By on January 20, 2011

I know, I know; it’s not the first time I’ve left TTAC, but this time is different. The odor of smoldering bridges in the air has a distinct whiff of finality to it. What happened? The picture above says it all well enough. I just can’t seem to fit in. And it’s time to stop hammering.

I’ll spare everyone the details. But here’s the underlying problem: I just can’t work part-time, or compartmentalize myself. If something engages me, like writing about cars, I throw myself into it fully and passionately. And although my other business can be ignored for the most part, eventually the deferred projects pile up. So either I quit writing and do what needs to be done, or I get paid in relation to my full-time writing passion and use the money to hire a contractor. Certain realities seem to preclude the latter.

If I was pragmatic, I’d just throw on a few pictures and a paragraph or two, call it a Curbside Classic Lite, and collect my very part-time check. But I don’t need a part-time job. And I can only be inspired to write what I would enjoy reading myself, and yes, I’m a discriminating reader and I set myself a high standard. Guess that makes me a square peg. Some undoubtedly use other words.

When I came back in August, the marching orders were that I’d just restrain myself to three weekly Curbside Classics; strictly part time, and stay out of the kitchen. Not possible; my recent pieces have been running up to 2000 words, with lots of research, links, polishing, and each came with a Clue. Quite full-time indeed. Sorry boss; my bad. I just can’t stop caring about what goes up, especially when “Niedermeyer” is on the byline.

If somebody out there wants to grubstake me on a site of my own, drop me a line; my e-mail is below. But I won’t hold my breath. In the meantime, I have lots of other projects to immerse myself in, like designing a new house. I’m going to miss writing, but most of all I’m going to miss you. You’ve been the shock absorbers that have made the hammering very worthwhile.

Thank you.

curbsideclassics@gmail.com

[Editor's Note: This is the toughest thing I've ever had to press "publish" on. Paul not only brought me into TTAC, he taught me much of what I know about cars and honesty, the two currencies of this site. My inability to keep him here at TTAC will be an enduring regret for me, and though I wish him the best in his offline endeavors, I look forward to the day when we will all be able to read his unique insights on automobiles once again... whether that's here at TTAC or elsewhere.]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

98 Comments on “Paul Niedermeyer Says Farewell, Again...”


  • avatar
    Educator(of teachers)Dan

    “Vaya con dios, Amigo.” (Go with god, friend.)
     
    I guess I’ll have to increase my diet of “Ate Up With Motor.”  Although no disrespect, to AUWM, CC is to AUWM as store bought sweet potato pie is to homemade sweet potato pie.

    • 0 avatar

      Dan, I couldn’t have said it better.
      Aaron’s been cutting back on his posts over at AUWM…they’re no longer weekly. But each one is worth the wait. That said, I’ve enjoyed “Curbside Classics” immensely and I too will miss you Paul.
       

    • 0 avatar
      Paul Niedermeyer

      Dan, thanks; and I’m making plans to start my own site. Keep an eye out (I own the curbsideclassic.com domain name)

    • 0 avatar
      Educator(of teachers)Dan

      Thanks for the really big hint Mr. Niedermeyer. 

  • avatar
    joe_thousandaire

    Good luck! Any person who is as passionate about all they do as you have shown yourself to be will find success in any path. You could always come back and go for the Bret Farve retirement hat-trick though…

  • avatar
    TEXN3

    All the best Paul, thank you for coming back for the short while. Look forward to anything in the future.

  • avatar
    jpcavanaugh

    I enjoyed your work.  Please accept my best wishes. 

  • avatar
    tallnikita

    <<But I don’t need a part-time job. And I can only be inspired to write what I would enjoy reading myself, and yes, I’m a discriminating reader and I set myself a high standard.

    I used to write for another fanatic website and I stopped for the same exact reasons. However, there is a saying for those who proclaim their departures in such grand fashion, “Don’t let the door hit you on the ass.”  With that said, your articles were great and I learned a lot from each of them.

  • avatar

    It can be tough to balance your passion with the realities of business and life. The equation actually becomes more difficult when you earn a paycheck from that passion; sometimes, you have to forgo the money to maintain your love for what brought you to the job in the first place.

    You’re a class act, Paul. You too Ed, for allowing Paul to publish his farewell address. All the best.

