlet is part of the Tech Package. Hyundai execs have personally tested the possibility of playing an Xbox in the car (while stationary). Hyundai’s new Blue Link adds some apps (like Pandora) along with OnStar-like emergency services, with an OnStar-like monthly fee after the first few months. There are also a couple of fuel economy-related games you can play, at least one of which compares the efficiency of your driving style to those of other Veloster owners.

The Veloster’s driver seat is better bolstered and more substantial than that in the Accent, if still not to the degree I’d prefer, but is similarly lacking in lumbar support. There’s only a single manual height adjustment, so the tilt of the cushion cannot be separately adjusted. But at least the steering wheel telescopes as well as tilts, unlike in the Accent. The view forward is open—you don’t sit too low in the car—the view rearward not so much thanks to a narrow, bifurcated rear window and stylishly raked C-pillars. The Tech Package with its rearview camera and rear parking sensors can come in handy. There’s enough room for heads and legs in the rear seat (adults up to 5-9 or so fit without issue) to make me wonder about the absence of a left rear door. Past three-door vehicles all ended up growing a fourth, and I would not be surprised to see history repeat itself with a future Veloster redesign. Also enough cabin width for three across in a pinch if Hyundai hadn’t designed the seat with an integral center console. Cargo volume is on the tight side, but sufficient for even sizable grocery runs.

Hyundai execs are apologetic about the Veloster’s performance, admitting that while the original concept was “eco-sport” the end result is more eco and less sport. Personally, I don’t mind limited power if the engine revs smoothly and eagerly, and the new Hyundai 1.6 does. I banged the rev limiter once because, eyes on the road, I wasn’t aware I was approaching it. As in the Accent, if anything I’d appreciate more of the good sort of noise at high rpm. Those looking for a punch in the lower back will be disappointed, though, as there’s little torque in play. Hyundai won’t confirm that a turbocharged variant is on the way to rectify this shortcoming, but one almost certainly is.

Okay, let me qualify that lack of disappointment. I was pleasantly surprised by the Veloster’s manual transmission, as its shift feel and ratios are much better than those in the Accent (though first and second remain too far apart while fifth and sixth remain too close together).

Accent6MT Veloster6MT VelosterDCT
1st 3.77 3.62 3.62
2nd 2.05 1.96 1.96
3rd 1.29 1.37 1.30
4th 1.04 1.04 0.94
5th 0.89 0.79 0.72
6th 0.77 0.69 0.57
FD 3.64 4.27 4.81

 

Simply put, the Veloster’s shifter and manual transmission should be in the Accent. Why Hyundai had two groups of engineers where one would have done a better job escapes me.

The ratios of the automated dual-clutch transmission, Hyundai’s first and developed in-house, are better yet. But on the road the theoretical advantages of a dual-clutch transmission fail to materialize. Shifts, though admirably smooth despite the employment of the cheaper-to-maintain dry clutches that have been such a drivability headache for Ford, are not lightning quick like those of VW’s dual-wet-clutch DSG transmission. I sense a tradeoff. Worse, acceleration feels considerably more sluggish with the DCT, even though it has a shorter final drive ratio. With no torque converter to sap the engine’s power, why might this be? City fuel economy is a bit better with the DCT (EPA city 29 MPG vs. 28), while the manual wins on the highway (40 vs. 38).

Perhaps the sluggishness of the DCT powertrain shaped my entire perception of the car. I can find no other convincing explanation for why the manual transmission Veloster felt lighter and more agile than its DCT counterpart. Okay, is it lighter, but only by 73 pounds. The Tech Package on the DCT car adds a few more, some of them possibly in its unique color-keyed wheels. Enough to make a difference? Whatever the reason, the manual transmission car felt balanced, poised, planted, and almost (but not quite) agile while the DCT car felt heavier and less willing to change directions. Unfortunately, even the manual car doesn’t feel significantly more agile than its considerably heftier arch-rival, the 3,060-pound Scion tC. Neither comes across as “tossable.” Lighter yet more communicative steering would help I the Hyundai’s case.

On the flip side, the Veloster also feels more solid than its kinship with the Accent and curb weight might suggest. Though bumps occasionally elicit sharp reactions, ride quality and noise levels are generally very livable. I’d much rather commute in the Veloster than in the bouncier Elantra sedan that provided the basis for the sport coupe’s twist-beam rear suspension.

So how much will this sporty looking, not so sporty driving Hyundai set you back? If you can live with 17-inch wheels, a steel roof, and a 196-watt, six-speaker audio system, then $18,060. The Style Package (18s, panoramic sunroof, fog lights, leather steering wheel, leatherette seat bolsters, 450-watt audio) adds $2,000. The Tech Package (color-keyed wheels, nav with rearview camera and sensors, proximity key, 115v outlet) adds another $2,000.

Compared to the Veloster with Style Package, a Scion tC checks in $755 lower, but based on TrueDelta’s car price comparison tool also includes about $600 less content. So the two end up very close in price. Which to get? The Hyundai looks more distinctive and is simply sexier, while the tC packs fifty-percent more displacement under its hood and has a roomier rear seat (but no third door to aid access to it). I enjoyed driving the tC more, but this is relative. In both cars’ defense, if you want to have considerably more fun, you’re going to have to spend considerably more money. Even a Ford Focus SE or Mazda3 is nearly $2,000 more when similarly equipped. In the other direction, an Accent SE costs about $1,500 less. For those who care about such things, the Veloster’s more stylish exterior and upgraded interior will easily be worth this premium.

So, the Veloster isn’t as fun as it looks. But its performance and handling are adequate, while its styling, feature set and price are very attractive. As-is, it will fit the bill for many sporty coupe buyers. Those who insist on go with their show needn’t despair, only patiently wait for the turbo Hyundai’s not yet talking about.

Hyundai provided the vehicle, insurance and fuel for this review during a media drive event.

Michael Karesh operates TrueDelta, an online source of automotive pricing and reliability data.

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112 Comments on “Review: Hyundai Veloster Take Two...”


  • avatar

    Reliability will likely be a strength. The 2011 Elantra, with which the Veloster shares some componentry, has rarely required repairs so far, based on responses to TrueDelta’s Car Reliability Survey.