  • avatar
    anchke

    This is a time mgmt problem, isn’t it? Since you’re describing an avocation, maybe you could find a way to reduce the amount of time needed while preserving your distinctive writing niche. “Curbside” is as cool as New England weather is lately and is a great reminder that there’s more to cars than the latest gadget-bedecked models.  Hate to see it (and you) vamoose. Good luck. 

  • avatar
    Jerry Sutherland

    Gonna miss your historical references Paul-we’re in the same ballpark in terms of age so I never had to decipher your mileposts in the 60s and 70s because I lived them. Best wishes.

    • 0 avatar
      mikey

      Jerry S…Mentioned age,and reading between the lines,and think it might be a factor in Pauls departure.

      I”ve been a hang around at TTAC since the death watchs were in single digits. I struggle to put it into words. However I sense TTAC evolving into something,that I personally can’t relate to. Its not to say its a bad thing,just different

       Paul…You, and I come from a different time, and a different era. I’ve been watching the “Barret Jackson” auction all week. I cringed, while the folks at speed channel explained the difference between an alternator and a generator. Somebody E mailed them asking what the big crome thing in the middle of the back seat back, of a 64 SS Impala was.

       I’m not quite 60  but I’m starting to feel old around this crowd.

       Just like Mr N senior, I got a bit too much on plate right now.

       Its been a slice guys I’m outt’a here

           Michael

    • 0 avatar

      Mikey, drop me a note @ rokem@netzero.net

    • 0 avatar
      LALoser

      I’m with ya Mikey;
      For the last few months I have seen a change in direction of TTAC, maybe it’s me, maybe not. I still check it most days, but hardly comment anymore. I can see it trailing off for me.

    • 0 avatar
      Gardiner Westbound

      Me too!

      TTAC has morphed into the mushy infotainment business. The edginess is gone lest corporate sensibilities are offended. It took the annual Ten Worst Automobiles Today (TWAT) awards with it. TTAC’s raison d’être left the building with Robert Farago.

    • 0 avatar
      Paul Niedermeyer

      Jerry, Mikey, and others: I’m hatching plans for a CC/Auto History site. I own the curbsideclassic.com domain name. Keep an eye out.

    • 0 avatar
      Detroit-Iron

      I am closer to Ed’s age than Paul’s but I also post a lot less.  Kind or weird cause I always liked Sageev, Lang, and BS and they are still here.

    • 0 avatar
      Acc azda atch

      TO Gardner Westbound and LA Loser:
       
      I must agree with you BOTH.
      I came on this site a coupla years ago and was completely attracted to the venom and insider attitude of Mr Farago. I used to make quite regular posts, that were long and descriptive. Now I rarely post and only read 3 out of every 10 posts.
       
      Now,
      There only real reason I check out TTAC is for the Curbside Classic in Eugene, ntm Sajeev and Steven Lang. I feel like I’m missing out on the venom and insider information.

  • avatar
    H Man

    Unfortunate, but understandable.  Your articles about Eugene were a nice tonic for me these past rough few years away from home.  Hell I’m back in Colorado AGAIN tying up some familial loose ends.  (Flew this time, no engines to blow up in Vegas.  Dang!)
     
    Best wishes!  Let me buy you a beer at Sam Bond’s some day.

  • avatar
    gslippy

    Aaaaah!  PN: There will be no shame in returning, and I hope you do.

  • avatar
    dastanley

    Well hell, I guess this is it.  It’s been real, and I’m gonna miss you and CCs.  Good luck and keep the greasy side down.

  • avatar
    ccttac

    Sure will miss and all the CC.  Hope you come back.  If you do start/go to another site please let us all know.
    Best of luck whatever you do.

  • avatar
    newfdawg

    Thanks for all the elucidation and entertainment; good luck in all your future endeavors.

  • avatar
    snabster

    Paul, might I suggest an alternative?
    Self-brand (or turn into a TTAC sub-brand) but with the intents of cashing out in a book.
     
    2000 words + 75 cars = 150K words.  Plus pictures, but you’d need a professional.
     
    Blog + book = minor TV show.
     
    Seriously.  The moment is hot.  People love BEATERS right now, they won’t in three years.
    Don’t dial down.  Dial up.

    • 0 avatar

      snabster,
      I already suggested to Paul and some of the other writers that compilations of our writing could be sold as books. 40,000 words is s book. 150K words is a pretty big book. With ereaders and the smartphone apps, you don’t even need to make hard copies, just sell digital versions. Paul doesn’t think anyone will buy what they can get for free here, but a compilation in one easy package with an impulse purchase level price could generate some additional revenue.
      The corporate bosses own first publishing rights as far as I know, but as long as they get a cut, they’d probably go along.

  • avatar
    N Number

    All the best, Paul.  The site won’t (isn’t) the same without your pieces.

  • avatar
    erik_t

    Life’s a bummer sometimes. Best of luck wherever life takes you.

  • avatar
    FleetofWheel

    Paul’s Curbside Classic articles were informative and great theater-of-the-mind that let us celebrate the cars and lifestyles of yesteryear. But his writing also got us to ponder the essential attributes that today’s cars and drivers should possess.
     
    And so I hope his cultural curator role will continue in some corner of the internet and that he will always be out somewhere, gum shoes on a back lane, camera in hand, peering into the interior of America gone by.
     

  • avatar
    geeber

    Good luck in whatever you do, Paul. Your “Curbside Classics” articles were classics of writing and history in and of themselves. You will be missed.

  • avatar
    geozinger

    @Paul: I’ve said it before, and I hope to say it again…
    Viele Späss und Auf Wiedersehen!

  • avatar
    Steven Lang

    Paul, you are a kindred soul. I hope you know that no matter how many houses you build in Oregon, there will always be a door open for you in Atlanta.
    Consider this temporary departure, “Good Morning!”. As opposed to good afternoon, good evening, good Friday, good journeys.. and good night once you’re 106 or so.
    The door is always open and us old-timers (I guess I qualify as it relates to this site) have to sometimes juggle the heavy balls of the here and now.
    All the best…

  • avatar
    Ingvar

    You’ll come back. I’m sure of it. In one way or another.

    But you’ll be greatly missed in the meantime. Nobody does your stuff the way you do. Take care, and don’t be a stranger…

  • avatar
    ben5

    TTAC won’t be the same without you. So long and thanks for all the Curbside Classics.

  • avatar
    jimboy

    Maybe a guest blog, occasionally?

  • avatar
    Russycle

    Oh cripes, not again!  Best of luck Paul, I’ll miss your writing, knowledge, humor, and those great pics.

  • avatar
    caljn

    I am saddened once again on this news.  I am a tremendous fan of cars and good writing, both satiated by Mr. N.  Like many here his CC is what brought me to TTAC.
    I find my own slowly closing window impelling me to recognize and appreciate more those things that bring simple pleasure, and indulge one’s interests.  Regular visits (with Paul) and CC were one of them.
    On the upside, we seem to be in good hands with his progeny, another job well done.
    I wish you the best…

  • avatar
    Kevin Jaeger

    The curbside classics have been awesome, a real hi-light of this site.  I hope you find an outlet for your obvious passion for these old cars in the fututre.

  • avatar
    Bimmer

    Thanks for all the knowledge, effort and soul that you put into this site and CC, Paul. You will be greatly missed. I hope to read more of your stories in the future, maybe you will tale a vacation from time to time in your building project.
     
    Best of luck!

  • avatar
    Steve65

    I’m going to miss the CCs, and I’m pretty sure without them I’ll drift away from the site. They were the epitome of automotive optimism. The stuff Murilee is putting up just doesn’t compare. And the junkyard pieces are positively appaling. Yes, we know great cars get sent to the crusher every day. We don’t need to be reminded of it every day.

    • 0 avatar
      Robert.Walter

      i agree.  the ‘survived the crusher, but not for long’ pieces are visually interesting, but are terribly thin soup when it comes to context and interpretation.  they, however, could have been an interesting counterpoise to pn’s cc pieces. although there is a lot to like at ttac, it feels like ttac is losing its mojo (not singularly due to the loss of pn and cc), despite upping its game (it is very curious, and I don’t know what it is, and maybe something is shifting in my everyday existance, but i don’t feel myself drawn to the site as i was just a few months ago…)

    • 0 avatar

      Robert, drop me a line. rokem@netzero.net

    • 0 avatar
      caljn

      Mr. Walker I am of a similar feeling…still checking in to the site but not as frequently.
      Not sure exactly why but perhaps one too many stories on China’s traffic woes, anti GM/govt bailout, UAW bashing, CAFE bellyaching etc.
      I came originally in search of untainted auto discussion, a place to read about cars, the CC’s, reviews etc.  We’ve since strayed somewhat from that.