    To help us provide better reliability information, on the Veloster or just about any car:

    http://www.truedelta.com/reliability.php

    • 0 avatar
      Steven02

      Now, I get that you don’t like the new Colorado and think it is ugly, but this thing looks terrible. The front end is absolutely hideous. Not Aztek bad, but AMC bad.

    • 0 avatar
      darex

      What a great, honest review!!

      I agree with everything you wrote too.

      I have had my manual, fully-loaded Veloster for about two weeks now, and it is an extremely comfortable place to spend time. It is far, far from feeling like a penalty-box, and people from all walks of life are startled and taken by its styling.

      It is a very convincing piece of kit.

      The clutch and shifter are top-notch (no pun intended). They are everything I hoped they’d be (but worried they wouldn’t be). I find the engine/torque to be quite up to the task and not lacking in sufficient “umph” across the power band. Again, better than I expected and was lead to believe by all the negative reviews on that subject. The feel of the shifter in the hand is also rather unusual, but feels very upscale and ergonomic.

      The seats fit well, but not as well as a MINI’s, which are as close to perfection as I’ve tried (if you like stiff, highly-contoured seats, as I do). They’ll do.

      Pretty much every aspect of this car has exceeded my expectations, in some areas, vastly.

      This is a very special car!

      • 0 avatar
        mnm4ever

        @darex… I am not sure its clear… so do you like your Velostar?? :)

        haha, seriously, I am glad you like the car, its very obvious you are thrilled with it. I was actually wondering why you hadnt commented on this thread yet, I started to think you and @Strippo were the same guy. Then tonight I get an update email with no less than 5 comments raving about the Velostar!

        I do wonder if you read the same review I did though. You said you agreed with everything Michael wrote, then proceeded to talk about how great it drives. I didnt get the impression so far that anyone (besides you and Strippo) have really liked the way it drives, it seems they find it kind of boring and unsporty.

        But I can say one thing… all this back-and-forth banter in the comments has made me decide that no matter what, I am going to go test drive one of these as soon as I am up by the Hyundai dealer. I am dying to see for myself how it drives. I am bringing my wife too, she is an excellent judge of interior quality, I cant wait to see how she ranks this car.

      • 0 avatar
        darex

        Probably Strippo and I are the only ones who actually have one yet. I have yet to see even one other on the road, and nobody I know has even heard of it, except for a handful who have seen the new commercials on TV.

        The thing is: everything that’s surprisingly good, is “surprisingly good”, but anything that’s not, is easily accounted for by the price. Hyundai can’t lose here. LOL [kind of kidding, kind of not].

      • 0 avatar
        Strippo

        @mnm4ever

        @darex… I am not sure its clear… so do you like your Velostar?? :)

        haha, seriously, I am glad you like the car, its very obvious you are thrilled with it. I was actually wondering why you hadnt commented on this thread yet, I started to think you and @Strippo were the same guy.

        Care to explain that comment?

      • 0 avatar
        mnm4ever

        :)

        I meant nothing negative, just that @darex was very vocal in the first Velostar review (and the Accent review) about how amazing the Velostar was, then he was strangely silent for this one, but you were also highly praising your new Velostar, you both made very similar comments.

        Of course, to look at it from a positive angle, if the two guys on TTAC who just bought Velostars both think its so great, there must be some truth to it…

      • 0 avatar
        Strippo

        @mnm4ever You’re conflating commenters. Feel free to respond to any comment where I picked up pom-poms and sounded like a total Hyundai fanboy. That never happened. Try to make the case and you’ll only look foolish.

      • 0 avatar
        mnm4ever

        @Strippo — “Lighten up Francis”

        I am not confusing commenters, I KNOW you are a different poster, it was a JOKE. And even then, the joke was directed more at @darex, since he tended to go a little overboard in his praise in the last review; your comments are obviously more toned down, although clearly you like your new Velostar too.

        If anyone should take offense, its @darex, are you calling him a fanboi? He takes it in stride, we are all just bs’ing about cars!

      • 0 avatar
        Strippo

        I KNOW you are a different poster

        But you implied that we appeared to be one and the same, regardless of whether we are, in fact, two different people.

        your comments are obviously more toned down

        A point you are now acknowledging for the first time. It took you long enough.

        “Lighten up Francis”

        There you go again. You do remember that “Francis” was making threats and generally acting like a homophobic psychopath, right? Did I fly off the handle? Did I pull a Francis? Really?

        You’re very careless with your comparisons. Kindly direct them elsewhere. Leave me out of your further discussions with third parties.

  • avatar
    stryker1

    Saw one of these parked outside of my local dealership while getting some service done. Very nearly asked for a test drive. It’s very attention getting in person.

    • 0 avatar

      Indeed, I saw one on the freeway a few days ago and did a double take and flashed back to my 91 CR-X Si. Didn’t realize they had been released here. I should look into the Hyundai tuner scene, there has to be one, right?

      • 0 avatar
        mnm4ever

        I used to make fun of the Hyundai tuner scene, until I met a guy with a daily driven 250hp turbo 4-cyl, his car was really done nice. There are two problems though:

        1. For every Hyundai guy like him, you meet literally 500 others who think “tuning” means painting the interior plastic and slapping on an ugly body kit. It is 10 times worse than the Honda tuner scene.

        2. The tuning scene for the Hyundai is for the old engines, not the new DI engines. I doubt they will be able to do much tuning to the new engines, not enough market. And if they dont do anything to the engine, I am not sure how much they will do for suspension tuning too. At least Ford is committed to offering some type of factory support for the Fiesta.

  • avatar
    carguy

    It may be in danger of being somewhat over-styled but the interior looks great and the overall appearance is like nothing else on the road. This car may just be a turbo and a better shift linkage away from becoming an iconic vehicle.

    • 0 avatar
      mike978

      Hopefully Hyundai will “fix” the transmission when they bring out the turbo model. Both Hyundai and Kia have the good habit of fixing some issues after only one model year – such as adding more sound insulation to the Sportage after complaints. It would be good if all companies could be so responsive since you will never get it 100% right on the first year.

  • avatar
    Secret Hi5

    I like the Veloster’s daring style, but cannot overlook the ho-hum performance. (Too much poseur!)

    Am very interested in your (Karesh) review of the Sonic turbo hatch, so I hope you’ll post one soon!

    • 0 avatar
      Thinkin...

      Ditto on the Sonic Turbo 5-door review. I’ve been surprised at how positive people have been regarding it. I had a keen eye on the Rio5, but now that the manual 6-speed isn’t offered, the Sonic has a fighting shot to climb near the top of my list. Based on my experience with GM’s offerings from the last few years, I’m AMAZED that the Sonic seems to be worthy of consideration…

      • 0 avatar
        darex

        Reviews for the Juke are generally glowing. The engine is great in most ways. The ground clearance, flat cargo area and sound system, and a few other details are excellent, but beyond that, it’s a fairly miserable, cheap, cheap, CHEAP place to spend time, from the standpoint of ergonomics. Fuel-economy is horrendous and the range is pitiful. These things weren’t so apparent during my test drives, but became so quickly after ownership. I traded mine in on the Veloster after only 10 months! All that I disliked about the Juke highly informed my evaluation of the Veloster. I should note that the low-end power on the Veloster, to me, is far more satisfying than the Juke’s. The turbo-lag on the Juke was very pronounced, and left me momentarily high-and-dry on many occasion. Oh, the power did come, just too late to be helpful. I hated that!! Despite reviews which suggest a similar absence of power from launch for the Veloster, I have not found that to be the case at all. Both had manual-transmission. Power delivery on the Veloster seems “even” to me, at least on the low end, which unfortunately is where I spend the majority of my time (City driving).

        My point: glowing reviews are all well and good, but I’m starting to believe that they aren’t worth very much, and should only factor into one’s decision, maybe 30%. Mr. Karesh’s are quite honest and thorough though. :-)

        No amount of brilliant reviews of the Sonic can make-up for what my own eyes are telling me: “Aveo”, cheap, awkward interior, and ho-hum exterior, and not so inexpensive that any of the above can be made-up for or excused.

      • 0 avatar
        Kaotic41

        I just test drove both cars Juke and Veloster, I am having a hard time deciding which one.I like them both for different reasons. Obviously you get more bells and whistles with the Veloster and looks, i Love how it looks inside and out. I like the looks of the Juke too def more leg room. Still need to test drive them again before I make my final decision

      • 0 avatar
        darex

        Well the range and fuel-economy on the Juke ought to help you decide in favor of the Veloster, not to mention the Juke had really bothersome squeaks and rattles below 50 degrees that the Veloster seems to not exhibit at all.

        I find the legroom in the Veloster to be adequate. I’m 6’1″.

        David

      • 0 avatar
        Kaotic41

        I can tell you really like this car, I liked it when I saw it and I liked it when i test drove it, of course I am not your average person I like things different and odd looking so this car is perfect for me. The interior is oddly cool looking, I feel your either gonna like it or not, but thats how everything is. I loved the price and the stereo and I might want to play xbox while waiting on a train, but then again thats just me. Thanks for the info on this car. I did also look at the Mazda3 Hatchback, I like it for all it does but may not be cool enough for me. I will give the 3 cars another look, that is the Juke, Veloster and Mazda3 before I make my final decision but I do know whichever one I get it will be white

    • 0 avatar
      darex

      Reserve your opinion until you actually drive one (a manual-transmission one). You may be quite surprised.

  • avatar
    mnm4ever

    I havent gotten to see one up close yet, just driving down the road. Its an interesting looking car, not quite sure if I would say attractive, but attention getting, I’m sure. I can’t help but think it would have been better with either a little more “hatchback”, or a little less “humpback”. I can see why Hyundai didnt want it to be too practical, then it would just be a fancier Accent, but to make the rear a little more sleak, but still include the back seats, would have made nice competition for the Honda CRZ, which I think is a much more likely competitor given its green credentials and sporty mission.

    But I have to ask, as its been debated so much lately… is the interior significantly better quality than the Accent or Elantra? Is it really befitting of a “$40k Lexus”???

    Oh, and could you see yourself replacing your P5 with it?

    • 0 avatar

      The interior is a little better than those in the Accent and Elantra, but still far from Lexus.

      I need five seats and four doors. So the configuration would take this car off my list even if the lack of agile handling didn’t.

    • 0 avatar
      darex

      It’s definitely closer to a Lexus than an Accent. It’s got very nice textures all around and the solidity of it are very convincingly in that direction.

      The view from the back seat is much closer to an Accent, however, I must admit. Up front, it’s all good though.

      Believe, me, I’ve been looking for the “cheap” in the 2 weeks I’ve had mine. I’ve not yet found it. Even a small thing like the center console lid is dampened and closes with a whimper, rather than a bang.

  • avatar
    EEGeek

    I drove one of these about a week ago. I liked a lot of the design elements, and I thought the seats felt really good. The shifter was so-so, but certainly not a problem. However, three things absolutely killed it for me.

    First, the rear seat and cargo space is just inadequate for me, but I knew it was a long-shot and I don’t hold that against the car. Still, though, my friend who is 5’4″ was up against the ceiling in the back seat. Really? I’d seriously consider this for a new driver because it makes it hard to tote around friends. And I’m a believer that young drivers should learn to drive with less power, rather than more. Which leads to…

    The power, particularly the torque, is just not enough for this car. It can get up to speed OK, but holding it there is a trick. There were three of us piled in for the test drive and on the freeway I was a bit surprised that I needed to drop from 6th to 4th to maneuver at speed to make the off ramp. Where most cars I’ve driven (all sticks, of course) could use a taller gear for freeway cruising with little fuss, this one really makes you row those oars.

    The real killer for me was the rear visibility. I was pleasantly surprised that side visibility was not a problem, but I was not expecting to find that the top of the hatch comes across the sight line out the back. The glass at the back of the roof provides more visibility, so the top of the hatch forms an arc of blockage right in the middle of the rear view mirror. It really bugged me while driving.

    • 0 avatar
      dolorean

      Absolutely agree on the rear visibility of the Veloster, the Accent, and cars in general today. Not sure where the styling cues are coming from for smaller and smaller windows and almost no rear view.

      BTW this car is so fugly I want to beat it to death with a shovel, bury it in the back yard and never mention it again.