    • 0 avatar
      Steve65

      I came originally in search of untainted auto discussion, a place to read about cars, the CC’s, reviews etc.  We’ve since strayed somewhat from that.
       
      Agreed. It seems to have become very much The Truth About the Car Industry”, a topic I have far less interest in.

    • 0 avatar
      Paul Niedermeyer

      Thanks. Stay tuned. I’m leaning to starting my own site.

    • 0 avatar
      newcarscostalot

      Good Luck! If you do start your own site, will it be at curbsideclassic.com? I will be looking forward to reading some more of your articles.

    • 0 avatar
      Paul Niedermeyer

      Yes.

  • avatar
    JMII

    Not again :( Maybe, just like the last time, this will not stick and you’ll be back… hopefully sooner then later.
     
    While at my age (getting close to 40 now) about half your references occurred before my “car time” I’m am really learning to appreciate vehicle history a lot more… as I (slowly) realize half of my references will be lost on my 3-year old nieces. I’m sure they will laugh at the mere though of a non-hybrid vehicle when they are really to buy their first car (in 2026!)

  • avatar
    peekay

    Paul, my visits to TTAC are definitely fewer since your regular contributions stopped.  I have loved your writing and your perspective on the cars that have been part of my history.  I visited Eugene last summer and stayed for a day on my way to California for the Monterey weekend… I wandered the streets of Eugene on foot feeling very much like I had come home to a place I know… in spite of the fact that I only knew it through your writing and photos.  Being born the same year as you, I’ve felt a strong resonance with the passion you brought to your observations.  And I’ve learned a ton.  Thank you so much for sharing so much of yourself with us… including readers like myself who may only seldom post responses.  I feel like I know you and Eugene as close friends.  I wish you all the best, and hope to hear more from you in future!

    • 0 avatar
      peekay

      A side note to the editors… please don’t allow any pollution of the pristine journalistic waters of Curbside Classics.  I’ve noticed some pieces by another writer being tagged as Curbside Classics without having the warmth, humor, insight or knowledge inherent in PN’s work.  Let that writer post his junkyard-oriented stuff in his own categories and those who want to read them can find them there.

    • 0 avatar

      Peekay,
      It’s not necessary to slag off Murille just because you’re a fan of Paul’s writing.
      CC was not the first “hey look at the cool car I found” feature on a car site or in a magazine, and it won’t be the last either. Paul did a good job mashing up Down On The Street with Ate Up With Motor. It’s no wonder that the series was popular. It draws traffic two ways, because people come to TTAC searching for info on that specific model, and because people like history/nostalgia.
      It’s hard writing history because in addition to Wikipedia level misinformation, sources sometimes disagree. Personal accounts are riven with self-interest, and often a host of secondary and tertiary sources can be traced to a single sometimes flawed primary source. Then it’s got to be written with some kind of style. Paul did a fine job.
      I wish him well on his future endeavors.
      Question to the B&B: Would you rather have only a single writer doing a column like CC or would you prefer having different takes on the same motif?
       
       
       

    • 0 avatar
      detlef

      Ronnie, my preference is for one writer, simply because I like the continuity of a single narrative voice.  That doesn’t necessarily mean that writer has to be Murilee, though I see no reason why it shouldn’t.  Unlike others, I really do enjoy his combing through salvage yards – it’s sort of the automotive version of archaeology.  I think those columns are actually stronger than his DoTS-style posts; perhaps his interest lies more in the underbelly of car culture than in pure history.
       
      That said, if you wanted to feature a stable of writers doing DoTS columns from different cities around the country, that could be pretty cool on its own.  I’d definitely tune in for that series.

    • 0 avatar
      Educator(of teachers)Dan

      That said, if you wanted to feature a stable of writers doing DoTS columns from different cities around the country, that could be pretty cool on its own.  I’d definitely tune in for that series.
       