    • 0 avatar
      darex

      Funny. I have my mirror adjusted such that I scarcely see the top glass at all (it’s nearly tangential to my line-of-sight), and see directly out the vertical glass, and the center mirror seems perfectly sized to frame that aspect of the rear glass, completely and nearly exclusively. Maybe you just needed to get used to it, or your mirror was “off”? I think it’s a much superior implementation to that in the Prius, for example, where the hatch line goes right across your field of view, obscuring any cars a couple of lengths behind you.

      Even this aspect of the design seems very thoroughly thought out and planned. I am happy with the rear view.

  • avatar

    Based on my Google Analytics stats for Cars In Depth there is a great deal of interest in the car. I get people at the site everyday who are looking for info on the car. Hyundai might have made a mistake with the unusual name Velostar. Lots of the Google queries are for people looking for the “Hyundai Velocity”. Hyundai pronounces it “Veh-lah-ster”. Maybe it’s my bicycle past by to my eyes it reads Velo-star. I think it confuses people.

    But they’ll sell a bunch.

    • 0 avatar
      gslippy

      “Hi-yoon-die Veelo-stir”

      Maybe Hyundai should bring back its pronunciation ads, since so many people still can’t pronounce the company’s name properly, let alone this car’s name.

    • 0 avatar
      fincar1

      At first I couldn’t figure out why the name reminded me of bicycles, but I decided it might be because it’s similar to “velocipede”.

    • 0 avatar
      darex

      It’s rather scary how many people (even owners of the car!) think it’s a “Nissan ROUGE”. I guess dyslexia is widespread.

      The name Veloster is pretty stupid, I’ll admit, but so were “Celica”, “Camry”, “Tercel”, etc…

      Oh well… Consider the source of these names. Not exactly notorious for their facility with Engrish.

      • 0 avatar
        mikeme2233

        Just because — The Veloster is obviously some kind of made up name — there may be some etymology, but I doubt it.

        In Toyota’s defense though, Celica comes from the Latin word Coelica, which means celestial or heavenly.

        Camry comes from a phonetic transcription of the Japanese word kanmur, which means crown.

        Tercel is the word for a male falcon or hawk – if you look at the embelem on the Tercel cars, you will see it is a beak and body of a bird of prey with it’s legs and talons extended as if it were coming in to swoop up its prey.

        So there are actual reasons behind the names, you have to give Toyota credit for the names of their vehicles, they’re not just made up.

  • avatar
    gslippy

    I look forward to the day when this ghastly green color fades from popularity.

    • 0 avatar
      tankinbeans

      On some cars I think it works, but this one makes me wonder when the tongue is going to fly out to catch a bug.

      It looks kind of toadish, sitting on its back legs waiting to leap. This is not said to say anything bad because I like toads, and frogs, and all sorts of little amphibians.

    • 0 avatar
      Zackman

      I’m still waiting for the return of Camaro Rallye Green of the late 1960′s. That and the Olive-drab-type green Pontiac used in the same period. Otherwise, make mine red!

  • avatar
    James2

    Hey, Hyundai designers, the Veloster looks good everywhere except the front. Why the need for the ‘tear ducts’? I’m sure your manufacturing types hate it. I’m sure the part supplier who had to form it hates it. It’s not functional and will only just collect its share of ‘roadkill’. The body-colored piece where the front license plate is going to be mounted –why? When a plate is installed it will give the car a buck-toothed appearance. Do you people even think about such details?

    • 0 avatar
      lilpoindexter

      Take a look at the car fro the side…note the incredibly short rear overhang…now look at the front…that goofy transformers front end hides a hideous amount of front overhang.

    • 0 avatar
      lilpoindexter

      Take a look at the car from the side…note the incredibly short rear overhang…now look at the front…that goofy transformers front end hides a hideous amount of front overhang.

      • 0 avatar
        ciddyguy

        Lilpoindexter,

        I saw that photo and had to look again, from the side, the front and rear overhands are almost the same with the rear being a tad less.

        I don’t see a huge amount of overhang anywhere on this car. The photo I saw a second time was in the slideshow and of the green car. The top photo in silver goes give it the illusion that it has more of a front overhang.

  • avatar

    “But at least the steering wheel telescopes as well as tilts”

    But does it rattle?

  • avatar
    genuineleather

    The asymmetry of this car kills it for me; maybe I’m just OCD, but the faster-rising beltline on the driver’s side would bother me.

  • avatar
    Zombo

    The Accent , Elantra, and Veloster all are rated for roughly the same mileage . When you look at them only the smaller Accent seems truly capable of reaching those numbers against the other two cars which are larger , heavier with bigger wheels/tires (especially on the Veloster) . It will be interesting to see what the real world mpg numbers are on all three of these models as the numbers to fueleconomy.gov are reported by the vehicle owners .

    • 0 avatar
      Strippo

      The Veloster numbers are righteous. I can personally vouch that the mpg numbers can be easily beaten right out of the box. Or you can drive the snot out of it. You’ll enjoy it more by trying to drive “intelligently,” though, for better or worse. I didn’t buy a car that I planned to drive hard, and the Veloster doesn’t tempt me to alter my original plan. It’s a “sweet spot” commuter that doesn’t feel like a penalty box, nothing more and nothing less. Having said that, it really will scoot if you drive it like a Miata and keep it on the boil. But the effect is too muted to be satisfying. It’s quiet and rattle free, and the shifter feels almost electronic. It’s a recipe for relaxation, not hoonery.

      • 0 avatar

        One thing I forgot to mention in the review: there are two fuel economy-related games you can play, at least one of which compares your score to those of other drivers (via Blue Link, I assume).

      • 0 avatar
        mnm4ever

        I think that just about sums why I have a problem with this car. Why on earth would anyone want a game built into thier car?? This isnt a car for drivers, its a car for iPhone addicts. They didnt even really try to make it a driver’s car, they just stuck thier basic economy car underpinnings under a fashionable body and sporty interior, and stuck a bunch of electronics in there.

      • 0 avatar
        Signal11

        @mnm4ever

        You sound like Commander Taco on iPods: “No Wireless, less space than a Nomad. Lame.”

      • 0 avatar
        Monty

        @mnm4ever – but what’s the target market for this car? It’s 20 to 30 year olds, the “connected” generation, and it’s perfect for most of them. Two adults, no kids, and enough tech wizardry to keep them occupied. It seats 4 in a pinch and isn’t a penalty box on wheels.

        They will sell lots of these.

      • 0 avatar
        Strippo

        The Eco Coach is a tool. I like it. The Blue Max thing I don’t have much use for.

      • 0 avatar
        mnm4ever

        @Monty — I have no doubt they will sell, not sure about a lot, but there is definitely a market for over-styled cars with underwelming performance, as long as they have good iPhone integration… LOL

        @Signal — no idea who Commander Taco is… guess I’m lame… :)

      • 0 avatar
        darex

        Agreed…and I love the relaxed and precise aspects it offers. That’s exactly what I was looking for and that’s what I got. I’m delighted with it.

      • 0 avatar
        darex

        Being able to plug an X-box into the display is rather ridiculous too. Fortunately, no one is forcing you to do any of these things. Are Millennials really drawn like a moth to the flame for these pointless features?

        Even BlueLink. I wish I’d been given the chance to NOT have it, and save a few $’s. I will never subscribe to any of it. It should absolutely have been an option only, as part of the “Paranoid Parents’ Package”. It surely cost Hyundai to include it. I’d rather have had self-leveling HID headlamps, or power-folding mirrors, myself.

        The system on this car (the Tech Package one) is extremely complete, however. I actually really appreciate how extremely customizable it is. It is also one of the most advanced Nav systems I’ve ever used. I’m really terribly impressed with it. It is vastly more sophisticated than the one I had in the Juke, and I believe it eclipses the Navigon GPS App in my iPhone. I’m not sure if all Hyundai’s get this same Nav/Audio/&c system now, or not, but it’s a really good one. Another pleasant “surprise”.

  • avatar
    bd2

    Hyundai is developing a 5-door Veloster for the UK and C&D is reporting that Hyundai is hinting that it may find its way to the US, along with the new i30 hatch (which will be the new Elantra Touring).

    Also, Hyundai has been working with Torvec, Inc. for over a year on an IsoTorque differential which will debut on a Hyundai coupe at SEMA.

    No word on whether it’ll be on the Veloster or the refreshed GenCoupe, but seems like something like this would come in handy for the Veloster turbo.

  • avatar
    Joss

    I’m trying to ID some of the cues here – radical Juke-like styling. Glass roof panel – a more opaque take on the old Citroen DS fibreglass top? Hyundai’s first dabble with DCT. Spin sales away from dumb ed down Toyonda?

  • avatar
    MrWhopee

    Looks like marketing hype going awry. Hyping a product before its launch can do wonders for its future sales success, but a hype that’s too successful creates unrealistic expectation, and if the actual car can’t measure up, it can lead to the car being thought of as “not good enough”, even though the car’s only guilty of being “pretty good” instead of “awesome”.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    I just got a look at this and, you know, I think I prefer the CR-Z. I wish we could get the rear seats in North America, though.

    • 0 avatar
      Strippo

      I drove the CR-Z the same day I bought the Veloster. The lack of visibility and the feeling of being confined was just too much in the Honda. It’s like Hyundai started with the CR-Z and improved upon what makes you want to jump out of that car just enough to make it livable. The Veloster is less sport and more ergonomic. And more MPG with less unnecessary complexity. And of course, rear seats. It’s a CR-Z V. Or something.

  • avatar
    NotFast

    Finally found a car to replace my first ‘real’ car: a Honda CRX Si. The rear is so similar!

    • 0 avatar
      mnm4ever

      The CR-Z is more similar, this is more similar to an old Citroen than a CRX. Plus the CR-Z is a 2-seater like the CRX was. Of course both with be disappointing to drive compared to the CRX Si.

  • avatar

    I love this car. I’d take this over a Elantra or a Sonata.
    You came to most of the same conclusions I did.

  • avatar
    ciddyguy

    Not a bad looking vehicle at all and I actually saw a silver one in the parking garage at work last week for the first time.

    Now, I didn’t have time to go take a look-see but there it was and I only spotted the rear end and knew what it was.

    I like the red seats and some of the details but it doesn’t swoon me like some cars do.

  • avatar
    otaku

    Yikes. That is one seriously ugly car – even by Hyundai standards.

    • 0 avatar
      Dynasty

      Maybe it is a good car, maybe it is not.

      But Man! That thing is hideous. I think the styling on that could go down as the AMC Pacer of the 2010s.

      And yep, peeps thought the pacer was cool looking too when it was new.. and at one time everyone wore bell bottoms.

      • 0 avatar
        mnm4ever

        Its very Pacer-like too, with the asymetrical door/window treatment! They should have just gone with 4-doors… more practical and really no visual loss, the side with the door looks better anyway, the proportions are better. I would bet they were thinking that this was a good compromise; coupe buyers wont consider a 4-dr but a 3-dr is ok, and buyers who want a 4-dr would think a 3-dr would be good enough.

      • 0 avatar
        darex

        I agree: 3 doors is a gimmick and harping on it to the exclusion of all else is getting old already.

        My take: It’s a 2-door hatch, with a bonus 3rd door. I’d rather have the 3rd door, than not, but if it had been up to me, I’d have done a conventional 4-door (er… 5-door, I guess I mean). The rear door is extremely well integrated into the sheet-metal. No one sees it at first, or second glance. It would not detract from “the look”, had there been a twin on the driver’s side.

        Asymmetry for weirdness’ sake, is just silly. In practice, it impacts my usage of the car … absolutely not at all. At least it’s a REAL door, and not a suicide door.

  • avatar
    Monty

    We test drove one yesterday, with the manual transmission, and I have to say that the car was actually more than I expected. My take on this car is very close to Michael’s review. I went with mild expectations, based on the many reviews I’ve read, and the Veloster exceeded all of my expectations.

    I found that as long as I kept the revs up that the Veloster had enough get-up-and-go to have some fun on the freeway. I got the okay from the salesman to do some hooning, so I was taking on and off ramps as speeds far more than I normally do, and the car seemed planted and secure, even at speeds approaching 60 mph on some sharply curved ramps. A few times I had to drop into 3rd gear to get some acceleration, but the car handled the high revving extremely well. The exhaust note sounds really sweet in the mid-range, but a little raspy at the top end when I came close to the cut-out point.