      Awesome idea if they could figure out a way to make it work.  Although as long as Ur-Turn is still alive and well as a possible site feature (is it?  I haven’t seen one in a long time) that venue could be thrown open to people to submit CC style pieces from their corner of the world.

    • 0 avatar
      peekay

      Ronnie, As much as I have appreciated Paul’s writing, I have also appreciated many of the other writers on TTAC, and have found things to like about their varying styles.  Baruth and Schmitt in particular come to mind.  Call it a matter of personal taste if you will, but I just haven’t enjoyed Murilee’s pieces.  I was surprised how offended I felt when I saw some of them tagged as Curbside Classics.
      The diversity of writing and opinions is what makes TTAC good… so I can accept that there will be some writers who I just don’t get.  I’ll keep making my multiple-times-a-day visits to the site, but there are getting to be fewer reasons to do so.

    • 0 avatar
      Steve65

      The junkyard pieces are the polar  opposite of the Curbside Classics. For me, much of the success fo the CCs was that those special cars -weren’t- in a junkyard. With a few exceptions, they were living working vehicles, in defiance of all reason. The survivors. Ultimate expressions of automotive optomism. To show a reparable car in the midst of being stripped, and bound for the shredder is completely pessimistic.

    • 0 avatar
      detlef

      Steve, I see your point.  I try to look at the salvage yard pieces as the other side to the story – cars which are being parted out by the guys who still are running others just like them on the street.  Sad as it is, the reality is that not all of them can be saved.  Some have sacrificed so others may survive.  Reading Murilee’s thoughts on how those cars, trucks, and vans were put together, and the care (or lack of care) in designing various vital components really has an appeal all its own.

  • avatar
    thebeelzebubtrigger

    It was sweet while it lasted. Hopefully one day you will go full-time with CC and keep us all spellbound for hours at a time. Meanwhile, I find getting older means I can reread the same material and it’s fresh again sooner (used to take years to forget, now just weeks). There really is a bright side to everything…
    ;)

  • avatar
    Zackman

    Oh, come on, Paul. At least throw us a bone once in a while. How about a “CC” once or twice a month with the same in-depth information so we can continue to enjoy your knowledge and research and insight on the old iron? I’m for all practical purposes 60 yrs. old and I’m not going anywhere! You older heads out there who seem to not to be able to relate: stick around. Nothing keeps you young like hanging around with the younger crowd. You get the benefit and energy of their enthusiasm (I’m talking about you, Educator Dan!) and they get the benefit of how things used to be, plus all the goofy (but true) stories we have to tell. Paul, all the success in the world and please don’t be a stranger – at least comment once-in-a-while! May your roads be curvy and the stoplights be green!

  • avatar
    ragtopman

    What I said the last time you left still goes. So many classics and so little time. . .

  • avatar
    Monty

    Paul: auf Wiedersehen (not goodbye, but until we see you again)

    I feel like I’ve lost a member of my family. As much as I like this site, and so many of the B & B, Curbside Classics is the biggest reason for continuing to return. I’m really going to miss your contributions, but I also understand the reason behind your decision.

    Ich wünsche Ihnen nichts aber am besten Wünsche für die Zukunft

    Monty

  • avatar
    Hank

    Thank you for your writing, Paul.  My wife thanks you for all the time I won’t be spending staring at a Curbside clue and racking my memory.

  • avatar
    PeriSoft

    Man, this sucks.

    …Yeah, that’s about all I’ve got. That, and, “Best of luck.”

  • avatar
    Robert.Walter

    Thanks Paul. 

    It certainly has been a pleasure in education.  I’m gonna miss the fruits of your labors.  Pity there was not room and funding enough for you inside the ttac tent. 

    Good luck and wishing you all happiness as you go forward.

    p.s.  Oh, and a personal request:  If you return or relaunch, can you please take a mulligan to do a do-over on the ’69/’70 Cougar ant treat my baby to do the voodoo that you did do so well. 

  • avatar
    Dimwit

    Damn! Well, enjoy yourself and I hope you change your mind. Or win a lottery. Or both!

  • avatar
    Johnnyangel

    Gee Paul …
    I don’t share the pessimism about TTAC others have shared (although a ban on junkyard pictures would be just great), but there are lots, and lots, and lots of people who can build houses, and very few who can write about cars in the engaging way you do.
    I’m going to choose to believe this isn’t any final decision. I’ve certainly gotta.
     