    The back seat is cramped, especially for my 6’1″, but it was easy ingress and egress due to the extra door. The front seat more than makes up for the back seat, though. I found the bolstering was sufficient to keep me planted for the corner carving, and due to the elevator, as well as the tilt and telescopic features that I found a comfortable position right away.

    I’ve had the fortune to have driven a 2005 Focus with a manual for the past 6 years, a car that encourages some fun driving – and while the Veloster is no Mazda 3 or new Focus, it’s close enough for Mrs. Monty.

    She wants this car – it’s fun to drive, and will be a great commuter car.

  • avatar
    another_pleb

    Can you open the rear-doors’ windows?

    If so, it already beats the Citroen DS4 hands-down in the wackily-styled hatchback/coupé market. Will it be coming to Europe?

    • 0 avatar

      I had to create a new feature in TrueDelta’s database – power rear side window (one side). The right side window opens, the left side one does not.

    • 0 avatar
      darex

      Should be there now. It’s on-sale in France and Germany already.

      The DS4 is attractive though. They are rather similar looking cars, aren’t they.

      I wish we had the DS3 here. It would be a great fit into our market and give the MINI Cooper a worthy competitor.

      In the Veloster, the non-door’s window is TINY. It really couldn’t “go down”. It fades to a point towards the aft. The 3rd door’s window starts sooner fore, so it’s bigger (and “square”), and perhaps that’s why. Asymmetrical doors result in asymmetrical everything else.

  • avatar
    JCraig

    We need more interesting cars on the road. I will seriously be looking at this as my next car if they come out with a turbo version. Just too slow to consider it as is.

  • avatar
    jerseydevil

    This car looks fine to me. However, i would never trade looks for tossability. Whats the point? If all the good stuff is on the outside and you are in the inside…

    The rear window is too small. I dont get this styling trend. Its dangerous.

    • 0 avatar
      Strippo

      Whats the point?

      Commuting ain’t tossing. Tossing is for the weekend car. Why pay for tossability and motor you can’t use every day? It’s downright frustrating. If you need a “runabout” more than you need a commuter vehicle and you have money to burn, then for you there probably is no point. The setup is plenty good for commuting. I don’t think either review here suggested otherwise.

      • 0 avatar
        bikegoesbaa

        Commuting is more fun with a dynamic car. I generally commute in a Miata that has been lightly modified to make it more “tossable” than stock. I’ve never found it to be frustrating.

        Given that there are quite a few cars in this price range that are both good commuters and tossable/fun I don’t see any reason to treat it as an either/or decision or to consider buying a car that’s only good at one of these things.

      • 0 avatar
        chaparral

        Why buy two cars when one will do better at both? The more tossable a car is the better it will be on a commute.

        On the run to work you’re trying to get there on time and alert and ready to start your day. So hit that gap, fly down that offramp and up the onramp, outjuke that sedan, clear-out from the traffic light to get in the lane you want, burn up that back road to knock three miles off against the highway route, and enjoy what everyone else thinks is a drudge.

        I commuted in a CRX for a couple years. It was like being Allen Iverson in a church league basketball game. Hauling around enough power every day to see 1-1-5 on every straightaway is a waste of fuel and money. Having a steadily expanding repertoire of moves that nobody even thinks about blocking isn’t a waste of Konis.

      • 0 avatar
        mnm4ever

        Exactly… commuting is the absolute worst part of driving. There are plenty of cars that work great for commuting, all you need is comfortable seats and your entertainment of choice.

        Besides, the point is that this car writes a check with its stylish looks that the chassis cant cash. I dont even care about the power, I could live with 130hp as long as I am getting 40+mpg, but a good stick and a lively chassis wouldn’t affect the mileage.

      • 0 avatar
        aspade

        Second cars only make sense when they complement each other. A new econobox doesn’t complement anything, because econoboxes don’t do anything well except cheap and the cost of buying an entire new car is far higher than anything you’d save in upkeep on another vehicle.

        Life is too short to leave your good car in the garage.

      • 0 avatar
        Strippo

        Why buy two cars when one will do better at both? The more tossable a car is the better it will be on a commute.

        My tossable car is a ’94 Miata. So, no.

      • 0 avatar
        bikegoesbaa

        So why is a 1994 Miata not a useable commuter?

    • 0 avatar
      Strippo

      The Miata was the perfect commuter when I had a three mile commute. Now I drive 23,000 miles a year, with a lot of open freeway driving. The Miata is terrible for that. Saps all the fun out of it to the point that you don’t want to drive it on the weekend. Besides, I believe in buying a car every 17 years whether I need one or not. I’m funny like that.

  • avatar
    FleetofWheel

    The V shaped dash is visually jarring. Maybe the designer is trying for a look similar to the front case of an Alienware game playing PC.

  • avatar
    JLD2k3

    Could a photo of the cargo area with the trunk open be added?

  • avatar
    Sinistermisterman

    I still don’t ‘get’ the Veloster.
    So they missed a door off. Apparently for safety reasons. Ooookay.
    So they gave it flashy, sporty styling, but made it less powerful and more expensive than the Elantra. Ooookay.
    I understand car designs where the original idea gets watered down by bean counters and focus groups, but to me the Veloster is such an incoherent design it looks like it was put together by a ten year old with ADHD.
    I’ve been impressed by Hyundai over the past couple of years, but IMHO this is their first misstep.

    • 0 avatar
      SV

      I’m inclined to agree, especially about the styling.

      They put a ton of stuff on the outside that might look good in isolation, but it’s just too much, and even worse, there’s no flow to it. The Focus, for example, might be over styled but at least all the lines co-ordinate with each other. The Veloster just looks messy.

      Also, the front end seems too big for the rest of the car – probably because the hood peaks way too high up. It needs a lower nose, and dropping the faux-brake scoops ahead of the front wheels wouldn’t hurt either.

    • 0 avatar
      darex

      It’s more expensive than the Elantra and feels every bit more expensive inside, as it should be.

      • 0 avatar
        mnm4ever

        And that would mean more if it wasn’t based on the less expensive Accent. You are so outrageously impressed with the dashboard quality that you completely miss the point about the chassis and engine.

      • 0 avatar
        darex

        @mnm4ever

        Oh, did I completely “miss the point” about the engine and chassis? So glad you’re here to tell me all about them. Silly me for being impressed by all that I see and touch and hear. Silly me for not dismissing all that. Silly me for finding the car peppy and the engine refined. Silly me for appreciating the 40 mpg it delivers. Here, take my keys. I’m so not worthy!

        Oh the shame! I have the Accent’s innards. I am going to go cry now, except I don’t think there’s much sharing between the two past the engine they share. Besides, I’ve read the “Veloster is based on the Elantra’s chassis” in multiple reviews. Even if they’re incorrect, does it matter? Both are ALL-NEW, and carry none of the baggage over from the past models that color your impressions.

  • avatar
    TrailerTrash

    No way.

    OK…so the Mazda3 or Focus will cost more.
    But there is a reason. They are better.
    Better designed and better running.

    And OK…cool attempt at design.
    However, sometimes the design needs to hit the reality road.
    That rear end! I mean, does it come with a back up camera!?
    I thought the rear windows of cars were becoming ridiculously small, but THIS one takes the cake!

    I was driving my Mazda3 the other day with my wife. She said this car really was fun to drive and even enjoyed it more than her 6S.
    We agreed that the hatch was really a design hit.
    Room, looks AND it had great vision all around it. No problem driving in the city.

    Some day I will look at the upcoming Focus ST hatch. But until then, the 3 is still, to me, one spot on design.
    This Hyundai was another design gone bad.

  • avatar

    Now that I’m starting to think about it, I really feel the lack of an opening rear window on the driver’s side is a problem. Normally I’d put a childseat there, but, if there was an emergency, I wouldn’t be able to get to the baby.

    The same 3 door layout that gives this car its uniqueness is definitely a problem.

  • avatar
    Disaster

    I drove the Accent, Elantra and Veloster last week. Of the three, the Accent had the best combination of ride, handling and acceleration. I liked the seating position of the Veloster, and it’s interior the best, but it had two big things going against it. The engine was anemic and really loud. It felt like Hyundai forgot to put sound insulation in the car. Message for Hyundai, Noise does not equate to performance feel. The back seat was really cramped too. The handling was no better than the Accent, but the ride and acceleration were worse. I really liked the Accent 5 door hatch.

    Overall though, I was really disappointed with Hyundai’s (and Kia) choice to decontent the manual transmission offerings. You can get a Honda Fit, in manual, with all the same offerings as the automatic. With Hyundai and Kias, you can’t get the nicer Microsoft BT sound system or even cruise control with a manual. It’s an insult to the sporty crowd.

  • avatar
    mnm4ever

    Dont be so dramatic! It’s pretty obvious you LOVE your new car, and thats cool. It might surprise you to hear that I kind of like it too, I am just not blind to its faults.

    The point I am trying to make is Hyundai started with thier basic economy car (Accent), priced it higher than thier mid-level economy car (Elantra), and just loaded it up with pseudo-luxury features and gadgets to appeal to younger buyers with iPhones, AND you have to pay $4000 over MSRP to get the good stuff. A loaded Velostar costs $6k more than a loaded Accent, apparently with no meaningful difference in performance, you are just paying for style and toys.

    Does that make it a good deal?? I guess it depends… obviously you are REALLY into the toys and the interior quality more than performance, you like the looks, the gas mileage is hard to argue with, so it fits for you. Personally, I couldnt care less about gadgets, though I do like a higher quality interior, but I place a premium on performance, especially handling. I withhold judgement until I drive it myself, but from what I read so far, there isnt much “sport” in the suspension. As for power, I doubt 138hp is going to impress me, honestly I find it hard to believe you can really be impressed with the power if you used to drive a Mini Cooper, unless you had a base Mini and not the S model. My GTI feels MUCH faster than my wife’s MR2, which also has 138hp but only weighs 2200lbs. But 40mpg goes a long way towards making up for less power, and I do not have a problem with slow cars that still feel fun to drive, so maybe it will impress me.

    I will take your keys though… since you offered… LOL

    • 0 avatar
      darex

      Okay, I was a little ;-).

      You’re correct. My 2005 MINI Cooper was a base model. A bit slow, but still lots of fun.

      I look at the Veloster differently than you. I knew I wanted the Tech and Style packages for certain, so it’s a $22,000 car.

      What other $22,000 cars are:
      1. Hatches
      2. Smallish
      3. Have quality interiors
      4. Get good fuel-economy
      5. Have MT in their top trim level?

      Etc…

      Almost none. This and the Nissan Juke.

      Focus? Pushing $30K for how I’d configure it. MINI? Pushed!!

      Fiesta? Too basic.

      Mazda3? Never cared for it, plus horrible fuel economy.

      Not many choices in a “premium hatch” ( for $22K).

      • 0 avatar
        mnm4ever

        Yea that explains the power thing… I like the base Mini, to me its a way better value than the turbo, and still very fun to drive because of the awesome chassis, better gas mileage, same style, etc. No one even can debate that the Mini is a blast to drive in either form, but… Mini offers the turbo too, so they deliver on the performance.

        So looking at your list, you may be right, of course it depends on what options you feel are must-haves, so when you say “how I’d configure it” then you are putting arbitrary limits on things. I would be perfectly happy with a $22k Focus, a stick with pretty much every option comes out right there. The Mazda3 has SkyActiv now, so it matches the fuel economy, and is a much better design IMO, more practical, and everyone who drives one loves the sporty feel, Mazda really nailed it. I could probably swing a VW Golf TDI for $22k, they sticker at $24k but they seem to be languishing on the lots, my dealer has a half dozen with sticks. I also like the CR-Z a lot too, even though it undercuts the mileage a bit, its still way better than my GTI.

        But my priority list is different from yours, I want a driver’s car first, then I worry about the toys. Gadgets are last on my list, and I would probably never pay extra for navigation, especially on a “budget” car. Maybe if I leased a luxury car that absorbed the value pretty easily, but not when I have to finance.

      • 0 avatar
        darex

        Not sure you’re right about the Focus. Only the Titanium has all the goods, and you CANNOT get that with a manual transmission (although rumor has it they may offer it after all later). In any case, I think we’re talking around $27,000 for such a beast.