    • 0 avatar
      Paul Niedermeyer

      Johnnyangel, your words  but there are lots, and lots, and lots of people who can build houses hit the bulls eye. I’m going to act on that, and follow my bliss: my own CC website, Watch for it.

  • avatar
    newcarscostalot

    Good luck Paul! I hope to see you here in the future. Next time I go through Oregon I will wave in your general direction. :-)

  • avatar
    MBella

    This is a shame. I really enjoyed your articles. Good luck on your other projects, and I hope you pull the Favre soon and come back.

  • avatar
    paul_y

    The end of an era. Best of luck with everything else! While multiple Niedermeyers are the ideal here, I suppose we’ll have to make do with only one.
     

  • avatar
    Sam P

    Thanks for the Curbside Classic series, Paul. While I (being an inveterate Gen-Y gearhead) already appreciated the historical significance of some of your subjects, not many people of my generation do, and I learned plenty of new facts and anecdotes myself.
     
    If you publish a book (whether it be in paper or Ebook format) I’d be interested in buying a copy.

  • avatar
    ihatetrees

    You’ll be missed. And the CC series will be a goldmine of historic context for a PHD historian looking at car culture 100 years from now… Well done.

  • avatar
    Tree Trunk

    I get it this is the right decision for you, but what about the rest of us?

    You actually expect us to do work at work rather than waste way to much time on the CC.

    I am sure there will be a test and that soon, camera in pocket, rare car in sight, musttt writeee another CC…

    The readers would welcome you back the moment you give in to the urge.

     

  • avatar
    Nicodemus

    A peg of square cross section will of course fit into a circular hole if the diameter of the latter describes a clearance fit circumcircle or larger to the former. I’ve never found this a particularly apt simile for describing something out of place.

  • avatar
    John Horner

    You will be missed. Unfortunately there are very, very few online publishing venues which are able to pay enough for quality original content to make it anything close to being financially worthwhile for the vast majority of people. The talent, knowledge and passion Paul brought  to the subject are rare and valuable, at least to some of us :).
    Once upon a time I used to do a lot of writing for TTAC. My efforts never held a candle to the Best of Paul, but I certainly understand the need to move on to other more financially viable efforts.
    Best of luck in everything you do.
    John
     

    • 0 avatar
      Paul Niedermeyer

      Thanks, John. Actually, since my financial situation is stable enough, I’m going to follow my bliss and am now laying plans to start my own CC/Automotive History site. Life is too short.

    • 0 avatar
      detlef

      It certainly does seem like much of what made TTAC special has disappeared into the digital ether.  I don’t just mean the names on the masthead, either, although Farago, Berkowitz, and Lieberman are sorely missed ’round these parts.  Many of the names I regularly looked forward to in the comments are much more seldom seen these days, if at all.  I guess that’s the nature of things, but the informed commentary from a chorus of what I assume to be an older generation of TTAC readers – including you, John, and chuckgoolsbee, psarhjinian, jpcavanaugh, et alii – has become more sporadic.  I’m glad some of you folks, including Ronnie, EoT Dan, Robert W., and others have remained, but there’s no question that a vital generation of TTAC readers has been diminished.  A lot of what made TTAC what it was went with them.

      Paul, I look forward with great anticipation to your solo career, and I hope to see a lot of familiar avatars over that way.

    • 0 avatar
      John Horner

      ” … am now laying plans to start my own CC/Automotive History site. Life is too short.”
      Bazzinga, now you are talking!  I’m thrilled to hear that news!
       

  • avatar
    ajla

    I had just figured that the Seville Mafia finally got you.
     
    I didn’t always agree with your thoughts on the automotive past (or present), but CC was a great read, and it’s sad to see you go again, GL in the future.

  • avatar
    Dr Lemming

    Paul, a site of your own sounds interesting.  You certainly have the talent to make it a compelling read.  I also wonder whether there is room for more collaboration out there.  Remember a lesson from the early 1950s:  The American independents waited too long before they recognized the importance of working together rather than trying to compete against each other.

  • avatar
    lincolnmark007

    i created this profile just now so that i could say how much i’m going to miss curbside classics. it was one of the things i looked forward to reading every single day. i loved the insight, the personal experience and the history that went into every post. please come back soon!