        Story of my MINI: got a base model with the most ordinary exterior I could muster (you can order à la carte, and you can nix constituents of certain packages and eliminate the things you don’t want, like spoilers), but made the interior full of nice things like sat-nav, XM, heated seats, etc… In this way, I had a somewhat loaded MINI for $23,000 — in 2005. Now, the same MINI would be >$29,000. OUCH!

        Certain things, if you’ve had them, you find you want to have them always. Things since as a back-up camera, convenience access, built-in nav, built-in bluetooth, etc… Some seem dumb — until you’ve had them.

        It’s why I lament the self-leveling HID headlamps I no longer have, and the heated seats I lack, but decided they’re not “deal breakers”.

        I’ve never liked the Mazda3. I did consider it when I got my MINI, but it lost. I am not saying it’s a bad car, but it just isn’t a fit for me.

        Where I live, I have certain requirements (urban, parallel parking, everything needs to be built-in (not able to be stolen), etc…, etc… It informs my car choices too.

        The Veloster matched my desires 90%. Not too shabby. If not for the Veloster, I would probably have opted for a Focus hatch (but, as I said, Ford botched it for me when it only offered manual on the base model). GTI would have been another option, yes, although lacking in many of the creature comforts I like.

      • 0 avatar
        mnm4ever

        There you go again with “all the goods”!! That means different things to different people. I dont care about a lot of that stuff (and I have had it, I really dont need it or use it, backup cameras, navigation, etc, no use for it, but I do like bluetooth!) Its just different priorities.

        I didnt mean you could get EVERY option on the Focus, I meant that by choosing the stick shift 5-dr, and loading it up, I would get everything I needed for $22k…stick, leather, Sync, and 17″ wheels. Or I could pay $8k MORE to get a bunch of electronic junk added to the same car. Granted, Ford completely dropped the ball by not offering a stick in the Titanium edition, but I wouldnt buy one even if they did. The options are too pricey. For that price I would wait for the ST.

        The Mini is a classic example of that… the base Mini, or even the base S, comes fairly well equipped for me. I wouldnt add anything to it (maybe the armrest, someone pointed out they dont include one!), because at base price its a good value. They severely overcharge for the options that you ordered up, crazy prices for packages too. I could have gotten myself the Cooper S I wanted for $25k, only wanted the Sport Pkg.

        BTW, the GTI can be had with “all the goods” too, its just really overpriced with the Autobahn package. Even the “base” GTI is overpriced for what you get, and still $3k more than even a fully loaded Velostar.

        Once again, I am not knocking your car, it really sounds like it hit all your hot buttons at the right price, and you really like it. I hope you dont get offended by my comments (like some people), I am actually really looking forward to taking one out for a test drive.

  • avatar
    FuzzyPlushroom

    My usual standard for RPM at highway speed isn’t entirely a fair one – my old Volvo 740. It does have a 4.10 rear end, though, so it’s not totally out of the question for comparison’s sake. Overdrive is the same ratio as sixth gear in the Veloster, though, so this little aphid wouldn’t be too much noisier than my car on the highway.

    Of course the Hyundai’s engine has two-thirds the displacement, but if you need to pass, downshift to fourth and go for it. Easy. Should make it far more livable for long trips than most subcompacts.

    Having gone off on a tangent, now, I’ll say that I like the look of this thing somehow. The hidden handle on the passenger side gives the cabin proportions reminiscent of a ’51-’55 Kaiser two-door sedan, while the rest of the car is, well, creatively sculpted. I certainly wouldn’t have it in a bland colour, and I’m not sure how well it will age, but in Marathon Blue and Boston Red it pops, especially with those wheels. (Reminds me of the New Beetle Color Concepts’ ‘Take 5′ wheels with body-colour inlays.)

    I suppose I’m the target demographic for this thing, being a guy in my early 20s. Of course, most of us can’t afford or justify a new car – but a few years down the road, anything could happen.

    Preferably with a turbo.

  • avatar
    rp2s

    I purchased my Veloster with the Style package and manual trans on 9/17. The first one in Pennsylvania. I have accrued 600 miles on her since. Everything about the car is exactly what I wanted. Great handling, super sound system, and exceptional fuel economy, all in a very sharp looking, comfortable car. At $20.4k, I think it is quite the bargain. I have virtually no highway miles, and I’m already averaging 33mpg.

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    Wow this car has something that even a 30K Toyota, a 50K Lexus or even a 100K Bimmer doesn’t offer. Red seats! Just not a fan of the silly 3-door idea and resultant lack of a rear opening window. That plus subpar rear legroom, odd styling, heavier weight and noisier ride leave me cold on this one.

    • 0 avatar
      rp2s

      The rear window on the third door works like any other power window. The red and black interior looks pretty damn nice in my white Veloster (in a retro kind of way), and my beagle thinks the back seat is quite roomy. I like the styling, and I haven’t had anyone think it was odd, quite the opposite. It’s a very well built car, not a cheap feather weight (the car wieghs in at 2600lbs), yet it still achieves 40mpg highway, 28 city. It’s also pretty quiet cruising on the highway.

    • 0 avatar
      ZekeToronto

      Actually you can get a $100K BMW with red seats. Here’s an example:

      http://www.bmwusa.com/standard/content/byo/byohome.aspx?enc=Q3fLWU2aNp0DXHbLJVFAvVSm/AEKnoCOIW6K3MzwBOU=

  • avatar
    elektrolyte79

    Please proofread your post before making public. The amount of spelling and grammatical errors in this review actually hinders the ability to read and understand what you’re trying to say.

  • avatar
    mikeme2233

    Everybody seems to have good reviews of their cars so far, (veloster owners) and while I am impressed with the improvement in quality of Hyundai/Kia products, I still have to say/ask — it’s still new, and it rides and drives good NOW — but will it still be on the road in 10 years? Or 17 years? My 1995 Honda Prelude Si is still running strong, looks as good as the day it rolled off the line in Japan, and is still on the same engine, no oil leaks or seeping rings — compression only a few pounds off in each cylinder from the original spces …and it has over 300K on the odometer.

    I have a feeling you won’t find any Velosters that can hold credit the same in almost 20 years from today. Hope I’m wrong — but I doubt it.


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