  • avatar
    MM

    Paul, thanks for the years of great articles and CC’s.  Thanks for the interesting insights into many cars I didn’t know well, and to the quirkiness that is Eugene.  Your style of writing has always been warm and personable, almost like that of a distant brother or cousin.  Best of luck, buddy, and looking forward to seeing your new site when it goes live.

  • avatar
    mcs

    Good luck Paul. I’m looking forward to your future endeavors!

  • avatar

    Apologies if I said this already the last time you left Paul but your writing is what brought me to this site (after Channel4 closed my old auto-news haunt 4car in early 2010) and remains a big part of what’s kept me coming back here.
     
    Sounds like you’ve made a tough decision for all the right reasons… I hope our loss turns out to be your gain, and I’ll be keeping an eagle eye out for news of a future home for your considerable writing talent.
     
    Bon voyages!

  • avatar
    406driver

    Sorry to hear you will no longer be contributing here, Paul. Really enjoyed your curbside classics especially the recent Chevy Citation and Pontiac LeMans. Great writing and excellent insights into motoring history. A big loss to this site.

  • avatar
    munnikrishnan

    Paul,
    I enjoy these Curbside Classics and keep checking the site to read the latest one. Well written and informative, they make my mornings.
    Incidentally, it was a Curbside Classic that inspired me to buy a Volvo 142S. So you’re responsible, indirectly, for restoring the joy of driving.
    –Madhu

  • avatar
    NotFast

    Dang!  Who moved my cheese again?!

  • avatar
    deco_droid

    Wow, I was wondering if we would ever get an answer for Paul’s absence…

    I, like many others here, kept returning to TTAC for Paul’s writing.  Some of the other writers are alright, but really just filled in the gaps for me when there was no new curbside classic available — and like others have said, even those other articles have seemed a little “off” the past few months.  Not sure why…

    One question I do have — Will Paul’s articles here be saved and archived, or should we start copying and pasting our favorites?  I just don’t want to take for granted they’ll always be here to reread.

    Can’t wait for your new site, and I hope to see a bunch of familiar usernames commenting there as well!
    deco

  • avatar
    cfclark

    Sad to see you go, although it looks like you’ll be finding an outlet for the CC content down the road, and one you can run as you see fit and at your own pace. Thanks for some great writing and for stirring up memories of the good, bad and ugly vehicles of our more-or-less recent past–now, when I see something like an actual running Ford Maverick (spotted two in the space of a week recently!) I think, “wonder what Paul could do with that?” CC not only brought some forgotten cars to our attention, it also reminded us of just why some had been deservedly forgotten (e.g., the Citation).
     
    Which raises the question: Whatever happened to that poor ’46 Packard?

  • avatar
    fastback

    Well PN,  thanks for the closure.  I’ve been touching base daily w/ TTAC for the better part of 4 wks looking for another CC entry.  I had a suspicion we’d be reading this type of ‘Adios’. Sad day indeed.

    I will not attempt to regurgitate what  others have written so clearly. Suffice to say that the site has changed gears in a way & what remains don’t hold a candle to your work– they’re not what the brunt of us came on here for. I for one will be beating a path over to the new site in an attempt to enjoy your work.
     
    I’m done here @ TTAC,  no point checking in to hear JB boasting on his overinflated self-appreciation OR for the millionth picture of the same junkyard.
     
    Buena Suerte Paul.  Good luck on your new endeavors!

  • avatar

    Karma

  • avatar
    GeneralMalaise

    And I can only be inspired to write what I would enjoy reading myself, and yes, I’m a discriminating reader and I set myself a high standard. Guess that makes me a square peg. Some undoubtedly use other words.

     
    Funny stuff! The words I’d use would be “a very knowledgeable, entertaining, and gifted writer”. Best wishes!


Recent Comments

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Authors

  • Brendan McAleer, Canada
  • Marcelo De Vasconcellos, Brazil
  • Matthias Gasnier, Australia
  • J & J Sutherland, Canada
  • Tycho de Feyter, China
  • W. Christian 'Mental' Ward, Abu Dhabi
  • Mark Stevenson, Canada
  • Faisal Ali Khan, India